debrief vs brief

debrief brief

Definitions

  • 1) transitive To question someone, or a group of people, after the implementation of a project in order to learn from mistakes etc.
  • 2) transitive To inform subjects of an experiment about what has happened in a complete and accurate manner.
  • 3) transitive To inform subjects of an experiment about what has happened in a complete and accurate manner.
  • 4) transitive To question someone, or a group of people, after the implementation of a project in order to learn from mistakes etc.
  • 5) transitive To question someone after a military mission in order to obtain intelligence.
  • 6) transitive To question someone after a military mission in order to obtain intelligence.
  • 7) to interrogate (a person) who has recently experienced an event, to obtain information about that experience; -- used especially of military pilots or diplomatic agents who have just returned from a mission.
  • 8) put someone through a debriefing and make him report
  • 9) To meet with (one who has undergone a traumatic or stressful experience), especially for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.
  • 10) To interview (a government agent, for example) at the end of an assignment, especially to obtain intelligence or to provide instructions regarding information that should be kept secret.

Definitions

  • 1) Law A document concisely stating the legal points being made, including often the citation and explanation of supporting legal authority.
  • 2) A short, succinct statement.
  • 3) Roman Catholic Church A papal letter that is not as formal as a bull.
  • 4) Law A document concisely stating the legal points being made, including often the citation and explanation of supporting legal authority.
  • 5) Short, tight-fitting underpants.
  • 6) Chiefly British The instructions that are given to explain a task or assignment.
  • 7) Roman Catholic Church A papal letter that is not as formal as a bull.
  • 8) Chiefly British The instructions that are given to explain a task or assignment.
  • 9) A briefing.
  • 10) A condensation or an abstract of a larger document or series of documents.
  • 11) (Law) A writ; a breve. See Breve, n., 2.
  • 12) (Law) An abridgment or concise statement of a client's case, made out for the instruction of counsel in a trial at law. This word is applied also to a statement of the heads or points of a law argument.
  • 13) An epitome.
  • 14) in a few words; in short; briefly.
  • 15) engraving A letter patent, from proper authority, authorizing a collection or charitable contribution of money in churches, for any public or private purpose.
  • 16) (Law) An abridgment or concise statement of a client's case, made out for the instruction of counsel in a trial at law. This word is applied also to a statement of the heads or points of a law argument.
  • 17) (Scots Law) A writ issuing from the chancery, directed to any judge ordinary, commanding and authorizing that judge to call a jury to inquire into the case, and upon their verdict to pro ce sentence.
  • 18) (Scots Law) A writ issuing from the chancery, directed to any judge ordinary, commanding and authorizing that judge to call a jury to inquire into the case, and upon their verdict to proce sentence.
  • 19) an abstract or abridgment of all the deeds and other papers constituting the chain of title to any real estate.
  • 20) engraving A letter patent, from proper authority, authorizing a collection or charitable contribution of money in churches, for any public or private purpose.
  • 21) A short concise writing or letter; a statement in few words.
  • 22) (Law) A writ; a breve. See Breve, n., 2.
  • 23) a letter of the pope written on fine parchment in modern characters, subscribed by the secretary of briefs, dated “a die Nativitatis,” i. e., “from the day of the Nativity,” and sealed with the ring of the fisherman. It differs from a bull, in its parchment, written character, date, and seal. See Bull.
  • 24) a type of men's underpants without legs, fitting tightly and held by an elastic waistband; also called Jockey shorts.
  • 25) A writ summoning one to answer to any action; or any precept of the sovereign in writing issuing from any court and ordering something to be done. In Scots law, same as brieve (which see). In England, a letter patent from proper authority authorizing a public collection or charitable contribution of money for any public or private purpose; a license to make collections for repairing churches, making up for losses by fire, etc.: sometimes called a church brief or king's letter.
  • 26) A writing in general; a letter.
  • 27) Specifically In law:
  • 28) In music, same as breve
  • 29) A short or concise writing; a short statement or account; an epitome.
  • 30) [Also spelled breif, breef, ⟨ OF. bref, brief, a spell, talisman, ⟨ ML. breve, in pl. brevia, a writing containing magical characters carried as an amulet or talisman: a particular use of L. breve, a writing, as above.] A spell. Burns. [Scotch.] Synonyms
  • 31) The name given to certain official documents emanating from the pope, having a less solemn character than a bull.
  • 32) Succinct; concise.
  • 33) Short in time, duration, length, or extent.
  • 34) Curt; abrupt.
  • 35) Prov. Eng. Rife; common; prevalent.
  • 36) Prov. Eng. Rife; common; prevalent.
  • 37) See under Brief, n.
  • 38) Concise; terse; succinct.
  • 39) Short in duration.
  • 40) Compact,compendious.
  • 41) Inshort.
  • 42) Compact, compendious.
  • 43) In short.
  • 44) In or after a short time; soon; quickly.
  • 45) To furnish with a brief; instruct by a brief.
  • 46) [Appar. a particular use of brief, short (hence quick, active, rife?); but some suppose a confusion with rife.] Common; rife; prevalent: as, I hear smallpox is very brief there.
  • 47) Clever; good: as, a brief discourse; “he gae us a very brief sermon,”
  • 48) In brief; in short; briefly.
  • 49) Keen.
  • 50) Short in expression; using few words; concise; succinct.
  • 51) Short in duration; lasting a short time.
  • 52) To abridge; shorten; make a brief of: as, to brief pleadings.
  • 53) Quick;ready;eager.
  • 54) Quick; ready; eager.
  • 55) Synonyms Short-lived, ephemeral, transitory, fleeting.
  • 56) Small with respect to length; short.
  • 57) Abbreviated; cut or made short: as, the brief skirts of a ballet-dancer. [Humorous.]—
  • 58) To give instructions or preparatory information to.
  • 59) To summarize.
  • 60) To make an abstract or abridgment of; to shorten.
  • 61) (in brief) In short.
  • 62) (in brief) In short.

Examples

  • 1) We'll need to have a proper debrief, but that can wait for morning.
  • 2) Half an hour later, I was back in the office, ready to debrief Bill.
  • 3) We had a brief ` debrief brunch ' back at Danilo's, where he filled me in on the `key learnings' garnered from his round of investigations.
  • 4) Animal was telling me about how you film every practice, then debrief.
  • 5) Denial of the debrief is also in direct violation of two Presidential Executive Order signed by Presidents Bush and
  • 6) Soon, your email will be filled with feedback, customer analytics, and meeting reqs to debrief from the research department.
  • 7) Jeff Jarvis links to a fascinating debrief from the Guardian's "white knuckle ride" after the first week of their CommentIsFree blog.
  • 8) Tien was polygraphed, and his debrief is believed to be accurate.
  • 9) One of the only ways these prisoners can get out the SHU is if they "debrief"--that is, give prison officials information on gang activity.
  • 10) "Before we get back to what you charmingly call the debrief, Gus ..."
  • 11) Then after that, after the debrief, which is expected to take two to three days, the crew members who are based at Whidbey Island at the Naval Air Station there in Washington state, will head back there and be reunited with families.
  • 12) ‘Once we returned to base camp, we handed any contraband or detainees over to the S2 and debriefed our soldiers, especially those on the assault force.’
  • 13) ‘I proceeded to the tactical operations center and debriefed Lancer 6 as my men refueled and rearmed.’
  • 14) ‘Every soldier in the patrol knew his mission and post-patrol debriefings began to yield better intelligence because soldiers knew ahead of time what indicators to look for.’
  • 15) ‘Soldiers want to maintain their equipment and get some chow and rest after a mission, but the mission is not over until participants are debriefed.’
  • 16) ‘I debriefed him on the mission over Clark Field.’
  • 17) ‘Each SF battalion runs its debriefings in a different manner.’
  • 18) ‘After I exited the aircraft, I stayed on the roof, debriefing the troubleshooters.’
  • 19) ‘Once there, trainers evaluated every second of the missions during post-flight debriefings.’
  • 20) ‘The CIA never debriefed him on anything of strategic importance and tried to kill the interest others might have by discrediting him behind his back.’
  • 21) ‘The single most important procedure in this methodology is an effective debriefing.’
  • 22) ‘He went to the US in October 1992 and spent most of the next year being debriefed by the CIA.’
  • 23) ‘Some of the information came from Embassy personnel debriefings and reports.’
  • 24) ‘They should at least write a certification that if somebody comes out of a war zone they need to be debriefed.’
  • 25) ‘In this case, I know for a fact the shooting happened; I debriefed the officer who did most of the ballistic damage, and his supervisor.’
  • 26) ‘He is safe in Germany this afternoon after being debriefed by his superior officers.’
  • 27) ‘He has been debriefed by police and taken to a safe house amid fears Hall's underworld associates may target him.’
  • 28) ‘The team was debriefed by the company commander and the operations officer as soon as it returned.’
  • 29) ‘Since then it has been a nun's missionary home, various forms of home for elderly people, and a place where airmen were debriefed during the second world war.’
  • 30) ‘He was in Germany in 1945 as part of a special team dedicated to debriefing Nazi scientists and shipping them back to the US.’
  • 31) ‘I raised these points during our debrief, and we discussed them at length.’
  • 32) ‘In our debrief, we discussed crew coordination and the process of deciding to eject.’
  • 33) ‘As discussed in the debrief, dumping gas would have been the right decision to make.’
  • 34) ‘Early in the deployment, we used written reports and oral debriefs with patrol leaders daily.’
  • 35) ‘Platoons and companies that conduct rigorous pre-combat inspections, training rehearsals, patrol debriefs, and AARs are laying the foundation of strong discipline.’
  • 36) ‘His notes became crucial during debriefs and filling out patrol reports.’
  • 37) ‘At the debrief, I felt good about how the mission unfolded, except for when we first established comms with the beach.’
  • 38) ‘Throughout the crew debrief, we recalled the many questions that had run through our heads.’
  • 39) ‘The centre will include state-of-the-art technology for commanders to oversee the exercises in real time then replay missions in debriefs to personnel.’
  • 40) ‘Midway through the debrief, we were notified the aircraft battery had gone into a thermal-runaway condition, which is very bad.’
  • 41) ‘We have to be in three hours before flight, and stay one hour after for debriefs and paperwork.’
  • 42) ‘After several debriefs and hours of exploring why the problems occurred, we made several determinations.’
  • 43) ‘Despite one of the most constructive debriefs in my aviation career, I could have done without this flight.’
  • 44) ‘Once I closed and locked the door, the ensuing debrief lasted for 2 hours - which is pretty amazing, considering we only flew one full-up engagement.’
  • 45) ‘It was not until after a thorough debrief, and after I had a chance to sit down and think about what actually happened, that I realized how close I had come to starring in a Class-A mishap.’
  • 46) ‘After admitting to maintenance and the squadron what had happened, as well as conducting a thorough debrief, the jet and I were back flying later that night.’
  • 47) ‘After the debrief, I found out I had shut down with 2,100 pounds of fuel remaining - not bad for a shore-based flight.’
  • 48) ‘In the debrief, I asked the crew of the lead jet if they had the same problem at the same time, and they said ‘yes.’’
  • 49) ‘The crew debrief brought out some interesting points.’
  • 50) ‘During the flight debrief, the instructor and I identified the following contributing factors to the near-mishap.’

Examples

  • 1) But the road was narrow and the offside wheels were on to the grass verge in the brief moment before he regained full control.
  • 2) By the end they'd hammered out a brief for a research paper.
  • 3) A brief flash of light caught her eye, from somewhere over near the tree.
  • 4) The larva had fared well in its brief time in the forest, surrounded by an inexhaustible supply of vegetation.
  • 5) The brief you will be making now will consist of an _introduction_, which states whatever facts and principles are necessary to an understanding of the brief, and the _brief_ itself, which consists of a series of propositions, each supporting your main contention, and each in turn supported by others, which again may each be supported by another series.
  • 6) Secretary Gates used the term brief pause again in his testimony.
  • 7) At any rate, without going into that specifically, in February he used the term brief pause.
  • 8) That, in brief, is the purpose of this little volume, in which Dr. Raper summarizes the results of careful studies, made by himself and Professor Walter Chivers, of the eight-four lynchings of the past five years.
  • 9) What, in brief, is the operative relation between aesthetic pleasure and criticism?
  • 10) This, in brief, is the system which has been laid out for us by child experts and educators generally, and the well-to‑do parents of America have accepted it without question as the normal and natural procedure in the upbringing of their children.
  • 11) Such in brief is the outline of the Indian State as it has emerged through the fifties.
  • 12) Such in brief is my specification for a genus Americans, whose voice I do not hear.
  • 13) ‘The brief visit left no time for discovery or inquiry.’
  • 14) ‘A brief visit to the temple in the house completes his morning routine before breakfast with the family.’
  • 15) ‘It consists of regularly scheduled, brief office visits.’
  • 16) ‘Formal psychotherapy is difficult in a brief office visit.’
  • 17) ‘The entire middle section of the book details this brief visit.’
  • 18) ‘She had gotten a brief visit from her family, and had hated it.’
  • 19) ‘She decided to pay a brief visit to one of the stalls herself.’
  • 20) ‘And a brief visit to their shuttle home was restricted to the upper level.’
  • 21) ‘He'd asked to be allowed just one visit, one brief encounter with Angel.’
  • 22) ‘It recoiled, struggling to crawl away, and its features twisted into a brief expression of pain or rage.’
  • 23) ‘Mr. Williams stammered, after flashed his daughter a brief expression of shock.’
  • 24) ‘His blank expression broke into a brief grin that disappeared almost as quickly as it had come.’
  • 25) ‘An image of Liza surfaced in his mind for a brief second and her words of their last interaction echoed in his head.’
  • 26) ‘He took a mouthful of his ready made breakfast to hide the brief lapse in expression.’
  • 27) ‘After its brief exposure, the word was masked and a letter was shown above and below one of the letter positions.’
  • 28) ‘As Cheska and Steve starred at each other for a brief moment the only expression Cheska could not hide was fear.’
  • 29) ‘He paused for the brief spattering of polite applause that followed.’
  • 30) ‘The knight gave a brief nod at Pher's words, expressionless.’
  • 31) ‘But during his brief tenure, Thomson has had choice words for both the government and the opposition.’
  • 32) ‘Only then does the audience have its brief opportunity to launch incisive ripostes into the heart of the thesis.’
  • 33) ‘Orion must have noticed my horrified expression, because he continued after only a brief hesitation.’
  • 34) ‘Her son gave a brief smile, comforted by those words but still not completely sure that they would follow through.’
  • 35) ‘Turning to Dimitri, her once stoic expression was shattered as a brief smirk lightened her face.’
  • 36) ‘A few brief words about the move to Skaggerak in 1902.’
  • 37) ‘A brief word, though, about Ms. Young, whom I'd never heard of before.’
  • 38) ‘With a brief word from his chauffeur, they were allowed admittance.’
  • 39) ‘He vaguely heard a brief exchange of words between Yulia and Jana.’
  • 40) ‘Once Heather saw that her mission had been accomplished, she sauntered over to Chez and spoke a few brief words.’
  • 41) ‘I didn't get out of my chair right away, her brief words deeply troubled me.’
  • 42) ‘During this brief exchange of words, Klauss had ventured over to the crumpled picture and unfurled it.’
  • 43) ‘She had hoped her brief explosion in words would have ceased his badgering.’
  • 44) ‘A brief interchange of words resulted in the unanimous decision to escape as soon as possible.’
  • 45) ‘Before moving on to a discussion of Mexicans in Aurora, a brief word is in order about sources.’
  • 46) ‘She delivered the message in a few brief words, then put down the phone.’
  • 47) ‘He firmly gripped the hilt of his long sword and shouted brief words of refusal.’
  • 48) ‘He seemed to sense this and gave her a hug whispering brief words of comfort to her.’
  • 49) ‘Whenever we passed on the street we exchanged brief words but that had been it.’
  • 50) ‘The minister had a brief word with the American team leader and left without eating or drinking anything.’
  • 51) ‘The information is brief and concise, and gives the reader a general overview of the various organ systems.’
  • 52) ‘This essay also showcases MacDonald's ability to capture the essence of a piece of music in a few brief words.’
  • 53) ‘They can send simple and brief messages like that but there's no easy way to communicate with a submarine.’
  • 54) ‘She offered polite, brief responses and laughed right along.’
  • 55) ‘Intervention messages should contain simple and brief information and avoid complexity.’
  • 56) ‘It covers ten areas, besides a brief foreword and a crisp introduction.’
  • 57) ‘The room Tripitaka entered contained about 30 women, all dressed in very brief clothing.’
  • 58) ‘A cheerful female gorilla garbed in a brief shirt and a halter top stood at a podium.’
  • 59) ‘God, how she wished she were wearing something more than her brief underwear.’
  • 60) ‘Mosquito bites line the insides of my legs only stopping at the brief cloth on my lower body that some would call shorts.’
  • 61) ‘When we receive a brief from a casting director, we go through our book of models and put forward who we think is suitable for the job.’
  • 62) ‘After receiving an informative brief on the testing process given by the warrant officer, the staff were counted.’
  • 63) ‘Chief executives of government authorities often complain that they are not given an unambiguous brief with clear mandates and a single objective.’
  • 64) ‘Most of what you get from your clients in a creative brief is akin to stereo instructions in terms of dramatic impact and sheer volume.’
  • 65) ‘Design is accomplishing the task, according to the brief, to the customer's satisfaction.’
  • 66) ‘Without any brief or instruction, the man had made his home in a clearing and even cultivated a small potato crop.’
  • 67) ‘What four areas should be covered in the task definition section of a creative brief?’
  • 68) ‘Adam brought his ten-year-old son to him, with a brief to knock the boy's piano technique into shape.’
  • 69) ‘This retained a lot of the edginess that you might associate with the band whilst adding the elements that was required from the original brief.’
  • 70) ‘What we all hoped - and actually, it was all part of the brief - that it would be political.’
  • 71) ‘He stayed with the company until 1994, where his experiences bled into the brief behind Theatre Absolute.’
  • 72) ‘Over the past year anyone with a brief to invest in, say, small companies or commodities would have naturally outperformed.’
  • 73) ‘But surely he can't be a currently serving, if he abuses his brief so widely?’
  • 74) ‘The brief was to produce something that could be turned into a tattoo - something with not too much fine detail.’
  • 75) ‘Once we get a brief from a client there is a research stage and a brainstorming session.’
  • 76) ‘He felt that the brief was too abstract.’
  • 77) ‘After the brief, we dash to complete one more task before strapping on the jet.’
  • 78) ‘In the interests of simplicity and keeping things as open as possible, it has been decided to go for an open brief with only a few key guidelines.’
  • 79) ‘It had to widen its brief to embrace purchasing and information technology as well.’
  • 80) ‘It doesn't matter how good your brief and debrief are if you haven't got airplanes to fight with.’
  • 81) ‘He was a barrister, he was offered a brief.’
  • 82) ‘Indeed, Mr Ross, now in his seventies, is still at his desk, working as a barrister taking briefs.’
  • 83) ‘The Bar Council last week announced that barristers could now take briefs directly from members of the public.’
  • 84) ‘When I was a very young barrister, I had a brief to defend a man who was charged with assaulting the police.’
  • 85) ‘Less prominent counsel was equally able to undertake the work and would have taken the brief for a lesser amount.’
  • 86) ‘The briefs on the other side of the case were written exclusively by major media companies, congressmen, and copyright holders.’
  • 87) ‘The team put together mountains of legal briefs to support the argument that Texas had no right to control the private conduct of its citizens.’
  • 88) ‘The Association has issued a number of legal briefs to support the civil rights of individuals.’
  • 89) ‘He didn't just file a brief; he helped write one with the Center for Law and Justice.’
  • 90) ‘These are briefs in support of deportation orders, decidedly not a traditional civil rights function.’
  • 91) ‘And fifteen other states evidently agreed - filing amicus briefs in support of Alabama's position.’
  • 92) ‘Skills like writing a brief, conducting a deposition, or arguing in court are useful by-products.’
  • 93) ‘He also helps to write legal briefs for other inmates.’
  • 94) ‘Heavy amicus curiae briefs are filed in support of both upholding and reversing the Circuit Court's decision.’
  • 95) ‘We're taught how to write case briefs, memorandums, appellate briefs, and case citations.’
  • 96) ‘The court have received these submissions as ‘friend of the court briefs,’ supporting one side or the other.’
  • 97) ‘The office also writes amicus briefs applying psychological research to legal issues.’
  • 98) ‘It is noted that neither he nor the plaintiffs ever requested copies of the briefs or reports in writing or otherwise.’
  • 99) ‘APA has filed an amicus brief in support of the policy.’
  • 100) ‘Nineteen states have joined in an amicus brief supporting Kansas.’
  • 101) ‘Counsel for the plaintiff shall make brief written submissions in reply and on costs within 10 days after that.’
  • 102) ‘The three groups in the brief sided with the British during World War II.’
  • 103) ‘He presents legal briefs on violations of environmental law to the authorities.’
  • 104) ‘To what extent is it appropriate for judges to ‘borrow’ language from one side's brief?’
  • 105) ‘The brief set forth the argument in six concise points.’
  • 106) ‘He has delivered a papal brief recommending it to that prince that he will take the same steps in this matter.’
  • 107) ‘He discovered that the agreement, far from being in accordance with the papal brief, was in direct opposition to it.’
  • 108) ‘For a papal brief to be valid, it has to be read in the presence of those whom it concerns.’
  • 109) ‘In 1773, following the expulsion of Jesuits from several European and Italian states, Clement XIV issued a brief suppressing the order.’
  • 110) ‘He has all the information you'll need and will brief you thoroughly.’
  • 111) ‘However, you can't fake knowledge, and the waiter was thoroughly briefed on all aspects of the menu.’
  • 112) ‘Figuring I'd briefed him thoroughly on the other aspects of the policy, I answered his question.’
  • 113) ‘Lucky Tahlia got to sit through my cursing and weariness as she directed and briefed me.’
  • 114) ‘But the one thing we were not able to do was brief the President directly.’
  • 115) ‘If you'll inform Crane as soon as possible, we can brief him and get him on the inside ASAP.’
  • 116) ‘The volunteers were briefed about the study protocol and informed consent was obtained from them.’
  • 117) ‘At his first meeting at the Pentagon three colonels briefed him.’
  • 118) ‘And the general who briefed us this morning said he was well aware of them from the earlier Persian Gulf War.’
  • 119) ‘I briefed him in Kathmandu all about altitude illness so he'd know what to look for.’
  • 120) ‘Well before I answer, let me brief you on how it all began…’
  • 121) ‘They'd brief us if there were any serious threats.’
  • 122) ‘He went to England in 2001 to brief the staff about water jets.’
  • 123) ‘We're going to brief you later on on who didn't get nominated and all that.’
  • 124) ‘Do they brief the family as to the progress, or is it as difficult for you to get information?’
  • 125) ‘Another problem arose when he briefed his people about this mission.’
  • 126) ‘They made us sit on seats and Nina began to brief us with the projector showing us the information.’
  • 127) ‘You can brief a witness all day long, all year long and the dynamics once you get in a courtroom always change.’
  • 128) ‘Even the easy stuff is hard: scheduling meetings, briefing the right people, keeping the bureaucracy under control.’
  • 129) ‘It is briefing me about the weather tomorrow.’
  • 130) ‘The exercise of sound judgment in briefing a barrister is one of the professional services a solicitor offers a client.’
  • 131) ‘We say that the solicitor was engaged and then briefed a barrister.’
  • 132) ‘That evening his solicitor was briefed by the police as to the circumstances of his arrest.’
  • 133) ‘A very experienced barrister had been briefed, but the Kellys couldn't find the money for his fees.’
  • 134) ‘Counsel have to be briefed, solicitors have to be employed.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy