current vs currant

current currant

Definitions

  • 1) A tendency or a course of events.
  • 2) electricity The time rate of flow of electric charge.
  • 3) The part of a fluid that moves continuously in a certain direction.
  • 4) electricity The time rate of flow of electric charge.
  • 5) The amount of electric charge flowing past a specified circuit point per unit time.
  • 6) A steady, smooth onward flow or movement: synonym: flow.
  • 7) A flow of electric charge.
  • 8) The part of a body of liquid or gas that has a continuous onward movement.
  • 9) A general tendency, movement, or course. synonym: tendency.
  • 10) A general tendency, movement, or course. synonym: tendency.
  • 11) A steady, smooth onward flow or movement: synonym: flow.
  • 12) A flowing or passing; onward motion. Hence: A body of fluid moving continuously in a certain direction; a stream; esp., the swiftest part of it; ; that which resembles a stream in motion.
  • 13) a mill driven by a current wheel.
  • 14) General course; ordinary procedure; progressive and connected movement
  • 15) a wheel dipping into the water and driven by the current of a stream or by the ebb and flow of the tide.
  • 16) an instrument for measuring the velocity, force, etc., of currents.
  • 17) a flow of electricity through a conductor
  • 18) dominant course (suggestive of running water) of successive events or ideas
  • 19) a steady flow of a fluid (usually from natural causes)
  • 20) Specifically, a portion of a large body of water or of air moving in a certain direction: as, ocean-currents.
  • 21) The amount of depression given to a roof to cause the water which falls upon it to flow in a given direction.
  • 22) General or main course; general tendency: as, the current of opinion.
  • 23) An obsolete spelling of currant.
  • 24) A flowing; a flow; a stream; a passing by a continuous flux: used of fluids, as water, air, etc., or of supposed fluids, as electricity.
  • 25) Course in general; progressive movement or passage; connected series: as, the current of time.
  • 26) Generally accepted, used, practiced, or prevalent at the moment.
  • 27) Existing or occurring at the moment.
  • 28) Prevalent, especially at the present time: synonym: prevailing.
  • 29) Being in progress now.
  • 30) Belonging to the present time.
  • 31) Prevalent, especially at the present time: synonym: prevailing.
  • 32) Running; flowing.
  • 33) Passing from one to another; circulating.
  • 34) Fitted for general acceptance or circulation; authentic; passable.
  • 35) Now passing, as time.
  • 36) Commonly estimated or acknowledged.
  • 37) lawful money.
  • 38) Passing from person to person, or from hand to hand; circulating through the community; generally received; common.
  • 39) Archaic Running or moving rapidly.
  • 40) See under Account.
  • 41) Archaic Running or moving rapidly.
  • 42) occurring in or belonging to the present time
  • 43) Entitled to credit or recognition; fitted for general acceptance or circulation; authentic; genuine.
  • 44) Running; moving; flowing; passing.
  • 45) Established by common estimation or consent; generally received: as, the current value of coin.
  • 46) Hence Passing from one to another; especially, widely circulated; publicly known, believed, or reported; common; general; prevalent; as, the current ideas of the day.
  • 47) To make current or common; establish in common estimation; render acceptable.
  • 48) Now passing; present in its course: as, the current month or year.
  • 49) Passing from hand to hand; circulating: as, current coin.

