dissent vs decent vs descent

dissent decent descent

Definitions

  • 1) Anglo-American common law A separate opinion filed in a case by judges who disagree with the outcome of the majority of the court in that case
  • 2) An act of disagreeing with, or deviating from, the views and opinions of those holding authority.
  • 3) Anglo-American common law A separate opinion filed in a case by judges who disagree with the outcome of the majority of the court in that case
  • 4) Disagreement with the ideas, doctrines, decrees, etc. of a political party, government or religion.
  • 5) Difference of opinion or feeling; disagreement.
  • 6) Law A judicial opinion reaching a conclusion contrary to that reached by the majority of judges deciding a case; a minority opinion.
  • 7) Law A judicial opinion reaching a conclusion contrary to that reached by the majority of judges deciding a case; a minority opinion.
  • 8) The refusal to conform to the authority or doctrine of an established church; nonconformity.
  • 9) (Eccl.) Separation from an established church, especially that of England; nonconformity.
  • 10) obsolete Contrariety of nature; diversity in quality.
  • 11) obsolete Contrariety of nature; diversity in quality.
  • 12) (Eccl.) Separation from an established church, especially that of England; nonconformity.
  • 13) The act of dissenting; difference of opinion; refusal to adopt something proposed; nonagreement, nonconcurrence, or disagreement.
  • 14) a difference of opinion
  • 15) (law) the difference of one judge's opinion from that of the majority
  • 16) the act of protesting; a public (often organized) manifestation of dissent
  • 17) The act of dissenting; a holding or expressing of a different or contrary opinion; refusal to be bound by an opinion or a decision that is contrary to one's own judgment.
  • 18) Eccles., refusal to acknowledge or conform to the doctrines, ritual, or government of an established church, particularly in England and Scotland.
  • 19) A declaration of disagreement in opinion about something: as, the minority entered their dissent on the records of the house.
  • 20) Contrariety of nature; opposite quality.
  • 21) intransitive To differ from, especially in opinion, beliefs, etc.
  • 22) intransitive To disagree; to withhold assent. Construed with from (or, formerly, to).
  • 23) intransitive To differ from, especially in opinion, beliefs, etc.
  • 24) intransitive To disagree; to withhold assent. Construed with from (or, formerly, to).
  • 25) express opposition through action or words
  • 26) withhold assent
  • 27) be of different opinions
  • 28) To differ; be of a different or contrary nature.
  • 29) To be of a different or contrary opinion or feeling; withhold approval or assent: with from before the object.
  • 30) Eccles., to refuse to acknowledge, conform to, or be bound by the doctrines or rules of an established church. See dissenter.
  • 31) Law To reach a conclusion contrary to the majority of the judges deciding a case; render a minority opinion.
  • 32) To have or express an opinion different from a prevailing or official position; disagree.
  • 33) Law To reach a conclusion contrary to the majority of the judges deciding a case; render a minority opinion.
  • 34) (Eccl.) To differ from an established church in regard to doctrines, rites, or government.
  • 35) To differ in opinion; to be of unlike or contrary sentiment; to disagree; -- followed by from.
  • 36) To differ; to be of a contrary nature.
  • 37) (Eccl.) To differ from an established church in regard to doctrines, rites, or government.

Definitions

  • 1) Sufficiently clothed or dressed to be seen.
  • 2) obsolete Appropriate; suitable for the circumstances.
  • 3) of a person Having a suitable conformity to basic moral standards; showing integrity, fairness, or other characteristics associated with moral uprightness.
  • 4) obsolete Comely; shapely; well-formed.
  • 5) obsolete Appropriate; suitable for the circumstances.
  • 6) of a person Having a suitable conformity to basic moral standards; showing integrity, fairness, or other characteristics associated with moral uprightness.
  • 7) Significant; substantial.
  • 8) Fair; good enough; okay.
  • 9) obsolete Comely; shapely; well-formed.
  • 10) Informal Properly or modestly dressed.
  • 11) Characterized by conformity to recognized standards of propriety or morality.
  • 12) Morally upright; moral or respectable.
  • 13) Informal Properly or modestly dressed.
  • 14) Free from indelicacy or obscenity; clean.
  • 15) Fairly good; acceptable; satisfactory.
  • 16) Suitable; fitting.
  • 17) Kind or obliging.
  • 18) Showing thoughtfulness or consideration.
  • 19) Free from immodesty or obscenity; modest.
  • 20) Suitable in words, behavior, dress, or ceremony; becoming; fit; decorous; proper; seemly.
  • 21) Archaic Comely; shapely; well-formed.
  • 22) Archaic Comely; shapely; well-formed.
  • 23) Moderate, but competent; sufficient; hence, respectable; fairly good; reasonably comfortable or satisfying
  • 24) conforming to conventions of sexual behavior
  • 25) decently clothed
  • 26) sufficient for the purpose
  • 27) according with custom or propriety
  • 28) observing conventional sexual mores in speech or behavior or dress
  • 29) socially or conventionally correct; refined or virtuous
  • 30) in the right manner
  • 31) Specifically Proper with regard to modesty; free from indelicacy; conformable to some standard of modesty.
  • 32) Moderate; respectable; fair; tolerable; passable; good enough: as, a decent fortune; he made a very decent appearance.
  • 33) Becoming, fit, or suitable in words, behavior, dress, etc.; proper; seemly; decorous.

Definitions

  • 1) A sloping passage or incline.
  • 2) Lineage or hereditary derivation
  • 3) A drop to a lower status or condition.
  • 4) An instance of descending
  • 5) A way down.
  • 6) The act or an instance of descending.
