heat vs temperature

heat temperature

Definitions

  • 1) An abnormally high bodily temperature, as from a fever.
  • 2) Estrus.
  • 3) The most intense or active stage.
  • 4) A burning sensation in the mouth produced by spicy flavoring in food.
  • 5) A form of energy associated with the motion of atoms or molecules and capable of being transmitted through solid and fluid media by conduction, through fluid media by convection, and through empty space by radiation.
  • 6) The police. Used with the.
  • 7) The warming of a room or building by a furnace or another source of energy.
  • 8) A degree of warmth or hotness.
  • 9) A preliminary contest held to determine finalists.
  • 10) The transfer of energy from one body to another as a result of a difference in temperature or a change in phase.
  • 11) Slang A firearm, especially a pistol.
  • 12) A furnace or other source of warmth in a room or building.
  • 13) A hot season; a spell of hot weather.
  • 14) The sensation or perception of such energy as warmth or hotness.
  • 15) An intensification of police activity in pursuing criminals.
  • 16) Sports & Games One round of several in a competition, such as a race.
  • 17) Informal Pressure; stress.
  • 18) One of a series of efforts or attempts.
  • 19) Intensity, as of passion, emotion, color, appearance, or effect.
  • 20) Slang Adverse comments or hostile criticism.
  • 21) A heating, as of a piece of iron to be wrought by a blacksmith, or of a mass of metal to be melted in a furnace; an exposure to intense heat.
  • 22) Indication of high temperature, as the condition or color of the body or part of the body; redness; high color.; flush.
  • 23) Hence Violent action; high activity; intense and uninterrupted effort: as, to do a thing at a heat.
  • 24) That condition of a material body which is capable of producing the sensation of heat; in physics, the corresponding specific form of energy, consisting in an agitation of the molecules of matter, and measured by the total kinetic energy of such agitation. See energy, 7.
  • 25) A division of a race or contest when the contestants are too numerous to run at once, the race being finally decided by the winners (or winners and seconds) of each division running a final race or heat.
  • 26) Especially— A single course in a horse-race or other contest.
  • 27) Vehemence; rage; violence; excitement; animation; fervency; ardor; zeal: as, the heat of battle or of argument; the heat of passion or of eloquence.
  • 28) In ordinary use, a sensibly high temperature, as the warmth of the sun, or of the body.
  • 29) The heat in calories required to convert a gram of liquid at its melting-point into saturated vapor at a given pressure.
  • 30) In electricity, that portion of the heat developed in an electric circuit which cannot be converted directly into electrie energy. The total heat in an electric circuit is HJ= IRt + PIt, where H is the heat in calories, J is the mechanical equivalent, I the current, R the resistance, t the time during which the current flows, and P is the difference of potential due to the heating of any metal junctions that may exist in the circuit. The term IRt represents the irreversible heat. Also called ohmic heat. Compare reversible heat.
  • 31) The quantity or weight of metal undergoing a metallurgical process. See heat. 4.
  • 32) A sensation of the kind produced by close proximity to fire.
  • 33) To cause to grow warm; communicate heat to; make hot: as, to heat an oven or a furnace; to heat iron. See heat, n., 2.
  • 34) To make feverish; stimulate; excite: as, to heat the blood.
  • 35) To warm with emotion, passion, or desire; rouse into action; animate; encourage.
  • 36) To grow warm or hot; come to a heated condition, from the effect either of something external or of chemical action, as in fermentation or decomposition.
  • 37) To run a heat over, as in a race.
  • 38) Physics To increase the molecular or kinetic energy of (an object).
  • 39) To become warm or hot.
  • 40) To become excited emotionally or intellectually.
  • 41) To excite the feelings of; inflame.

Definitions

  • 1) when not used in relation with something The temperature(1) of the immediate environment.
  • 2) this sense?) (medicine) Body temperature noted as: cool, cold, warm, or hot as part of the skin signs assessment
  • 3) obsolete The state or condition of being tempered or moderated.
  • 4) A measure of cold or heat, often measurable with a thermometer.
  • 5) An elevated body temperature, as present in fever and many illnesses.
  • 6) archaic The balance of humours in the body, or one's character or outlook as considered determined from this; temperament.
  • 7) A measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in a sample of matter, expressed in terms of units or degrees designated on a standard scale.
  • 8) The degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment.
  • 9) The degree of heat in the body of a living organism, usually about 37.0°C (98.6°F) in humans.