Definitions

  • 1) A small dried grape, usually the Black Corinth grape, rarely more than 4mm diameter when dried.
  • 2) A shrub bearing such fruit.
  • 3) The fruit of various shrubs of the genus Ribes, either white, black or red.
  • 4) A small seedless raisin of the Mediterranean region, used chiefly in baking.
  • 5) Any of various deciduous, spineless shrubs of the genus Ribes, native chiefly to the Northern Hemisphere and having flowers in racemes and edible red, black, or white berries.
  • 6) Any of several other plants or their fruit.
  • 7) The fruits of any of these plants, used for jams, jellies, desserts, or beverages.
  • 8) (Zoöl.) an insect larva which eats the leaves or fruit of the currant. The most injurious are the currant sawfly (Nematus ventricosus), introduced from Europe, and the spanworm (Eufitchia ribearia). The fruit worms are the larva of a fly (Epochra Canadensis), and a spanworm (Eupithecia).
  • 9) (Zoöl.) the larva of an insect that bores into the pith and kills currant bushes; specif., the larvae of a small clearwing moth (Ægeria tipuliformis) and a longicorn beetle (Psenocerus supernotatus).
  • 10) (Zoöl.) the larva of an insect that bores into the pith and kills currant bushes; specif., the larvae of a small clearwing moth (Ægeria tipuliformis) and a longicorn beetle (Psenocerus supernotatus).
  • 11) (Bot.) A shrub or bush of several species of the genus Ribes (a genus also including the gooseberry); esp., the Ribes rubrum.
  • 12) A small kind of seedless raisin, imported from the Levant, chiefly from Zante and Cephalonia; -- used in cookery.
  • 13) a variety of the red currant, having a strong, symmetrical bush and a very large berry.
  • 14) a shrub or bush (Ribes nigrum and Ribes floridum) and its black, strong-flavored, tonic fruit.
  • 15) a species of Ribes (Ribes aureum), having showy yellow flowers.
  • 16) (Bot.) A shrub or bush of several species of the genus Ribes (a genus also including the gooseberry); esp., the Ribes rubrum.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) an insect larva which eats the leaves or fruit of the currant. The most injurious are the currant sawfly (Nematus ventricosus), introduced from Europe, and the spanworm (Eufitchia ribearia). The fruit worms are the larva of a fly (Epochra Canadensis), and a spanworm (Eupithecia).
  • 18) The acid fruit or berry of the Ribes rubrum or common red currant, or of its variety, the white currant.
  • 19) small dried seedless raisin grown in the Mediterranean region and California; used in cooking
  • 20) any of several tart red or black berries used primarily for jellies and jams
  • 21) any of various deciduous shrubs of the genus Ribes bearing currants
  • 22) A very small kind of raisin or dried grape imported from the Levant, chiefly from Zante and Cephalonia, and used in cookery.
  • 23) In Australia and Tasmania, a species of Leucopogon, especially
  • 24) A name for various melastomaceous species of tropical America, bearing edible berries, especially of the genera
  • 25) The small round fruit (a berry) of several species of Ribes, natural order Saxifragaceæ; the plant producing this fruit: so called because the berries resemble in size the small grapes from the Levant.
  • 26) An obsolete spelling of current and courant.