  • 7) A lowering or decline, as in status or level.
  • 8) The fact or process of being derived or developing from a source.
  • 9) Hereditary derivation; lineage.
  • 10) A sudden visit or attack; an onslaught.
  • 11) A way down.
  • 12) A downward incline or passage; a slope.
  • 13) Law Transmission of property, especially real estate, to a hereditary heir by an intestate owner.
  • 14) Law Transmission of property, especially real estate, to a hereditary heir by an intestate owner.
  • 15) (Law) Transmission of an estate by inheritance, usually, but not necessarily, in the descending line; title to inherit an estate by reason of consanguinity.
  • 16) Inclination downward; a descending way; inclined or sloping surface; declivity; slope.
  • 17) rare Lowest place; extreme downward place.
  • 18) (Mus.) A passing from a higher to a lower tone.
  • 19) Derivation, as from an ancestor; procedure by generation; lineage; birth; extraction.
  • 20) A step or remove downward in any scale of gradation; a degree in the scale of genealogy; a generation.
  • 21) Incursion; sudden attack; especially, hostile invasion from sea; -- often followed by upon or on.
  • 22) (Mus.) A passing from a higher to a lower tone.
  • 23) That which is descended; descendants; issue.
  • 24) The act of descending, or passing downward; change of place from higher to lower.
  • 25) (Law) Transmission of an estate by inheritance, usually, but not necessarily, in the descending line; title to inherit an estate by reason of consanguinity.
  • 26) rare Lowest place; extreme downward place.
  • 27) Progress downward, as in station, virtue, as in station, virtue, and the like, from a higher to a lower state, from a higher to a lower state, from the more to the less important, from the better to the worse, etc.
  • 28) a downward slope or bend
  • 29) the descendants of one individual
  • 30) properties attributable to your ancestry
  • 31) the kinship relation between an individual and the individual's progenitors
  • 32) the act of changing your location in a downward direction
  • 33) a movement downward
  • 34) A rank; a step or degree.
  • 35) A fall or decline from a higher to a lower state or station; declension; degradation.
  • 36) In logic, an inference from a proposition containing a higher term to a proposition containing a lower term.
  • 37) A generation; a single degree in the scale of genealogy, traced from the common ancestor.
  • 38) Foray, raid.
  • 39) In law, the passing of real property to the heir or heirs of one who dies without disposing of it by will; transmission by succession or inheritance; the hereditary devolution of real property either to a single heir at law (common in England) or to the nearest relatives in the same degree, whether in a descending, ascending, or collateral line.
  • 40) A downward slope or inclination; a declivity.
  • 41) Offspring; issue; descendants collectively.
  • 42) Debasement.
  • 43) In music, a passing from a higher to a lower pitch.
  • 44) Generation, parentage, derivation.
  • 45) Genealogical extraction from an original or progenitor; lineage; pedigree; specifically, in biology, evolution; derivation: said of species, etc., as well as of individuals.
  • 46) The lowest place.
  • 47) The act of descending; the act of passing from a higher to a lower place by any form of motion.
  • 48) A sudden or hostile coming down upon a person, thing, or place; an incursion; an invasion; a sudden attack.
  • 49) plural In fortification, a hole, vault, or hollow place made by undermining the ground.

Examples

  • 1) He handled dissent with humour and reasoned argument.
  • 2) The increasingly hard line taken by the authorities to crush dissent has drawn a growing number of protests internationally.
  • 3) ‘I have continually argued for France's right to express its dissent from the opinion of the international community.’
  • 4) ‘It is at delicate moments in world affairs, such as this, that expressions of widespread dissent from opinion-formers can become a real political force.’
  • 5) ‘He pointed out that it was easy to exaggerate the importance of Australian expressions of dissent from Allied plans, and Curtin's messages.’
  • 6) ‘Brown wrote the Committee for the Nation expressing his dissent from the President's gold purchasing program in late 1933.’
  • 7) ‘Protest, chant, yell, shout your dissent from the rooftops.’
  • 8) ‘The policy has apparently generated little dissent from within the Scouts.’
  • 9) ‘This is the first sign of an Opposition shaping up to reflect current dissent from so many of current government policies.’
  • 10) ‘There have been some signs of dissent from Barnaby Joyce and Queensland Liberal Senator David Johnston about the states' rights implications of the plans.’
  • 11) ‘One is composed of intellectuals, people who preach dissent from the values of the ‘core culture.’’
  • 12) ‘But this is exactly the model that China has chosen to take - with little in the way of dissent from the ‘international community’.’
  • 13) ‘But in a move seen as an attempt to quell this dissent from the back benches, Mr Cullen announced the abolition of plans for the direct election of mayors.’
  • 14) ‘To march is a symbolic act not only of dissent from the government's position but to remind everyone that a people is not - and can never be - the same as a regime.’
  • 15) ‘An ‘anti-national’ Press is not alone in its dissent from the orchestrated spectacle.’
  • 16) ‘There is some dissent from this among the comments - particularly Carrie.’
  • 17) ‘Yet the organisation, with no dissent from the Executive or the Crown Office, continues to stand by its discredited experts.’
  • 18) ‘These words provoked no murmurs of dissent from this largely Republican crowd.’
  • 19) ‘The move caused widespread discontent in the Conservative Party and open dissent from leading modernisers.’
  • 20) ‘He has just about put the lid on dissent from within the Cabinet.’
  • 21) ‘Fair enough, but why did we hear so little dissent from within the movement?’
  • 22) ‘When a state's appropriation imparts too generous a benefit to religion alone, the establishment clause should provide a pathway to dissent.’