  • 10) An abnormally high condition of body heat caused by illness; a fever.
  • 11) (Physics) See under Absolute.
  • 12) Constitution; state; degree of any quality.
  • 13) (Physiol. & Med.) The degree of heat of the body of a living being, esp. of the human body; also (Colloq.), loosely, the excess of this over the normal (of the human body 98°-99.5° F., in the mouth of an adult about 98.4°).
  • 14) (Physiol.) the nearly constant temperature maintained in the bodies of warm-blooded (homoiothermal) animals during life. The ultimate source of the heat is to be found in the potential energy of the food and the oxygen which is absorbed from the air during respiration. See Homoiothermal.
  • 15) (Physiol.) the faculty of perceiving cold and warmth, and so of perceiving differences of temperature in external objects.
  • 16) obsolete Freedom from passion; moderation.
  • 17) (Physics) Condition with respect to heat or cold, especially as indicated by the sensation produced, or by the thermometer or pyrometer; degree of heat or cold
  • 18) obsolete Mixture; compound.
  • 19) the somatic sensation of cold or heat
  • 20) the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
  • 21) Constitution; state; temperament.
  • 22) Mixture, or that which is produced by mixture; a compound.
  • 23) Specifically, the thermal element of weather or climate.
  • 24) Temperateness; mildness.
  • 25) In physiology and pathology, the degree of heat of a living body, especially of the human body. It is usually taken, clinically, in the axilla, under the tongue, or in the rectum.
  • 26) Temper, as of metals.
  • 27) The state of a substance with regard to sensible heat; the degree or intensity of the sensible heat of a body.
  • 28) In phenology, the temperature below which the germination of the seed and the growth of the plant do not take place.
  • 29) Moderation; freedom from passions or excesses.

Examples

  • 1) Tip into a casserole pan on a medium heat with the butter.
  • 2) In the heat of the moment few would have been able to ignore such mocking provocation.
  • 3) Stir in the courgette and heat through for one minute.
  • 4) Return the pan to a high heat.
  • 5) Stir over a low heat to dissolve.
  • 6) By day the heat was intense.
  • 7) But admit it - the heat can also make us a bit flustered.
  • 8) They are usually found in bedrooms, lured by our body heat and carbon dioxide from our breath.
  • 9) Blitz to a very smooth purée, then pour it into a small saucepan and heat until piping hot.
  • 10) Clothes drying on radiators means they have clothes, the clothes are washed and there is some heat in the house.
  • 11) We ask in the heat of emotion.
  • 12) The heat eases this week with more of an unsettled look across all parts.
  • 13) This has been a campaign stronger on heat than light.
  • 14) The last thing you want is a great big house to heat.
  • 15) It uses twice the amount of energy to heat as the average home.
  • 16) They reach the top in the white heat of competition that burns across the planet.
  • 17) Ask an adult to microwave it on a medium heat for around one minute.
  • 18) Another endlessly dreary round of the cookery contest heats.
  • 19) Other systems drew heat from the earth.
  • 20) They provide a healthier way to live as you have one source of heat.
  • 21) Strain the sauce and place in a small saucepan over a low heat to keep warm.
  • 22) Turn off the heat under the pan.
  • 23) Your own body heat helps to keep things warm.
  • 24) Stir the sauce over a medium low heat until it boils and thickens.
  • 25) We both acted regrettably in the heat of the moment.
  • 26) We stop to sleep and avoid the heat of the day.
  • 27) You feel the zip and the heat and the air pressure.
  • 28) These are skills that wilt in the heat of the race if duress has not become habit.
  • 29) Flames and heat fanned around the planet.
  • 30) The system can be made more efficient by capturing waste heat from the gas turbine to drive a steam turbine.
  • 31) They both failed to get through the 100m heats.
  • 32) Avoid man-made fibres which could make prickly heat worse.
  • 33) And, perhaps this story of heat and anger, devotion and bitter hatred is best savoured in our dog days of winter.
  • 34) ‘At least my dress was not welcoming the sun's heat; on the contrary I was comfortable with a slight breeze ruffling my skirts.’
  • 35) ‘The building will also be sensitive to sun angles and heat and cold retention.’
  • 36) ‘Their accumulation in the air traps heat and raises the temperature.’
  • 37) ‘heat pumps work by taking a large amount of low-temperature heat and turning it into a smaller quantity of heat at a higher temperature.’
  • 38) ‘The iguana, in Wyke, was one of two reptiles discovered in a makeshift vivarium which did not have heat or temperature control.’
  • 39) ‘Klett added the system can be easily interchanged to enable personnel working in very cold temperatures to get insulated heat.’
  • 40) ‘It will fund a research project involving the design of equipment to measure microwave heat at temperatures of up to 1,500 degrees Celsius.’
  • 41) ‘This acts like a huge duvet, trapping heat from the sun and slowly raising the temperature of the Earth's climate.’
  • 42) ‘In quantitative terms using heat, the temperature at which the animals experienced discomfort was approximately halved.’
  • 43) ‘The heat instantly doubled its temperature, turning the ground within hundreds of feet into lava.’
  • 44) ‘Storage at average room temperature away from direct heat or direct sunlight is best.’
  • 45) ‘The air became thicker and with haze of heat, the temperature was rising severely and her skin began to moisten with sweat.’
  • 46) ‘Uncertainty about the correct temperature or what heat was needed led to disaster.’
  • 47) ‘The heat was so fierce and fumes so thick, Mr Feather was unable to get back into his room to reach his keys and the four became trapped by the locked door separating the pub from the private living area.’
  • 48) ‘Insulin will remain stable for months at room temperature, but should be protected from extreme heat and freezing cold.’
  • 49) ‘Afterwards, we de-ice ourselves in the welcome, healing heat of the water.’
  • 50) ‘Local people were braving the fierce heat trying to pull something from the cabin, most probably the driver, who was certainly dead.’
  • 51) ‘Hoses and jets were also used to keep gas canisters from exploding in the fierce heat and to stop the fire from spreading to the marina's petrol station.’
  • 52) ‘Irrespective of temperature, though more challenged by cold than heat, blood glucose must be maintained.’
  • 53) ‘Two firemen were burned as their equipment melted in the fierce heat, believed to have been as high as 1,200 deg C.’
  • 54) ‘The human body usually emits heat by way of convection and radiation, and in hot weather the body has to dissipate perspiration by transpiration.’
  • 55) ‘This is because during the collision the meteor loses part of its kinetic energy as heat radiation.’
  • 56) ‘Our results show that the conductive heat transfer model and the convective plus radiative heat transfer model best represent the data measured.’
  • 57) ‘Do you suppose that all objects are able to transfer energy as heat equally?’
  • 58) ‘Clausius interpreted free heat as the kinetic energy of the particles of the body.’
  • 59) ‘The course was as usual in superb condition but the oppressive heat drained the strength of the competitors and the scores reflected this.’
  • 60) ‘The package has had to contend with sandstorms, muddy conditions and oppressive heat.’
  • 61) ‘Also, adverse weather conditions, such as heat or rain, may compromise walking performance.’
  • 62) ‘In the Gulf the conditions were bad with heat and the sand storms.’
  • 63) ‘The weatherman says the scorching heat is on its ways back later this week.’
  • 64) ‘Dolly and I had a grand siesta right through the oppressive heat of the afternoon, waking to find the early evening cooler and more pleasant altogether.’
  • 65) ‘But such was the oppressive humidity and heat of his last event, the Malaysian Open, that Dyson has now wisely decided not to take part in the Qatar event.’
  • 66) ‘Be prepared for more oppressive heat during the next two months as the dry weather will likely continue before entering the transition to the rainy season.’
  • 67) ‘Having been used to arid, scorching heat, the brisk weather was both welcome and refreshing, if not a bit cold.’
  • 68) ‘After breakfast we looked in at the National Parks Centre in Reeth and got some info on our route and a weather forecast of heavy heat with possible thunderstorms and flash floods.’
  • 69) ‘It constantly amazes me how so many plants can go into survival mode in extreme heat, toughing out conditions that humans would soon perish in.’
  • 70) ‘One week was spent trudging through snow and ice, the other trying to cope with supernaturally oppressive heat and humidity.’
  • 71) ‘They had been packed together without air conditioning in the sweltering heat with nothing to eat nor to drink.’
  • 72) ‘Summer's spiritual hardships are manifest through the oppressive summer heat.’
  • 73) ‘He even spent a couple of weeks at a military boot camp to prepare, braving extremes of weather from blistering heat to thunderstorms and a tornado.’
  • 74) ‘Girlfriends will drive through rain, storms, hail, heat and darkness to get to you in a crisis.’
  • 75) ‘It remains to be seen how much of an impact the extreme heat coupled with dry conditions during the past 30 days will have on corn yields.’
  • 76) ‘In that same vein, you'll be working up a sweat without any effort in the sweltering August heat without air conditioning.’
  • 77) ‘Another week of heat and dry conditions will warrant further upgrades to these states, as well as eastern Nebraska.’
  • 78) ‘Others, mainly women, were just taking the necessities of survival in the sweltering heat: food and water.’
  • 79) ‘Because you are applying direct heat, skillet cooking will quickly cook vegetables and even meats such as chicken and beef.’
  • 80) ‘heat the olive oil in a large saucepan over moderate heat.’
  • 81) ‘Cooking with cheese works well when using techniques that call for low heat and slow cooking.’
  • 82) ‘Longer, gentler heat ensures thorough cooking, while sauces and stuffings help to preserve moisture.’
  • 83) ‘Place them in a heavy, dry skillet over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until fragrant.’
  • 84) ‘It's true that non-stick cookware manufacturers recommend moderate heat.’
  • 85) ‘Place the pan over medium heat, add the porcini mushrooms, and sauté for one minute.’
  • 86) ‘Warm the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium-low heat, and add the garlic and rosemary.’
  • 87) ‘Make a blond roux by melting the butter over medium heat and adding the flour.’
  • 88) ‘Usually, food that was cooked over direct heat from a burning substance, or one that was smoked, could contain carcinogenic material.’
  • 89) ‘Put the saucepan back over low heat, add tahini, pepper and chili powder, and stir to combine.’
  • 90) ‘Place a large skillet over medium heat and add 1 inch of corn oil to the skillet.’
  • 91) ‘Add the parsley, increase the heat and add the wine and the reserved juices from the crab.’
  • 92) ‘heat the olive oil in a large stock pot over medium heat and add the sausage.’
  • 93) ‘In a large skillet or sauté pan, warm the olive oil over high heat, almost to the smoking point.’
  • 94) ‘Reduce heat and add the coconut milk a little at a time, stirring continuously until creamy.’
  • 95) ‘Melt the butter in a pan over a very low heat, add the pancetta and cook until golden brown and tender.’
  • 96) ‘Add your garlic and fry over medium heat until the garlic just starts to turn brown.’
  • 97) ‘Add brown rice and oregano, reduce heat to low, cover and simmer 5 minutes.’
  • 98) ‘Boil milk with sugar, saffron, yellow colour and cornflour on low heat, add the egg yolk and boil till the mixture thickens.’
  • 99) ‘The two sources that appear via Google both suggest it is food noisy with heat.’
  • 100) ‘The kind and amount of chili peppers you use will determine the chili's heat.’
  • 101) ‘C-fibers convey to the central nervous system sensations of noxious heat and certain inflammatory signals.’
  • 102) ‘Like a hot spicy rain, it falls, it's hot spicy heat melding with the sugary sweet taste.’
  • 103) ‘Here it was mixed with what must have been cayenne pepper because there was definite heat to it.’
  • 104) ‘Plus it made my mouth fluffy in addition to the excruciating heat.’
  • 105) ‘Plump shrimp empanadas, fried dark as copper, get heat from adobo and sweetness from pineapple.’
  • 106) ‘Like calamine lotion on burnt skin, it soothes the blistering heat of the local cooking.’
  • 107) ‘A massoman curry has a much gentler level of heat than a kapao, in case you were wondering.’
  • 108) ‘Too little or too much water in the growing stages can increase pepper heat, while cooler temperatures can decrease it.’
  • 109) ‘heat will then be absorbed in the process and the heat of solution will be positive.’
  • 110) ‘The weakest part of a weldment is the base metal affected by the heat of welding.’
  • 111) ‘Anger was also a product of innate heat, which excitement and emotion agitated and caused to rise to the surface from the heart.’
  • 112) ‘The red was a terrible sign, as that indicated heat, generally anger but sometimes some other kind of passion.’
  • 113) ‘I rose from my chair, and I could feel my heat was flushed with anger.’
  • 114) ‘His eyes were almost white with heat, an anger she had never seen.’
  • 115) ‘The heat and anger brewing between both Blake and Rei was growing rapidly.’
  • 116) ‘The heat of anger fanned his face as all kinds of unpleasant thoughts filled his head.’
  • 117) ‘For he had felt a sudden change and then a rush of heat as an incomprehensible anger had flowed through him.’
  • 118) ‘Each time we sit still with the restlessness and heat of anger we are tamed and strengthened.’
  • 119) ‘Having run from the bus station to Headquarters, she moistened with sweat, but Thurman sweated through shear heat of anger.’
  • 120) ‘Growing up in a remote and frozen patch of Minnesota, Dylan found heat in the excitement of 50s rock 'n' roll.’
  • 121) ‘Not the same heat of excitement - the novelty already wearing off - but good hard work.’
  • 122) ‘It grants clarity to chaos and provides rational justification for decisions taken in the heat and anger of the moment.’
  • 123) ‘Maybe Australia are not as good as New Zealand but the intensity and heat was there.’
  • 124) ‘Let's start with their selection policies, the one exercise that usually raises as much heat and excitement as the Lok Sabha polls itself.’
  • 125) ‘Jun's eyes never ceased to stray from the ruckus that burned with such intense heat and fury.’
  • 126) ‘I felt the heat of my anger pass and I made myself cool down.’
  • 127) ‘Cryel's high emotional walls had barely stood against the battering they had received in the day and now they burned away in the heat of his anger.’
  • 128) ‘Erika felt a rush of excitement and heat because she just saw this guy who looked really cute standing next to her.’
  • 129) ‘As I edged forward, the embrace became warmer, slowly seeming to pass through my body, increasing in both heat and intensity as it did so.’
  • 130) ‘York City today turned up the heat on the local authority over its phased redevelopment plans for Huntington Stadium.’
  • 131) ‘Critics of the plan turned up the heat in early March as the House Democratic Caucus passed a resolution criticizing the new structure.’
  • 132) ‘There's no doubt that the federal authorities have turned up the heat throughout the financial community.’
  • 133) ‘Strangford turned up the heat after the break and three super strikes from mighty Marty Craig saw them race into a 4-1 lead.’
  • 134) ‘The Abbey really turned up the heat in the fourth period and mercilessly ripped their opponents apart, outscoring them 21 points to two.’
  • 135) ‘Reporters have turned up the heat on Governor Bush ever since.’
  • 136) ‘On Tuesday, the International Monetary Fund turned up the heat on Argentina, saying its economic policy was unsustainable.’
  • 137) ‘Leeds cruiserweight Denzil Browne has turned up the heat on Jamie Warters by claiming he wants to ‘punish’ the Jorvik Warrior.’
  • 138) ‘The chase for a premium berth in the finals has really turned up the heat in local cricket with all four sides remaining in the hunt, based on last Saturday's play.’
  • 139) ‘In a separate development yesterday, Eircom turned up the heat in its attempts to sign up more customers by launching a new introductory package.’
  • 140) ‘As the Magpies turned up the heat, Wilkinson netted again but his effort was disallowed because Emmett's pinpoint cross was deemed to have swerved out of play.’
  • 141) ‘Former champion Phil Golding turned up the heat on his rivals for the Mauritius Open title by shooting a course record 65 at Belle Mare Plage Links.’
  • 142) ‘Seam bowler Kevin Nash, a gas reader by trade, turned up the heat on the visitors taking 4-46, and the man of the match award.’
  • 143) ‘The Cheesemen, who lost both last season's encounters with the Reds, turned up the heat with a succession of forward drives close to the Scots' line.’
  • 144) ‘With MacDonald converting for a 14-10 lead, New Zealand turned up the heat.’
  • 145) ‘By contrast Lunesdale turned up the heat and netted four times to Ambleside's one to finish winners at 4-2.’
  • 146) ‘Manchester turned up the heat, playing with confidence.’
  • 147) ‘After trailing by two at the first break, the Australians turned up the heat and limited Angola to only six points in the second quarter.’
  • 148) ‘It proved too much to bear for the young Monaleen side as Nemo turned up the heat and slipped into turbo charge as required to pick off the scores at will.’
  • 149) ‘It will also have turned up the heat on manager Alex McLeish, who is still desperately seeking a left-back and a centre-half.’
  • 150) ‘Players from all but three of Britain's professional clubs will contest heats over 100 metres, followed by a final.’
  • 151) ‘The first event for the Sri Lankans was the Men's 400 metres first round heats that were scheduled to be run at 9.45 p.m. Sri Lanka time last night.’
  • 152) ‘That's 16 riders racing over 20 heats with a first-place run-off if necessary.’
  • 153) ‘Never go out and run the race, a heat, or a semi-final, and believe that you must save yourself for the final.’
  • 154) ‘With time allowing the first two second round heats to also be contested this afternoon, however, he was able to make amends and gained revenge over his wildcard opponent.’
  • 155) ‘It sets me up well for the rest of the series and also means I avoid the preliminary heats in the Danish Grand Prix which I am very glad about.’
  • 156) ‘There are preliminary heats in the 50m, 100m and 200m distances that lead to semi-finals and then finals, all based on who gains the fastest times.’
  • 157) ‘Slim prospects of bigger surf before the weekend, has resulted in the organisers attempting to complete as many of the 16 round two heats as possible yesterday.’
  • 158) ‘The quiz will be based on a knock-out system system with first and second round heats organised on a regional basis, explained quiz organiser Barry Woods of TCH.’
  • 159) ‘In the quarter-finals, semifinals and final heats four skaters raced head to head.’
  • 160) ‘German Sandra Voelker set a new women's 50m backstroke world record in the preliminary heats of the national championships in Berlin.’
  • 161) ‘The Preliminary heats of the Championships will start Wednesday morning as planned.’
  • 162) ‘He only just made it through to the final after beating Graham Jarvis in two dual lane races in the heats.’
  • 163) ‘First round heats are scheduled for this morning and the finals of the three divisions on Sunday afternoon.’
  • 164) ‘Challenge cup Jet Racing intends to promote competition among racers and allow maximum opportunity to compete in the race heats.’
  • 165) ‘Indeed, the heats of the 10,000 metres were his Olympic debut.’
  • 166) ‘He had barely survived his preliminary and semifinal heats.’
  • 167) ‘Purnell's idea has its roots in kart racing, where heats and finals work very well, and has been well received by Formula One people who do not have vested interests.’
  • 168) ‘As the 19-year-old raced in the heats he picked up his eighth medal at a single Olympics equalling Russian gymnast Alexsander Dityatin's feat in 1980.’
  • 169) ‘The day I visited, the whole village had turned out for a ‘carrera’, a marathon running race with heats for all age groups, which seemed to last all day.’
  • 170) ‘Once the engine is warm and has heated up the radiator fluid, which in turn heats the vegetable oil, you can switch the engine to run on straight vegetable oil.’
  • 171) ‘So even if you're contemplating dining on fruit and vegetables, it's better to heat them gently until warm.’
  • 172) ‘Electromagnetic waves of radio frequency can make molecules vibrate and heat up - like microwaves heat food.’
  • 173) ‘As land or ocean water warms, it heats the air next to it and this air begins rising.’
  • 174) ‘The pendant seemed to be getting warmer, heating her neck in a comfortable way.’
  • 175) ‘The trail began early that morning before sunrise; with daylight the warm air heated steamy mist above damp soil.’
  • 176) ‘The simplest explanation is that greenhouse warming heated the surface and atmosphere sufficiently.’
  • 177) ‘The warm sand heated our sleep sacks, and the sound of the waves lapping on the shore was a comforting sound to my ears.’
  • 178) ‘She heated warm milk, and then served some smoked haddock she had found on a small china plate.’
  • 179) ‘The water passing through the piping cools rooms by absorbing heat during the summer and is warmed to heat the spaces during the winter.’
  • 180) ‘The warm floor helps heat the building and maintain occupant comfort, even after sunset.’
  • 181) ‘So far most of the few hundred litres that they've sold have gone to custom paint shops that create designs which reveal themselves when the engine warms up and heats the painted panels, or if the car or motorbike is left in the sun.’
  • 182) ‘The sun, his friend for the moment, seemed sullen today, not wishing to warm the straw and heat his limbs in any magnanimous act of good neighbourliness.’
  • 183) ‘To toast, place the spice mix in a bone dry frying pan and heat it until warm and you can smell the fragrance.’
  • 184) ‘When they were dry they were damped and rolled for the dampness to spread evenly before they were ironed with an iron heated and reheated on the stove.’
  • 185) ‘So when the sun shines on the roof it gets warm and heats everything up.’
  • 186) ‘Spelthorne Borough Council has made the money available on a first come first served basis to help senior citizens in the area make their homes warmer and cheaper to heat.’
  • 187) ‘The bottom line is that it will cost more to keep warm this winter, whether you heat with natural gas, electricity or home heating oil.’
  • 188) ‘Warmer temperatures had heated the ice mass, causing dense fog to form.’
  • 189) ‘When you visit seniors in their home, a meal ready to heat is always a welcome gift.’
  • 190) ‘Kelsey Thu began to heat up on the field as she was shooting the ball exceptionally well early on in the game.’
  • 191) ‘As I kept hitting shots and began to heat up, the Celtics tried to mix it up a little.’
  • 192) ‘Luckily for the Spartans, he heated up just in time.’
  • 193) ‘But she heated up substantially when discussing the performance of then-newcomer Steve Buscemi.’
  • 194) ‘Things, of course, begin to heat up when two girls move in next door.’
  • 195) ‘Meanwhile, comment and letters pages all over Quebec began to heat up with the whole gamut of opinions.’
  • 196) ‘Despite the icy cold introduction to the New Year, football fever is beginning to heat up once again.’
  • 197) ‘With the championship only around the corner, things are beginning to heat up.’
  • 198) ‘As with almost every September in Bulgaria, sporting life has begun to heat up.’
  • 199) ‘It isn't until the fifth track, The Coming Of Spring, that things really begin to heat up.’
  • 200) ‘When the lunch rush really heats up, three cooks slam out plates of homemade pasta from the exposed grill at the back, while joking with servers and shouting greetings to regular customers.’
  • 201) ‘Yet at the same time, domestic demand is coming off the boil, after being heated up by steep tax cuts and super-low interest rates.’
  • 202) ‘Work just heated up again and will be boiling away for another week at least; I will try to post quite a bit but email will fall by the wayside.’
  • 203) ‘Ms July will warm up your Aussie winter or heat up your northern hemisphere summer.’
  • 204) ‘Powerboat races were also held, heating up the action on the water much to the excitement of spectators.’
  • 205) ‘The spam wars are heating up in state courts, and may soon boil over into the federal circuit.’
  • 206) ‘However, this is annoyingly located in the bottom left-hand corner, which makes the device tricky to grip as the action heats up, and will cause swift thumb-ache for those with man-sized digits.’
  • 207) ‘And since most of his donors have not yet contributed the $2,000 legal maximum, they can likely give and give again as the primary campaign heats up.’
  • 208) ‘The war of words heats up on the campaign trail as the military records of U.S. presidential candidates takes center stage and both candidates talk tough on national security.’
  • 209) ‘Both foreign and local lenders are going online as the battle for the e-banking market heats up between domestic and foreign banks following China's WTO entry.’
  • 210) ‘As government funding dwindles and the competition for charitable donations heats up, several facilities have turned to corporations and exchanged naming rights for cash.’
  • 211) ‘Around 1 a.m., after a few drinks, the discussion heats up.’
  • 212) ‘The White House surveillance scandal heats up.’
  • 213) ‘The kinetic world of dance heats up April 20-21 with Torontonian Kathleen Rea's raw exploration of movement Dressed in White.’

Examples

  • 1) The proteins will also stay intact for up to three years at room temperature.
  • 2) It can also warn if temperatures rise drastically.
  • 3) Low temperature works its way through the meat.
  • 4) Hot temperatures were a cue for butterflies or their larvae to emerge too early and then be killed when cooler weather returns.
  • 5) We also perceive flavours better when they're closer to our body temperature.
  • 6) That should have her rivals quaking more than the sub-zero temperatures.
  • 7) The warm spell will last for another three days before more normal winter temperatures arrive on Sunday.
  • 8) As the temperature rises, the condensation dries up.
  • 9) High temperatures are forecast for Sydney this week.
  • 10) And yet the winter of 2005-06 had fairly average temperatures, although unusually dry.
  • 11) The idea was it softened as it reached body temperature and formed a barrier against the cervix.
  • 12) The global temperatures might have risen too high.
  • 13) The emotional temperature in the room rose notch by notch.
  • 14) The warnings follow a day where temperatures reached six degrees higher than expected.
  • 15) Weather forecasters are again predicting milder than normal temperatures for the early part of this winter.
  • 16) Small changes in average world temperatures have huge impacts.
  • 17) Sudden increases in temperature can also occur after any exertion and they usually occur following food.
  • 18) Lower winter temperatures enhance the colour intensity.
  • 19) The revised method requires a woman to frequently measure her temperature and other body signs.
  • 20) We have tested the best clothes for those temperatures in a cold chamber.
  • 21) Th run this year was five successive days of record temperatures.
  • 22) The body has to work incredibly hard to raise its temperature.
  • 23) Research suggests that picturing a snowy environment can lower your body temperature.
  • 24) Global temperature is rising but it is not rising as rapidly as was feared.
  • 25) Stir in all but a few leaves of the basil and leave to cool to room temperature.
  • 26) The virus is destroyed at normal cooking temperatures.
  • 27) Find the average temperature by adding the three figures together and dividing by three.
  • 28) We tested it last weekend in sub-zero temperatures and slept like a dream.
  • 29) The endangered polar bear is struggling to survive in its shrinking Arctic landscape as temperatures rise.
  • 30) They endure daytime temperatures in excess of 110 degrees while wearing body armour.
  • 31) He stood on the touchline wearing just a suit as protection against the sub-zero temperatures.
  • 32) As temperatures rose ten degrees, global warming ran riot.
  • 33) It is still just possible to keep the global temperature rises below 2 degrees but a really big effort needs to be put in place.
  • 34) The latter temperature (106) still stands as the highest official temperature* ever recorded for Washington, and without air conditioning at that!
  • 35) The temperature to which a substance must be heated in order to burn and continue to burn is called the _kindling temperature_ of that substance.
  • 36) If the conservatives truly read the available information and were honest they would see the HUGE swings in temperature is a sign of bad things to come.
  • 37) Adaptation to shifts in temperature is not that difficult ...
  • 38) If you claim Earth's increase in temperature is caused by humans then Mars increase in temperature is caused by humans.
  • 39) ‘With the outside temperature touching 43 degrees Celsius, the extreme heat policy was in force.’
  • 40) ‘Only in the study of quantum liquids at temperatures close to absolute zero does experimental accuracy approach Heisenberg's limit.’
  • 41) ‘Meteorologists compare the two temperatures when calculating humidity and dewpoint.’
  • 42) ‘The Victorians usually used the Fahrenheit scale to measure temperature.’
  • 43) ‘For a machine to attain full efficiency, temperatures of absolute zero would have to be incorporated.’
  • 44) ‘After checking the time, he took out the thermometer and studied the temperature.’
  • 45) ‘Ideally you should use a meat thermometer to monitor the temperature as you cook.’
  • 46) ‘Show your child how to use a simple thermometer to take the temperature of the water.’
  • 47) ‘These were based on the measurement of canopy temperature using infrared thermometers.’
  • 48) ‘He would record the temperature, atmospheric pressure, the degree of cloud cover, whether there was rain or snow.’
  • 49) ‘Refrigeration is the cooling of substances below ambient temperatures by extracting heat from them.’
  • 50) ‘Heating a metal to temperatures below its melting point causes it to expand or increase in length.’
  • 51) ‘As the temperature of a substance is increased, so is the kinetic energy of the molecules.’
  • 52) ‘He studied seawater luminescence and ocean temperatures while charting the path of the Gulf Stream.’
  • 53) ‘With the proper enzymes present, biological temperatures suffice to allow reactions to proceed.’
  • 54) ‘The temperature at which a substance melts depends upon the external pressure on the solid.’
  • 55) ‘The boiling point of a substance is the temperature at which the liquid boils.’
  • 56) ‘The main challenges are swimming in temperatures below 60 degrees Fahrenheit and the high winds, he says.’
  • 57) ‘Food should be kept in the fridge because mould cannot flourish at a temperature below five degree centigrade.’
  • 58) ‘Man can't land on Venus, where the surface temperature is 800 degrees Fahrenheit, but a robot can.’
  • 59) ‘If the ambient temperature exceeds body temperature, heat cannot be dissipated by radiation.’
  • 60) ‘Until my fever broke on the evening of my first full day the nurses would take my temperature and change my ice packs every few hours.’
  • 61) ‘Your child has to sit still for a short time while you take his temperature.’
  • 62) ‘The doctor will take your temperature and look at your abdomen.’
  • 63) ‘This will normally stabilize heat balance and body temperature, but represents the last defence against cold.’
  • 64) ‘For some reason, children's bodies are less able to control high temperatures and fevers and sometimes this seems to cause a seizure.’
  • 65) ‘They asked if she had a temperature and I replied that she did.’
  • 66) ‘She had a temperature and some flu-like symptoms.’
  • 67) ‘The peasant leader's words raised the temperature of the debate.’
  • 68) ‘Such language is sure to raise the temperature of the debate between the two countries.’
  • 69) ‘This saw a rather more elevated temperature of debate than the lobby group was probably expecting.’
  • 70) the temperature was hot
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