in vs into

in into

Definitions

  • 1) One that has position, influence, or power.
  • 2) Informal Influence; power.
  • 3) Informal Influence; power.
  • 4) A suffix of Latin (or Greek) origin forming, in Latin, adjectives, and s thence derived, from s, many of which formations have come into or are imitated in modern Latin and English.
  • 5) An obsolete spelling of inn.
  • 6) An abbreviation of inch or inches.
  • 7) A prefix of Latin origin, being the Latin preposition in so used.
  • 8) A prefix of Anglo-Saxon origin, being the preposition and adverb in so used.
  • 9) A nook or corner; used chiefly in the phrase ins and outs.
  • 10) In chem., the symbol for indium.
  • 11) A prefix of Latin origin, having a negative or privative force, ‘not, -less, without.’
  • 12) Hence— All the details or intricacies of a matter: as, the ins and outs of a question.
  • 13) A person in office; specifically, in politics, a member of the party in power.
  • 14) Incoming; inward.
  • 15) Relating to, understandable to, or coming from an exclusive group.
  • 16) Currently fashionable.
  • 17) Holding office; having power.
  • 18) Concerned with or attuned to the latest fashions: synonym: fashionable.
  • 19) Concerned with or attuned to the latest fashions: synonym: fashionable.
  • 20) Located inside; inner.
  • 21) So as to include or incorporate.
  • 22) To or toward a destination or goal.
  • 23) So as to occupy a position of success or favor.
  • 24) To or toward the inside.
  • 25) Within a place, as of business or residence.
  • 26) So as to be available or under one's control.
  • 27) Sports So as to score, as by crossing home plate in baseball.
  • 28) Sports So as to score, as by crossing home plate in baseball.
  • 29) In a particular relationship.
  • 30) inch
  • 31) A Latin preposition. cognate with English in.
  • 32) To get in; take or put in; house.
  • 33) After the style or form of.
  • 34) Made with or through the medium of.
  • 35) Used to indicate the second and larger term of a ratio or proportion.
  • 36) With the aim or purpose of.
  • 37) By means of.
  • 38) From the outside to a point within; into.
  • 39) To or at a situation or condition of.
  • 40) With the arrangement or order of.
  • 41) With reference to.
  • 42) During the act or process of.
  • 43) With the characteristic, attribute, or property of.
  • 44) Within the limits, bounds, or area of.
  • 45) Having the activity, occupation, or function of.
  • 46) (in on) Informed about; participating in.
  • 47) (in on) Informed about; participating in.
  • 48) (in for) Guaranteed to get or have.
  • 49) (in for) Guaranteed to get or have.
  • 50) (in that) For the reason that.
  • 51) (in that) For the reason that.

Definitions

  • 1) Within, implying deficiency: as, the pole was long enough into a foot.
  • 2) Unto; until. Compare intil.
  • 3) Of change of condition: after such verbs as pass, fall, grow, change, convert, transmute, etc. Into, as thus indicating change, may when used with an intransitive verb give it a transitive force: as, to talk a man into submission; to reason one's self into error.
  • 4) In and to; to and in: implying motion: used to express any relation, as of presence, situation, inclusion, etc., that is expressed by in, accompanied by the idea of motion or direction inward. Compare in.
  • 5) In: not implying motion: as, he fought into the Revolution.
  • 6) Going inside (of)
  • 7) colloquial Intensely interested in or attracted to.
  • 8) mathematics The operation of division, with the denominator expressed first.
  • 9) mathematics The operation of division, with the denominator expressed first.
  • 10) Investigation of a subject.
  • 11) Going to a geographic region.
  • 12) Against, especially with force or violence.
  • 13) Of (when describing duration)
  • 14) mathematics Taking distinct arguments to distinct values.
  • 15) Producing, becoming
  • 16) colloquial Intensely interested in or attracted to.
  • 17) mathematics Taking distinct arguments to distinct values.
  • 18) To the activity or occupation of.
  • 19) Informal Interested in or involved with.
  • 20) Informal Interested in or involved with.
  • 21) To the inside or interior of.
  • 22) So as to be in or be included in.
  • 23) As a divisor of.
  • 24) In the direction of; toward.
  • 25) To the condition, state, or form of.
  • 26) To a point within the limits of a period of time or extent of space.
  • 27) Against.
  • 28) To the inside of; within. It is used in a variety of applications.
  • 29) Expressing penetration beyond the outside or surface, or access to the inside, or contents
  • 30) Expressing entrance, or a passing from the outside of a thing to its interior parts; -- following verbs expressing motion
  • 31) Denoting inclusion.
  • 32) Indicating the passing of a thing from one form, condition, or state to another
  • 33) Indicating insertion.

Examples

  • 1) To make matters worse, the other woman had moved straight in with Nick.
  • 2) He stood around uneasily, obviously not wanting to go back to his game of solitaire while I was still in the room.
  • 3) The rule as regards this is plain and simple: admit as much fresh air as you can; provided it does not _blow in_ upon you _in a stream_, and provided you are not in a state of profuse perspiration at the time; for in accordance with the
  • 4) Paulson, who has large positions in gold via the GLD ETF, bragged that “in addition to maneuvering our investment strategy based on where we are in the economic cycle, a large part of our success has been based on anticipating market events before they are generally recognized.
  • 5)            “About the moly mine in, under and around Bartlett mountain” But she hurried off to polish the white oak railing in front a of couple of bears dressed like men, or perhaps a couple of men disguised as bears in  brown plaid corduroy with axle grease on their paws.
  • 6) I stood in line to get a wristband and was not even asked for i. d.-in fact the young woman in charge didn't even make eye contact with me, probably for fear of laughing or showing her disdain.
  • 7) Marine base in the province until, one day soon, the American military can install him in an  “abandoned government building”  or simple  "a clump of ruins"  in that city.
  • 8) Problems in affording healthcare are well above levels seen in  2009.
  • 9) ‘What is in that box?’
  • 10) ‘He was well known in the area but was a quiet type of man who went about his way in a gentle manner.’
  • 11) ‘Nothing I did could make me an acceptable guest in that hotel without a credit card.’
  • 12) ‘He's standing in the street.’
  • 13) ‘A century ago, there was hardly an educated woman in this part of the world.’
  • 14) ‘The bride was in a striking off-white dress.’
  • 15) ‘There was black smoke and I could hardly see anything but there was no-one in the room.’
  • 16) ‘He's dressed in faded jeans and a navy T-shirt.’
  • 17) ‘As the days get longer and the sun warms the air we begin to see activity in our ponds.’
  • 18) ‘I'm from a very small town in Texas.’
  • 19) ‘Jose arrived last night about 9 p.m., but we were all in bed.’
  • 20) ‘Never soak brushes in water, commercial cleaners or even paint.’
  • 21) ‘I have lived in Bolton for four years now and I enjoy walking around the town.’
  • 22) ‘And while all of this is going on I'm having to move out of my flat - a place I've been in for 4 years.’
  • 23) ‘in the early part of the year staff in the department took nearly six days off sick each.’
  • 24) ‘They want to hear from anyone living inthe area who may have seen or heard anything.’
  • 25) ‘She arrived to be sentenced with her belongings packed in bags ready to take to jail.’
  • 26) ‘She also cannot manage the stairs or getting in and out of the bath so has a stairlift and a bathlift too.’
  • 27) ‘One of the great attractions of the traditional paddling pool is being able to jump in it.’
  • 28) ‘The surf was good, the waves big enough to make me keep a close eye on the dog as he ran in and out of the water.’
  • 29) ‘Upon inspection we discovered ants crawling in and out of every hole in the computer.’
  • 30) ‘The hordes of away fans were marshalled safely in and out of the ground by police.’
  • 31) ‘There's a flurry to get them unloaded so people can get in the building.’
  • 32) ‘He was given a security code by a member of staff who was fed up with letting them in and out of the building.’
  • 33) ‘She climbed in the car, and the man drove to the next street.’
  • 34) ‘Store the potatoes for short periods in a dark cupboard.’
  • 35) ‘From the cab's front view, we witness Iris get in the back.’
  • 36) ‘Cuttings, leaves, plants, and uncooked fruit and vegetables can all be put in the green bin.’
  • 37) ‘He dropped anchor in the bay that fronts San Sebastian, the island's capital.’
  • 38) ‘He cut her hair and then took her to a studio where he got some shots done to display in his salon.’
  • 39) ‘I drove to Reno with my son and all the things I could fit in my car.’
  • 40) ‘It doesn't take a highly trained director to tell a few actresses to run in the woods and pretend to be scared.’
  • 41) ‘There are people who walk in my office and see nothing but the dullest thing in the world.’
  • 42) ‘Mum should never have allowed me to be put in that situation, or at least given me some info on what to expect.’
  • 43) ‘Most people come to my farm in the afternoon and have traveled a good distance to get there.’
  • 44) ‘He hadn't had a girlfriend in ages.’
  • 45) ‘I began the book in the summer of 1995.’
  • 46) ‘Nothing else was happening in January.’
  • 47) ‘This scheme has done very well in the past.’
  • 48) ‘American courts in the nineteenth century demonstrated much broader standards of accountability than is the current practice.’
  • 49) ‘I helped teach the role to Jane and Beth: they learnt it in a month.’
  • 50) ‘It was around 4 o' clock in the afternoon and we wanted to have a snack before the show.’
  • 51) ‘We have seen, in recent years, ambulance crews stoned by yobs as they try to go about their work.’
  • 52) ‘Twice in the last few days I have been for walks on Dartmoor.’
  • 53) ‘Nobody who is associated with the bank in that period can come out with any credit.’
  • 54) ‘Five years have passed since Daly held up the trophy and in that time much has changed.’
  • 55) ‘He's getting married in a few days.’
  • 56) ‘I'll make my mind up in a week or two's time.’
  • 57) ‘Tessa will start school in three and a half years.’
  • 58) ‘That marriage contract said that in ten years, both of us could divorce and not have anything to do with each other.’
  • 59) ‘She returned in ten minutes after she made sure the girls were fast asleep.’
  • 60) ‘They promised to come back in 60 days if nothing had been done to redress their grievances.’
  • 61) ‘Experts agree that, with an election expected in less than a year's time, the Tories should be doing even better.’
  • 62) ‘Until the rose bushes are in bloom again, the earlier-flowering bulbs will provide a lively picture.’
  • 63) ‘I was madly in love with her and I was pretty sure she was in love with me.’
  • 64) ‘Many people lined up for hours to see the movie only to come running out in horror before it was over.’
  • 65) ‘I first read the book when I was in my twenties.’
  • 66) ‘He shook his head, in sadness and grief.’
  • 67) ‘Her affair with Duchamp continued in secrecy until 1950, when she returned to Brazil.’
  • 68) ‘He had been in good health apart from the angina and had not smoked for 17 years.’
  • 69) ‘Still, I live in hope that one day I might get my money.’
  • 70) ‘Alfalfa fields range in height from 8 to 18 inches and look very good.’
  • 71) ‘in reality, given human limitations, it can only be said we are doing the best we can.’
  • 72) ‘The content of the drawings, while generally clear and well-detailed, is variable in quality.’
  • 73) ‘While lacking in merit as a decision-maker, he was extremely adroit in working the congressional funding process.’
  • 74) ‘Because marriage figures so prominently in her novels, much has been made of Austen's decision not to marry.’
  • 75) ‘He was a huge hit in the comedy ‘Oh, God!’.’
  • 76) ‘Tom Hanks is set to star in the film.’
  • 77) ‘in the play, Herzen neither wins nor loses.’
  • 78) ‘However, there is no reason to think that the claims in that material are unjustified.’
  • 79) ‘Some expressions of opinion in that newspaper and elsewhere fall between the two.’
  • 80) ‘The picture used in that billboard was actually the photo of Ibrahim on the cover of his solo album.’
  • 81) ‘Williams has examined this literature in her book Ten Lectures on Theories of the Dance.’
  • 82) ‘Those who don't know him better could be forgiven for missing the irony in that expression.’
  • 83) ‘It is four years since I was in politics.’
  • 84) ‘He studied fine art at Nebraska University, completing his degree after service in the army in the First World War.’
  • 85) ‘Jeff is working in sales for Southwest Landmark, Ohio.’
  • 86) ‘I've been in computers for more than 15 years.’
  • 87) ‘The recent scandal at the paper has affected all of us in the journalism profession.’
  • 88) ‘After college I went to work in libraries, while I waited for the position I wanted in fashion.’
  • 89) ‘At that time I painted mostly in watercolor.’
  • 90) ‘The questionnaire, in Spanish, took approximately 45 min to administer.’
  • 91) ‘She thought that he was the greatest master of the art of telling a story in pictures without words.’
  • 92) ‘The website will offer information not only online but also in PDF format, which allows the user to access then print information.’
  • 93) ‘Create a job description, put it in writing and then discuss it with potential employees.’
  • 94) ‘The student could barely put a sentence together in English.’
  • 95) ‘A defamatory statement is libel if it is in permanent form such as writing or pictures.’
  • 96) ‘It begins in G minor but progresses to a different key, C major.’
  • 97) ‘This leads to an extended coda, also in C minor, which gradually works its way back to the G minor key.’
  • 98) ‘‘Eroica’ is the name of Beethoven's Symphony No. 3 in B Flat.’
  • 99) ‘in announcing the program, Computershare pointed out the environmental benefits of reducing the use of valuable resources such as trees.’
  • 100) ‘I was not prepared for the variety of approvals and difficulties that came about in building a golf course.’
  • 101) ‘in comparing the results of this study with the database, it was determined that two species previously undocumented had been collected.’
  • 102) ‘I sacrifice the old to make way for the new and in doing so, I gain spiritual wisdom.’
  • 103) ‘The organisation, in seeking to attract more male students to take up teaching, could have put their proposal forward as a special measure.’
  • 104) ‘It would seem that the professor, in attempting to explain politics and religion to us, has lost his hold on common sense.’
  • 105) ‘Anyone who is in that income bracket will pay tax at 19.5c in the dollar.’
  • 106) ‘The proposed scheme will involve writing off most of the company's £ 11.4 million debt and, if approved, unsecured creditors will lose 90p in the pound.’
  • 107) ‘Perhaps only one in twenty of the city's adult residents had been born there.’
  • 108) ‘He projects a success rate of one in five - twice the norm.’
  • 109) ‘Mr Gilburn, who failed to appear in court, is thought to have moved in with a friend who lives locally.’
  • 110) ‘He was in New York for the premiere of Tommy in 1975 and had decided to pop in on his admirer while he was in town.’
  • 111) ‘The phone line for the office was put in on time and later today I am hoping to set up my internet connection.’
  • 112) ‘Within the walls of the medina, the buildings close in on you, and you are taken into cool shadow.’
  • 113) ‘‘Anna! Are you alright?’ Evan asked, jumping in after me.’
  • 114) ‘The we went in and sat down and lots of other people were there.’
  • 115) ‘There he burst in on an astonished young American couple and ran past them into a bedroom.’
  • 116) ‘Apparently, we are going to be able to put plastic in with our cans and bottles.’
  • 117) ‘They were finally caught out when one brother got their shifts mixed up and walked in on a romantic meal for two.’
  • 118) ‘Two weeks later, I had another appointment in the city and I was supposed to go in with my son again.’
  • 119) ‘I think the child had been feeding the ducks when he fell in.’
  • 120) ‘The story goes that he was working in a café one night when a pop star popped in for some grub.’
  • 121) ‘I had no idea he was going to be there until he walked in with his girlfriend.’
  • 122) ‘I was the one who didn't want to get too serious, so I was surprised when he asked me to move in with him.’
  • 123) ‘If you'd been here an hour ago, you'd have seen the girl come in with her friend.’
  • 124) ‘Teams are reminded that bonus points are not awarded when the result card is not sent in on time.’
  • 125) ‘She had previously enjoyed food with nuts in, including breakfast cereals, and she had eaten chicken curries at other restaurants.’
  • 126) ‘Staying in on a day like this is criminal.’
  • 127) ‘She turned to the government for help and they found her an apartment for her to live in.’
  • 128) ‘Cases of domestic violence rose as families stayed in on New Year's Eve to avoid the bad weather.’
  • 129) ‘Shut in with his cronies, he sees the world as his enemy and opposition to his will as personal affront.’
  • 130) ‘Kathy gave me a cup of tea with sugar in to help calm me.’
  • 131) ‘We've had them for a good few years now - they were in with another box of books we bought.’
  • 132) ‘Sixth grade was handled by general instructors, and each class was locked in with one instructor all day long.’
  • 133) ‘Their first pieces of work would be due in on Wednesday or Thursday of first week.’
  • 134) ‘I'm a bit disappointed that my flight out is Friday afternoon, which allowing for time differences gets in at 8pm.’
  • 135) ‘Bearing in mind the flight is due in at 11.20 pm, you'll watch its progress on the internet up to 20 minutes before it's due to land.’
  • 136) ‘Entries must be in by 5pm.’
  • 137) ‘Becky's train actually managed to get in on time.’
  • 138) ‘The tide was in, and the breakers were a good twenty feet high when they hit the harbour wall.’
  • 139) ‘Night had fallen, and the tide was in.’
  • 140) ‘The tide came in and floated our canoes.’
  • 141) ‘The tide was coming in and people moved their blankets up the beach.’
  • 142) ‘It is now 10:00 am, and I've only been in for about 20 minutes.’
  • 143) ‘I've only been in for five minutes and I stumble across a wedding party.’
  • 144) ‘He does little else; his idea of a good time is a night in with some scouting reports.’
  • 145) ‘Suffice it to say that his press conferences have all the allure of a night in with the prime minister.’
  • 146) ‘The lads upstairs were having a sports night in with, I suspect, more than a few beers.’
  • 147) ‘I'm not in on Monday.’
  • 148) ‘Luigi's was a large and crowded restaurant that was clearly the in place for the in-crowd.’
  • 149) ‘The very in words are slammin' and rockin'.’
  • 150) ‘This year, monochromatic colors are the in thing.’
  • 151) ‘in addition to statement T-shirts, graphic T-shirts are in this year.’
  • 152) ‘Way back when beards were in, mawkish mystics brought forth the concept album.’
  • 153) ‘He even let his membership lapse at Au Bar, the in club.’
  • 154) ‘Before I even came off the pick, I felt the shot was in.’
  • 155) ‘As you can see, I held my finish and barely looked up even as the ball went in.’
  • 156) ‘I don't think I got any first serves in today.’
  • 157) ‘An analysis of his 53 centuries shows that in these innings he made 72% of the runs put on while he was in.’
  • 158) ‘For years, people have begged distant relatives concerning even the possibility of anyone knowing someone who has an in with owner Frank Sr.’
  • 159) ‘For him, an in with the Bush family is worth more than anything lottery players have in their hand’
  • 160) ‘The company has an in with the private club in Switzerland.’
  • 161) ‘Once you've got an in with the right guys, they don't need to see a full script before, in theory, they start giving you development cash.’
  • 162) ‘They knew, from endless meetings and conferences, which people they needed on their team, which people had an in with which interest groups, and who could help them in certain places.’
  • 163) ‘The notably venerated violinist who gave him an in at the National Theater, where he soon found a niche.’
  • 164) ‘I have never, never had an in at a bar before, where you can cut to the front of the line and get free tabs and stuff.’
  • 165) ‘He has an in to the presidential process.’
  • 166) ‘Tim might have an in with this agent or something because of his dad.’
  • 167) ‘It never hurts to have an in with your head coach.’

Examples

  • 1) He knew how to get back into things straightaway.
  • 2) Unless they flower into something of their own accord.
  • 3) Find a new way into these things.
  • 4) Rich floral embellishment transformed simple lines into something special.
  • 5) It helps them turn snapshots into something out of the glossy pages of a lifestyle magazine.
  • 6) Fixed ideas about what makes a good relationship can be changed into something wonderful.
  • 7) As soon as we got into running, we wanted to run marathons.
  • 8) There's more value put into things now.
  • 9) It offered 100 compensation and is looking into why things went wrong.
  • 10) But it's turned into one more thing for parents to feel guilty about.
  • 11) We have tried to turn a difficult day into something beautiful.
  • 12) Things were moving into a minor key.
  • 13) That sort of thing is bred into a chap at any decent public school.
  • 14) Partizan crept into things and fashioned the best two chances of the first half.
  • 15) My role is to read and grind things down into understandable terms for others.
  • 16) It flared up into a ridiculous thing and he has not spoken to us since.
  • 17) But today they are thrown straight into things.
  • 18) But quite a few things are fitting into place.
  • 19) They are going at it the wrong way - charging into things too quickly.
  • 20) It's probably a hard thing to put into a film.
  • 21) It took the things we already knew about ourselves and projected them into something that at once felt wholly familiar and yet was new.
  • 22) I want to put something back into this area.
  • 23) It might have been a good idea initially but they didn't use it as a springboard into something else.
  • 24) It can provide the impetus for change and give us the motivation and insight into things that are bothering us so that we can take action.
  • 25) When people put a lot of care and attention into making something, watching it streamed online is not the ideal way.
  • 26) At least I turned it into something good.
  • 27) A quiet conversation tonight could transform a so-so relationship into something wonderful.
  • 28) Then I got into doing banks.
  • 29) You've got to look after that person and nurture it if it's going to grow into something great.
  • 30) In him, the many fabrics of American life seemed to have been woven into something genuinely new and colourful.
  • 31) Cope, like all the best poets, has the ability to twist the mundane and workaday into something new and enchanting.
  • 32) So I got into investing.
  • 33) I was panting from the exertion, the call was really more a strained grunting series of messages as we all but ran down the slope……..into the gun smoke…possibly into Hell!
  • 34) They walk *into* the building they want to break into?
  • 35) But he sent Robert there often, into that beautiful summer afternoon when Hank Bauer had leaped so high from the green diamond -- and the ball had _smacked _into his leather glove -- and the crowds went wild!
  • 36) It is generally due to an inflammation of the Fallopian tubes which closes up the openings of the tubes into the womb, so that no more ova can pass _from_ the ovaries _through_ the tubes _into_ the womb.
  • 37) Although inrúpit means 'burst _into_,' the preposition is nevertheless required with the noun to express the place into which he burst.
  • 38) Who knows not, that Satan may, and has oft _transformed_ himself _into an angel of light_; his ministers into the form of inspired apostles; and his influences, almost indiscernibly similar to those of the Spirit of Jesus Christ?
  • 39) A little boy puts my thoughts into words when he exclaims, "How steady the ground is!" and becomes a still more faithful interpreter of a wave-worn voyager's sensations when, a couple of hours later, he demands permission to get _out_ of his delicious little white bed that he may have the pleasure of getting _into_ it again.
  • 40) Eating their way into the anti-entropy ... _into a state of matter which Russ and Greg had thought would resist all change_!
  • 41) The irrevocable wrong that must blot her life had been committed; she had brought sorrow into the lives of others, —into the lives that were knit up with hers by trust and love.
  • 42) Must this, and that fair flower of Freedom which, despite the jeers of latter-day striplings, sprung from our fathers’ blood, must that too degenerate into a dusty quest of gold, —into lawless lust with Hippomenes?
  • 43) ‘The first thing that strikes you when you walk through the door into the cafe is the charming decor.’
  • 44) ‘She also said that she missed being able to walk out and jump into the swimming pool at her house.’
  • 45) ‘The conman stepped into the hall saying he was from the police and walked straight into the living room.’
  • 46) ‘I want to go home… to go stand on the roof and then walk downstairs and crawl into bed.’
  • 47) ‘Just as I was walking back into the sitting room I heard something that shocked me to my core.’
  • 48) ‘The beach loungers are well spaced apart and you can walk straight into the sea.’
  • 49) ‘She often walked deep into the woods behind our house by herself, carrying a handsaw.’
  • 50) ‘She unbarred the front door and walked out into the cool air, glad to be out of the building.’
  • 51) ‘He walked back into the shack and emerged a few moments later with a bottle of water.’
  • 52) ‘Gordon walked out into the hall and took his long leather coat from the rail.’
  • 53) ‘She stood up and walked down the hall into the living room where he would be waiting.’
  • 54) ‘He shook his head and smiled as he walked back into the bedroom to grab his wallet and keys.’
  • 55) ‘He turned as well and with his hand resting on his sword he walked off into the crowd.’
  • 56) ‘Once they finished they walked back into the dressing room and just grabbed their stuff.’
  • 57) ‘She walked back into the flat and then returned with a girl slightly younger than Laura.’
  • 58) ‘With one last glance at her retreating back, he turned and walked back into the house.’
  • 59) ‘I walked stiffly into the lounge and had the sudden urge to have a boiling hot bath.’
  • 60) ‘I walked back into the room and sat on the bed, trying to put all the facts together.’
  • 61) ‘She stood up and walked back into the small house, which she shared with her mother.’
  • 62) ‘Compressed air is being pumped into the area through the hole.’
  • 63) ‘Their call for action follows an incident last weekend where a car crashed into the wall of a house.’
  • 64) ‘A woman had a lucky escape when a car crashed into her kitchen just a few feet from where she was sitting.’
  • 65) ‘A young couple living in one of the cottages were asleep when the car crashed into their home.’
  • 66) ‘In Hadleigh, she put her foot down and crashed into a car with the schoolboy inside.’
  • 67) ‘A woman has told how her family had a lucky escape as a car crashed into her house.’
  • 68) ‘He crashed into a car and was seen wielding a sword as he headed down the dual carriageway on foot.’
  • 69) ‘An overturned car which crashed into a van and a fence was believed to have been stolen.’
  • 70) ‘The towrope snapped, and the towed car veered across the road before crashing into the side of the bus.’
  • 71) ‘A woman died on a North Yorkshire road after the car in which she was travelling crashed into a fence.’
  • 72) ‘The car mounted a pavement, crashed into the side of a dry cleaning shop then hit a lamppost in May last year.’
  • 73) ‘She also crashed into two lampposts, a shop front and two adjoining cars in the process.’
  • 74) ‘Police said the car had left the road and crashed into the tree on the side of the A420.’
  • 75) ‘Then they had to land somewhere where a baggage truck crashed into the side of the plane.’
  • 76) ‘He died at the scene, crashing into a concrete shop canopy before landing on the pedestrian area.’
  • 77) ‘The helicopter he was flying reportedly hit power lines then crashed into a house on the lake shore.’
  • 78) ‘The windscreen cracked and the elephant came forward again, crashing into the door.’
  • 79) ‘I was dragged along underneath it and it mounted the pavement and crashed into a garden wall.’
  • 80) ‘The ambulance crashed on to a freight line and at no time was there any likelihood a train would crash into it.’
  • 81) ‘There was a collision and the forklift crashed into the central reservation barrier.’
  • 82) ‘Mr Holmes was sent flying into shelves by the blow and needed hospital treatment for his injuries.’
  • 83) ‘His skill was in caricatures, a route which led him into a career as a political cartoonist.’
  • 84) ‘One route into the industry is to become a camera trainee on a feature film.’
  • 85) ‘However the journey times of routes into London from the North, East and South all fell.’
  • 86) ‘If you turn that into a route into town that will not be possible to handle.’
  • 87) ‘Labour wanted to tackle the shortage by creating more flexible routes into teaching.’
  • 88) ‘The park and ride service will be well signposted on all routes into the town.’
  • 89) ‘A main route into the city has been named the worst litter black spot by thousands of residents.’
  • 90) ‘The area is on one of the main routes into town and has now been transformed.’
  • 91) ‘This was a fine service on a quicker and less congested route into the city's business heart.’
  • 92) ‘It is on one of the main routes into Sheffield and I would have thought it would improve the area.’
  • 93) ‘The main routes into Bolton are the main problem areas, where publicity is at a maximum.’
  • 94) ‘Traffic tailed back along a main route into York after a huge crane got stuck at a busy junction today.’
  • 95) ‘Theres a road here called the Wellingborough Road, which is also a main route into a busy town center.’
  • 96) ‘This position was important because it controlled the route south into the centre of France.’
  • 97) ‘So the theme that understanding requires love to attain its end merges by this route into theology.’
  • 98) ‘This would make a great value system for someone looking for a fast route into editing digital video.’
  • 99) ‘The journey takes you half a mile along a cactus-lined track, and into a village.’
  • 100) ‘It is hoped to erect the memorial at the lych gate, which leads into the grounds of the Holy Cross Church.’
  • 101) ‘The pipe is also being laid at the moment along the main road into the village of The Neale.’
  • 102) ‘Several streets and main roads leading into the city were blocked as black smoke rose from the fires.’
  • 103) ‘I decided to start off mid way down the left bank with a wind blowing into my face.’
  • 104) ‘My tackle tends to be much heavier than in Summer as I often have a wind blowing into my face.’
  • 105) ‘The waves rolled towards the beach, as the dusty winds blew wild sands into the air.’
  • 106) ‘All the teen girl magazines do is try and channel the urges into a responsible direction.’
  • 107) ‘It is a meeting that sends the life of the charming Irish lass spinning into a new direction.’
  • 108) ‘It was cold there, damn cold, with a wind blowing straight off Dartmoor into our front room.’
  • 109) ‘As they reached the summit, an icy northerly wind began to blow sleet into their faces.’
  • 110) ‘I really like the idea of the third person narrative taking you into different directions.’
  • 111) ‘It didn't so much change the way I work as push me further into a direction I was going anyway.’
  • 112) ‘Graham acted like a powerful magnet, pulling the lumps of metal into one direction.’
  • 113) ‘The wind blew soft black hair into her eyes, but she didn't bother to tuck it behind her ears.’
  • 114) ‘He sits alone, sobbing into his hands, unable to find the words to speak of his grief.’
  • 115) ‘I bent down to inhale, but he blew the powder into the air, muttered an expletive and stumbled out.’
  • 116) ‘Note the seagull crashing into the sea ending, as Donny's ashes are blown into their faces.’
  • 117) ‘He also told how a second officer tried to subdue the thug with CS gas but it blew back into his own face.’
  • 118) ‘The picture on the front of the box is of a family on a couch, blown up into the air by a tornado.’
  • 119) ‘To which end, I have mostly been sobbing into my keyboard for the last couple of days.’
  • 120) ‘Annie pulled herself away and threw herself face down onto the bed, sobbing into her pillow.’
  • 121) ‘The last time we saw Kieren, he was sitting in a darkened room sobbing quietly into his hands.’
  • 122) ‘Ann was sobbing loudly into her soft pillow so Myra went to her, sat on the bed and put her arms around her.’
  • 123) ‘It was an interesting insight into the debate as to why Kiwi teams are able to make the whole add up to more than the sum of its parts.’
  • 124) ‘Great stuff, and an interesting insight into the Edwardian England of his youth.’
  • 125) ‘It's an interesting insight into what it was like to live and blog in that police state.’
  • 126) ‘This cat fight was an interesting insight into what happens when girls fight.’
  • 127) ‘The hunt ban has afforded an interesting insight into the mind of the politically correct lobby.’
  • 128) ‘Along with the tears and squabbles comes an interesting insight into the male psyche.’
  • 129) ‘More interesting is the insight into what it's like to be a party leader on a daily basis.’
  • 130) ‘These give you a real insight into the community of the internet's most obsessive interests.’
  • 131) ‘Such a student prefers to go in depth into an area of interest rather than going wide.’
  • 132) ‘Perhaps it's not as luxurious as a hotel might be, but it provides a great insight into the Cuban way of life.’
  • 133) ‘There must be a wider judicial inquiry into the way this matter was handled by the British government.’
  • 134) ‘That may be why calls for an independent inquiry into her death are still ringing in the ears of the government.’
  • 135) ‘Brent council is currently carrying out an internal inquiry into the post-mortem.’
  • 136) ‘They offer a unique insight into the mind of one of the 20th century's greatest poets.’
  • 137) ‘Mind you, the site has given me new insight into the jargon of the loveless.’
  • 138) ‘She is critical of the three years it is expected to take before an inquiry is held into her husband's death.’
  • 139) ‘They have been released on bail until January while inquiries into the accident continue.’
  • 140) ‘The Greater London Assembly is holding an inquiry into smoking in public places.’
  • 141) ‘The union recently began an inquiry into claims of ballot-rigging in that election.’
  • 142) ‘An independent inquiry into the validity of animal experiments is long overdue.’
  • 143) ‘The food grows so well here that Robyn has plans to turn the surfeit into jams and pickles to sell from the Cascina.’
  • 144) ‘Vegetables are dried or pickled and fruits are also dried, candied, or made into jams.’
  • 145) ‘People turn into snails and violent and gruesome deaths seem to be the only way to escape the grisly vortex.’
  • 146) ‘Alcohol wrecks lives and families and too often transforms people into violent thugs.’
  • 147) ‘He began life in a violent way but has learnt to channel that physical violence into creative energy.’
  • 148) ‘Valerie said Haworth was transformed by the film crew into a working Victorian village.’
  • 149) ‘The plan is to change the village into a place where artists can work, free of charge.’
  • 150) ‘Gravity makes the ice crystals fall and the winds blow them into the distinctive hook shape.’
  • 151) ‘It started out as a thriller, morphed into action and towards the end tried to be a comedy.’
  • 152) ‘This model works in the first half but it does unravel into messy pretentiousness towards the end.’
  • 153) ‘Somehow, this small step in the right direction has metamorphosed into a mighty triumph.’
  • 154) ‘It's just the stress factor of having to deal with people who panic and turn a minor itch into a full blown crisis.’
  • 155) ‘I have no interest in turning myself into an opinionated commentator on the world's news.’
  • 156) ‘They are all interested in the arts and would like to find a way to turn their interest into a job.’
  • 157) ‘The plans concern the ground flood of the building which would be turned into a snooker club with a bar.’
  • 158) ‘If anything it looked like a textbook attempt to turn the club into a contender.’
  • 159) ‘When the band finished the disco started and it turned into a regular club night.’
  • 160) ‘Sasha liked the record so much that in a rare studio sortie he's turned it into an essential club item.’
  • 161) ‘He believes they have the mental toughness to turn their new club into champions.’
  • 162) ‘Foreign coaches had come before and tried to turn their clubs into foreign clubs.’
  • 163) ‘This is where a manager uses all sorts of subterfuge to entice a player into leaving his present club.’
  • 164) ‘Some are genuinely injured, while others are cowed into submission by their clubs.’
  • 165) ‘While we were in France, we were tricking her into walking the odd step on her own.’
  • 166) ‘Stephenson fully admits that she had to push her husband into confronting his family with the truth.’
  • 167) ‘Some of them will be there hoping to force world leaders into a change of direction.’
  • 168) ‘It is only the first of many sequences that jolts and stuns you into full attention over a two hour running time.’
  • 169) ‘Widespread outrage in Nigeria prompted the government into launching an inquiry.’
  • 170) ‘In the event of victory, the two agreed to the division of the peninsula into four states.’
  • 171) ‘Equal tempering is a system for breaking up each octave into twelve equal semi-tones.’
  • 172) ‘If enough teams apply, the second division will be split into a Conference North and South.’
  • 173) ‘In essence the year is split into four equal seasons, each lasting 91 days plus a bit.’
  • 174) ‘Division of subzones into zonules is the ultimate expression of such patterns.’
  • 175) ‘The section is now so huge that it needs to be split into five big electronics divisions.’
  • 176) ‘Turkey invaded the island and brought about its present division into two parts.’
  • 177) ‘Thus, a law of this nature may in no way serve as a basis for a division of society into classes.’
  • 178) ‘British settlement led to the internal division of the continent into colonies.’
  • 179) ‘Its symbolism is partly derived from the fact that a square aspect is a division of the whole chart into four.’
  • 180) ‘The curve may be used for dividing an angle into any number of equal parts.’
  • 181) ‘They agree to split the coconuts into five equal integer lots, any remainder going to the monkey.’
  • 182) ‘If we divide each day into 24 equal hours, the length of a second will vary from day to day.’
  • 183) ‘Divide the mane into equal sections and damp each section before you start plaiting.’
  • 184) ‘The size of the demonstration meant that it split into several different routes.’
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