coarse vs course

coarse course

Definitions

  • 1) Composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.
  • 2) Lacking refinement, taste or delicacy;
  • 3) Consisting of large particles; not fine in texture.
  • 4) Rough, especially to the touch.
  • 5) Lacking in delicacy or refinement.
  • 6) Vulgar or indecent.
  • 7) Of low, common, or inferior quality.
  • 8) Large in bulk, or composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture; gross; thick; rough; -- opposed to fine.
  • 9) Not refined; rough; rude; unpolished; gross; indelicate.
  • 10) of low or inferior quality or value
  • 11) of textures that are rough to the touch or substances consisting of relatively large particles
  • 12) lacking refinement or cultivation or taste
  • 13) Exhibiting or characterized by lack of refinement; rude; vulgar; of manners or speech, unpolished, uncivil, or ill-bred: as, a coarse face; coarse manners.
  • 14) Of inferior or faulty quality; poor in kind or character; not pure or choice; not soft or dainty; rude; common; base.
  • 15) In pathology, rough; hoarse: said of the respiratory note or of râles heard in auscultation of the chest.
  • 16) Rough; inclement; unpleasant: said of the weather: as, it's a coarse day.
  • 17) Wanting in fineness of texture or delicacy of structure, or in elegance of form; composed of large parts or particles; thick and rough in texture: as, coarse thread or yarn; coarse hair; coarse sand; coarse cloth; coarse paper.
  • 18) Gross; indelicate; offensive: as, coarse language; a coarse gesture.

Definitions

  • 1) Nautical The lowest sail on a mast of a square-rigged ship.
  • 2) Movement in time; duration.
  • 3) A typical, natural, or customary manner of proceeding or developing.
  • 4) A part of a meal served as a unit at one time.
  • 5) A point on the compass, especially the one toward which a vehicle, such as a ship, is moving.
  • 6) Development in a particular way; progress.
  • 7) A systematic or orderly succession; a sequence.
  • 8) The route or path taken by something that moves, such as a stream or vehicle.
  • 9) A continuous layer of building material, such as brick or tile, on a wall or roof of a building.
  • 10) A mode of action or behavior.
  • 11) Nautical The lowest sail on a mast of a square-rigged ship.
  • 12) The direction of continuing movement.
  • 13) A designated route or area on which a race is held.
  • 14) A unit of such a curriculum.
  • 15) A complete body of prescribed studies constituting a curriculum.
  • 16) The direction of a mine working.
  • 17) A passage-way.
  • 18) The line or direction of motion; the line in which anything moves: as, the course of a projectile through the air; specifically (nautical), the direction in which a ship is steered in making her way from point to point during a voyage; the point of the compass on which a ship sails.
  • 19) In mining: An influx of water from one direction.
  • 20) The path, direction, or distance prescribed or laid out for a running or race; the ground or distance walked, run, or sailed over, or to be walked, run, or sailed over, in a race: as, there being no competition, he walked over the course.
  • 21) The direction of a lode or vein.
  • 22) An obsolete variant of curse.
  • 23) In surveying, a line run with a compass or transit.
  • 24) A running in a prescribed direction, or over a prescribed distance; a race; a career.
  • 25) A running or moving forward or onward; motion forward; a continuous progression or advance.
  • 26) Hence The space of distance or time, or the succession of stages, through which anything passes or has to pass in its continued progress from first to last; the period or path of progression from begiuning to end: as, the course of a planet, or of a human life.
  • 27) To hunt; pursue; chase.
  • 28) To cause to run; force to move with speed.
  • 29) Tohunt;pursue;chase.
  • 30) Togroom.
  • 31) To engage in the sport of coursing. See coursing.
  • 32) To dispute in the schools.
  • 33) To groom.
  • 34) To run through or over: as, the blood courses the winding arteries.
  • 35) An obsolete spelling of coarse.
  • 36) To run; pass over or through a course; run or move about: as, the blood courses.
  • 37) To set (hounds) to chase game.
  • 38) To move swiftly through or over; traverse.
  • 39) To hunt (game) with hounds.
  • 40) To hunt game with hounds.
  • 41) To proceed or move swiftly in a certain direction or along a course.
  • 42) (run/take) To follow its natural progression or development.
  • 43) (of course) Used to indicate assent or agreement.
  • 44) (off course) Away from the planned or intended course.
  • 45) (of course) As is to be expected under the circumstances; naturally or obviously.
  • 46) (in due course) At the proper or right time.
