hypothesis vs theory

hypothesis theory

Definitions

  • 1) sciences Used loosely, a tentative conjecture explaining an observation, phenomenon or scientific problem that can be tested by further observation, investigation and/or experimentation. As a scientific term of art, see the attached quotation. Compare to theory, and quotation given there.
  • 2) general An assumption taken to be true for the purpose of argument or investigation.
  • 3) general An assumption taken to be true for the purpose of argument or investigation.
  • 4) sciences Used loosely, a tentative conjecture explaining an observation, phenomenon or scientific problem that can be tested by further observation, investigation and/or experimentation. As a scientific term of art, see the attached quotation. Compare to theory, and quotation given there.
  • 5) grammar The antecedent of a conditional statement.
  • 6) grammar The antecedent of a conditional statement.
  • 7) A tentative explanation for an observation, phenomenon, or scientific problem that can be tested by further investigation.
  • 8) Something taken to be true for the purpose of argument or investigation; an assumption.
  • 9) The antecedent of a conditional statement.
  • 10) (Natural Science) A tentative theory or supposition provisionally adopted to explain certain facts, and to guide in the investigation of others; hence, frequently called a working hypothesis.
  • 11) A supposition; a proposition or principle which is supposed or taken for granted, in order to draw a conclusion or inference for proof of the point in question; something not proved, but assumed for the purpose of argument, or to account for a fact or an occurrence.
  • 12) (Natural Science) A tentative theory or supposition provisionally adopted to explain certain facts, and to guide in the investigation of others; hence, frequently called a working hypothesis.
  • 13) See under Nebular.
  • 14) a message expressing an opinion based on incomplete evidence
  • 15) a tentative insight into the natural world; a concept that is not yet verified but that if true would explain certain facts or phenomena
  • 16) a proposal intended to explain certain facts or observations
  • 17) A supposition; a judgment concerning an imaginary state of things, or the imaginary state of things itself concerning whose consequences some statement is made or question is asked; the antecedent of a conditional proposition; the proposition disproved by reductio ad absurdum.
  • 18) A condition; that from which something follows: as, freedom is the hypothesis of democracy.
  • 19) An ill-supported theory; a proposition not believed, but whose consequences it is thought desirable to compare with facts.
  • 20) The conclusion of an argument from consequent and antecedent; a proposition held to be probably true because its consequences, according to known general principles, are found to be true; the supposition that an object has a certain character, from which it would necessarily follow that it must possess other characters which it is observed to possess.
  • 21) A proposition assumed and taken for granted, to be used as a premise in proving something else; a postulate.

Definitions

  • 1) countable (logic) A set of axioms together with all statements derivable from them. Equivalently, a formal language plus a set of axioms (from which can then be derived theorems).
  • 2) A set of statements or principles devised to explain a group of facts or phenomena, especially one that has been repeatedly tested or is widely accepted and can be used to make predictions about natural phenomena.
  • 3) A set of theorems that constitute a systematic view of a branch of mathematics.
  • 4) The branch of a science or art consisting of its explanatory statements, accepted principles, and methods of analysis, as opposed to practice.
  • 5) A belief or principle that guides action or assists comprehension or judgment.
  • 6) Abstract reasoning; speculation.
  • 7) An assumption based on limited information or knowledge; a conjecture.
  • 8) The science, as distinguished from the art.
  • 9) etc. See under Atomic, Binary, etc.
  • 10) An exposition of the general or abstract principles of any science.
  • 11) The philosophical explanation of phenomena, either physical or moral
  • 12) A doctrine, or scheme of things, which terminates in speculation or contemplation, without a view to practice; hypothesis; speculation.
  • 13) a belief that can guide behavior
  • 14) a tentative insight into the natural world; a concept that is not yet verified but that if true would explain certain facts or phenomena
  • 15) a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena
  • 16) Specifically, in music, the science of composition, as distinguished from practice, the art of performance.
  • 17) Contemplation.
  • 18) In mathematics, a series of results belonging to one subject and going far toward giving a unitary and luminous view of that subject: as, the theory of functions.
  • 19) An intelligible conception or account of how something has been brought about or should be done.
  • 20) Perception or consideration of the relations of the parts of an ideal construction, which is supposed to render completely or in some measure intelligible a fact or thing which it resembles or to which it is analogous; also, the ideal construction itself.
  • 21) Plan or system; scheme; method.
  • 22) At this point we may again for a moment turn aside to consider the so-called Conscious Automaton Theory.

Examples

  • 1) What we need is a general hypothesis to explain merger waves.
  • 2) Various hypotheses have been put forward to explain this increase.
  • 3) We have only been able to test this hypothesis once.
  • 4) The findings support the hypothesis that taller and shorter people see the world differently.
  • 5) Consider how much observed behaviour my hypothesis explains.
  • 6) Different hypotheses have been put forward to explain why these foods are more likely to offend.
  • 7) The point is to test different hypotheses to determine which craving is driving your routine.
  • 8) Some tantalising if preliminary results that could support this hypothesis also emerged this week.
  • 9) Note specific points of agreement or disagreement with the theory or hypothesis you were testing.
  • 10) How can empirical evidence be assembled to provide rational support for a hypothesis?
  • 11) How could you test such a hypothesis?
  • 12) His wonderful behaviour with you when his mother is not around supports this hypothesis.
  • 13) Further support for the hypothesis is obtained from data for more narrowly defined groups of countries.
  • 14) Country data also provide evidence supporting the hypothesis.
  • 15) His colleagues must surely be asking themselves whether they really need to test this hypothesis before making a change.
  • 16) First, that the lifestyle concept suggests hypotheses which are true by definition and therefore trivial.
  • 17) An experiment is normally designed to test a specific hypothesis, a particular causal explanation.
  • 18) There is less support for asthma and eczema and very little to support the view that the hygiene hypothesis explains the rise in food allergy.
  • 19) How to test this hypothesis?
  • 20) Clearly, then, there is no tidy hypothesis to explain this.
  • 21) After following a cohort of men for 28 years, they found that their hypothesis was indeed true.
  • 22) This research probably needs further work to test and prove its hypotheses, but it seems very helpful, like that into infant mortality.
  • 23) It is important to know if your results support or contradict your initial theory or hypothesis, or are simply inconclusive; all such findings must be reported.
  • 24) March 6th, 2009 at 9: 27 am nullasalus: But who knows – after all, the Darwin hypothesis is a minority viewpoint, but and the lack of physical evidence leaves considerable doubt.
  • 25) March 7th, 2009 at 10: 38 am nullasalus: But who knows – after all, the Darwin hypothesis is a minority viewpoint, but and the lack of physical evidence leaves considerable doubt.
  • 26) But who knows – after all, the Darwin hypothesis is a minority viewpoint, but and the lack of physical evidence leaves considerable doubt.
  • 27) Are you familiar with the term hypothesis as it is used in science?
  • 28) However, in common usage, it has come to mean ‘hunch’ or ‘speculation’ what the word hypothesis means in science.
  • 29) For myself, I think that the evidence most often adduced in favor of the hypothesis is the most persuasive testimony for the other side of the case.
  • 30) Senior Vice Finance Minister Yukihisa Fujita, who oversees budget making with Finance Minister Jun Azumi, said at a news conference on Thursday that he hadn't read the IMF report, and declined to assess what he referred to as a "hypothesis" about Japan's finances.
  • 31) Acipenser, a hypothesis is an answer (a tentative one), not a question.
  • 32) ‘The only thing you can do is say the evidence suggests that the hypothesis is true.’
  • 33) ‘Well, everyone comes at an investigation with certain hypotheses or certain biases.’
  • 34) ‘All you will ever have is circumstantial evidence and an un-falsifiable hypothesis.’
  • 35) ‘Even a religion that stresses faith above all else seeks evidence to confirm its hypotheses.’
  • 36) ‘The conceptual peg hypothesis provides a theoretical explanation of the difference.’
  • 37) ‘I think it's important to note that what I'm proposing here is a hypothesis rather than a conclusion.’
  • 38) ‘The scientific method involves proposing a hypothesis then trying to disprove it.’
  • 39) ‘In the seventeenth century, a number of hypotheses had been proposed for the origin of fossils.’
  • 40) ‘All scientists do is try to generalise hypotheses from evidence and then attempt to test them in future.’
  • 41) ‘Embedded within the hypothesis will be concepts that will need to be translated into researchable entities.’
  • 42) ‘The hypothesis is that the view from the castle will be so spoiled that it will put off visitors.’
  • 43) ‘This variation is poorly understood, and several hypotheses have been proposed.’
  • 44) ‘All of those hypotheses were proposed indirectly and may not be mutually exclusive to each other.’
  • 45) ‘Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the number of times segmentation arose.’
  • 46) ‘Almost all were rhetorical or editorial, with some offering explanatory hypotheses or sociological theories.’
  • 47) ‘Three hypotheses may be proposed to account for this unanticipated observation.’
  • 48) ‘Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanism of attachment.’
  • 49) ‘We use the emergence of these patterns as hypotheses that may be investigated in real fish schools.’
  • 50) ‘There are several hypotheses or models proposed to explain how feedback limitation of photosynthesis may be regulated.’
  • 51) ‘Several hypotheses can be proposed to explain why variance increases with longer intervals.’
  • 52) ‘Popper consistently has opposed the appeal to inductive arguments to justify hypotheses.’
  • 53) ‘In what way could the hypothesis that McFadden's process is consciousness be falsified?’
  • 54) ‘This allows a test of the hypothesis that central tendency determines typicality.’
  • 55) ‘The second example of Hobbes's hypotheses about the physical world which I want to consider is his idea about the nature of light.’
  • 56) ‘If we act as if these ideas were true of reality, then we are led to formulate true hypotheses.’

Examples

  • 1) There are three main theories about why this is.
  • 2) We have two theories to explain the world.
  • 3) It is the product of an absurd conspiracy theory.
  • 4) Economic theory is clear on the issue.
  • 5) It can in theory go after any assets.
  • 6) It has been a magnet for conspiracy theories.
  • 7) theory and practice are very different, though.
  • 8) Thousands of years on, theory still rings true.
  • 9) A further 111 people were convicted of taking practical or theory tests on behalf of others.
  • 10) And I have a theory about it.
  • 11) They also write an extended essay and study theories of knowledge.
  • 12) But we seem to prove all these theories wrong.
  • 13) What seems so intuitively true in theory is not always so in practice.
  • 14) Fitness instructors rarely explain the theory behind their routines.
  • 15) This intuitive approach will help you understand how the theory works in practice.
  • 16) The question then is whether political theory can provide the planner with something better than opinion.
  • 17) This means it is difficult to test theories and ideas.
  • 18) How does the hypothesis fit in with other hypotheses or more general theory?
  • 19) The task now becomes one of realizing theory through practical struggle.
  • 20) This is to supplement economic theory with an understanding of politics and human nature.
  • 21) What are the major differences between theories of societal change?
  • 22) Theories come and go as our factual knowledge increases.
  • 23) Talking up conspiracy theories is one thing.
  • 24) There are conflicting theories about the purpose of sleep.
  • 25) The displacement of subject theory out of philosophy occurred a long time ago.
  • 26) There are two theories about the delay.
  • 27) This theory is also true for larger roasts.
  • 28) But then he was challenged to put his theories into practice.
  • 29) This combined ideas of number theory with the geometry of surfaces.
  • 30) Equally important is the decline in public interest in political theory and in the details of party policies.
  • 31) We knew we were seeing something beyond what we have seen before and beyond what current theories can explain.
  • 32) It could only be understood and interpreted within the framework of a " general economic theory of capitalism".
  • 33) Knowledge and theory move forward together in a kind of uneasy, shuffling collaboration.
  • 34) The problem is that none of the alternative theories can be proved with convincing evidence, either.
  • 35) ‘Instead, he now requires them to be able to explain the scientific theory of evolution.’
  • 36) ‘Religious-mystical theories, biological theories and socio-historical theories explain the existence of the caste system.’
  • 37) ‘In general, this theory attempts to explain when and how people adopt new behaviors.’
  • 38) ‘Pope John Paul II has already explained that the theory of evolution is not irreconcilable with the creation doctrine.’
  • 39) ‘Objections to the general theory of evolution are presented in both Darwin's conclusion and glossary of terms.’
  • 40) ‘In geology, the theory of evolution could explain two agreed facts that had given the scriptural view of creation a hard time.’
  • 41) ‘No general theory explaining breeding dispersal has yet been formalized, but two main hypotheses have emerged.’
  • 42) ‘Eventually Einstein's general relativity theory explained the phenomenon in terms of a distortion of the fabric of space by the Sun's gravity.’
  • 43) ‘But bundle theory is supposed to explain the structure of things on a metaphysical, not scientific level.’
  • 44) ‘He is regarded as the founder of the general functionalist theory of the social system.’
  • 45) ‘Hypotheses and theories are generally based on objective inferences, unlike opinions, which are generally based on subjective influences.’
  • 46) ‘All makers of monolithic theories want their theories to explain everything, and they want them to be strong and relatively simple.’
  • 47) ‘Social cognitive theory, ecological systems theory and cultural-historical theory have a contextual base.’
  • 48) ‘Do you think that Hume wanted a general theory of human nature to explain why human beings act, think, perceive and feel in all of the ways that we do?’
  • 49) ‘Evolutionary theories attempt to explain how the fact of evolution occurs.’
  • 50) ‘That was before he started questioning whether Darwin's theory of evolution fully explained life on earth.’
  • 51) ‘She neatly interweaves discussions of online behavior with social science theories that may explain some Internet phenomena.’
  • 52) ‘No matter how hard we try to produce theories and hypotheses to explain the market, it will always prove to be unpredictable.’
  • 53) ‘In 1915, with his theory of general relativity, Einstein extended this hypothesis to include gravitation.’
  • 54) ‘Theories do not become facts; theories explain facts, and a well validated theory does not turn into something else; it remains a theory forever.’
  • 55) ‘It was a residential programme which accepted successful applicants for two years of training in the theory of education and practice of teaching.’
  • 56) ‘What follows foregrounds just some of the implications of biomedicine for the theory and practice of public mental health.’
  • 57) ‘However, in both the Christian and the Islamic worlds, it was the theory, not the practice of music that held sway as an intellectual pursuit.’
  • 58) ‘The journal provides a forum for the discussion of the theory and practice of drama and theatre education.’
  • 59) ‘The author proposes that only through a knowledge of music theory and practice can one understand the origins of modern science.’
  • 60) ‘Whatever it comes to be called, we know it as the discipline devoted to the theory and practice of writing and teaching writing.’
  • 61) ‘The problem is that it's a lot harder to put the theory into practice.’
  • 62) ‘Nowadays it's not so common for writers to put their theory into practice!’
  • 63) ‘But they also learn the theory and practice of guerrilla warfare.’
  • 64) ‘On the debit side it seems we don't always have the players with the required levels of skill to carry the theory into practice.’
  • 65) ‘Really good trainers know it's important to make you perform each task - but how many of them put the theory into practice?’
  • 66) ‘And he was a rare example of a scholar who put his theories into practice, both inside and outside the classroom.’
  • 67) ‘The principles link theory and practice, they translate the theoretical positions into the language of military practice.’
  • 68) ‘Cayley's book was written at a time when the rehabilitative theory and practice of prisons, parole and other measures were under attack from the right.’
  • 69) ‘If the argument of this essay is valid, then we face a major task of reassessment of much of the theory and practice of Christian spirituality.’
  • 70) ‘His research spans economic history, methodology, and the theory and practice of interdisciplinarity.’
  • 71) ‘But theory and practice never seem to square properly with each other.’
  • 72) ‘In an interview with this magazine, he offered some of his best thinking on the theory and practice of managing knowledge.’
  • 73) ‘A simple theoretical construct underlies the theory and practice of counterinsurgency warfare.’
  • 74) ‘Much is known about the biological effects of radiation, and the theory and practice of human radiation protection has been developed in a systematic way.’
  • 75) ‘And of course my personal theory on this is that women, who do childbirth after all, can handle a lot more pain.’
  • 76) ‘And of course there is the theory that the dinosaurs were wiped out by a mega-tsunami caused by an asteroid.’
  • 77) ‘That's only a theory, of course, but one which I'm willing to defend.’
  • 78) ‘Besides the miraculous escape, the theory also accounts for the waters flowing back to destroy the Pharaoh's army that chased Moses and the Jews.’
  • 79) ‘My theory, of course, is that these were all written by one person using various pseudonyms.’
  • 80) ‘There are many theories about Vietnam of course.’
  • 81) ‘There is no evidence to support such theories, of course.’
  • 82) ‘Those are wonderful theories and of course, no one can ever prove them right or wrong.’
  • 83) ‘In any case, much qualitative research entails the testing of theories in the course of the research process.’
  • 84) ‘There are, officers say, five theories which could account for his death.’
  • 85) ‘The experts laugh at my theories of course until I point out that they help me manage and live with the pain.’
  • 86) ‘He replied that polygenists in the United States had in fact used their theories to justify slavery.’
  • 87) ‘Of course, the theory is very attractive, and leads many medical doctors and public health officials to believe we should vaccinate more often and against many more diseases.’
  • 88) ‘And of course, as the theory of nuclear deterrence ordains, India and Pakistan, being nuclear powers, would never go to war again.’
  • 89) ‘I have no other proof than logic, and so far events have justified my theory.’
  • 90) ‘Blake was beginning to develop a new theory to account for what seemed to be going on around him.’
  • 91) ‘It may be that in a federal constitutional situation your theory is correct.’
  • 92) ‘Of course, the simplest theory is that he did so well because he was a very good swimmer!’
  • 93) ‘His theory does not adequately account for the dual powers of divine conflagration and divine grace.’
  • 94) ‘He took a step towards me, his eyes searching, ‘I have my theories, of course.’’
  • 95) ‘His mathematical work covered Cartesian geometry and the theory of equations.’
  • 96) ‘This restriction makes the subject very different from the knot theory traditionally studied by mathematicians.’
  • 97) ‘Bolzano's theories of mathematical infinity anticipated Georg Cantor's theory of infinite sets.’
  • 98) ‘In particular he strongly criticised Cantor's and Dedekind's theories of irrational numbers.’
  • 99) ‘Goldbach also studied infinite sums, the theory of curves and the theory of equations.’
  • 100) ‘However he made many contributions to number theory and to the theory of equations.’
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