  • 23) ‘It called for a new crackdown on doctrinal dissent, and recommended a papal investigation of American seminaries, the subtext of which was to blame gays.’
  • 24) ‘That kind of perspective teaches me the need to respect dissent, nonconformity, and liberty of conscience as priority Baptist values.’
  • 25) ‘Historians sometimes make the mistake of thinking that early modern religious dissent argues secularization.’
  • 26) ‘Their readings have roots in and derive their stimulus from historical and political schema of dissent outlined in the biblical narratives.’
  • 27) ‘They issue Tracts carrying forward a debate about Anglican identity: the Church of England would be Catholic but it would stand against Popery on the one hand and dissent on the other.’
  • 28) ‘A theology of dissent has become the new establishment.’
  • 29) ‘The Inquisition's actions would be excessive today because we have the leisure to tolerate dissent with no threat to our survival - not as yet, at any rate.’
  • 30) ‘Or in the face of dissent when his party had lost their way and run short of food the avid Bible student resorted to his Scriptures.’
  • 31) ‘I maintained that my dissent was not from core tenets of Catholic faith, but from noninfallible church teachings.’
  • 32) ‘No thesis of theology escapes criticism, and no edict is exempt from conscientious dissent.’
  • 33) ‘One perspective reflected a background of English / Welsh dissent and the other a Scots / Irish covenanter tradition.’
  • 34) ‘Any dissent or questioning of the group's teachings is discouraged.’
  • 35) ‘A state religious court evaluating nonconformity or dissent deserves whatever answers it receives.’
  • 36) ‘Church, democracy and dissent: Paul Rule reviews two books by Paul Collins.’
  • 37) ‘Are you getting at the fact that perhaps what we see in religious practice is not so much dissent, active opposition, but a kind of muddling through?’
  • 38) ‘It seems to me that this approach to dissent has the potential to be pastorally disastrous.’
  • 39) ‘Rotherham did not help their cause when they had a player sent off for dissent after arguing the decision to award a short corner.’
  • 40) ‘On the next Lancaster defence one of Bury's players was sent out for dissent to the referee.’
  • 41) ‘Showing dissent at umpiring decisions can amount to violation of the conduct code for players.’
  • 42) ‘Not even a week has passed since his reprieve and Ganguly has been penalised again, this time for showing dissent against an umpiring decision.’
  • 43) ‘The referee is surrounded by a mass of home team players, three of whom are cautioned for dissent, and the goalkeeper is sent off violent conduct.’
  • 44) ‘She has written or joined eighty-seven dissents from court decisions she deemed insufficiently activist in scope and character.’
  • 45) ‘Simmons-Harris, was of course the most newsworthy aspect of the decision, but the dissents were no less revealing.’
  • 46) ‘Thus, over 2 strong dissents, the Court did not permit the misappropriation claim.’
  • 47) ‘The two-clerk era, saw an annual average of 107 opinions of the court, 78 dissents and 33 concurrences.’
  • 48) ‘Now consider this dissent from Planned Parenthood vs. Casey by Antonin Scalia.’
  • 49) ‘He took the unusual step of reading his dissent from the bench.’
  • 50) ‘One suspects that their ultimate target was Justice Rehnquist's dissent in Jaffree, and that their goal was to repair the damage to Everson's foundation.’
  • 51) ‘In his biting dissent Justice Antonin Scalia charged that Justice Stevens' unusual approach was a result of judicial bias.’
  • 52) ‘That this is Justice White's position is clearly affirmed by Justice John Paul Stevens' comments on Justice White's dissent.’
  • 53) ‘Thus Justice Douglas' dissent was based on an unproven supposition.’
  • 54) ‘Seven judges expressed a separate opinion, while two dissented from the majority.’
  • 55) ‘He tangled with other cardinals and disciplined church officials who dissented from official church policy.’
  • 56) ‘Not one Supreme Court justice dissented from the Moyer opinion, which was drafted by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.’
  • 57) ‘No respondent dissented from the vocational view, but teachers rarely voiced it.’
  • 58) ‘However, some Democrats dissented from that conclusion.’
  • 59) ‘Even before the dramatic escalation of hostilities yesterday, two Labor MPs publicly dissented from Labor's position.’
  • 60) ‘Only one Senator out of the hundred dissented from the passage of the Patriot Act, which is providing unprecedented powers for law enforcement bodies.’
  • 61) ‘They don't extend to justices who have dissented from the principle.’
  • 62) ‘Some of them were actually aggressive, convinced that anyone who dissented from the view that their child was a genius must be motivated by malice.’
  • 63) ‘When I dissented from the liberal line on race, the Texas papers depicted me as a racist.’
  • 64) ‘But a significant minority in the Conservative Party dissented from this view.’
  • 65) ‘Only a fool likes to hear the sound of his own voice. We welcome dissenting opinions.’
  • 66) ‘The third judge, Lord Justice Neuberger, dissented from this, stating that he did not consider it conducive to a fair trial.’
  • 67) ‘Alito, on the Circuit Court had dissented from the majority and said that Congress had the right to so act.’
  • 68) ‘Most participants dissented from time to time and said they did not want to go on, but the researcher would prod them to continue.’
  • 69) ‘On every matter on which he could have dissented from the Government in its formation, he has gone with the Government.’
  • 70) ‘People can disagree, differ and dissent, even within the ruling party, without this negatively affecting the stability of our country and the peace that we continue to enjoy.’
  • 71) ‘For the right it is an article of faith that scientists are dogmatic atheists with the will and the power to crush anyone who dissents from orthodoxy.’
  • 72) ‘What's the difference between dissenting by deciding and taking the law into your own hands?’
  • 73) ‘He can be unpredictable and even manage to dissent from established opinion, if only on the margin.’
  • 74) ‘Along the way, Fraser reminds us, various sects dissented and established parochial schools.’
  • 75) ‘That is, we dissented from somebody else's religion, and we paid the price for it.’
  • 76) ‘Baptists dissented from a state religion that claimed the right to determine what should be believed and how belief should be practiced.’
  • 77) ‘There developed in Qumran a Jewish sect that dissented from Sadduceanism and was hostile to the Pharisians.’

Examples

  • 1) You had to be on your mettle to get a decent seat.
  • 2) Your reputation for being a decent guy may be gone already where your colleagues are concerned.
  • 3) It's decent banter and people always come for me.
  • 4) He just struck me as a genuinely decent, kind man.
  • 5) decent people here are disgusted.
  • 6) There's a decent chance he's well weighted.
  • 7) If he can bounce back to his Wetherby form, he goes there with a really decent chance.
  • 8) At least it gave the guys one decent story about the time they met a World Cup winner.
  • 9) They came away and did a decent job.
  • 10) The depth to which you sank is astounding and highly shocking to all decent people.
  • 11) We were brought up to be decent and honest.
  • 12) The furlong shorter distance and sharper track are in his favour so he has a decent chance.
  • 13) There has to be something decent in there.
  • 14) You have to give these guys a decent shot.
  • 15) They will grow up without access to decent education or medicine or housing.
  • 16) No question it needs a decent kit man.
  • 17) He should be given a decent burial and shown due respect.
  • 18) And he has done a pretty decent job.
  • 19) They attempt to keep the politics of their own land honest and decent.
  • 20) It was a decent chance and should have been taken.
  • 21) Something other than decent attributes will be required if the exceptional is to be attained.
  • 22) Think about why you wreck things with decent guys.
  • 23) By all accounts he was a decent man.
  • 24) The bond allows them to do that - and get a decent return.
  • 25) They were so polite and spoke decent English.
  • 26) You can see this house is a decent, normal household.
  • 27) Old alligators -- one couldn't call you men, and it's enough to make decent men squirm that you should be at large and be called by the same name -- can act like you and yet be considered respectable, but this is to show you what _decent_ women think of your likes, and their spirits are with us in armies to-night in what we are doing.
  • 28) "decent people" advisedly, for those who bring this kind of suit _are decent_, wishing to act honorably and kindly, and carrying out the always difficult severing of the marriage bond with as little pain as possible.
  • 29) People ought to be cremated in what she calls decent privacy.
  • 30) Astellas, which trades at below five times its earnings before interest, has bought back about 20% of its stock in the past seven years, Mr. de Lardemelle said, and has what he called a decent pipeline of drug development.
  • 31) I am glad to hear that Peter B is happy with what he call a decent organisation, its nice to know that out of the multitude of unhappy residents that at least a few are getting some service, just check this blog to see how the numbers stack up.
  • 32) Foodfreak said... on now that's what I call a decent pastry - sounds delicious and is very pretty!
  • 33) KOCH: And also of concern that to crack down on this insurgency, the new government is planning to bring back what it calls decent members of Saddam Hussein's army and police force.
  • 34) In Baerlon, after her father died, her aunts had tried to make her into what they called a decent proper woman, though maybe her Aunt Miren had understood that after ten years running about the mines in boys 'clothes, it might be too late to stuff her into dresses.
  • 35) He said I ought to insist on them having what he called decent attire.
  • 36) "Does he never paint what they call decent people?" he inquired.
  • 37) ‘Since then thousands of youngsters have learned good manners, decent behaviour and mutual respect, all through the seemingly anachronistic art of ballroom dancing.’
  • 38) ‘We could help to maintain decent moral standards in advertising, by using our own purchasing power ethically.’
  • 39) ‘We should be here in the House to establish decent standards of behaviour in our society.’
  • 40) ‘Society has allowed a lowering of standards and eroded the rules of decent, thoughtful behaviour.’
  • 41) ‘There is no place for it in a decent and moral society.’
  • 42) ‘It's insulting to my morals as a decent human being to have to watch people degrade themselves on television and use sly tactics in order to win money.’
  • 43) ‘I am impressed with the other family though, who kept their cool in the face of such childish behaviour and showed what decent people they were.’
  • 44) ‘If some leader was prepared to argue the decent moral position, people would follow.’
  • 45) ‘The majority of people who live on that north Peckham estate are decent, peaceful and moral.’
  • 46) ‘But there used to be limits that decent men and women respected.’
  • 47) ‘But this is Australia and most people are fair, decent and respect difference.’
  • 48) ‘Ninety nine percent of Heysham High pupils are decent, respectful, hardworking and a credit to their parents.’
  • 49) ‘Then the question that arises is what sort of political institutions and practices are appropriate in a decent society.’
  • 50) ‘We have a lot of nice, decent people who come here to drink, and will have nowhere else to go if it is shut.’
  • 51) ‘He said it had once been a decent community, a nice place to live, but it had gone downhill in the last five years.’
  • 52) ‘I suppose it's harmless and they're all decent, nice people, but we don't have much in common.’
  • 53) ‘I talk to a nice, decent guy who understands my frustration but can't do jack about it.’
  • 54) ‘Both these people have talent but far more than that they come across as nice, decent, genuine young people.’
  • 55) ‘Don't get me wrong, I work with nice, decent people.’
  • 56) ‘In Anne's case, the overriding impression was that of a dignified and decent woman struggling hard to cope with the pain of ending a marriage which just hadn't worked out.’