  • 47) (off course) Away from the planned or intended course.
  • 48) (on course) Following the planned or intended course.
  • 49) (on course) Following the planned or intended course.
  • 50) (in due course) At the proper or right time.
  • 51) (of course) As is to be expected under the circumstances; naturally or obviously.
  • 52) (run/take) To follow its natural progression or development.
  • 53) (of course) Used to indicate assent or agreement.

Examples

  • 1) Which of coarse is Latin for “so there, nyah/neener/nannynannybooboo”
  • 2) One day, because he was tired and unhappy, he knocked their heads together, and they plotted to destroy him, but they were afraid, and secretly admired what they called his coarse habits.
  • 3) The agency is also reviewing standards for other types of particle pollution, including what are known as coarse particles.
  • 4) And a fine pallid specimen too, the kind that teenagers should tell each other in coarse whispers while huddled around a camp fire on a pitch-black night.
  • 5) Form dough into 1 inch balls, roll in coarse sugar and place on baking sheet.
  • 6) His first pan of the morning washed out over two dollars in coarse gold.
  • 7) The working class is characterized as coarse, lazy, and vulgar, deserving of their plight.
  • 8) To do this, Venardou says capers are well-cleaned, packed in coarse salt, and stored in glass containers.
  • 9) His words sharply punctuated, delivered in coarse staccato.
  • 10) ‘I can see the depths of his chestnut eyes, the coarse texture of his jet black hair, and the shape of his slightly muscular figure.’
  • 11) ‘He was a rather tall boy with a head full of coarse black hair.’
  • 12) ‘Her coarse black hair was pulled into two cute pigtails, and she smiled shyly.’
  • 13) ‘Everyone always wants to touch the cloth because it looks so rough and coarse, but I can assure you, there is nothing so comfortable for the climate!’
  • 14) ‘The coarse texture and mild flavour of the beans contrasted nicely with the saltiness of the smoked ham and the richness of the sausage.’
  • 15) ‘Objects jumped out in sharp relief: furniture, stairs, the grain of the wood on the cleanly swept floor, the coarse texture of rugs.’
  • 16) ‘Dulse is a seaweed native to the British Isles that has a reddish-brown color and coarse texture.’
  • 17) ‘The material is coarse and rough, the fabric verdant and winter green.’
  • 18) ‘She stared at herself, and then pulled on her own clothes, feeling safer in the thick coarse fabrics, the rough knitted jumper.’
  • 19) ‘In his most characteristic works he carved directly in stone, preferring a hard stone with a coarse texture.’
  • 20) ‘The carpet lining the boot was scratchy - it was black and coarse and smelled of old mud and car.’
  • 21) ‘We added a sack of sugar, a pouch of coarse black tobacco, and got his grudging acceptance.’
  • 22) ‘They wore flannel shirts over loose-fitting pants fashioned of droguet, or drugget, a durable and coarse woolen fabric.’
  • 23) ‘He stood six feet tall and was covered in coarse black fur.’
  • 24) ‘I sighed, moved to stroke the slightly coarse fur on her shoulder.’
  • 25) ‘His voice was coarse and scratchy, filled with malice and hunger.’
  • 26) ‘Her voice was coarse as if she had been yelling all night.’
  • 27) ‘Today, refined wheat and rice have virtually displaced coarse grains and millets as the staple cereal.’
  • 28) ‘Oats can be used for hay; however, as with the winter cereals, oats are coarse, slow to dry, and often produce dusty hay.’
  • 29) ‘It will also be advisable to reclassify coarse cereals as ‘nutritious grains’ in order to underline their desirable nutritive properties.’
  • 30) ‘In fact it was rather ugly, with coarse brown scales and thick awkward looking fins.’
  • 31) ‘Water used for domestic purposes can be easily recycled by passing it through layers of charcoal and coarse sand.’
  • 32) ‘If your soil is poorly drained, it may be necessary to put a little coarse sand at the base of the hole.’
  • 33) ‘Beneath these lies a floor of coarse granite sand and broken shell.’
  • 34) ‘For plants that need free drainage I add very coarse sand or fine gravel.’
  • 35) ‘If the surface is slick, such as ceramic tile, sand it with coarse sandpaper.’
  • 36) ‘The coarse white sand of the sea floor contrasted with the pinkish walls with their splattering of yellow, orange and red anemones.’
  • 37) ‘Beneath her she could feel the coarse grit of sand and pebbles, and in the air she could smell the ocean.’
