defuse vs diffuse

defuse diffuse

Definitions

  • 1) To remove the fuse from (a bomb, etc.).
  • 2) obsolete To disorder; to make shapeless.
  • 3) obsolete To disorder; to make shapeless.
  • 4) To make less dangerous, tense, or hostile.
  • 5) remove the triggering device from
  • 6) etc. See diffuse, etc.
  • 7) etc.Seediffuse,etc.
  • 8) To remove the fuse from (an explosive device).
  • 9) To make less dangerous, tense, or hostile.
  • 10) To make less dangerous.
  • 11) obsolete To disorder; to make shapeless.
  • 12) obsolete To disorder; to make shapeless.
  • 13) To remove the fuse from; to deactivate (a bomb or other explosive device) or make it ineffective.

Definitions

  • 1) Everywhere or throughout everything; not focused or concentrated.
  • 2) Widely spread or scattered; not concentrated.
  • 3) Wordy or unclear: synonym: wordy.
  • 4) Wordy or unclear: synonym: wordy.
  • 5) Poured out; widely spread; not restrained; copious; full; esp., of style, opposed to concise or terse; verbose; prolix
  • 6) lacking conciseness
  • 7) (of light) transmitted from a broad light source or reflected
  • 8) spread out; not concentrated in one place
  • 9) intransitive To be spread over or through as in air, water, or other matter, especially by fluid motion or passive means.
  • 10) intransitive To be spread over or through as in air, water, or other matter, especially by fluid motion or passive means.
  • 11) transitive To spread over or through as in air, water, or other matter, especially by fluid motion or passive means.
  • 12) transitive To spread over or through as in air, water, or other matter, especially by fluid motion or passive means.
  • 13) spread or diffuse through
  • 14) move outward
  • 15) cause to become widely known
  • 16) Widely spread or diffused; extended; dispersed; scattered.
  • 17) To spread, as a fluid, by the wandering of its molecules in amongst those of a contiguous fluid.
  • 18) Specifically
  • 19) Synonyms To scatter, disseminate, circulate, disperse, distribute, propagate.
  • 20) Synonyms Loose, rambling, wordy, long-winded, diluted, spun out.
  • 21) In embryology, applied to a form of non-deciduate placenta in which the fetal villi form a broad belt.
  • 22) To spread abroad; scatter; send out or extend in all directions.
  • 23) In pathology, spreading widely and having no distinctively defined limits: as, a diffuse inflammation or suppuration: opposed to circumscribed.
  • 24) Prolix; using many words; verbose; rambling: said of speakers and writers or their style.
  • 25) To pour out and spread, as a fluid; cause to flow and spread.
  • 26) Hard to understand; perplexing; requiring extended effort.
  • 27) In boto, spreading widely and loosely.
  • 28) In zoology, sparse; few and scattered, as markings; especially, in entomology, said of punctures, etc., when they are less thickly set than on a neighboring part from which they appear to be scattered off.
  • 29) Physics To cause to undergo diffusion.
  • 30) Physics To cause to undergo diffusion.
  • 31) To cause to spread out freely.
  • 32) To make less intense; weaken.
  • 33) Physics To undergo diffusion.
  • 34) To make less brilliant; soften.
  • 35) To make known to or cause to be used by large numbers of people; disseminate.
  • 36) To become widely dispersed; spread out.
  • 37) Physics To undergo diffusion.
  • 38) To pass by spreading every way, to diffuse itself.
  • 39) To pour out and cause to spread, as a fluid; to cause to flow on all sides; to send out, or extend, in all directions; to spread; to circulate; to disseminate; to scatter; as to diffuse information.

Examples

  • 1) No one knows how to defuse this nationwide crisis, least of all the government.
  • 2) Police admitted last night it could take days to defuse the devices.
  • 3) Viewers lapped it up and the crisis was defused.
  • 4) Try to spot the warning signs and act to defuse the situation.
  • 5) Last night bomb disposal experts were trying to defuse three more devices.
  • 6) That conviction and his winning personality enabled him to defuse many a crisis.
  • 7) Try to defuse awkward situations in advance.
  • 8) But this is far from sufficient to defuse the crisis.
  • 9) Training crossing guards to spot and defuse volatile situations is one of the options being explored.
  • 10) Think of ways of defusing anxious situations by simply doing things differently.
  • 11) Run through example scenarios at home to teach them how to defuse situations.
  • 12) Now he has to defuse a tricky situation that is all of his own making.
  • 13) Security personnel claimed to have defused another bomb close to the president's official residence this week.
  • 14) Moreover, he says cities have defused the population bomb.
  • 15) The bomb disposal expert was killed as he tried to defuse a roadside device in Helmand.
  • 16) An empathetic listener can do a lot to defuse a crisis, regardless of the seriousness of the problem.
  • 17) An army bomb disposal team that had been on stand-by throughout the day did not have to defuse any device.
  • 18) Those seemingly simple acts will have beads of sweat running down your brow as if you're trying to defuse a bomb.
  • 19) A bomb was also defused nearby.
  • 20) A bomb squad defused the device.
  • 21) If this country did not have a continuous patrol, it would need to decide when to deploy its capability to defuse a crisis.
  • 22) He has a piece of bone sticking into his spinal chord like a spear, and removing it is like trying to defuse a bomb.
  • 23) A fourth bomb was defused.
  • 24) One expert who was a chemical weapons specialist with the U.S. government says malls in the U.S. and elsewhere are susceptible to what he calls a defuse threat.
  • 25) Likewise a vague mention of a 'truth and reconciliation commission' for Balochistan will not in the short-term defuse the situation unless practical and tangible confidence-building measures are taken to assuage the angry Baloch.
  • 26) Renewing Google's license "was a smart move on the part of the Chinese government to kind of defuse the situation," said Paul Denlinger, an Internet consultant for startups.
  • 27) At what point is it not enough that the mother can "defuse" the situation -- when the situation shouldn't be occurring in the first place?
  • 28) While mother Barbara Smith admits that her son has thrown such tantrums before, and was once suspended for knocking over a desk, she believes she should have been allowed to "defuse" the situation without police intervention.
  • 29) "Basically, this was a smart move on the part of the Chinese government to kind of defuse the situation," said Paul Denlinger, an Internet consultant for startups.
  • 30) Knowing Sarkozy, he probably made a pass a Merkel in an attempt to "defuse" the situation.
  • 31) The one that was designed to "defuse" the whole Reverend Wright issue? ...
  • 32) ‘Security guards patrolling the area informed police, who in turn notified the Bomb Disposal Unit, who defused the explosive device.’
  • 33) ‘Grimly, he picked up a manual on defusing explosive devices and began to skim through it, just in case.’
  • 34) ‘The army began searching the area on Friday and is defusing explosive devices strewn around the area by the blasts.’
  • 35) ‘The device was defused by police bomb disposal experts.’
  • 36) ‘Some competitors had already passed the part of the route where army explosives experts were brought in to defuse a live device.’
  • 37) ‘Many of the policemen injured had gathered to see the device being defused.’
  • 38) ‘How on earth do you defuse these tricky devices?’
  • 39) ‘After the first three blasts, disposal experts tried to defuse a fourth bomb but failed, and it exploded, injuring one officer.’
  • 40) ‘A tourist attraction to open in France will invite visitors to race a motorised gondola, crack a safe and save the world from destruction by defusing a nuclear bomb.’
  • 41) ‘At around 9.30 pm, the explosive disposal squad was in place to defuse the bomb.’
  • 42) ‘Detectives defused the bomb, which was found under a pot plant outside the pub.’
  • 43) ‘He summoned the police, the van turned out to be packed full of a terrorist's explosives, and the bombs were defused.’
  • 44) ‘Meanwhile, bomb experts were defusing a hand grenade found near a Buddhist temple when a second grenade exploded about 50 metres away, wounding three people.’
  • 45) ‘One died this morning, trying to defuse an improvised explosive device.’
  • 46) ‘For months even men defusing bombs had no protection against blast because they worked without bullet-proof vests.’
  • 47) ‘Earlier Tuesday, rebels manning the blockade ambushed an army truck, killing at least four soldiers and wounding two others shortly after troops defused a roadside bomb, officials said.’
  • 48) ‘A bomb squad arrived, along with officers from the police's Mobile Brigade, and defused the bombs that were equipped with timers.’
  • 49) ‘The demolitions expert defused the bomb about 10 minutes later.’
  • 50) ‘Police don't know whether he was trying to defuse the bomb, or whether he deliberately detonated it, killing himself.’
  • 51) ‘Should you decide to defuse a bomb, don't worry about which wire to cut.’
  • 52) ‘I can't help thinking that if Chuck were alive, he would have handled this unsavory, unneighborly encounter much better than I, for he was an expert at defusing tense situations.’
  • 53) ‘It is learnt that more changes in the civil administration are also in the offing as part of the ongoing efforts to defuse the tense situation.’
  • 54) ‘With their friendly but firm goodwill and common sense they were able to defuse many potentially dangerous situations and undoubtedly saved many lives.’
  • 55) ‘With a joke and a smile he was able to defuse many a tense situation and his presence in any room was unmistakable.’
  • 56) ‘The situation was defused by quick-thinking American officers who had their men take a knee, visibly disarm, and then back off slowly.’
  • 57) ‘To some, it seemed like both men's actions were crucial in defusing a potentially explosive situation.’
  • 58) ‘If we don't defuse these time bombs quickly, they will quite literally explode in our faces one morning as we open the newspapers.’
  • 59) ‘Disraeli saw its dangers and wished to take steps to quickly defuse the gathering tensions.’
  • 60) ‘The ploy was intended to defuse tensions and pre-empt a possible rebellion in the Campo.’
  • 61) ‘King Frederick William IV, who was crowned in 1840, defused the situation.’
  • 62) ‘Can they defuse the crisis in time to avert a potential nuclear war?’
  • 63) ‘Now he is trying to defuse the crisis that the warmongers have created.’
  • 64) ‘Back then it was Deacon's intervention which helped defuse the row.’
  • 65) ‘Honest and timely disclosure may defuse anger when people feel that information is not being withheld.’
  • 66) ‘Acknowledge their behaviour to defuse confrontation and to help prevent a recurrence.’
  • 67) ‘The alternate is that the nuclear crisis should be defused peacefully through dialogue.’
  • 68) ‘But he was trotted out for the media and expertly defused what was an overblown tiff.’
  • 69) ‘What means have our rulers employed to defuse anger over fiscal privileges?’

Examples

  • 1) Local church power is a diffuse entity.
  • 2) His most diffuse and most difficult role.
  • 3) You have to diffuse light in a flattering way.
  • 4) This movement alters the range of the beam from narrow and direct to wide and diffuse.
  • 5) In the latter situation stress can build up in the absence of any form of physical release which could diffuse the situation.
  • 6) These people can drive change, diffuse information and bridge diverse perspectives and opinions.
  • 7) We diffuse our feeling over others, and count on their acting from our motives.
  • 8) Credit should go to the Swede for the speed with which he got to his feet to diffuse the situation.
  • 9) When we are embarrassed we tend to laugh diffuse the situation, but if you laugh while telling him to stop you give him mixed messages.
  • 10) But she added: 'You can be a superhero in a little way and diffuse little situations.
  • 11) This crisis has arisen, the Prof says, because intensive cultivation has given rise to an upward trend in "diffuse" pollution from nitrates and phosphates which is proving difficult to reverse.
  • 12) The object is felt to say something succinctly and forcibly that the inner vision reports vaguely, in diffuse feeling rather than organically.
  • 13) DESCRIPTION: Also called St. Anthony's Fire, erysipelas is characterized by diffuse inflammation of the skin, or of the subcutaneous cellular tissue, usually with accompanying fever.
  • 14) And in 1995, with Mike Jura at UCLA, we published a paper suggesting that if it was in space, it should be responsible for some very puzzling features that have been known for 90 years called the diffuse interstellar bands.
  • 15) How about the definition for the word diffuse, courtesy of Dictionary. com?
  • 16) There are theories that Marie may have had a medical condition termed diffuse alopecia areata, which can result in sudden hair loss.
  • 17) ‘It works efficiently to create and diffuse purchasing power throughout the economy and disseminate liquidity throughout the financial system.’
  • 18) ‘It has diffused a wider lack of confidence on the part of investors and consumers, accentuating the trend towards recession.’
  • 19) ‘But slowly, in the course of time the proletarian agenda of the communist parties is also diffusing rapidly.’
  • 20) ‘This is indigenous to Brazil, where it is known as aroreira, but since the 19th century has been widely diffused in other tropical areas.’
  • 21) ‘They were under-represented in the gold and other mining regions, and were diffused widely in rural areas.’
  • 22) ‘The ink will be visibly distinguishable from the water for some amount of time, but it will diffuse eventually to all areas of the beaker.’
  • 23) ‘The technology can be expected to diffuse rapidly as all major vendors are developing such systems and many are pursuing internet based applications which would allow ordering and provide a common platform.’
  • 24) ‘Otherwise, this staging, full of padding and smart-aleck references, diffuses Wagner's musical power: it is an elemental drama gelded by unasked questions and a lack of ambition.’
  • 25) ‘People, ideas, and capital are less mobile so that technology diffuses more slowly than in the other scenario families.’
  • 26) ‘The rule of law dilutes power; it diffuses it; and yet it also makes it more efficient.’
  • 27) ‘His heart sank, fear spread and diffused through his body.’
  • 28) ‘Technology today is diffusing faster than ever.’
  • 29) ‘We must understand that Western technology diffuses to the rest of the world by moving sidewise, not disruptively.’
  • 30) ‘It diffuses and redistributes power, often to the benefit of what may be considered weaker, smaller actors.’
  • 31) ‘The Second World War produced the weapons which characterized all post-war conflicts, and diffused this technology world-wide.’
  • 32) ‘Power, especially economic power, has been diffused.’
  • 33) ‘Knowledge and power are both diffused downward throughout the system.’
  • 34) ‘Perfecting this technology would not only diffuse a contentious ethical and political issue, it is also the ideal solution from a scientific perspective.’
  • 35) ‘It diffuses competition and gradually creates a co-operative dynamic where people can feel safe to air their concerns.’
  • 36) ‘Once a musical form is created, it diffuses geographically and culturally.’
  • 37) ‘During such movement, oil molecules diffused into the cytoplasm of both palisade and spongy cells.’
  • 38) ‘The interior of channel-forming membrane proteins contains a column of water molecules through which protons and other small ions can diffuse across the membrane.’
  • 39) ‘Unfortunately, the majority of cancer deaths are due to metastases from malignant cells that have stealthily diffused into adjacent tissues and into organs far from the primary.’
  • 40) ‘During this unwinding period the alkali diffused into the viscous lysate to give a final pH of 12.4.’
  • 41) ‘It is initially absorbed into the fat layers under the skin, then is diffused into the capillaries where it enters the blood stream as needed.’
  • 42) ‘The fourth side is screened by lightweight wattle wall that gently diffuses the harsh light.’
  • 43) ‘It's refreshing these days to be reminded how good film can be when film-makers don't plane every rough edge and diffuse each harsh ray of sun, like make-over artists gone berserk.’
  • 44) ‘Upstairs, etched glass light wells diffuse luminance into the restaurant and glazed screens enclose private rooms.’
  • 45) ‘The morning light was diffused to a mucky orange by the pollution of the shuddering city.’
  • 46) ‘For this one, I put two cheap tungsten spots on the other side of the door, and taped white tissue paper all along the opening to diffuse the light.’
  • 47) ‘This is accomplished by either bouncing the light off a surface before it reaches your subject or by moving the flash off the camera and diffusing the light.’
  • 48) ‘The lights were diffused, casting a soft peach-shaded glow over everything.’
  • 49) ‘Using wood for its easy working but not liking its ‘natural wood’ look, the final touch would be an integral black paint which let the acrylic inserts diffuse the blue light through it.’
  • 50) ‘They need at least six hours a day of indirect sunlight; if direct sun can't be avoided, diffuse the light with a shade or sheer curtain.’
  • 51) ‘This background serves to diffuse the light and alters as the light itself changes and moves, creating a shimmering effect.’
  • 52) ‘Slatted or lattice style roofs are just enough to diffuse the sun's rays when they are at their peak without covering your deck or patio completely.’
  • 53) ‘As the day progresses, the weather starts to take on a gloomy appearance, with dark, gray clouds moving in, covering up the sky and diffusing the sunlight.’
  • 54) ‘And in the double-height exhibition space, two large window-screens, with built-in shutters, serve to break up and diffuse the sunlight.’
  • 55) ‘The tape doesn't reduce light transmission too much but serves to diffuse the direct rays that get by the shields.’
  • 56) ‘Lighter window treatments such as voile and muslin can diffuse daylight into a room with designer effects.’
  • 57) ‘The spatial sequence is crowned by the parallel skylight bars which diffuse a soft luminance into the gallery spaces.’
  • 58) ‘This causes light to be reflected evenly rather than being diffused by empty pores, creating a shinier surface.’
  • 59) ‘The incandescent bulbs, silvered on the tops to diffuse their light in a soft spread over the wall, function as punctuation points and visual anchors.’
  • 60) ‘Fretted screens diffuse the light, and wooden doors and panels are delicately carved.’
  • 61) ‘Incorporated within the timber louvres are troughs for planting that will gradually become established on the north side, screening and diffusing the sun's glare.’
  • 62) ‘Instead it comes from several diffuse sources spread over a large geographical area.’
  • 63) ‘The new threats were going to be diffuse, spread out, springing up wholly formed from unexpected quarters.’
  • 64) ‘By the time of the Civil War, a black fiddle tradition, which still exists in some regions of the Southeast today, was diffuse through that area.’
  • 65) ‘I find this area diffuse with a billion reasons advanced for becoming serious or evasive over serious music.’
  • 66) ‘Prose is discursive, its energies more diffuse and spread out across space and time.’
  • 67) ‘First, it moves a great deal of diffuse wealth and concentrates it in the hands of the war industry.’
  • 68) ‘Older people, an important category of newspaper readers, are also exhibiting more diffuse community ties.’
  • 69) ‘American games quickly united a diffuse immigrant community struggling for ways to become more American.’
  • 70) ‘Church officials were appointed on a regional basis so as to bind a diffuse community.’
  • 71) ‘Its large ecological potential and diffuse dispersal contribute significantly to the mosaic structure of many meadow communities.’
  • 72) ‘If the state spreads itself too thinly across the disconnected and diffuse networks of personal identity, it will simply dissipate.’
  • 73) ‘The label's glowing globalism and diffuse spirituality are still intact, and they're no strangers to neo-dub with a world-beat bent, which is the theme on their latest comp.’
  • 74) ‘And people on the streets outside the immediate blast zone would be exposed to a very small dose of dissipating radiation, made even more diffuse by the explosion itself.’
  • 75) ‘The loss they see is personal and immediate, while the benefits of increased productivity, competitiveness and innovation are diffuse and global.’
  • 76) ‘Everywhere people are promenading, basking in the miraculous light: warm, long, slanting, at once brilliant and diffuse.’
  • 77) ‘At the national level, however, this kind of more direct control is more difficult to achieve given the complex and diffuse nature of patronage networks.’
  • 78) ‘In addition, stock ownership became more diffuse, enabling middle-class Americans to benefit from economic growth.’
  • 79) ‘When, on the other hand, the target group is large and diffuse, as it is for women, it is more difficult to direct resources and tailor programs towards that group.’
  • 80) ‘We are interested in ideas, stories and voices that are overlooked by the dominant media, and in contributing to a more diverse and diffuse public culture.’
  • 81) ‘Work-based networks, diffuse friendships and shared or mutually acknowledged social values are also forms of social capital.’
  • 82) ‘In general, signs of focal or diffuse inflammation superior to the spinal cord were mild.’
  • 83) ‘Condylomata represent a focal manifestation of a diffuse infection and occur in only a minority of those infected with HPV.’
  • 84) ‘Bronchocentric granulomatosis can present radiologically as a single mass, as multiple masses, or as a more diffuse disease.’
  • 85) ‘The diagnoses, therefore, were hyperreactive airway disease and diffuse intrapulmonary telangiectasia.’
  • 86) ‘The majority of these patients were initially suspected of having an infectious etiology for their diffuse pulmonary disease.’
  • 87) ‘The large painting is strangely diffuse and lacking in structure for that master of tight, well-ordered composition.’
  • 88) ‘Today, the term has something of a diffuse meaning.’
  • 89) ‘But it might as well be scrapped if it becomes too accommodating and diffuse to remain meaningful.’
  • 90) ‘Although such a study clearly runs the risk of feeling diffuse and disconnected, her work succeeds because she uses a similar heuristic with each war and each text.’
  • 91) ‘Without the emotional drive that the US brought to bear on a quite unprecedented situation, the international community's response is likely to have been confused and diffuse.’
  • 92) ‘Defined in parallel with synesthesia as the blending of images or concepts, metaphor enables us to make concrete what is diffuse, familiar what is unfamiliar.’
  • 93) ‘His choice of difficult and often diffuse texts, with which most students of of the classics have but a passing acquaintance, means that his services are not always recognized.’
  • 94) ‘Like the Republicans, the protesters here in Philadelphia are mainly staying on message, but their message is very diffuse.’
  • 95) ‘But, unaware as I am that this is my real goal, my dissatisfaction will remain diffuse and unintelligible to me.’
  • 96) ‘Though filled with powerful, often hilarious moments, it is too diffuse.’
  • 97) ‘And for my money Ryan's use of viewpoint is too diffuse.’
  • 98) ‘Last time, the Biennial was a group curatorial effort, and the result was a rather diffuse exhibition.’
  • 99) ‘More generally, his writing style is somewhat diffuse, full of jokes and asides, with the result that his line of analysis is sometimes opaque.’
  • 100) ‘What I am basically saying is there are so many different strands of accountability in one way or another, the whole context of accountability can get somewhat diffuse; would you share that view?’
  • 101) ‘She is both the discerning scholar from the West who has managed to keep a sense of perspective and balance in a diffuse narrative and an enchanted participant in the action.’
  • 102) ‘His third volume is his most diffuse work.’
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