definitive vs definite

definitive definite

Definitions

  • 1) grammar a word, such as a definite article or demonstrative pro , that defines or limits something
  • 2) grammar a word, such as a definite article or demonstrative pro, that defines or limits something
  • 3) philately an ordinary postage stamp that is part of a series of all denominations or is reprinted as needed to meet demand
  • 4) A definitive postage stamp.
  • 5) Grammar A word that defines or limits, such as the definite article or a demonstrative pro .
  • 6) Grammar A word that defines or limits, such as the definite article or a demonstrative pro.
  • 7) (Gram.) A word used to define or limit the extent of the signification of a common , such as the definite article, and some pros.
  • 8) (Gram.) A word used to define or limit the extent of the signification of a common , such as the definite article, and some pro s.
  • 9) In grammar, a defining or limiting word, as an article, a demonstrative, or the like.
  • 10) definite, authoritative and complete
  • 11) conclusive or decisive
  • 12) philately general, not issued for commemorative purposes
  • 13) explicitly defined
  • 14) Mass produced in indefinite quantities over an indefinite period of time. Used of postage stamps.
  • 15) Serving to define or identify as distinct from others.
  • 16) Supplying or being a final settlement or decision; conclusive: synonym: decisive.
  • 17) Authoritative and complete.
  • 18) Biology Fully formed or developed, as an organ or structure.
  • 19) Limiting; determining.
  • 20) Determinate; positive; final; conclusive; unconditional; express.
  • 21) obsolete Determined; resolved.
  • 22) of recognized authority or excellence
  • 23) In logic, applied to a judgment which is accompanied by a full assent of the mind.
  • 24) Specifically— In biology, completely formed; fixed and finished: opposed to primitive or formative: as, the definitive aorta; a definitive anus.
  • 25) Ending; determining; final; conclusive: opposed to conditional, provisional, or interlocutory.
  • 26) Tomakedefinite.
  • 27) Limiting the extent; determinate; positive; express: as, a definitive term.
  • 28) To make definite.
  • 29) In metaphysics, having position without occupying space.

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete Anything that is defined or determined.
  • 2) obsolete A thing defined or determined.
  • 3) A thing defined.
  • 4) Having distinct limits.
  • 5) Free from any doubt.
  • 6) linguistics Designating an identified or immediately identifiable person or thing.
  • 7) Forthright and unambiguous.
  • 8) Grammar Limiting or particularizing.
  • 9) Of a fixed number usually less than 20, as certain floral organs, especially stamens.
  • 10) Readily distinguished or certain.
  • 11) Cymose; determinate.
  • 12) Clearly defined; explicitly precise: synonym: explicit.
  • 13) Clearly developed or firmly decided.
  • 14) (Chem.) the essential law of chemical combination that every definite compound always contains the same elements in the same proportions by weight; and, if two or more elements form more than one compound with each other, the relative proportions of each are fixed. Compare Law of multiple proportions, under Multiple.
  • 15) (Bot.) See Determinate inflorescence, under Determinate.
  • 16) Having certain limits in signification; determinate; certain; precise; fixed; exact; clear.
  • 17) Having certain or distinct; determinate in extent or greatness; limited; fixed
  • 18) (Gram.) the article the, which is used to designate a particular person or thing, or a particular class of persons or things; -- also called a definitive. See Definitive, n.
  • 19) Serving to define or restrict; limiting; determining.
  • 20) known for certain
  • 21) precise; explicit and clearly defined
  • 22) In grammar, defining; limiting: applied to the article the and its correspondents in other languages.
  • 23) Limited in development: as, a definite inflorescence. See centrifugal inflorescence, under centrifugal.
  • 24) Expressly or precisely prescribed, fixed, or established.
  • 25) In botany: Of a constant number, not exceeding twenty: as, stamens definite.
  • 26) Fixed; determinate; exact.
  • 27) Having fixed limits; bounded with precision; determinate: as, definite dimensions; definite measure.
  • 28) Having clear limits in signification; determinate; certain precise: as, a definite word, term, or expression.

Examples

  • 1) It's not certain that the defining games will offer definitive evidence.
  • 2) This is anything but a definitive list, but you get the idea.
  • 3) At various times we discussed writing his book, the definitive account of his life in the sport.
  • 4) The point of these devices is not to come up with definitive answers to questions such as'Is this book any good?
  • 5) On Tuesday she clashed with MPs on the liaison committee for refusing to give definitive answers to a string of questions.
  • 6) But for the overall health of the economy the definitive answer is this: sometimes a currency depreciation is beneficial and sometimes it isn't.
  • 7) I wish I had the definitive answer.
  • 8) The following is not a definitive list of all organic organizations.
  • 9) Now researchers have put together a definitive list of evidence that you really are getting on.
  • 10) This book is definitive and covers all aspects of cooking for the season.
  • 11) There is no definitive answer about how good it is for you.
  • 12) No one can suggest this is a definitive list.
  • 13) In our mind there is at least one more definitive step to go.
  • 14) Research has not and probably cannot offer a definitive answer.
  • 15) Obviously this is a very difficult choice and there is no definitive answer to it.
  • 16) This will set out the broad outlines of agreement but will still be far from a definitive text.
  • 17) He was just very excited about doing the definitive book of his life in great pictures and in great detail.
  • 18) The shareholder list is not definitive.
  • 19) We are still waiting for a single definitive study or biography of Stewart.
  • 20) But so far the most definitive self comes from the Struggle.
  • 21) There remains no definitive evidence about the Korean allegations one way or the other.
  • 22) In 1974 he published the definitive book on the history of carriage clocks.
  • 23) A definitive study should be ready by the end of this year.
  • 24) The drugs have been previously identified as increasing the risk of heart attacks but experts say this is the biggest and most definitive study of its kind.
  • 25) I wish this year is the definitive one and we can have Cesc by our side.
  • 26) A Canadian university has produced the definitive study of procrastination.
  • 27) But he admitted there was'no definitive evidence to prove or disprove the suggested link '.
  • 28) If a disarmament and the group's dissolution were fully implemented, ETA's move—which it referred to as a "definitive" halt to armed activity, rather than a cease-fire—would represent a milestone in Spanish history.
  • 29) Dr Patricio Bustos, who directs Chile's Medical Legal Service, announced the autopsy results, which he described as definitive.
  • 30) WELNA: Holbrooke told Luger he would go from the hearing back to Afghanistan, where he said he did not yet see what he called a definitive turning point in either direction.
  • 31) FEYERICK (on camera): The Commission hopes to provide what it calls the definitive account of 9/11 and ways to save even more lives if a terror attack should happen again.
  • 32) Dr. Patricio Bustos, who directs Chile's Medical Legal Service, announced the autopsy results, which he described as definitive.
  • 33) Feast features a scoring system that brings together a wide range of reviews, ratings and opinions and produces what it calls a definitive score known as the Feast Rank.
  • 34) Obama laid out for forging what he termed the definitive partnership of the 21st century.
  • 35) ‘He added: ‘It is far too early to reach any definitive conclusions and, in some areas, we may never reach that goal.’’
  • 36) ‘It has found that numerous and serious deficiencies in the paper did not allow it to reach the same definitive conclusions reached by the authors.’
  • 37) ‘It comes as a surprise, then, to learn that many medical studies include too few patients to reach any definitive conclusion.’
  • 38) ‘We do not believe that definitive conclusions can be reached on so obviously inadequate an evidentiary record.’
  • 39) ‘In a statement released on Sunday the company confirmed it had reached definitive agreement to sell the company to three private equity groups.’
  • 40) ‘Although the meeting lasted for over three hours, no definitive agreement was reached.’
  • 41) ‘Even then, as Woodruff points out again and again, we can never be assured that we'll reach a definitive end.’
  • 42) ‘Next year, Delta will receive 11 737-800s and says it has a definitive agreement to sell them.’
  • 43) ‘If a definitive agreement is signed - one is hoped for by the end of April - Reilly will be named president and CEO of the new company.’
  • 44) ‘The definitive agreement for the acquisition was announced December 8, 2004.’
  • 45) ‘I want this case brought to a definitive conclusion.’
  • 46) ‘The companies expect to enter into a definitive agreement within 60 days.’
  • 47) ‘We expect, and demand, that the authorities do all within their power to put a definitive end to this utterly indefensible action.’
  • 48) ‘Patients usually present to their general practitioner but a definitive diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction can only be achieved by cardiac imaging.’
  • 49) ‘People are always spouting off with definitive answers about what design is… except that everyone has a different take on it.’
  • 50) ‘This procedure is considered the gold standard for definitive diagnosis of lesions.’
  • 51) ‘Histomorphology, therefore, remains as the gold standard for a definitive diagnosis.’
  • 52) ‘Written by Teddy Fennelly, the book is deemed to be the definitive text on the co-operative movement in Ireland.’
  • 53) ‘Fortunately, this may not be the definitive book on Bill Brandt.’
  • 54) ‘On the Arts and Disciplines of the Liberal Letters was the definitive text for the Middle Ages.’
  • 55) ‘The number of flood defence committees is also to be drastically reduced, scrapping all local committees and establishing a definitive list of regional committees.’
  • 56) ‘There is currently no widely accepted, concise, definitive list of key health education journals.’
  • 57) ‘Linda Lear is author of the definitive biography of Rachel Carson.’
  • 58) ‘Although the revelation was complete before the death of Muhammad in 632, the tradition tells us that he did not himself assemble the material into a definitive text.’
  • 59) ‘This immense study was published between 1851 and 1854 and immediately became the definitive text on the subject.’
  • 60) ‘Michael Phillips has written the definitive book on organic apple growing, The Apple Grower.’
  • 61) ‘This is a definitive book on the subject, made all the more collectable by its beautiful presentation.’
  • 62) ‘In 1924, he published his definitive volume, The Pipe Book, still an invaluable reference tool for tobacco historians today.’
  • 63) ‘Will this be the definitive list of top ten songs?’
  • 64) ‘One hopes that this is just the first edition of what will become the definitive textbook in the field.’
  • 65) ‘We had a few drinks, threw around a few names and came up with a definitive list of the ten most influential art people in Sydney.’
  • 66) ‘I always planned to write a definitive article about him and never did (which was one reason why, twenty years later, I did the encyclopedia entry on him).’
  • 67) ‘This last species may occur in N. Iraq near the Turkish border but I haven't found any definitive documentation.’
  • 68) ‘I recall well the thrill of finding in a Paris bookshop a definitive biography of the contemporary French king, Louis VII.’
  • 69) ‘He published the senior's complete works in a definitive edition.’
  • 70) ‘Is that really the tiny study where Noah Webster penned his definitive dictionary?’
  • 71) ‘Despite its noble remit, and the broad range of material which must have been available, this is not a definitive anthology in terms of calibre.’
  • 72) ‘This review includes definitive and commemorative stamp types with some exceptions.’
  • 73) ‘Everyday stamps are called definitives, and are available continuously, being reprinted as necessary.’
  • 74) ‘There are two types of postage stamps: definitives and commemoratives.’
  • 75) ‘They only printed two billion of these definitive stamps, so hurry up while supplies last!’
  • 76) ‘In contrast, the second set of definitives, the ‘Five Year Plan Series’, were forward looking and depicted the nation assuming its historical destiny as it sought to reconstruct its greatness through economic modernisation.’
  • 77) ‘The monarch, flag, maple leaf, and Parliament Building definitives are not included in this study.’

Examples

  • 1) And now, alien enthusiasts are all running around saying this is definite proof we are not alone.
  • 2) I tried it for about a month and there was a slight but definite improvement in radiance.
  • 3) Each required a definite and precise answer.
  • 4) In my mind there was a definite possibility.
  • 5) There was a definite improvement after that.
  • 6) This gives you something definite with which to come to terms.
  • 7) The answer is a definite yes and nor is it as difficult as you might imagine.
  • 8) They were now without a home or any definite plan for the future.
  • 9) There should be a definite improvement on her performance.
  • 10) There was a definite whiff of something at the old ground yesterday.
  • 11) It may not give you a definite answer but it will help you think.
  • 12) It is important that you have a definite plan which you try and stick to.
  • 13) In the past month there have been signs of definite improvement.
  • 14) His family obviously wanted to know for definite one way or another so tests were done which came back positive.
  • 15) It is important to remember that an employer does not need to have definite proof that an employee stole something.
  • 16) I know for definite that he knew this would all come out after he died.
  • 17) Modern menu planning is more about possibility than a definite list of what we're going to eat when.
  • 18) With all garden design, simple and definite shapes have more impact and help to hold the garden throughout the winter.
  • 19) Certainly I admit that consciences neither ought to nor can be bound here to definite and precise legal formulas.
  • 20) There should be a clear, definite set of things that the Government will do to make the landing softer.
  • 21) Although there seems to be no limit to the variety, only definite, obvious shapes really count in an image.
  • 22) You can divide the frame in any number of ways and proportions, the more easily if your subject has strong, definite lines and shapes.
  • 23) On March 12th Mr. Lippert communicated to us what he termed the definite proposals of the Government of the S.A.R., which were duly cabled to our friends in Europe (a copy of this cable has already been sent to you).
  • 24) But he said he too had been helped out by family connections with what he called a "definite leg-up internship" at his father's stockbrokers.
  • 25) Mr Cameron, however, openly acknowledged that he been helped out by family connections with what he called a "definite leg-up internship" at his father's stockbrokers.
  • 26) I have no certain -- "definite" thing to write my lord -- Nero.
  • 27) Island McGill was only so large, and the land could support but a certain definite proportion of those that dwelt upon it.
  • 28) Hers is a certain definite organism, somewhat different from all other female organisms.
  • 29) Augustine undermines the question by pointing out that God did not bring creation into being at a certain definite moment in time, because time did not exist prior to creation.
  • 30) Complaints to local police resulted in definite stonewalling, so a complaint to county HQ brought an initial assesment by an inspector.
  • 31) As Mr. Finck has said, "Not till Dante's 'Vita Nuova' appeared was the gospel of modern love — the romantic adoration of a maiden by a youth — revealed for the first time in definite language."
  • 32) ‘Although I'm planning on some definite distinctions between the two.’
  • 33) ‘I don't think there's a definite answer to whether or not writers use alcohol as a creative enabler, a relaxant, a means to conquer fear, or a way to battle neuroses.’
  • 34) ‘Council departments have been asked to draw up proposals on how to save money, although definite plans can't be made until the Government announces its spending assessments early next year.’
  • 35) ‘I don't want to give an off-the-cuff definite answer.’
  • 36) ‘Approval in principle has been obtained from the Department of Environment, and it is hoped to have a definite plan for phase one of infill housing submitted to the Department by mid year.’
  • 37) ‘Both speak as if the question has a definite answer one way or the other; they seem to share the assumption that a play is a fixed and authorially controlled text which must be performed as written or not performed at all.’
  • 38) ‘One 72-year-old man had definite plans: ‘I am now going to have a pint, and toast the Queen before I go home,’ he said.’
  • 39) ‘The uncertainty has been going on since February or March, and right through the summer we've been asking about what was going to happen, because we need to know, but without any definite answer.’
  • 40) ‘The interviewer is looking for evidence that you followed a definite lead that was planned, thought through properly and had long-term potential.’
  • 41) ‘It goes without saying that planners will hope to have a definite site and building plans for the proposed National Stadium available by then.’
  • 42) ‘Experts said the accident would not force a change in the rail route and a definite restoration plan will be worked out by late October or early November.’
  • 43) ‘Officialdom in any form, government or anywhere else, seems not to be prepared to help until a definite clearance programme is planned and assessed.’
  • 44) ‘A visitor centre is being planned for the Great Bustard Project in the Everleigh area and more details will be published when plans are more definite.’
  • 45) ‘In any event, Lara wishes she could have given you a more definite answer; but this is the best she's got.’
  • 46) ‘Depression is a shifting concept with definite but vague historical parameters.’
  • 47) ‘We're looking at ways of commemorating his memory in a lasting way in the school and will decide on something definite in the coming weeks.’
  • 48) ‘The four-member commission's report is still being drafted and its final conclusions are not yet definite.’
  • 49) ‘‘Angie's death is a possibility, Christopher, but it is not yet definite,’ I insisted.’
  • 50) ‘They've yet to reach a definite conclusion about why a hydrogen fuel sensor failed last Wednesday.’
  • 51) ‘So there is a definite connection with the real world, but only a few important properties have been selected for further consideration.’
  • 52) ‘‘This means it's not definite yet and that's a good sign,’ she said.’
  • 53) ‘While Gardaí have yet to established a definite motive for the stabbing, they are investigating whether she was deliberately targeted.’
  • 54) ‘Anyhow, this tournament is really making me start to scratch my head as I don't have a definite pick yet for the winning team, just too unpredictable.’
  • 55) ‘There are many theories without any definite proof.’
  • 56) ‘I said last time it needed to be sorted out quickly and, although that is still the case because nothing is yet definite, I'm pleased some kind of decision has been made.’
  • 57) ‘But there is still no definite proof of the existence of such an animal.’
  • 58) ‘It was almost incomprehensible to her that anyone could exist in this ramshackle environment, yet there were definite signs of life; not least of all the faint sound of chatter coming from up the road.’
  • 59) ‘One case where there is definite proof of a serious after-effect is with the live polio vaccine which induces paralysis at an incidence of about one case per two to three million doses.’
  • 60) ‘‘My getting this award is definite proof that our traditions and customs are appreciated by other nations,’ he said.’
  • 61) ‘I have had the rare opportunity of seeing definite proof of this fact.’
  • 62) ‘He faced every modern government's dilemma of trying to seek definite proof in cases of conspiracy.’
  • 63) ‘There is not a single object the existence of which we hesitate to accept until definite proofs are furnished.’
  • 64) ‘Here was definite proof that Alex liked me, and I wasn't sure how I felt about it.’
  • 65) ‘The economy is too large and complex to draw definite conclusions.’
  • 66) ‘This, she felt, was definite proof of Charlie's negative influence in Adam's behavior.’
  • 67) ‘Yet I've pretty much come to the definite conclusion that he must at least be attracted to me.’
  • 68) ‘But Dymbel knows his subject, and he's absolutely definite - it's not a Beatle.’
  • 69) ‘Plenty of time for that when we are more definite about people's intentions.’
  • 70) ‘So I'm definite that he did catch me and it should have been a penalty.’
  • 71) ‘I am definite that we will lay our hands on those criminals.’
  • 72) ‘But no, she was quite definite it was Gandhi she had in mind.’
  • 73) ‘The woman was very definite as to who was at fault.’
  • 74) ‘He was unusually definite about his current choice.’
  • 75) ‘I play very definite women who are very forward and don't suffer fools.’
  • 76) ‘Ollie may be only just over a week old, but he's quite definite about what he likes, so here's a list of his favorite things.’
  • 77) ‘Andy is definite about staying in Bulgaria and already calls Rousse his home.’
  • 78) ‘It is his sole hobby and he is definite that his future career lies in computers or electronics.’
  • 79) ‘She was definite that no one from the Church had offered help.’
  • 80) ‘First of all he's very definite about the place of non-rational experience.’
  • 81) ‘He pulls me into one last hug and I'm definite I'm not going to let him go this time.’
  • 82) ‘This statement must be made in clear and definite terms, and there must further be some prima facie evidence that it has some foundation in fact.’
  • 83) ‘Therefore, I would like to challenge all those clubs and organizations that go so far in promoting this type of discrimination to provide a clear and definite reason for doing so.’
  • 84) ‘It could be that a lot of us don't have any real clue about what we want - we don't have a clear and definite aim and therefore are lacking the ambition of living life to the full.’
  • 85) ‘Muir never asked himself those questions, but it is clear that a definite change occurred.’
  • 86) ‘As is to be regretted, no clear and definite tasks of this kind were posed to the Navy.’
  • 87) ‘It's a bit too early to see any clear and definite results, but it seems things are going well.’
  • 88) ‘Attempting to get that rune is definite, clear and utter suicide.’
  • 89) ‘This only takes me about ten minutes a day and I feel so much more in tune with things; I can notice a definite decrease in my perception when I am away or skip a day by being in a total rush.’
  • 90) ‘There's a definite country influence that runs throughout the record, most obviously on ‘Say It Ain't So’.’
  • 91) ‘The photo you sent of yourself will be a definite asset to you.’
  • 92) ‘The number of provocative questions raised make it a most definite asset to the fields of African film and cultural studies.’
  • 93) ‘Diego Corrales has been criticized for having a porous defense but his asset is definite power in either hand.’
  • 94) ‘Quick-thinking reactions become a definite asset during the fighting sequences.’
  • 95) ‘He makes big plays and his ability to play up in the box would be a definite asset in Dom Capers' zone blitz scheme.’
  • 96) ‘Signatures of interest groups who have credibility in the state can be a definite asset.’
  • 97) ‘They have a definite Brit-pop influence but much harder, at least live (i don't think the new album is as hard).’
  • 98) ‘On the topic of mass gatherings, Blackburn also notes that the student strike during creation/rehearsal time had a definite influence on the production.’
  • 99) ‘I don't really like drum and bass, and the album has a definite influence, but it's not overly, mmm, overt, and on occasions I think the singer sounds a little like Sade.’
  • 100) ‘It used to be only in America that cities were defined rather unromantically as ‘municipal corporations occupying a definite area’.’
  • 101) ‘As a rule it will not be waged in a definite military-geographic area.’
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