  • 38) ‘For container gardening use a fast draining potting soil mixed with a little coarse sand.’
  • 39) ‘Just lay it on the ground in the cleared area, and fill it with a coarse grade of sand.’
  • 40) ‘There are places where the sand is coarse and hard instead of soft, worn by years of the sea and her moods.’
  • 41) ‘Blend this all together using the tips of your fingers, until it resembles coarse sand.’
  • 42) ‘Work started on the site for the pergola today, with the foundations being levelled and the gaps between the stone being filled with coarse gravel ready to receive sand and slabs.’
  • 43) ‘Inhalation of coarse, ambient particulate matter may also contribute to the exacerbation of reactive airways disease.’
  • 44) ‘Lard in particular has a coarse, crystalline structure which makes a highly effective barrier.’
  • 45) ‘A little coarse salt, some ground pepper, and fire.’
  • 46) ‘Sprinkle the coarse salt over a sheet pan and arrange the clams on top.’
  • 47) ‘A ragged, yellow-green plant had pushed its way through the coarse, black soil.’
  • 48) ‘Some sift sand from millet, while others pound the grain into a coarse flour.’
  • 49) ‘Just whiz some of the bread in a food processor until it becomes a pile of coarse crumbs.’
  • 50) ‘At a microscopic scale, at the surface of the deposit, coarse particles roll on a deposit of fine particles as a result of particle segregation.’
  • 51) ‘Some biologic links between coarse particles and exacerbation of respiratory problems support these findings.’
  • 52) ‘Grain orientation also plays a large part in determining toughness of alloys containing coarse particles.’
  • 53) ‘The gold distribution in the ore is quite uneven - coarse grains with occasional nuggets are typical.’
  • 54) ‘He also needs to know the fineness, because coarse particles don't work.’
  • 55) ‘These coarse particles indicate that the decorator prepared his paint poorly.’
  • 56) ‘The second heating refines the coarse grains and leaves the steel in a softened condition.’
  • 57) ‘If the grains are too coarse the metal will exhibit a rough surface finish on machining and an ‘orange peel’ effect after pressing.’
  • 58) ‘Breton butter is notable since it's almost always flecked with large, coarse grains of salt that crunch when you bite into them.’
  • 59) ‘This wider mix of particle sizes is important because how much sediment a river carries also depends on the relative mix of coarse and fine grains.’
  • 60) ‘Sprinkle with coarse grain sugar; bake until golden brown, about 40 minutes.’
  • 61) ‘Grain size in the intrusion remains coarse right up to the contact with metasedimentary host rocks.’
  • 62) ‘If a drop of the same ink is mixed with a drop of fresh blood, the carbon precipitates at once in the form of rather coarse black particles, assembling in small irregular clusters.’
  • 63) ‘In this type of sediment, relatively coarse sand grains are mixed with silt and clay.’
  • 64) ‘Because of the fragmentation of nuclei and the disruption of cellular membranes, coarse granular particles are formed.’
  • 65) ‘These observations explained the presence of the coarse suspended particles found in the present study.’
  • 66) ‘His facial features were coarse, his hands were spade-like, and his feet were large.’
  • 67) ‘The male figures here, as before, are represented as coarse, even brutal in feature.’
  • 68) ‘From the servants I had heard that she was very coarse looking and rude.’
  • 69) ‘The food was meager, coarse bread and a single cup of water along with a small bowl of some kind of stew, long gone cold.’
  • 70) ‘A Chinese hostess will usually say to her guests she has nothing to offer them but some coarse food and plain tea.’
  • 71) ‘The Romans considered the leek a superior vegetable, unlike onions and garlic which were despised as coarse foods for the poor.’
  • 72) ‘Elderly people often describe the hard days of the past with examples of how they struggled with inadequate and coarse food.’
  • 73) ‘The stuff available is of poor quality - yellow rice that smells rancid; coarse sugar full of dirt, etc.’
  • 74) ‘After days without respite from the coarse gruel and dairy produce that was the usual fare of a herdsman, I was more than ready for some good meat.’
  • 75) ‘It was Julian, the urchin who had once served the coarse wine in The Oranges bar.’
  • 76) ‘This is just as well; the coarse meat of a big, ‘wormy’ drum makes poor table fare.’
  • 77) ‘You are never coarse or vulgar, and people who display such traits offend you.’
  • 78) ‘A crude culture makes a coarse people, and private refinement cannot long survive public excess.’
  • 79) ‘He sees a woman much like himself, a coarse merchant's daughter who guffaws loudly at a dirty joke.’