  • 57) ‘One source told Hersh that ‘after a decent interval,’ he would depart.’
  • 58) ‘Some 19 months later, time enough for five or six decent intervals, Tenet still holds the job and appears to have job security, too.’
  • 59) ‘Then came the main courses - served after a decent interval to allow some digesting and conversation to take place before studious consumption resumed.’
  • 60) ‘There isn't a decent interval of time during which one must hold on to a present out of respect to the giver, although the introduction of such a tradition would save a lot of heartache.’
  • 61) ‘The mildest critics argued that they were premature and that a decent interval should have been allowed before the struggle to analyse and understand began.’
  • 62) ‘These orders were invariably cancelled, after a decent interval, due to the whims of our fictitious clients.’
  • 63) ‘After a decent interval, a period of dating and familiarisation, and ultimately marriage and homemaking, the first children were born.’
  • 64) ‘For our grand finale, ordered after a decent interval, there was only ever going to be one choice for me, the dark treacle custard tart with rum soaked raisins.’
  • 65) ‘After a decent interval has passed, we'll hear what they're going to do.’
  • 66) ‘In that case, the decision, after some hesitation, was to cancel sporting events for a decent interval.’
  • 67) ‘I chatted for a decent interval, then picked up my book, smiled, and wished them a pleasant vacation.’
  • 68) ‘We must hope that when we all come to look back, after a decent interval, we shall not regret our lack of interest.’
  • 69) ‘So, after a decent interval occupied by morning chores, off we went into the sunshine.’
  • 70) ‘After a decent interval of days, the identity of the new Prime Minister was no surprise.’
  • 71) ‘After a decent interval, laughter became acceptable as a means of relieving the tension.’
  • 72) ‘No one's come up with a brilliant new scheme (and publishers have to wait a decent interval before repackaging the old ones).’
  • 73) ‘After a decent interval, Prince George married his late brother's fiancée, Princess May, and they were a far more suitable couple than she and Eddy would have been.’
  • 74) ‘After a decent interval he and Madeleine left Carew to his liqueurs and cynicism and headed back across the square to the Hotel Adernis.’
  • 75) ‘Though Adams was a doubter on many aspects of Christianity, he nonetheless had a decent respect for it.’
  • 76) ‘Willingness to consider foreign judicial views in comparable cases is not surprising in a Nation that from its birth has given a decent respect to the opinions of mankind.’
  • 77) ‘I also wondered why a manufacturer would make an otherwise decent dress too sheer so everyone can have a perve at your undies if you wear it.’
  • 78) ‘From the sounds downstairs, my mother was trying to recover from last night's hangover and put on a decent dress for her daughters' weddings.’
  • 79) ‘She got out of bed and changed into a decent dress of woolspun.’
  • 80) ‘By the time she was dressed and looking somewhat decent, she had only three minutes until Aidan was due to arrive.’
  • 81) ‘She made for a decent picture dressed in simple dark brown cashmere, and her hair placed in a simple bun at the nape of her neck.’
  • 82) ‘He also made the request that people who attended should attend in decent dress, as per a golf course.’
  • 83) ‘And for heaven's sake people, put some decent clothes on your daughter.’
  • 84) ‘Besides, I also don't want to see your hairy chest… wear some decent clothes.’
  • 85) ‘Coincidentally, she had on very decent clothes as well, I think it was a buttoned up cardigan with jeans.’
  • 86) ‘Others find her propensity for tacky glamour and ostentatious lack of decent clothing a little too much to bear.’
  • 87) ‘Over the weekend I tend to wander around in my pyjamas, contact lenses not yet inserted, until after breakfast, before attempting to dress and get decent.’
  • 88) ‘Now go get yourself decent, I'll call a cab’
  • 89) ‘‘Lyn are you there?’ Andrea said knocking. ‘Are you decent?’’
  • 90) ‘"Yeah, well I'm glad one person is half decent here besides myself.’
  • 91) ‘As always I struck up a conversation with the barista, commenting it had been three days since I'd had a decent cup of coffee.’
  • 92) ‘The text is a decent size; leading satisfactory; and it's longish - nearly 400 pages - but not too long.’
  • 93) ‘They were both pretty ordinary, lived normal lives, made satisfactory grades and were decent looking.’
  • 94) ‘Try as I would, I couldn't seem to make a decent cup of tea, and it even looked odd - a dismal grey instead of a healthy brown.’
  • 95) ‘Without a decent road network and fitting sewerage system, Livingstone is bound to not only lose out on increased numbers of tourists but also job creation.’
  • 96) ‘They use cheap materials and actually destroy a lot of decent furniture and fittings in the process - if something is considered unfashionable it gets taken out or painted over.’
  • 97) ‘We want clean, quiet hospital wards with appropriate privacy and decent food.’
  • 98) ‘The eight English clubs with the most money should really compete for the European places if they have a half decent manager and appropriate board level backing.’
  • 99) ‘We don't have a preference for any particular part of town, just a nice B&B with decent Tube access.’
  • 100) ‘The truth is, most lawyers in Canada make a decent, modest living.’
  • 101) ‘A respected international footballer speaking decent Spanish and enjoying life in Madrid should shut up both the snobs and the Europhobes.’
  • 102) ‘The defense has been respectable and the pitching decent.’
  • 103) ‘Leeds Council has been working successfully for a number of years with many responsible landlords who provide decent accommodation.’
  • 104) ‘Don't get me wrong I'm not a habititual complainer, but I expect to be given a decent service and politeness, not much to ask is it?’
  • 105) ‘Naples suffers from a dearth of decent affordable accommodation.’
  • 106) ‘Those of us who depend on a decent public transport service are entitled to ask Mr Hughes for a list of those bus routes he intends to chop if he is elected.’
  • 107) ‘A decent crowd of 1,526 witnessed something of a shock result, but really the game was as one-sided as anything seen at Cougar Park this season.’
  • 108) ‘Anthony Fedorov has a decent voice, but he's more likely to make it through on sympathy votes.’
  • 109) ‘Many women are angry that the system fails to give them a decent income and it is an issue that is likely to affect their votes on polling day.’
  • 110) ‘Quite how authentically Tunisian the snake charmers, contortionists and belly dancers were I don't know, but it was a good laugh and the meal was decent enough.’
  • 111) ‘Cash also plays its part in managerial success, but the £5m that Moyes has been given to spend represents no more than a down payment on a decent Premiership player.’
  • 112) ‘Somehow, the York players transformed themselves into what we all know they have the potential to be - decent rugby players.’
  • 113) ‘A person who loves watching movies can never be alone when they have a decent VHS or DVD player.’
  • 114) ‘If you put all of those young players into the team at the same time, without some really decent players alongside them, you will lose.’
  • 115) ‘Results are decent, the players are happy again, the club is doing well.’
  • 116) ‘It's as good a day as I've had in football, and I was lucky enough to have some decent days as a player.’
  • 117) ‘Apart from being a decent player, he's also a nice lad and is the skipper this year.’
  • 118) ‘‘They are playing really well and they have some decent young players, so they are a hard team to play against,’ conceded Paul.’
  • 119) ‘Because they have only a handful of decent players, trades have been hard to come by - you can't get something for nothing.’
  • 120) ‘In this vein, as well as the fact that this recipe is Ligurian in its history, it seemed only appropriate to post a decent pesto recipe.’
  • 121) ‘Now I am not going to complain if they do put more stuff out of this nature but I think that there is quite a lot already - maybe I would like at least one programme a night but some decent drama would be nice as well.’
  • 122) ‘She is offering to get me the Vegas Video 4.0 upgrade for my services, and that means decent colour correction tools, which I'd kill for.’
  • 123) ‘It was followed by a decent Caesar salad, with a tangy dressing that was appropriately not too creamy after the pot of cheese we'd just consumed.’
  • 124) ‘It's fair to say that a few decent shops would be nice and many areas of the town could do with a facelift, but that does not mean we live in misery and squalor.’
  • 125) ‘What you have here is nice folks running a decent restaurant with unique food.’
  • 126) ‘So, if you live not too far away, make sure it is on your list of places to visit next time you want to sit down to a decent meal and a nice glass of wine without breaking the bank.’
  • 127) ‘If you think for a minute that I don't want a nice house, a decent car, gadgets and remote controls, then you've really got the wrong idea.’
  • 128) ‘It's satisfying to get two decent, sustaining main meals for two hungry blokes out of one medium sized chicken.’
  • 129) ‘It's been a disappointing season for us so far, so to have a decent run in the Cup is massive for us, and massive for the fans as well.’
  • 130) ‘A decent game of football was never likely as both teams struggled to adapt to the atrocious conditions.’
  • 131) ‘Frank has always been approachable, a very honest, decent, generous man, with a great sense of humour too.’
  • 132) ‘Lots of Tories hold a strange affection to the ageing leftie, and when I read the last volume of his diaries he came across as a very decent, generous fellow.’
  • 133) ‘So let no-one say British people aren't decent, aren't generous.’
  • 134) ‘I enjoy Paul's company and judge him to be decent and generous-hearted.’
  • 135) ‘Tommie was regarded among all who knew him as a very decent and obliging man.’
  • 136) ‘‘David was the best husband you could wish for; he was loving, dependable and considerate, a very decent man,’ she said.’
  • 137) ‘We may disagree on much, but he's a thoughtful, decent man.’
  • 138) ‘If you stick around and look underneath the make-up you just may find a very decent and worthy human being.’
  • 139) ‘John and Rich were very decent though, agreeing to sleep on the lounge floor.’
  • 140) ‘He's a decent bloke, kind, generous and gentle to a fault.’
  • 141) ‘He was a grand decent neighbour, reliable and dependable, and one of the fine ‘old stock’ of the parish.’
  • 142) ‘I told her everything and she listened, which I thought was pretty decent of a total stranger who looked sober.’
  • 143) ‘It was decent of him to apologize to you.’
  • 144) ‘Brett has been Mr House Husband today, cooking dinner and now doing the washing up, which is very decent of him as I'm feeling a bit rough for some reason.’

Examples

  • 1) All societies have means for organizing residence and descent groups.
  • 2) His descent into chaos and criminality had begun.
  • 3) The sudden descent could have happened because the pilots failed to put on oxygen masks.
  • 4) What followed for all of them was a descent into showbiz hell.
  • 5) Then begins the long descent into hell.
  • 6) And then will begin the descent into hell.
  • 7) There were reports that the brakes had failed as the coach rounded the bend on the steep descent.
  • 8) There was a great deal of screaming from the cast and the audience and a satisfying descent into chaos.
  • 9) The distinction between local groups and descent groups is therefore one between common residence and a sense of common identity.
  • 10) Reaching for a dictionary is made all the more difficult by the steep and winding descent that follows shortly afterwards.
  • 11) The other path for failed attempts at behavioral control through physical punishment was outright cruelty and sometimes descent into unremitting family warfare.
  • 12) Their cosy marriage's sudden descent into chaos is chillingly depicted.
  • 13) In this situation, women are mutually exchanged by descent groups in each generation.
  • 14) It traces descent through the father, and descent groups are formed around the relationship between father and son.
  • 15) The coach crashed through a roadside wall on a sharp bend at the bottom of a steep descent near Grenoble.
  • 16) Prominent family of French descent.
  • 17) Like so many of Scottish descent my family now finds itself in England.
  • 18) Nobody gains from Syria's descent into chaos.
  • 19) But, of course, there is a slow and awful descent into chaos.
  • 20) I got to know a lot of people of West Indian descent.
  • 21) Having at last found it, however, he forthwith began his descent; and here again he was disagreeably reminded of the much greater difficulty which is experienced in the _descent_ than in the _ascent_ of a cliff.
  • 22) What happens when a nationalized citizen of Latin descent is pulled over and told to show his identification papers?
  • 23) Brunswick, and the fourth in descent from the famous Henry the
  • 24) When I say Darwinian evolution, I'm referring to Darwin's theory, which he called descent with modification.
  • 25) In each case of what we call descent, it is still the first reproducing creature identically the same -- doing what it has done before -- only with such modifications as the struggle for existence and natural selection have induced.
  • 26) The abrupt ridges face the Atlantic; on the west the descent is almost lost in the broad, elevated plateau which slopes down towards the Mississippi.
  • 27) But we've put in a little twist where the rockets are actually attached to what we call a "descent stage" that flies the rover down and the rover is attached to the underside of that stage.
  • 28) She and Patricio Lanfranco, a Chilean filmmaker and news producer who did occasional work for "The NewsHour," spent years tracking the judge and what he called his descent into "the abyss" of the country's past, continuing on despite considerable challenges raising the funds that went for, among other things, acquiring the expensive archival footage that the duPont judges found compelling.
  • 29) Using "descent" is almost begging to be misinterpreted.
  • 30) The line of descent from the first organism to the manifold life around us is astonishingly beautiful, orderly, lawful and harmonious, the more so if there are no gaps that must be bridged by ad hoc divine interventions.
  • 31) ‘He said the incident could have been quite serious, as the night turned cold and heavy rain began to fall during the descent.’
  • 32) ‘The two climbers, then in their 20s, did reach the summit, but after a fall on the descent, Thomas suffered a severe leg injury.’
  • 33) ‘I knew I could get the better of him on the descent even though I fell a number of times.’
  • 34) ‘The idea is to prevent my back from arching and my legs from dropping during the descent.’
  • 35) ‘The descent was fast, steep, and playfully technical in parts.’
  • 36) ‘After the steepest descent I have ever ridden to this day, it was a short ride up the valley to the lodge where hot dinner was waiting.’
  • 37) ‘By the time the steepest descent is over my arms are hurting, but we haven't stopped and it's not over yet.’
  • 38) ‘After a quick tour of the mine facilities, the party re-boarded the little train, sans locomotive, for the descent was to be made by gravity.’
  • 39) ‘Gunter is careful to control the descent on this movement so he doesn't overstretch his shoulders.’
  • 40) ‘The descent and ascent should both be at the same moderate pace.’
  • 41) ‘Prior to the final touch down, the spacecraft shuts down the propulsion engine and enters into a free fall descent.’
  • 42) ‘During the descent, four members of his group fell to their deaths.’
  • 43) ‘It was while glancing back that he took a fall and twisted his ankle on the final descent and came back into the finishing field with bloodied knees.’
  • 44) ‘The images sent back to Earth partially overlap, due to the probe's rotation during the descent and due to the overlap between the fields of view of the different cameras.’
  • 45) ‘What I thought was a straightforward descent turned horrific.’
  • 46) ‘During descent, you should gently equalize your ears and mask.’
  • 47) ‘Resist the pull of the gravity on the descent and force the weight to move slowly back to the start.’
  • 48) ‘Then began the slow cold descent into darkness.’
  • 49) ‘Upon pulling them on, I started my slow descent down the stairs.’
  • 50) ‘Carefully, she started a gradual, painstaking descent to the frothing ocean below.’
  • 51) ‘Sheep grazed the slopes above them; the descent to the shore ended in a farmyard.’
  • 52) ‘The snow-topped, ice clad giants offer refuge from the daily grind in the form of miles of skiable slopes and long descents.’
  • 53) ‘The showers before and during the race made the very steep descents a real challenge.’
  • 54) ‘From there, a steep descent drops to a high and rocky col, from where very rocky ground leads to the summit and some of the widest views I've seen for months.’
  • 55) ‘From the steep descent he turned aside into the deer path by which he had come, and when he reached the beach he paused and turned, raising his eyes up the length of the waterfall to where he thought the rock and the pool might be.’
  • 56) ‘We arrive at a steep descent and he suggests I engage Hill descent Control, an electronic system that automatically controls the speed of the vehicle as it descends.’
  • 57) ‘Anyone driving north on the N2 this week should keep their eyes peeled just before the steep descent to the old bridge.’
  • 58) ‘The descent was not steep at all and I could go down there as well as anyone.’
  • 59) ‘Eventually with the sun fading and the wind rising we found a steep descent down to pale limestone and black rabbits, and back at the campsite lots more tents.’
  • 60) ‘The track rolled down a steep descent and then gathered itself again in tight knots and ruts which led us through a long, spreading puddle to an estate gate.’
  • 61) ‘Arthur's Pass is 920 metres above sea level, and there is a steep descent to Otira in the west.’
  • 62) ‘The descent drops straight into the sump with no place to rest.’
  • 63) ‘It is the steepest descent on the course, and runs for nearly 2 miles.’
  • 64) ‘The descent is much steeper at only 20 km, with some fast bends at the top changing to tight hairpins at the bottom.’
  • 65) ‘From there a steep descent north took us to the edge of another plantation where a well-used footpath dropped down through the trees to a broad track.’
  • 66) ‘With the skill of a veteran mountaineer, he masterfully accomplishes this task while going down a steep descent.’
  • 67) ‘The outcome will be a sexual identity free-for-all, and a further descent into a moral vacuum.’
  • 68) ‘The results are a partial empirical accounting of the ideological developments accompanying the descent into civil war.’
  • 69) ‘In the process he drove himself to exhaustion, and began a tragic descent into paranoia and self-destruction.’
  • 70) ‘How can the working class, faced with this crisis, defend its social and democratic rights and prevent a descent into war and barbarism?’
  • 71) ‘The absence of any semblance of discipline is to blame for this descent into moral turpitude.’
  • 72) ‘The only alternative to denying responsibility appears to be a complete loss of control - a descent into chaos.’
  • 73) ‘It is an overwhelming, confusing, meandering descent into seasonal decline.’
  • 74) ‘It is a small effort worth making if we want to avoid a descent into widespread anarchy, terrorism, pandemics of global disease, and other avoidable calamities.’
  • 75) ‘But the sadder scenes were the ones where they shut him in front of a large screen and played him highlights of his career, and excerpts of news footage chronicling the descent into tragedy.’
  • 76) ‘Miranda's claims of innocence are seen by her friends, colleagues and former patients as the beginnings of a deep descent into madness.’
  • 77) ‘The structural underfunding which caused the gradual descent into debt has not been addressed, although clearly the hope is that there will be some future rectification.’
  • 78) ‘The result has been an unintended descent into confusion.’
  • 79) ‘But wait - the nightmarish descent into the blind refusal of personal responsibility continues apace.’
  • 80) ‘This descent into enmity is not just one party's fault.’
  • 81) ‘Despite valiant efforts from the cast, the two hours that follow it prove to be nothing more than a descent into the quicksand of mediocrity.’
  • 82) ‘The more I think about this, and as I write it, it rather does seem less a quirky singularity, and more of an onrushing descent into a foggy loopiness.’
  • 83) ‘It reminded me of the descent into cynicism about politics that I still haven't completely shaken.’
  • 84) ‘It is slightly worrying that I should become obsessed with this again and I think it may signal a descent into nervous break-down.’
  • 85) ‘But even they can't entirely salvage the mixture from a gradual descent into mediocrity.’
  • 86) ‘However, the descent into savagery is opposed by many of the children, recognising it as a construct imposed from above by adults.’
  • 87) ‘The term ‘dynasty’ refers to a succession of kings belonging to one line of family descent.’
  • 88) ‘Indeed, common place of origin is often connected with genos, one's origins by common descent and parentage.’
  • 89) ‘Their rulers claimed descent from a common ancestor.’
  • 90) ‘Partly Spanish by ancestry, he claimed descent on his father's side from the Scottish monarchy.’
  • 91) ‘I had a school friend whose family traced their descent and their identity even further, back to William the Conqueror.’
  • 92) ‘These entries suggest that people of African origins or descent, although very much a minority, were not unusual in sixteenth-century London.’
  • 93) ‘Many families of Luxembourger descent today also include traditions from the more mainstream Anglo- and German-American cultures.’
  • 94) ‘This story celebrates the families of African descent in North America and the transitions of children spending summers with their elders.’
  • 95) ‘A few girls of African American descent were sitting on the front porch.’
  • 96) ‘Umbilical hernias occur more often in premature infants and those of African American descent.’
  • 97) ‘People of African American descent often face challenges when they try to trace their ancestors.’
  • 98) ‘Clans are created through common descent from a shared male ancestor.’
  • 99) ‘Rather, we can entertain common descent from multiple ancestors.’
  • 100) ‘Today in the United States alone, more than 40 million Americans claim some Irish descent.’
  • 101) ‘They possessed significantly more knowledge of Irish politics and history than those claiming no Irish descent.’
  • 102) ‘Many others throughout the kingdom assert patrilineal descent from eponymous ancestors from ancient Arab tribes.’
  • 103) ‘About 40 % can trace an Italian descent, although Spain is considered the mother country.’
  • 104) ‘In these societies, descent is traced through the female side of the family.’
  • 105) ‘His mother was of Huguenot descent; his father died six months after his birth.’
  • 106) ‘Thus, at common law, an alien can acquire or take real or personal property under a will, and may acquire or take personal property by descent.’
  • 107) ‘An estate is either ancestral or nonancestral; or, as this court says, there are two modes of acquiring title to property, one by descent or inheritance and the other by purchase or by the act or agreement of the parties.’
  • 108) ‘The civil status of slaves in Tennessee, as well as in other states in which slavery existed, was such as to disable them from inheriting or transmitting property by descent.’
  • 109) ‘We hear of ambushes, sudden descents on armies still in marching column, and enemies taken by surprise as a result of sudden forced marches, stealthy changes of position, deceptive signals, and deliberate misinformation.’
  • 110) ‘Any sort of significant expedition meant risking defeat in the field, or a sudden descent on Damietta and loss of the city.’
  • 111) ‘A sudden descent by a Roumanian army into Transylvania on August 30th was hailed as the harbinger of further successes.’
  • 112) ‘He first provided against a sudden descent upon the city by rebuilding the walls of Rome, which remain to this day and are known as the walls of Aurelian.’
  • 113) ‘A section of patrolmen made a sudden and unexpected descent upon an alleged gambling hell.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy