explicit vs implicit

explicit implicit

Definitions

  • 1) The concluding words of a book or section of a book. See the quotation under incipit.
  • 2) Containing material (e.g. language or film footage) that might be deemed offensive or graphic.
  • 3) Very specific, clear, or detailed.
  • 4) Readily observable.
  • 5) Fully and clearly expressed; leaving nothing implied.
  • 6) Describing or portraying nudity or sexual activity in graphic detail.
  • 7) Fully developed or formulated.
  • 8) Forthright and unreserved in expression.
  • 9) (Math.) See under Function.
  • 10) (Math.) See under Function.
  • 11) Not implied merely, or conveyed by implication; distinctly stated; plain in language; open to the understanding; clear; not obscure or ambiguous; express; unequivocal. Opposite of implicit.
  • 12) Having no disguised meaning or reservation; unreserved; outspoken; -- applied to persons.
  • 13) in accordance with fact or the primary meaning of a term
  • 14) precisely and clearly expressed or readily observable; leaving nothing to implication
  • 15) A word formerly used (as finis is now) at the conclusion of a book to indicate the end.
  • 16) It is finished or completed: a word formerly inserted at the conclusion of a book, in the same way as finis. See etymology.
  • 17) Open to the understanding; express; clear; not obscure or ambiguous: opposed to implicit: as, explicit instructions.
  • 18) Plain; open; unreserved; having no disguised meaning or reservation; outspoken: applied to persons: as, he was explicit in his terms.

Definitions

  • 1) Implied indirectly, without being directly expressed
  • 2) Having no reservations or doubts; unquestioning or unconditional; usually said of faith or trust.
  • 3) Contained in the essential nature of something but not openly shown
  • 4) obsolete entangled, twisted together.
  • 5) obsolete entangled, twisted together.
  • 6) Having no doubts or reservations; unquestioning.
  • 7) Implied or understood though not directly expressed.
  • 8) Contained in the nature of something though not readily apparent.
  • 9) obsolete Infolded; entangled; complicated; involved.
  • 10) Tacitly comprised; fairly to be understood, though not expressed in words; implied.
  • 11) Resting on another; trusting in the word or authority of another, without doubt or reserve; unquestioning; complete
  • 12) (Math.) See under Function.
  • 13) obsolete Infolded; entangled; complicated; involved.
  • 14) (Math.) See under Function.
  • 15) implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something
  • 16) being without doubt or reserve
  • 17) Submissively yielding; unquestioningly obedient; trusting confidently or blindly.
  • 18) Implied; resting on implication or inference; that may or should be understood, though not directly expressed; tacitly included.
  • 19) Involved in or resulting from perfect confidence in or deference to some authority or witness; hence, submissive; unquestioning; blind: as, implicit faith; implicit assent; implicit obedience.
  • 20) Complicated; involved; puzzling.
  • 21) Infolded; entangled.
  • 22) Infolded;entangled.

Examples

  • 1) There were explicit texts and pictures from her to another guy.
  • 2) The star is no longer comfortable in her home after he posted her an explicit picture.
  • 3) Police found they had sent hundreds of texts and explicit pictures.
  • 4) He sent other explicit photos to a 20-year-old student who he also invited to share hotel trysts.
  • 5) There are no explicit scenes, yet the whole book is simply heaving.
  • 6) The band formed in 1970 with an explicit and unapologetic political angle.
  • 7) Volunteers who had half a litre found it easier to look at explicit pictures - but women loosened up more than men.
  • 8) Technology existed to allow social media platforms to block explicit images from young users automatically, following a request from their parents, he said.
  • 9) He proceeded to send explicit messages and pictures before sharing her details with other men.
  • 10) Young people receive little or no explicit instruction.
  • 11) We meet most weekends and he sends me explicit photos.
  • 12) Few of his political works are explicit.
  • 13) There was general agreement that the previously unpublished conventions should become explicit and public.
  • 14) One photo is too explicit to publish.
  • 15) This is where explicit images are sent by text message from one mobile phone to another.
  • 16) The scenes were so explicit that there was incorrect speculation that they had been real.
  • 17) His work has no explicit campaigning message.
  • 18) The programme will explore how angry exes have destroyed lives by sharing explicit images of their previous partners.
  • 19) Most guilty parties wouldn't have any explicit intention.
  • 20) Our chats have become explicit and pictures have been sent, mainly by me to prove my love for him.
  • 21) Something so explicit, so impersonal, on a phone.
  • 22) And childhood exposure to explicit pics has little effect on teenage behaviour, claims the US study.
  • 23) Since politics is a process we must again reconsider planning as a process, but from a wider and more explicit political perspective than that of "procedural" theory.
  • 24) ‘To ensure consistency, several definitions were made explicit before data entry began.’
  • 25) ‘The methodologies employed are not only made explicit, but discussed in some detail, albeit at times anecdotally.’
  • 26) ‘At least one has even made explicit reference to the use of nuclear bombs, albeit as a retaliatory measure.’
  • 27) ‘A narrative is implied, but never made explicit.’
  • 28) ‘Although his condition is never made explicit, the Swindon teenager shows all the signs of having Asperger's.’
  • 29) ‘It is not to my present purpose to consider how such an explicit definition of the notion of a sense-datum might be formulated.’
  • 30) ‘It's clearly an explicit miscarriage of justice, and I'm glad to see that these young guys are being free.’
  • 31) ‘Others make more explicit the objectives to which the government should devote itself.’
  • 32) ‘During the initial days after the diagnosis, your patient or the parents may need very explicit instructions.’
  • 33) ‘The ransom note is very explicit on what he's going to do.’
  • 34) ‘I have explicit instructions not to share that with you right now.’
  • 35) ‘A number of instructional texts make explicit reference to the difficulties of learning Thai.’
  • 36) ‘In 2003 the Justice Minister gave his explicit consent for the adoption of 595 children.’
  • 37) ‘You may use my personal information - but only with my explicit permission.’
  • 38) ‘The contract with the writer is very explicit, he explains.’
  • 39) ‘The area of this part can be found once we have an explicit description of its graph.’
  • 40) ‘Plekhanov's program did not represent an explicit disavowal of socialist objectives.’
  • 41) ‘Assumptions are explicit statements describing the present and future environment.’
  • 42) ‘In this section, we describe these forms of explicit prejudice.’
  • 43) ‘Taking examples from actual primary care practice, Launer presents the techniques in a clear, explicit fashion.’
  • 44) ‘He was not explicit but implied to me that most of the people were in some way connected with publishing or writing.’
  • 45) ‘We were quite explicit in the consultation process that this would be one of the savings that would be made.’
  • 46) ‘People fall in love all the time, but few professional athletes are so explicit in recounting the moment they met their soulmate 15 years earlier.’
  • 47) ‘From the start, he was explicit about his modus operandi: We were to give him our program, and he would give us a design.’
  • 48) ‘It would have helped had he been more explicit on this point.’
  • 49) ‘His former colleagues were explicit in their condemnation.’
  • 50) ‘Can you be explicit about whether you think a pull out of Australian troops would be a substantial damaging of the alliance?’
  • 51) ‘It is important that scientists are explicit about the limitations of their work.’
  • 52) ‘However, he was not explicit as to when and how a civil dictatorship could replace a military government and eventually be replaced by a democratic system.’
  • 53) ‘The Spanish-dominant families were explicit about their concerns.’
  • 54) ‘Fortunately, Alexander is more explicit elsewhere in his writings.’
  • 55) ‘At the end of the book Toussaint moves toward post-development discourse, although he is not explicit about it.’
  • 56) ‘The officials were very explicit at the select committee.’
  • 57) ‘Henry was explicit about this in one of only two articles he published on decorative art while he was in Sydney.’
  • 58) ‘If they were not explicit, it would certainly have been implied.’
  • 59) ‘If you are explicit in the comment section of your order, I've found that they are pretty good.’
  • 60) ‘Once we are explicit in the legislation, we can move away from that general reference to the principles of the treaty.’
  • 61) ‘Now she was very explicit as to what her first choice still was, it was still revenge.’
  • 62) ‘In fact, the Court is quite explicit on this point.’
  • 63) ‘I think they've been very explicit about this for months.’
  • 64) ‘They said they just felt that the explicit depiction of sexual activity and nudity was unacceptable.’
  • 65) ‘I'd put an even more explicit photo on, except I'd have to put an Agecheck on my site!’
  • 66) ‘He also described ‘a gay sexual encounter in explicit and derogatory terms’ from the pulpit.’
  • 67) ‘Testimony also included description of explicit photographs that include the defendant in them.’
  • 68) ‘The site includes explicit photography and detailed descriptions of sex acts.’
  • 69) ‘There are often legal and other obstacles to using highly explicit videos in assessing sex offenders.’
  • 70) ‘Pimping, hookers, all sexual acts and explicit language has been censored in the Australian version.’
  • 71) ‘The explicit references to sexual perversions are not the best thing about the book, although they don't really do it much harm.’
  • 72) ‘Her explicit accounts of her sexual journey developed into this fictionalised memoir.’
  • 73) ‘The board objected to explicit scenes depicting sexual relations between a 15-year-old girl and an adult man.’
  • 74) ‘This is erotic fiction complete with explicit language and sexual content.’
  • 75) ‘There's no other way to describe him without using explicit language.’
  • 76) ‘Any readers who are easily offended or who simply dislike explicit descriptions of sex should avoid this novel.’
  • 77) ‘It was a very explicit, very descriptive story with a sex scene between Tristan and Ian.’
  • 78) ‘He only read it because he heard there were some very explicit sexual situations in it.’
  • 79) ‘The trilogy also introduced a far more explicit approach to the sexual nature of the vampire.’
  • 80) ‘Do librarians have a right to a workplace reasonably free of sexually explicit materials?’
  • 81) ‘The director's cut features a few fairly explicit scenes that didn't make it to U.S. theaters.’
  • 82) ‘Do you think things have become too explicit today and thus less erotic?’
  • 83) ‘Have today's films become too explicit in dealing with sex?’

Examples

  • 1) The request was laced with an implicit threat to resign.
  • 2) Nobody will speak out because of the implicit threat of retribution.
  • 3) The implicit belief seems to be that education and happiness have little to do with one another.
  • 4) The clear majority of his letters contain some explicit or implicit critique of landed power.
  • 5) It depends to a great extent on the explicit and implicit aims.
  • 6) Only that implicit guarantee held fears of a default at bay.
  • 7) There was clearly an implicit criticism.
  • 8) We take into consideration the explicit and implicit teachings of the Bible.
  • 9) But there was implicit criticism, too.
  • 10) In that sense, although it was not under direct threat, there was an implicit threat.
  • 11) Because, other than regretting their womanising, there is no threat implicit in their hilarity.
  • 12) This third element, though sometimes explicit, is often implicit.
  • 13) So should the Government boost confidence in British banks by making the implicit guarantee explicit?
  • 14) Perhaps, also, banks should no longer benefit from an implicit taxpayer guarantee.
  • 15) That levy was carefully designed to reward taxpayers for the implicit government guarantee afforded to big banks and was rightly linked to a bank's global liabilities.
  • 16) He also said that lenders still expected the taxpayer to bail them out, and could use the implicit guarantee to increase the size of their bonuses.
  • 17) Further implicit criticisms came last week, continuing a pattern of public pronouncements that has now become familiar to Falcao.
  • 18) This is what I term implicit whiteness? implicit because explicit assertions of white identity have been banned by the anti-white elites that dominate our politics and culture.
  • 19) The president rejected what he described as the implicit suggestion from some quarters that the Public Protector was not up to this task.
  • 20) Paralleling this, I observe significant reductions in implicit bias (0.20 to 0.57 standard deviations) among Hindu children.
  • 21) But I can't believe anymore has suggested that he literally - what's not implicit is that ...
  • 22) "We aided and abetted it in implicit ways by not demanding more earlier."
  • 23) “Even though implicitly acquired knowledge tends to remain implicit, and explicitly acquired knowledge tends to remain explicit, explicitly learned knowledge can become implicit in the sense that learners can lose awareness of its structures over time, and learners can become aware of the structures of implicit knowledge when attempting to access it, for example for applying it to a new context or conveying it verbally to somebody else.”
  • 24) Similarly the idea of the "American family" which was hegemonic for much of the last century and which serves as the basis for some political arguments is predicated on certain implicit ideas about who is an american, about what proper relationships look like, and about the place of the family within society, etc. Maddy
  • 25) Rather, what was implicit is changed by explicating it.
  • 26) ‘Resource limitation is an implicit assumption of any competition hypothesis and should be tested.’
  • 27) ‘He conceded that such an inference would be only implicit.’
  • 28) ‘They may also be curtailed, with the explanation left implicit.’
  • 29) ‘The process of learning to read seems to involve both explicit and implicit learning.’
  • 30) ‘And it is that implicit possibility that gives depth to humor.’
  • 31) ‘Why, it even carries the implicit endorsement of the US Secretary of State.’
  • 32) ‘The attention on young middle class protestors was far less direct but often implicit.’
  • 33) ‘Expanding debate and liberating speech is at least implicit in the mandate of any university governing body.’
  • 34) ‘As subtle as implicit attitudes are, they can cause serious real-world damage.’
  • 35) ‘It has always been implicit in television that the programs are just delivery vehicles for the advertising.’
  • 36) ‘The tradeoff I have described has always been implicit in the law, but it now may become explicit.’
  • 37) ‘The implicit social connections that blog linking imply are public: they are there for anyone to see, and the individuals involved actively create those links with that in mind.’
  • 38) ‘The implicit message is always the same: it is your capitalist (imperialist, racist, whatever) society that is the true enemy of the people.’
  • 39) ‘The implicit presumption was always that politicised corrections for market failures would work perfectly.’
  • 40) ‘Her earlier work exploited the tensions of flatness in paintings of punctures, protrusions and simple forms whose symbolic possibilities were always implicit.’
  • 41) ‘It seems to me that they were fundamentally asking why we need to have 100 pages of legislation that set out how a Crown entity must report when it has always been implicit that that agency must report anyway.’
  • 42) ‘It always maintains an implicit threat of violence.’
  • 43) ‘There is an implicit question as to whether perfections are coherent such that they can exist in one person.’
  • 44) ‘The official focus on the ageing question, with the implicit notion that people have a responsibility to reproduce a new generation of elder-carers, contributes to the instrumental view of parenthood.’
  • 45) ‘The implicit question is whether this move can prod uncabled Australians out of their pay TV inertia and get subscription television's hoof in the door of more homes.’
  • 46) ‘In any case, whether or not our present lethal lack of cohesion can be attributed to the rise of multiculturalism, the moral relativism implicit in that view always made it a dubious position to hold.’
  • 47) ‘This would also provide tremendous fodder for analysis of the social networks implicit in links.’
  • 48) ‘This view is so fundamentally flawed yet so implicit in the Australian mentality that it seems almost impossible to efface or even moderate.’
  • 49) ‘Although used mainly in secular schools, this book calls for a searching inquiry into the political and social morality implicit in the American constitutional order.’
  • 50) ‘Discourses reflect viewpoints that are implicit in social movements and cultural and political institutions in our society, and change as ideas and values shift.’
  • 51) ‘Civil and political rights may constitute the condition for and thus be implicit in economic and social rights.’
  • 52) ‘The impression is that we are witnesses after the fact and once again we naturally construct a hypothetical narrative, its tragedy implicit in the necessarily tawdry ingredients.’
  • 53) ‘For, as Bataille says, ‘it takes an iron nerve to perceive the connection between the promise of life implicit in eroticism and the sensuous aspect of death’.’
  • 54) ‘The notions of transaction and reciprocity-I do for you what you do for me-are also implicit in moral concepts like the golden rule, the social contract, and enlightened selfinterest.’
  • 55) ‘While implicit in both the Generalized Model and social marketing models, this involves formative and summative evaluation.’
  • 56) ‘There are other assumptions implicit in the language used to describe community capacity and social capital.’
  • 57) ‘It is only to say that his norms were not implicit in any notion of the ‘social’.’
  • 58) ‘This characteristic was implicit in the women's concerns for meeting basic human needs for their families and their description of making use of the resources in their environment.’
  • 59) ‘Jung intuitively felt this pointed to an acausal archetypal order at the root of all phenomena which is responsible for the meaningfulness implicit in the coincidence of associated physical and mental events.’
  • 60) ‘In my view, efficiency is implicit in the concept of sustainability, which is ingrained in the bill's purpose and elsewhere.’
  • 61) ‘One could dwell on the fact that it contains several inherent contradictions and that the numbers implicit in the proposals don't add up.’
  • 62) ‘Scarcity is also implicit in anti-globalisation arguments against the development of global water markets.’
  • 63) ‘What assumptions are implicit in these sorts of relationships between subjects and objects (computers)?’
  • 64) ‘The contradictions implicit in this argument are fairly obvious.’
  • 65) ‘A legitimate value would have to be one implicit in the nature of legal reasoning itself.’
  • 66) ‘I have further narrowed the field of important questions by following some implicit principles.’
  • 67) ‘The patient has read a bit, is very anxious, and reaches the doctor most often imagining the worst and with implicit faith in this ‘worker of miracles’.’
  • 68) ‘He has implicit faith in his advice so in spite of many people's doubts and reservations, it is now as successful and professional a partnership as there is on tour.’
  • 69) ‘The young intelligentsia refuse to place implicit faith in God and begin to ask why and wherefore.’
  • 70) ‘As Mom faced her illness, she did so in a spirit of fortitude based on an implicit faith and a godly life.’
  • 71) ‘How many times have you read those words, which have become a flippant phrase which contains a hint of both the scepticism and implicit faith we have in science?’
  • 72) ‘This modern young man has implicit faith in God.’
  • 73) ‘Her implicit faith in others allows her to approach Mateo without fear, rather than to cower away from him like the other inhabitants of the tenement.’
  • 74) ‘It was her sympathy, her love for him, and her implicit faith in him, which made the Prophet love her dearly.’
  • 75) ‘My faith in prayers took an awful tumble that day, and I doubt whether implicit faith ever returned.’
  • 76) ‘As truths, they are worthy of the most implicit faith that can be given to human testimony.’
  • 77) ‘But if you agree to this, I'll need your complete, total, and implicit trust.’
  • 78) ‘The message was basic to the Victorian army: that systematic uniformity and implicit obedience were essential.’
  • 79) ‘The quality of training programs was variable, but they always contained the implicit belief in the rightness of obedience to orders from those above, and the threat of dismissal if rules were not followed.’
  • 80) ‘This paper contains his famous deep implicit function theorem.’
  • 81) ‘Actually, since the domain of a function is usually implicit from context, putting the * in front of an extended function is slightly redundant and thus usually omitted.’
  • 82) ‘In figure 2b, the implicit function is plotted for different values of q.’
  • 83) ‘The foundation for such an study is provided by the implicit function theorem, formulated below.’
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