  • 80) ‘The ogres, unable to see her, began to look around, still roaring and shouting in their coarse speech.’
  • 81) ‘A maid hurries towards the coarse fellow with the bowl of charcoal used as a pipe-lighter.’
  • 82) ‘If there was one place that Angel detested it was the village, full of smelly houses and coarse women.’
  • 83) ‘These treasure hunters were coarse and greedy types whose only intention was plunder.’
  • 84) ‘She had become like all the other strong, hard, coarse women of poor households.’
  • 85) ‘Though she is coarse and stupid, she imagines she is cut out for a job in the movies.’
  • 86) ‘He could hear the low hum of voices and the occasional coarse laugh.’
  • 87) ‘The people whom he met, besides his own kin, were coarse in speech and thought.’
  • 88) ‘The poet who was so courtly and gentle in his verse could be coarse and vulgar in his everyday speech.’
  • 89) ‘Or, you could argue that our language has become downright coarse, offensive and rude.’
  • 90) ‘To such as these the everyday language of the factory workers will sound shocking, and their general behaviour appear coarse and vulgar, but it is not so in reality.’
  • 91) ‘You will see women lose their uniqueness - they will become as coarse, as brutish as men.’
  • 92) ‘He was far too coarse and obvious to make that necessary, wasn't he?’
  • 93) ‘I heard some laughing, like a thick coarse chuckle.’
  • 94) ‘This created peer pressure and the cultivation of rough manners, coarse language and status symbols like the body tattoos.’
  • 95) ‘The missives were framed in particularly coarse language to make the point.’
  • 96) ‘If the government were made up entirely of that coarse element - the violators, self-seekers, and flatterers - who form its core, it could not continue to exist.’
  • 97) ‘There are no smiles of a summer night here as Mozart's warm human comedy degenerates into an ugly, coarse sex farce.’
  • 98) ‘The Internet has made a huge difference to acquiring information on many subjects, including angling, and the coarse anglers over here have their own club and national sites on the Net.’
  • 99) ‘Many more anglers are now going out fly fishing for the coarse and sea fish species.’
  • 100) ‘You can also increase your catch numbers by copying our coarse fishing colleagues and employing swim feeders.’
  • 101) ‘Once the river levels were back to a fishable condition, coarse and game anglers experienced some good fishing.’
  • 102) ‘Even if you are a coarse angler these fish are a sight not to be missed.’
  • 103) ‘The owner keeps an eye on coarse anglers to make sure all the trout are returned.’
  • 104) ‘I should stress at this point that my own interest is in coarse fishing on lakes and rivers and all that I write here is done so with this in mind.’
  • 105) ‘Before putting away my coarse fishing gear until June 16th I made sure it had all been cleaned.’
  • 106) ‘The fixed spool reel is the most versatile reel in coarse fishing and as such is the most popular reel.’
  • 107) ‘The majority of English coarse fishermen naturally tend to think of French fishing in terms of carp alone but this couldn't be further from the truth.’
  • 108) ‘Angling, both fly-fishing and coarse fishing, is governed by intricate rules, which justify the catch as the end-point of a contest.’
  • 109) ‘Working-class coarse angling was also becoming more accessible thanks to the railways.’
  • 110) ‘Indeed, sections of the Grand Canal have some of the best coarse angling in the country.’
  • 111) ‘In fact, many hire companies provide the tackle for coarse fishing, so it's very easy to try your hand at catching bream, perch, roach or rudd.’
  • 112) ‘One of the fundamental reasons for this is that there have always been three distinct types of fishing - game, coarse and sea angling.’
  • 113) ‘The native fish will then be reintroduced in time for the coarse fishing season which starts in the summer.’
  • 114) ‘The main reservoir will be used for coarse fishing and there will be an additional trout lake and a junior pond.’
  • 115) ‘Let me tell you about one of the greatest day's coarse fishing I've had for many, many years.’
  • 116) ‘Don't lift the rod tip high as in trout or coarse fishing.’
  • 117) ‘Anglers can also enjoy the open spaces and easy access to excellent coarse fishing.’

Examples

  • 1) We booked the venue at a nearby golf course.
  • 2) Of course no one wants to stand in the way of technological innovation.
  • 3) He told followers he took a speed awareness course rather than points on his licence.
  • 4) The report will be published in due course.
  • 5) That is his right, of course.
  • 6) But yes, of course we need something now.
  • 7) There's also a golf course next door.
  • 8) Not very often, of course.
  • 9) Of course, the doctor survived.
  • 10) To which the obvious answer is: 'Of course not.
  • 11) But how much more difficult when the right course of action for the patient is disputed.
  • 12) Out went golf courses and shops in favour of a firmer focus on industrial and business space.
  • 13) The next part of the course is often the most challenging.
  • 14) What happens here can determine the course of the series.
  • 15) They have been seen throughout the course of history.
  • 16) We normally eat one course at a minimum of two venues each.
  • 17) Of course something like that does not improve your frame of mind.
  • 18) That could still happen of course as there is a lot to play for.
  • 19) It is of course essential that doctors should consider themselves on the side of their patients.
  • 20) We will set out more details in due course.
  • 21) Things can change quickly in the course of a tennis match and so it proved.
  • 22) Of course the best way to shut them up is to perform well.
  • 23) And they want men who batter wives to go on courses instead of facing jail.
  • 24) What changed the course of my life?
  • 25) Students are selected for courses through interview rather than being judged on academic results.
  • 26) Let your imagination run its own course.
  • 27) Our production schedule was thrown off course for the next eight weeks.
  • 28) The skirt sizes of three quarters of the women increased over the course of their adult lives.
  • 29) The resort offers packages with more than two dozen golf courses in the area.
  • 30) Of course he scored twice but he also showed there is a lot more to his game than goals.
  • 31) Of course, having somewhere safe to go is essential.
  • 32) In the course of the day, the sand flats will emerge and disappear.
  • 33) There is a nearly straight 5f course.
  • 34) Why does she say 'of course' she would help a relative to die with such emotion?
  • 35) But the real climax is reached when Kelly shouts over the telephone "Of course, in self-defense, you fool, _of course_, in self-defense."
  • 36) OLIVIA: I'm being silly, I know -- of course I _ought_ to get married, and _of course_ this is a wonderful chance, and -- HUBERT
  • 37) In place of, ‘the Aintree course is of a trying nature’ we can surely say ‘Aintree is a trying course’ or ‘the Aintree course is a trying one’—just that and nothing more.
  • 38) It has no railway station, which, of course, is a great merit; it's not to have any big blatant hotels or pensions -- nothing but charming bungalow-cottages; there'll be no pier, no band, none of those banal winter-gardens and impossible pleasure palaces that _ces autres_ delight in, and, _of course_, none of those immensely fearful concert parties and pierrots.
  • 39) Of course she's played with me -- that sort always does -- but I think I might really have a chance with her, if it weren't for her mother -- horrible old -- no, of _course_ I don't mean that!
  • 40) Of course it had to be taken off to the rock in pieces, and we may almost say _of course_ the ocean offered opposition.
  • 41) They came to the conclusion that the voltaic current caused decompositions throughout its whole course in the humid conductor, not merely as preliminary to the recompositions spoken of by Grotthuss and Davy, but producing final separation of the elements in the _course_ of the current, and elsewhere than at the poles.
  • 42) Starting with a car chase cold is par for the course, of * course* there was going to be a car chase at some point so why not one out of the gate?
  • 43) •course materials the beginning of the course •The learning objectives •course structure
  • 44) Hitherto our story has run a rapid course; but now it stays because Malachy _has finished his course_. [
  • 45) ‘One example of this is the Huanhe Road project that is to follow the course of the Xindian River in Taipei County.’
  • 46) ‘At its most basic, canyoning is following a river along its course through a gulley.’
  • 47) ‘Alternatively, you could hire a bike and follow the course of the River Loir from Vendome to its confluence with the Sarthe.’
  • 48) ‘It has been said that the course of a winding river is just like the tortuous path life sometimes takes.’
  • 49) ‘The sun and wind shower their might along the course of the river making their task of drying the clothes easier.’
  • 50) ‘These are surface diamonds, washed along the course of rivers over millions of years.’
  • 51) ‘Ur ceased to exist in the 4th century BC, probably because the River Euphrates changed course.’
  • 52) ‘In other areas, rivers will appear and disappear along their course as they find the easiest route to the sea.’
  • 53) ‘We took off, the bus bumping along the rough coast road, charting a course due north in the late afternoon sun.’
  • 54) ‘When cities were built close to the river, some of the streets followed the courses of the creeks and streams that fed the river.’
  • 55) ‘Middle Head Road and Peat Road, both tracks, respectively parallel and cross the course of a Roman road.’
  • 56) ‘And by far the best way to enjoy it is to hire a cabin cruiser and chart a course along its winding length.’
  • 57) ‘Hence, it is reasonable to assume that they change their orientation to more southeasterly courses along the routes.’
  • 58) ‘In other words, the flight paths of aircraft on a collision course are also shown in green.’
  • 59) ‘It is true that present-day river courses are not wholly natural.’
  • 60) ‘These unknown areas were often divided by straight lines or the course of a river or a watershed.’
  • 61) ‘A distant sweep of pink sand marks the course of a seasonal river, Wadi Kutum.’
  • 62) ‘The ships then maintain parallel courses while the fuel is pumped - an operation which requires a high degree of seamanship.’
  • 63) ‘After briefings and an exchange of stores, both ships continued their respective courses with a wave and a toot goodbye.’
  • 64) ‘Once respiratory or renal disease develops, the course is usually rapidly progressive.’
  • 65) ‘We'll of course be back to you if any developments occur during the course of this program.’
  • 66) ‘It has characters that are compelling, sympathetic and which develop over the course of the plot.’
  • 67) ‘How do you feel about how Irish cinema has developed over the course of your career?’
  • 68) ‘Labor believes that the true course for world progress lies in it being run cooperatively.’
  • 69) ‘He vows to defy the logic of time and arrange the course of history according to his liking.’
  • 70) ‘Secondly, Honda will push along its development over the course of a season, so it is constantly improving.’
  • 71) ‘These extinctions become a problem to solve rather than the natural course of things.’
  • 72) ‘However, pursuit of such a course can only lead to dependency and loss of control.’
  • 73) ‘Postoperatively, the patient's course was unremarkable.’
  • 74) ‘The human race is on a course of discovering a new and unknown power hidden within.’
  • 75) ‘An osteopath will review the individual's health first before advising on a course of action.’
  • 76) ‘We are trying to avoid the word policy, that commits us down a certain course of action.’
  • 77) ‘I will not pretend to have the skill necessary to lay out a course of action to solve this problem.’
  • 78) ‘Certainly topping up on any index tracker investment would be a good course of action at the moment.’
  • 79) ‘After contemplating many dreadful acts, he finally decided on a course of action.’
  • 80) ‘The central issue in the case is whether that was a justified course of action.’
  • 81) ‘Are we to regard that as a tacit seal of approval for such a course of action?’
  • 82) ‘To reject a course of action as clearly undesirable is to reject it on practical grounds.’
  • 83) ‘We must always ask what harm we are doing by taking a particular course of action.’
  • 84) ‘He was not limited to those courses of action which would be open to a court in litigation.’
  • 85) ‘We only ever take parents to court as a last resort and it is not a course of action we take lightly and one which we would rather avoid.’
  • 86) ‘These emotions handcuff you to a particular course of action that you would rather not carry out.’
  • 87) ‘They can advise on the best course of action and can even arrange for an ambulance to be sent if it is needed.’
  • 88) ‘Both courses of action are preferable to stocking up piles of atomic waste.’
  • 89) ‘It isn't enough anymore to think outside the box - you have to back it up with winning strategies and specific courses of action.’
  • 90) ‘The brief which finally reaches the minister will list the pros and cons of various courses of action on a policy and the top paper will contain a recommendation.’
  • 91) ‘The concept of policy assumes that governments define their goals and choose the methods and courses of action for reaching those goals.’
  • 92) ‘Hopefuly, I have explained why option four was the only practical course of action.’
  • 93) ‘First, what courses of action are open to us, and what are their likely consequences.’
  • 94) ‘They point out that there is often a high chance of an adverse event no matter what course is pursued.’
  • 95) ‘The Japanese, like most other Asians, do not usually serve meals in courses but set all the dishes on the table at the start of the meal.’
  • 96) ‘Instead of serving dishes in courses, a Thai meal is served all at once, permitting dinners to enjoy complementary combinations of different tastes.’
  • 97) ‘On the Sunday evening after the competition was over, a 3 course meal was served.’
  • 98) ‘The dining room was dolled up like a palace and they served an eighty course meal.’
  • 99) ‘Pita meat pie often is the final course of a meal or is served as a light supper on its own.’
  • 100) ‘Fantastic food although quite expensive unless you eat early when they serve two courses for under £9.’
  • 101) ‘It was a communal experience, as everyone was served the same courses at the same time, and it felt more like a party than a meal.’
  • 102) ‘If you do the math, I think it will fall a little short but that's only because some of the courses were served at the same time.’
  • 103) ‘Serve it as a breakfast in bed, a brunch dish, a first course, or as a special supper with a glass of champagne.’
  • 104) ‘It was a fixed menu, dish after dish, five courses - soup, main course, salad, dessert, and beverage.’
  • 105) ‘Even without the filling soup as a first course, the T-bone steak and salad had been an excellent meal.’
  • 106) ‘This will be great served as a first course, or as a side to duck or game.’
  • 107) ‘The maid came in and took away the soup and salad courses.’
  • 108) ‘Lunches tend to be lengthy with several courses served because the noon meal is the main meal of the day.’
  • 109) ‘Dinner was equally large, with numerous dishes served during each course.’
  • 110) ‘Rabbit stewed in wine is a specialty, often with some of its sauce served over pasta as a first course.’
  • 111) ‘I shuddered at the thought of a three course meal filled with dumplings, bread and cheese.’
  • 112) ‘The final dish in the eight course evening was a Campari parfait served with orange ragout.’
  • 113) ‘As they were having lobster and langoustine, respectively, for their first courses and beef for their mains, I suggested that a red Burgundy might be a better one-stop choice.’
  • 114) ‘The meal came in courses accompanied by wine from bottles - the sort that need corkscrews, not twist tops - and with real knives and forks.’
  • 115) ‘The ‘rhumb’ lines that criss-cross the map are designed to aid compass bearings, allowing navigators to sail reasonably accurate courses.’
  • 116) ‘One of the benefits of playing golf at new courses are the ideas you pick up.’
  • 117) ‘It is a full service shotgun complex with two fully automated sporting clays courses, and golf carts are included.’
  • 118) ‘While they want to incorporate some sightseeing into the trip, they have specified a minimum of four rounds of golf at leading courses in the chosen area.’
  • 119) ‘The course was on land reclaimed from the old British Steel works.’
  • 120) ‘The weather gods were unkind making the course unpleasant in certain areas.’
  • 121) ‘Conditions were fine for golf and the course was beautifully prepared.’
  • 122) ‘The more spectacular slalom racing will take place on an artificial course at the Olympic Complex.’
  • 123) ‘We got by, however, and proceeded to get onto a great course and play good golf with winners.’
  • 124) ‘‘Our priority is to ensure that racing fans are able to turn on their television sets and watch a wide selection of racing from courses across Britain,’ he said.’
  • 125) ‘Graphics have been sharpened slightly, but the racing courses are the same, and with minor exceptions, so are the vehicles.’
  • 126) ‘It was a wise decision, as the course was well prepared with consistent greens and good fairways.’
  • 127) ‘Have you ever tried to play golf on a course where there were more than a few annoying insects?’
  • 128) ‘Previously it appeared that members would gain £4000 each from sale of the course as a racing concern.’
  • 129) ‘The course was playing good and true and the weather could not be better.’
  • 130) ‘Outside the golf club members were working hard to prepare the course for open week.’
  • 131) ‘They use another service for showing races but have their own racing presenters on the course.’
  • 132) ‘The $3-a-person game simulates real courses, with wind factors and club choices.’
  • 133) ‘Clearly, he enjoys the course, even the rather silly island green at the notorious 17th hole.’
  • 134) ‘As managers, golf course superintendents have to deal with trust at every level.’
  • 135) ‘The main event will include pistol, rifle and sporting clay courses.’
  • 136) ‘This could occur in small groups in teacher education courses or in large class discussions.’
  • 137) ‘The center offers research fellowships, courses, lecture series, conferences, and publications.’
  • 138) ‘The figures relate to primary and secondary postgraduate teacher training courses for all subjects.’
  • 139) ‘More math and reading courses for elementary school teachers were mandated.’
  • 140) ‘Only dual enrollment mathematics courses taught on high school campuses are included in the study.’
  • 141) ‘Tibetan communities made efforts to teach more subject courses in Tibetan in primary and secondary schools.’
  • 142) ‘Because on-site attendance can be impossible for those living far away, numerous schools and educators offer distance learning courses.’
  • 143) ‘While aspects of the curriculum can be assessed in the written examination, courses of study in each school reflect the whole curriculum.’
  • 144) ‘The school's academic courses include Chinese language lessons taught by professors from China, night classes for adults, and computer lessons.’
  • 145) ‘This information, while useful in upgrading the college courses, only indirectly affected the high school courses.’
  • 146) ‘Many of the sites offered community college credit for courses taken as part of a high school diploma.’
  • 147) ‘Without textbooks in minority languages, schools were more likely to offer subject courses in Chinese.’
  • 148) ‘True revision is only possible if you have studied the subject conscientiously throughout your course.’
  • 149) ‘The internet based company develops internet continuing education courses and distance learning on their web site, with almost all the specialties.’
  • 150) ‘His research shows that 82 percent of students taking distance learning courses are either local or on-campus.’
  • 151) ‘The new master's program has a set curriculum with no elective courses.’
  • 152) ‘The summer school will include courses on a range of subjects as well as outings and recreational activities.’
  • 153) ‘Initially, the vocational training center will mainly provide training courses for vocational school teachers.’
  • 154) ‘I've had students write me telling me that they used one of my courses in high school.’
  • 155) ‘The project also will test use of the Web to provide science lab courses to high schools.’
  • 156) ‘Initial treatment should be medical with a course of antibiotics of at least two weeks duration.’
  • 157) ‘First dose reactions occur after the first dose of a course of treatment and not necessarily thereafter.’
  • 158) ‘A recurrence followed his initial recovery, and he needed a repeat course of treatment.’
  • 159) ‘A repeat course of antibiotics at a later date to keep the condition under control.’
  • 160) ‘Most clinical trials have used 10-to 14-day courses of antibiotic therapy.’
  • 161) ‘A continuous render is taken up the sides and over the top of the core material of a wall, the core material being some three courses of mud bricks about forty centimetres high.’
  • 162) ‘The effect of height of a temple till now was mitigated and compromised by the horizontal courses of stone used for construction.’
  • 163) ‘One face of the double-sided fireplace features two courses of light buff brick alternating with a single, inset course of red bricks.’
  • 164) ‘The courses are horizontal, but the stones are not all of uniform height or width, and in some cases two stones are placed one on top of the other to maintain the height.’
  • 165) ‘Without mortar, lay two courses of brick to help determine the size of your barbecue.’
  • 166) ‘The wall was built in regular horizontal courses bonded by mud mortar.’
  • 167) ‘The warm liquid coursed down her throat, calming the fear she felt.’
  • 168) ‘My father may have been in the merchant navy, but that doesn't mean there's salt water coursing through my veins.’
  • 169) ‘The start of the main race was delayed after a thunderstorm hit the circuit, causing heavy flooding, with water coursing across the track in several places.’
  • 170) ‘Nikolas closed his eyes as the spray of water coursed down his body.’
  • 171) ‘The tears flowed freely now, coursing down my cheeks and soaking into her tank top as she cradled my head with one arm and encircled my waist with the other.’
  • 172) ‘As water coursed through houses and shops, stock and belongings were swept out; mud and rubbish were swept in.’
  • 173) ‘Water coursed through the empty gullies, filling oceans, creating islands, lapping up on sand and rocks, and hosting a new swarm of creatures.’
  • 174) ‘Water coursed from his hair, to his neck, and to his toes in tiny rivulets.’
  • 175) ‘Once the dam's stored waters coursed into the valley, a bucolic canal culture blossomed.’
  • 176) ‘She turned and ran as fast as she could, trying all the while to control the stream of tears coursing down her cheeks.’
  • 177) ‘I nodded; tears were still coursing down my cheeks.’
  • 178) ‘When I could stand it no longer, I buried my head in my arms, and the tears began coursing down my cheeks; though I felt none of the usual relief crying brings.’
  • 179) ‘She cried, tears coursing down her cheeks, mingled with the rain.’
  • 180) ‘I took the opportunity to glance at her, and noticed tears coursing down her cheeks.’
  • 181) ‘It felt like my entire right side had been blown off, and every breath sent liquid fire coursing through every vein.’
  • 182) ‘Power coursed like liquid fire through my veins, as my adrenaline spiked and I screamed in pain.’
  • 183) ‘Cassandra merely stayed where she was, unable to move as the pain coursed through her body.’
  • 184) ‘Even writing that I can feel a little adrenaline rush coursing through my veins.’
  • 185) ‘I was determined to catch some of the big trout I could see in the clear streams that coursed down each valley floor.’
  • 186) ‘But a fallen power line or nearby lightning strike can easily overwhelm the power supply and send a mortal surge of electricity coursing through your motherboard.’
  • 187) ‘True: but we have all seen photographs of beings in rapid motion - horses racing, greyhounds coursing a hare, men running over a field, and so on.’
  • 188) ‘He is too fast to be coursed in sight, and is hunted by scent, which varies with temperature, climate and soil.’
  • 189) ‘The farmer thought they were coursing hares and called police.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy