flour vs flower

flour flower

Definitions

  • 1) Powder obtained by grinding or milling cereal grains, especially wheat, and used to bake bread, cakes, and pastry.
  • 2) Obsolete form of flower.
  • 3) Powder of other material, e.g., wood flour produced by sanding wood.
  • 4) A soft, fine powder.
  • 5) Any of various similar finely ground or powdered foodstuffs, as of cassava, chickpeas, or bananas.
  • 6) A fine, powdery foodstuff obtained by grinding and sifting the meal of a grain, especially wheat, used chiefly in baking.
  • 7) a flour box.
  • 8) a tin box for scattering flour; a dredging box.
  • 9) a mill for grinding and sifting flour.
  • 10) a mashine for sorting and distributing flour according to grades of fineness.
  • 11) The finely ground meal of wheat, or of any other grain; especially, the finer part of meal separated by bolting; hence, the fine and soft powder of any substance
  • 12) in milling, a gauze-covered, revolving, cylindrical frame or reel, for sifting the flour from the refuse contained in the meal yielded by the stones.
  • 13) fine powdery foodstuff obtained by grinding and sifting the meal of a cereal grain
  • 14) The finely ground meal of wheat or of any other grain; especially, the finer part of meal separated by bolting; hence, any vegetable or other substance reduced to a fine and soft powder: as, flour of emery; hop-flour.
  • 15) A snow-like mass of finely crystallized saltpeter used in the manufacture of gunpowder.
  • 16) An obsolete spelling of flower (in the botanical and derived senses).
  • 17) To apply flour to something; to cover with flour.
  • 18) convert grain into flour
  • 19) cover with flour
  • 20) An obsolete spelling of flower.
  • 21) Tosprinklewithflour.
  • 22) In mining, in the amalgamation process, the mercury is said to flour when it breaks up into fine globules, which, owing to the presence of some impurity, do not unite with the precious metal with which they are brought in contact.
  • 23) To sprinkle with flour.
  • 24) To grind and bolt; convert into flour: as, to flour wheat.
  • 25) To make into flour.
  • 26) To cover or coat with flour.
  • 27) To grind and bolt; to convert into flour.
  • 28) To sprinkle with flour.

Definitions

  • 1) A flower head.
  • 2) The period of highest development or greatest vigor. synonym: bloom.
  • 3) The period of highest development or greatest vigor. synonym: bloom.
  • 4) The highest example or best representative.
  • 5) Chemistry A fine powder produced by condensation or sublimation of a compound.
  • 6) Such a structure having showy or colorful parts; a blossom.
  • 7) A plant that is cultivated or appreciated for its blossoms.
  • 8) The condition or a time of having developed flowers.
  • 9) Chemistry A fine powder produced by condensation or sublimation of a compound.
  • 10) A natural development or outgrowth.
  • 11) The reproductive structure of angiosperms, characteristically having either specialized male or female organs or both male and female organs, such as stamens and a pistil, enclosed in an outer envelope of petals and sepals.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) an Australian bird of the genus Anthornis, allied to the honey eaters.
  • 13) (Bot.) a compound flower in which all the florets are sessile on their receptacle, as in the case of the daisy.
  • 14) (Zoöl.) one of a family (Dicæidæ) of small Indian and Australian birds. They resemble humming birds in habits.
  • 15) (Fine Arts) A picture of flowers.
  • 16) (Zoöl.) an Australian bird of the genus Anthornis, allied to the honey eaters.
  • 17) (Bot.) a compound flower in which all the florets are sessile on their receptacle, as in the case of the daisy.
  • 18) (Fine Arts) A picture of flowers.
  • 19) flowers cut from the stalk, as for making a bouquet.
  • 20) obsolete Grain pulverized; meal; flour.
  • 21) In the popular sense, the bloom or blossom of a plant; the showy portion, usually of a different color, shape, and texture from the foliage.
  • 22) (Print.) Ornamental type used chiefly for borders around pages, cards, etc.
  • 23) (Zoöl.) any beetle which feeds upon flowers, esp. any one of numerous small species of the genus Meligethes, family Nitidulidæ, some of which are injurious to crops.
  • 24) (Old Chem.) A substance in the form of a powder, especially when condensed from sublimation.
  • 25) The fairest, freshest, and choicest part of anything; ; the state or time of freshness and bloom.
  • 26) A figure of speech; an ornament of style.
  • 27) (Bot.) That part of a plant destined to produce seed, and hence including one or both of the sexual organs; an organ or combination of the organs of reproduction, whether inclosed by a circle of foliar parts or not. A complete flower consists of two essential parts, the stamens and the pistil, and two floral envelopes, the corolla and callyx. In mosses the flowers consist of a few special leaves surrounding or subtending organs called archegonia. See Blossom, and Corolla.
  • 28) (Zoöl.) any beetle which feeds upon flowers, esp. any one of numerous small species of the genus Meligethes, family Nitidulidæ, some of which are injurious to crops.
  • 29) obsolete Grain pulverized; meal; flour.
  • 30) (Bot.) the peduncle of a plant, or the stem that supports the flower or fructification.
  • 31) (Bot.) That part of a plant destined to produce seed, and hence including one or both of the sexual organs; an organ or combination of the organs of reproduction, whether inclosed by a circle of foliar parts or not. A complete flower consists of two essential parts, the stamens and the pistil, and two floral envelopes, the corolla and callyx. In mosses the flowers consist of a few special leaves surrounding or subtending organs called archegonia. See Blossom, and Corolla.
  • 32) an unopened flower.
  • 33) (Old Chem.) A substance in the form of a powder, especially when condensed from sublimation.
  • 34) (Bot.) the peduncle of a plant, or the stem that supports the flower or fructification.
  • 35) (Zoöl.) one of a family (Dicæidæ) of small Indian and Australian birds. They resemble humming birds in habits.
  • 36) (Zoöl.) See under Animal.
  • 37) a plat in a garden for the cultivation of flowers.
  • 38) an assemblage of flowers which open and close at different hours of the day, thus indicating the time.
  • 39) (Print.) Ornamental type used chiefly for borders around pages, cards, etc.
  • 40) Menstrual discharges.
  • 41) (Zoöl.) See under Animal.
  • 42) The finest part of grain pulverized. See flour.
  • 43) Eccles., an ornament of a chasuble, consisting in gold or other embroidery of branching or floreated patterns, extending over the upper part of the back, about the shoulders, and sometimes also in front, so as to cover the chest.
  • 44) plural In chem., fine particles of a substance, especially when raised by fire in sublimation, and adhering to the heads of vessels in the form of a powder or mealy deposit: as, the flowers of sulphur.
  • 45) A figure of speech; an ornament of style.
  • 46) In popular language: Any blossom or inflorescence.
  • 47) Any plant considered with reference to its blossom, or of which the blossom is the essential feature; a plant cultivated for its floral beauty.
  • 48) The best or finest of a number of persons or things, or the choice part of a thing: as, the flower of the family.
  • 49) plural The menstrual flow.
  • 50) In botany: A growth comprising the reproductive organs of a phenogamous plant and their envelops.
  • 51) That state or part of anything which may be likened to the flowering state of a plant; especially, the early period of life or of adult age; youthful vigor; prime: as, the flower of youth or manhood; the flower of beauty.
  • 52) In printing, a type of decorative design used in borders, or in constructed typographic head-bands or ornaments, or with an initial letter.
  • 53) To come as froth or cream from the surface.
  • 54) To froth; ferment gently; mantle, as new beer.
  • 55) To blossom; bloom; produce flowers; come into bloom or a blooming condition, literally or figuratively.
  • 56) Plants cultivated especially for their flowers.
  • 57) To cover or embellish with flowers, or figures or imitations of flowers, as ribbons, lace, gloves, glass, etc.
  • 58) To flourish; be in a flourishing or vigorous condition.
  • 59) To decorate with flowers or with a floral pattern.
  • 60) To produce a flower or flowers; blossom.
  • 61) To develop naturally or fully; mature.
  • 62) To blossom; to bloom; to expand the petals, as a plant; to produce flowers.

Examples

  • 1) Add the butter and plain flour and stir for about a minute to make a paste.
  • 2) Then stir in the flour and caster sugar.
  • 3) Sift the flour into a mixing bowl.
  • 4) Add the flour and cocoa powder and mix well.
  • 5) Put the flour into a large mixing bowl and stir in the salt.
  • 6) Dust a clean work surface with flour, then tip out the dough.
  • 7) Such a diet would exclude any added sugar and refined grains such as white flour, white pasta and rice.
  • 8) Set a pan over a medium heat, add the scooped fat, then stir in the flour to make a thick paste.
  • 9) It has an effect on the proteins which make up the gluten in the wheat flour.
  • 10) Beat the liquid into the flour to make a smooth batter.
  • 11) Turn the dough out on to a lightly floured surface.
  • 12) Use your fingertips to rub the margarine into the sugar and flour.
  • 13) Sift together flour and remaining spices into a bowl.
  • 14) Then fold through the remaining flour and cocoa powder.
  • 15) Whisk the egg in a second bowl and put the flour in a third.
  • 16) It remains law for all white and brown flour to still have calcium added.
  • 17) And chestnut flour can be used in just about anything in which wheat flour is normally used.
  • 18) Spread crumbs in a second bowl and flour in a third.
  • 19) Turn onto a clean surface dusted with flour.
  • 20) Sift the flour into a second bowl and whisk the eggs in a third.
  • 21) Stir in the sifted flour and cocoa powder.
  • 22) Put the flour on the first and season generously with salt and pepper.
  • 23) Avoid too many milk products and white flour or sugar.
  • 24) Sift the flour into the bowl of a blender.
  • 25) Turn on to a lightly floured surface and knead.
  • 26) Sift the flour into a large bowl.
  • 27) The pastry weight given in each of these recipes refers to the amount of flour used to make it.
  • 28) To make the crumble topping, put the flour and brown sugar in a bowl and mix.
  • 29) They contain no additives and are simply made from wheat flour, palm oil and salt.
  • 30) Meanwhile, make a flour spice mix.
  • 31) Put 75g caster sugar and the flour into a small saucepan.
  • 32) In a mixing bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the sugar, cornflour and plain flour until smooth.
  • 33) ‘These breads list whole wheat, whole-wheat flour or another whole grain as the first ingredient on the label.’
  • 34) ‘If the main ingredient on a multigrain bread is enriched wheat flour, for example, it does not contain whole grain.’
  • 35) ‘On January 3, the government discontinued the subsidy on wheat flour, causing flour and bread prices to rise.’
  • 36) ‘A third is basbusa, a baked cake made of wheat flour and soaked in syrup.’
  • 37) ‘Reacting to media reports about growing flour prices, Kabil said wheat, flour, and bread prices were approaching the ideal ratio of one to two to four.’
  • 38) ‘Children learned how to produce wheat, mill flour and make bread.’
  • 39) ‘Next time you are outside with a fire, make a biscuit dough, a simple one with whole wheat flour, baking powder, salt and the like.’
  • 40) ‘Other reasons for importing the commodity was because of its high quality nature which if blended with the local wheat gives quality bread flour.’
  • 41) ‘People preferred white bread made from wheat flour.’
  • 42) ‘flours such as cake and pastry flour, which have a low protein content, tend to produce tender baked goods.’
  • 43) ‘When a landlord gives them alms, usually wheat flour or grain, a Basdeva sings a song in praise of the family.’
  • 44) ‘Such scones are made from wheat flour sifted with baking powder, mixed with a small proportion of sugar.’
  • 45) ‘I can assure you she gave them no chance to eat wheat bread from her flour barrel.’
  • 46) ‘According to The Grocer magazine, sales of flour and bread and cake mixes have rocketed by 14% in the past year.’
  • 47) ‘Steep rises in the price of grain, flour, and bread posed serious problems for that vast majority of Frenchmen who were wage-earners.’
  • 48) ‘It comprises requisite ingredients like khandsari sugar, whole wheat flour, soya protein and drum stick leaves.’
  • 49) ‘One company plans to produce organic noodles and steamed breads from wheat flour obtained by milling organic wheat.’
  • 50) ‘Using about half white and half whole wheat flour is a good mix for a nutritious light bread.’
  • 51) ‘Add to flour mixture, along with remaining whole wheat flour, salt and honey.’
  • 52) ‘Basically a mix of refined wheat flour, sugar and dried fruit, there's not much to be said for this from a nutritional perspective.’
  • 53) ‘Make sure that you add just enough gram flour so that the vegetables stick together.’
  • 54) ‘Manioc flour may be used to make a watery porridge which is served as a drink.’
  • 55) ‘The Chamorro people make tortillas of flour from seeds of cycads, which carry potent chemicals such as the neurotoxin BMAA.’
  • 56) ‘Instead, the seed cysteine concentrations were consistently slightly lower for the transgenic seed flour than for the non-transgenic controls.’
  • 57) ‘Flax seeds, flaxseed flour and flaxseed meal are also good dietary sources of phytoestrogens.’
  • 58) ‘Long before this, however, Native Americans had used the seeds for flour and the oil in their hair, and the petals for dyes.’
  • 59) ‘One example is the brand's Egg Replacement, which comes in a box and uses potato starch and tapioca flour as a base.’
  • 60) ‘Least alluring was the sabzi kofta, essentially rather solid balls of gram flour, potato and mustard seed only tepid in the middle, served in a vinegary sauce.’
  • 61) ‘The daily quota of manioc flour must be of five level alqueires, placing enough harvesters so that these can serve to hang up the coverings.’
  • 62) ‘Traditionally made with manioc flour, this is another thing I have had to improvise.’
  • 63) ‘The manioc flour produced by this process is usually toasted on large ceramic griddles called budares.’
  • 64) ‘Throughout the southern part of Brazil, large fields of cassava are grown for flour and starch in a manner similar to the way we grow crops in the United States.’
  • 65) ‘Net impact carbs result from replacing wheat flour with soy flour or adding fiber, sugar alcohols or fat.’
  • 66) ‘Combine flours (rice, corn & wheat), spring onion and water to make a batter.’
  • 67) ‘Roll out just over three quarters of the dough on a lightly floured work surface and line the flan tin.’
  • 68) ‘Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead until smooth, about 10 minutes.’
  • 69) ‘Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and divide into 12 rounds.’
  • 70) ‘Lay the pasta on a very lightly floured work surface.’
  • 71) ‘Unwrap the dough, transfer to a lightly floured work surface, and roll until paper thin.’
  • 72) ‘Unwrap the dough and transfer to a lightly floured work surface and roll as thin as possible.’
  • 73) ‘When a cake recipe calls for flouring the baking tin, use a bit of the dry cake mix instead and there won't be any white mess on the outside of the cake.’
  • 74) ‘Scrape and pour the dough onto a heavily floured work surface.’
  • 75) ‘Turn the stollen dough onto a lightly floured work surface.’
  • 76) ‘Transfer the dough to a lightly floured cold work surface and set aside to rest at room temperature for five minutes.’
  • 77) ‘Sprinkle some flour on a clean surface and flour your rolling pin.’
  • 78) ‘Mix until dough comes together; transfer to a lightly floured work surface and finish mixing by hand.’
  • 79) ‘On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the pie dough to 1/8-inch thickness.’
  • 80) ‘On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough into a thin round and line a flan tin with it.’
  • 81) ‘Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead for about ten minutes, until it is smooth and elastic.’
  • 82) ‘I floured the board, and set to work rolling and cutting.’
  • 83) ‘Well, when I lightly floured it I still had about 1/4 cup of flour left from the original cup.’
  • 84) ‘One hour later I took the first piece out, floured my counter top, and attempted to roll a 9-inch circle.’
  • 85) ‘What's the advice that books always give after they tell you to lightly flour your baking surface?’
  • 86) ‘Cut the dough into two equal portions, flour them lightly, and tuck and shape them into fat cylinders.’

Examples

  • 1) They sow grass and plant flowers and shrubs.
  • 2) Why do my courgettes rot from the flower end?
  • 3) The pale yellow flowers are delightfully scented and blossom over a long period.
  • 4) Pineapple lily leaves and flower stems have turned to complete mush now.
  • 5) There are still some wild flowers to be seen.
  • 6) This comes out in the summer with spectacular, deep pink flowers.
  • 7) It's a marvellous thing as a backing to other shrubs, in flower and autumn colour.
  • 8) Yes, you'll lose flowers for one season.
  • 9) The flowers are often striped with red beneath.
  • 10) Yellow flowers on bare stems in early spring.
  • 11) They often produce more than one flush of flowers each year.
  • 12) Secure any extra flowers or decorations with craft glue.
  • 13) This should foster new growth and flowers.
  • 14) It flowers on bare stems with small clusters of light pink flowers.
  • 15) Generations before have also had their identity forged in the flower of youth.
  • 16) The flowers will keep appearing as long as you keep picking!
  • 17) The "hundred flowers" had blossomed for little more than one season.
  • 18) The bulbs can be planted outside and flower in spring.
  • 19) You are a flower in full bloom.
  • 20) Where do all the flowers in our gardens come from?
  • 21) Perhaps our working relationship flowered because there was understanding on both sides.
  • 22) They may flower or just come up blind.
  • 23) Remove and burn any rotten flowers and stems.
  • 24) The freak rains also triggered an astonishing bloom of flowers.
  • 25) Old plants can have all their leaves cut away to leave the flower stems naked and proud.
  • 26) Paint all the flowers in bright colours.
  • 27) There is no point placing a flower bed under flowers that are already dead.
  • 28) It will soon burst out into cascades of glorious large white flowers.
  • 29) The common names for our wild flowers and trees go back into the mists of time.
  • 30) Try breathing on to the flowers first to warm them up on a cold day.
  • 31) These plants should be kept under control by cutting back any unruly or unwanted stems after flowering has ended.
  • 32) ‘The pistil and the stamen of the flowers are the specialized organs responsible for the reproductive processes.’
  • 33) ‘I didn't see anything but green plants, brightly coloured flowers, and brown earth.’
  • 34) ‘Unisexual flowers with three white petals produce numerous stamens or carpels and both present floral nectar.’
  • 35) ‘These cells may then become a new branch, or perhaps on a flower become petals and stamens.’
  • 36) ‘The sun poured gently down onto a flat stone, surrounded by brightly coloured flowers.’
  • 37) ‘Males produce only staminate flowers with stamens and no vestigial pistils.’
  • 38) ‘Closed flowers were stripped of sepals, petals and anthers just prior to stigma maturity.’
  • 39) ‘The phenology index was calculated as the proportion of flowers with dehiscent stamens.’
  • 40) ‘Anthers were isolated from flowers at anthesis and pollen grains were collected.’
  • 41) ‘Beetles did not move to unopened flowers as long as petals were covered by sepals.’
  • 42) ‘These plants have pale yellow flowers with five petals and are insect pollinated.’
  • 43) ‘At your feet you may see Dianella, a low growing plant which has white flowers with three petals.’
  • 44) ‘Ethylene production from whole flowers, petals, and the gynoecium (ovary plus styles) was examined at a given time of senescence.’
  • 45) ‘As for calculation of the selfing rate, self-pollination was with pollen from other flowers of the same plant.’
  • 46) ‘Even the number of petals on a flower can change after leaf removal.’
  • 47) ‘The bisexual flowers generally consist of carpels and staminodes inserted on the same whorl.’
  • 48) ‘In the field the plants displayed many flowers at full anthesis.’
  • 49) ‘Pistillate flowers are polymorphic for dehiscence and sepal number.’
  • 50) ‘Rose petals, lavender flowers, mint leaves and many other parts of plants are made into tea.’
  • 51) ‘Though you might not guess it by looking at them, they are flowering plants, producing numerous tiny flowers without showy petals.’
  • 52) ‘The simplicity of a ribbon-tied bunch of long stalk flowers is absolutely alluring.’
  • 53) ‘C'mon lads, when was the last time you bought a bunch of flowers?’
  • 54) ‘She often goes there to buy fresh flowers to decorate her big residence.’
  • 55) ‘Should I go out and buy a bunch of flowers and lay them by the side of the pavement where poor sad Paul keeled over and breathed his last?’
  • 56) ‘And even Mr Hague's attempts to buy a bunch of flowers for his wife were hijacked.’
  • 57) ‘Try to pick the flowers, bag and bin them to prevent seeding.’
  • 58) ‘A wreath of white roses from Princes William and Harry, and a wreath of flowers picked from Prince Charles' garden at his Highgrove Estate, ringed the altar on the floor.’
  • 59) ‘What I did was I picked flowers everywhere where he'd been and I pressed them in a book and I took them home to my mother, because it meant a lot more to her even than it did to me.’
  • 60) ‘Nor was this the hothouse perfume of fashionable London ladies; it was the delicate fragrance of hundreds of spring flowers, all together in a warm room.’
  • 61) ‘She picked the flowers, the linens, the table service, the music, the program - everything.’
  • 62) ‘As I crossed the hospital grounds, I noticed some really beautiful flowers; I picked them up for my vase.’
  • 63) ‘Buy some scented candles, even go out and pick some flowers.’
  • 64) ‘One day, as she was picking flowers while her sisters were gone, Hermaphroditus was passing through the countryside.’
  • 65) ‘The pottery workshop is filled with exquisitely painted plates for decoration, with flowers and birds the main motifs.’
  • 66) ‘On the first anniversary of Debbie's death, the tight-knit family came up to York together to lay flowers at the site of the accident.’
  • 67) ‘The carved decorations feature flowers, birds, animals, paintings and people's daily life.’
  • 68) ‘Best of all, picking the flowers prolongs the flowering period, so both the inner gardener and the interior decorator in you will be happy.’
  • 69) ‘He picked up the flowers as if on a sudden impulse, and he winked at the old woman, as if he had some shining joke to share with her.’
  • 70) ‘Now even the sale of flowers and sweets is picking up on the net.’
  • 71) ‘I picked up the flowers and smelt them gaily for extra effect, but he was already crying and too wrapped up in his own world to notice me.’
  • 72) ‘Bulbs planted late in winter come into flower in early summer.’
  • 73) ‘Tubers were harvested on August 17, just as the plants were coming into flower and before the tubers were fully mature.’
  • 74) ‘And every summer the threat to livestock increases as the plant comes into flower in its millions.’
  • 75) ‘Nor are cherries the only plants bursting into flower; camellia, iris, lotus and mustard flowers are abundant.’
  • 76) ‘We are into the fourth month of the year, evenings are longer and the warm week we had after Easter has seen blossom trees coming into flower and potted plants in need of regular watering.’
  • 77) ‘While outside, I noticed that several spring plants are already well advanced and coming into flower.’
  • 78) ‘It is a wonderful sight throughout the summer months as the different species come into flower.’
  • 79) ‘Like the rest of the plants in this group, it comes into flower just as the large Rosa mundi, which blooms wonderfully once in June, has faded.’
  • 80) ‘Previous year's efforts are paying dividends - many plants that we had planted and given up on have finally come into flower.’
  • 81) ‘Be kind to the trees and they will bloom into flower for you and attract a flock of honeysuckers and a swarm of bees.’
  • 82) ‘Like many other giants, they are also wonderful to watch through the season as they keep on growing and then come into flower when more growth would seem impossible.’
  • 83) ‘The wood bursts into flower, one last miracle after a lifetime of miracles.’
  • 84) ‘The daffodils seem to have gone over very quickly whilst spring bulbs like bluebells and wood anemones are rushing into flower.’
  • 85) ‘Because the protective coating needs time to break down, it takes longer to germinate than petunia seed in its natural state and, in consequence, comes into flower later.’
  • 86) ‘Although it germinates in May along with everything else, it seldom comes into flower before September, and if the weather is cold and wet it may not come into flower at all.’
  • 87) ‘The people in charge of arranging such operations know full well that dandelions come into flower at much the same time as our daffodils and then take over as the daffodils fade away.’
  • 88) ‘By the end of October or early November they will be back into flower.’
  • 89) ‘Different types of jasmine come into flower and turn your evenings magical.’
  • 90) ‘It has far outlasted the bowls of hyacinth and narcissi that came into flower at the same time.’
  • 91) ‘I am going to try lifting and transplanting some now, before they come into flower.’
  • 92) ‘What's up then, flower?’
  • 93) ‘Well, flower, when we moved here we couldn't afford Manchester rates.’
  • 94) ‘‘Good luck, flower,’ he said.’
  • 95) ‘While travelling to the North-East last year, I knew I was nearing my destination when the cashier at the motorway services called me 'flower’’
  • 96) ‘It’s all right flower, we'll be fine.’
  • 97) ‘‘Of course I would forgive you, you are my youngest daughter, the flower of our family,’ Christiana cried.’
  • 98) ‘From a country with only 3.5 million people, the troops - the flower of Albania's youth - represent the best Albania has to offer.’
  • 99) ‘For the resurrection of this Isis, the Simphonie du Marais spared no effort, bringing together some excellent players and the flower of French Baroque singing.’
  • 100) ‘But Shanley is simply the flower of the sexual libertinism that our culture advocates in a million voices.’
  • 101) ‘First up to bat, then, is the flower of the British press, the Sun, which claims to have identified the intern in question and talked to her parents.’
  • 102) ‘However, through no fault of the weapons designers, France did indeed send the flower of her youth off to war in August of 1914 armed with the obsolete Lebel M1886 - M93.’
  • 103) ‘No-one had been so consistently maniacal throughout the entire tournament or spilt more blood as he single-handedly destroyed the flower of Britain's youth.’
  • 104) ‘It certainly is an evocative month for visiting Flanders, where the flower of European youth died in a morass of mud and blood in the First World War.’
  • 105) ‘The Croats were defeated and left the flower of their nobility on the field.’
  • 106) ‘The tired, sun-burnt hills of summer have awoken with a new, hopeful greenness and the catalpa trees are flowering with huge white orchid-like flowers in the village squares.’
  • 107) ‘The daffodils and the cherry trees flowering in the spring are the most popular feature on postcards or calendars, but the Gardens are worth visiting in all seasons.’
  • 108) ‘In some cases, the name simply implies that the species flowers earlier than other similar plants.’
  • 109) ‘One of the unlikely results of warmer seasons is that, because many trees and grasses are flowering earlier and over a longer period, there has been an increase in the length of the hay fever season.’
  • 110) ‘Unable to stand the sight of the lover who left her, the tree flowers only at night and sheds them like tear-drops before the sun rises.’
  • 111) ‘Along the roadside were trees flowering gloriously, chiefly the magnificent African Tulip, with its spectacular orangey-red flowers.’
  • 112) ‘The rose bush is flowering although it's still having a little trouble with aphids, which I used for target practise with my squirt gun yesterday.’
  • 113) ‘From Katherine to Darwin, growers are reporting a 40 per cent increase in tree flowering.’
  • 114) ‘As native shrubs finish flowering, snip the dead flowers off with the secateurs.’
  • 115) ‘Each spring a pear tree will flower on the banks of the River Foss in York in memory of Miss Stuttle, who was a former pupil at Huntington School.’
  • 116) ‘My suggestion to him was there are so many coral trees flowering that perhaps the birds just can't cover them all.’
  • 117) ‘Trees have flowered on the study plot in January in the past four years; fruits become mature by the following September and fall in October through December.’
  • 118) ‘After the almond trees flowered in February he pruned them to take out central sprouts to make them easier to harvest.’
  • 119) ‘In the cool spring of 1996, mild in comparison to 1814, apple trees flowered as late as early June..’
  • 120) ‘Twenty-seven trees flowered in the first year but only 18 did so in the second.’
  • 121) ‘The caragana bushes would flower along the sidewalks; buildings would be painted the morning after a happy event.’
  • 122) ‘Winter barley now has ears fully emerged and is flowering.’
  • 123) ‘Seedlings can be purchased in a relatively advanced stage of growth which means they will be flowering for Christmas.’
  • 124) ‘It flowers twice in the year, and it is the fully grown but still closed buds which are harvested to be dried and marketed.’
  • 125) ‘Dad had looked so lost when he joined our group at my sister's front gate on Monday, when Sue was talking to Alison about the oleanders which grow and flower so fully in the summer.’
  • 126) ‘Since then, it has flowered into a dynamic forum to access, understand, and research the rapidly mushrooming field of Indian Literature in English, as well as to translate regional literature.’
  • 127) ‘The naughty twinkle she displayed in films such as Ghostbusters has flowered into a comic touch that knows no fear of shame.’
  • 128) ‘If this was meant as an insult, it soon flowered into prophesy.’
  • 129) ‘Since then, however, it has flowered into a truly remarkable society.’
  • 130) ‘Still later, it flowered into the variegated cities and states of the Middle Ages.’
  • 131) ‘Despite, or perhaps thanks to, the U.S. embargo of that rhythmically rich island, Cuban culture has flowered into exotic fruition in an isolated hothouse.’
  • 132) ‘When she offered herself to him out of gratitude, David gently declined her offer until gratitude flowered into the maturity of love.’
  • 133) ‘Somehow it all circles back to Melvin Van Peebles, whose independent moviemaking dream has flowered into so many others.’
  • 134) ‘This high school has now flowered into a big Technical Institute.’
  • 135) ‘As she grew, she flowered into the most beautiful woman Egypt had ever seen.’
  • 136) ‘He saw a faint ripple in the tides of the force as silver unfolded within him and flowered into furious life.’
  • 137) ‘I met her the last time about a year or so ago, and she had really flowered into a beautiful, mature friendly married young woman.’
  • 138) ‘Under his aegis, the department of Gandhian Studies flowered into a bright, vibrant one, drawing students from not just all over the country, but from all over the world.’
  • 139) ‘Kiernan's acquaintance with Faiz in Lahore flowered into a life-long friendship.’
  • 140) ‘Haan proposes that some primal ideas from a Mantuan fable involving an apple tree and a covetous neighbor flowered into an epic inspiration for Milton.’
  • 141) ‘This way, he gets the chance to disprove my theory that the FA had the right idea but got the wrong man and also to enable this generation, as good technically as any in the world, to flower fully.’
  • 142) ‘We're hoping that school will help these interests develop and flower, but, of course, we do not know.’
  • 143) ‘This allowed those who wanted to flower and develop in an entirely new political context.’
  • 144) ‘The crowds were slow enough in the early stages and it took some years for the venue to flower into one of the best known halls in the province.’
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