Examples

  • 1) Fraudsters can open current accounts to receive the illicit cash transfers.
  • 2) These crystals give off a small electric current.
  • 3) How do you see his current situation?
  • 4) Bank current accounts have been the way to earn high interest in recent years.
  • 5) If the current year plays out like the last, that will have to be cut.
  • 6) Without that, the current winter crisis will become a permanent crisis.
  • 7) He screamed, but his friends did not hear him and he could not swim across a strong current to reach them.
  • 8) There are fears as many as 1,000 ex-servicemen could face charges in the current witch hunt.
  • 9) A glider is ready to take off from Argentina in a flight designed to surf mountain air currents to the edge of space.
  • 10) It won’t slow down the ongoing robotics revolution in manufacturing, because current processes still have lots of room for automation to improve safety, speed and quality.
  • 11) One in ten people have current accounts with it.
  • 12) There are current season crops still going.
  • 13) The battery makes an electric current low through the copper wire.
  • 14) The present value method reduces all future cash flows to current values.
  • 15) You need to compare the assessed charge with your current bill to see which is cheaper.
  • 16) The purpose was to map ocean currents.
  • 17) Training activities aim at improving the skills needed to perform current job duties effectively.
  • 18) Viewers and the studio audience can pose questions on current affairs and air their views.
  • 19) The currents proved too strong and he was forced to turn back.
  • 20) The situation reminds me of when the current interest in small groups was just beginning.
  • 21) We urge him now to show the same moderation in addressing the current situation.
  • 22) The current liquidity crisis has seen perfectly viable small companies dragged down.
  • 23) Are you wondering whether to switch your current account to another bank?
  • 24) Few of us save all our current cash flow or borrow fully against our future cash flow.
  • 25) They take interest on our current accounts and charge us for services.
  • 26) They felt a current of air like a hurricane wind.
  • 27) Rescue divers battled strong currents as they tried to get into the ship.
  • 28) Our obedient dog lay motionless as we stood and watched the trio work the currents of the river.
  • 29) It uses variations in electric current along a long wire to transmit coded messages from one location to another.
  • 30) The vocals add a contemporary edge and are essential to keeping the show current yet still retaining an urbane feel.
  • 31) Because the current threats to ocean life are environmental and diffuse, they are easier to deny.
  • 32) Further, it has already secured 30 per cent of its expected housing sales for the current financial year.
  • 33) An electric current produces a magnet, and _a magnet also may be made to produce an electric current_.
  • 34) Now when a current acts by induction upon conducting matter lateral to it, it probably acts upon the electricity in that conducting matter whether it be in the form of a _current_ or
  • 35) # Alternatively, we could just use makeobj in the commands below ... current = ` pwd ` if [ "$srcFolder" = "$current"]; then cb fi
  • 36) * @param string $current is the current value of the option in use (used to set the selected option in the list) * @param string $options should be an array of the options to be generated function generate_option_list ($current, $options) $list = ""; foreach ($options as $curopt) $sel = ""; if ($current = = $curopt) $sel = "selected = \" selected\ "";
  • 37) # substitute build dir with src dir dest = ` pwd | sed - e s, $KDE_BUILD, $KDE_SRC, ` current = ` pwd ` if [ "$dest" = "$current"]; then cd "$KDE_SRC" else cd "$dest" fi fi
  • 38) {remove x from list} return {break} end else {x not yet found} current: = current↑. next end end end; {DELETE} Fig. 4.12.
  • 39) x then goto add; {break} current: = current↑. next end; add: {current is now the cell after which x is to be inserted} new (newcell); newcell↑. element: = x; newcell↑. next: = current↑. next; current↑. next: = newcell end; {INSERT} Fig. 4.6.
  • 40) We needed to be inventive about wording in the communique in consideration for a country that did not want to use the term 'current account balance'...
  • 41) ‘This was done in the current research by presenting events (bets on the toss of a coin) in blocks.’
  • 42) ‘I'm not expected to be well-educated on modern politics and current events.’
  • 43) ‘However, they obviously did not do enough because if there was not a serious problem the current turn of events would not have happened.’
  • 44) ‘Most often people indulge in a fight not over a current event but about something that happened in the past.’
  • 45) ‘Has anyone bothered to ask the population at large how safe they feel in the current police presence?’
  • 46) ‘The prospectus doesn't forecast what will happen in the current year.’
  • 47) ‘He also updated the branch on the current happenings in the county.’
  • 48) ‘Like all problems, however, the current perception of incompetence presents an opportunity.’
  • 49) ‘The orchestra is made up of both past and current students from the Presentation College.’
  • 50) ‘He said the current services that were present were insufficient because of a lack of funding.’
  • 51) ‘I wish the producers would realise that current affairs is not the only show in town.’
  • 52) ‘The decline of the dollar is a warning sign that current economic trends cannot continue.’
  • 53) ‘The previews I read were all excited by this new idea technique of treating history as current affairs.’
  • 54) ‘Unlike other diagnostic criteria, the pulse is very reactive and reflects the most current state of the individual.’
  • 55) ‘Most current accounts pay a pitiful rate of interest, usually only a fraction of 1 %.’
  • 56) ‘One current trend is to make the skirt panels extremely stiff.’
  • 57) ‘What use was learning about the past when there were much more current situations to deal with?’
  • 58) ‘The most current bibliographical entry dates from June 2003, the year before publication.’
  • 59) ‘He is not sure whether this legislation does dovetail neatly into the current situation.’
  • 60) ‘Itching to begin new projects while current ones still sit unfinished?’
  • 61) ‘A common current myth about American English is that it is being ruined by mass media.’
  • 62) ‘The attitude current at the time was that they were an inferior race.’
  • 63) ‘In the underwater world, the lateral system sensed the currents of water surrounding the fishes' bodies.’
  • 64) ‘It is so big it has blocked wind and water currents that break up ice floes in McMurdo Sound during the Antarctic summer.’
  • 65) ‘The data will cover things such as water currents, wind direction and temperatures.’
  • 66) ‘Also significant were crisscrossing layers of sediment in the rock that revealed they formed beneath currents of moving water.’
  • 67) ‘Formed in the process of oceans, by wind and tide and currents, layers of water all lapping over each other, you rise in the dance of water and eventually fulfill your destiny and crash onto the shore.’
  • 68) ‘Winter changes abruptly into summer, borne by warm winds and the arrival of the Climate Stream, a shift of ocean currents that brings warm water to the land.’
  • 69) ‘The experimental tandem mission data will help scientists better detect and understand ocean currents, tides and eddies.’
  • 70) ‘She would learn the secrets of the ocean's past, hear them whispered through the currents and waters.’
  • 71) ‘Many huge currents of water move through the oceans often aided by the winds.’
  • 72) ‘A stream looks like it's flowing in one direction, but there are little eddies and currents that move water in different directions.’
  • 73) ‘Driven by forces such as wind, tides, and gravity, currents keep our oceans in constant motion.’
  • 74) ‘It is caused by a slowing down of the Atlantic Conveyor, the current which circulates water in the ocean.’
  • 75) ‘Elsewhere, we witness fluid arabesques that suggest currents of wind or water and a grove of green trees, their leaves knotted into high relief.’
  • 76) ‘For example, I have assumed that the animal is active only for twelve hours each day, and I have ignored any effects of winds and water currents.’
  • 77) ‘It glittered and it looked almost as if a current of water ran through it.’
  • 78) ‘Air movement and thermal currents transport dust and microbial particulates; particles that become airborne then can settle on open wounds.’
  • 79) ‘An apparition of misty light, the passage suggests currents of wind and water but the composition resists settling into the pictorial vocabulary of landscape.’
  • 80) ‘Thoughts swirled through her mind like currents of water rushing down a section of rapids.’
  • 81) ‘You must pick your time well, as she is often swept by strong tidal currents.’
  • 82) ‘The normal situation has giant ocean currents flowing anticlockwise around the South Pacific Ocean.’
  • 83) ‘The very small particles stream through wires and circuits creating currents of electricity.’
  • 84) ‘This interaction causes giant electrical currents to flow above our heads of around one million amps!’
  • 85) ‘Due to certain conditions of the earth beneath dwellings, electrical currents are caused to flow, thus producing a magnetic field that extends into the dwelling space.’
  • 86) ‘To give a bit more detail, the motion of the air causes a skin membrane in the inner ear to vibrate, and those vibrations are converted into tiny electrical currents that flow into the brain.’
  • 87) ‘Experts used to think it was just a matter of the air being heated by particles and electric currents in the regions around the poles, where auroras occur.’
  • 88) ‘Their faces light up and eyes twinkle as if there's a current of electricity swirling inside them.’
  • 89) ‘In this context the resistivity of a rock means its resistance to the flow of an electrical current.’
  • 90) ‘However, the magnet exists only when the current is flowing from the battery.’
  • 91) ‘The direct analogy to voltage and current is the flow of water through a hose.’
  • 92) ‘Electrocardiography records the flow of electrical currents of the heart as they move away or toward a specific electrode.’
  • 93) ‘Electric currents result from inducing the movement of electrons within the solid.’
  • 94) ‘Her hands juddered at her sides as if charged with an electric current.’
  • 95) ‘The current then reverses and flows in a negative direction for the remaining milliseconds of the electrical discharge.’
  • 96) ‘When a current flows through a wire a circular magnetic field is created around it.’
  • 97) ‘Small currents of electricity began to surge around him, coming off of his body.’
  • 98) ‘Turbulence within the super-hot plasma has a nasty habit of transporting the heat out as fast as colossal electric currents and particle beams can shovel it in.’
  • 99) ‘When these currents flow across the circuitry that separates the rover chassis and power bus return, they create a small voltage that is measured and reported in telemetry.’
  • 100) ‘Owing to this resistance, an electric field has to drive the electrons in order to maintain the current.’
  • 101) ‘The shock wave and cloud smashed into the Earth's magnetic field, causing a huge increase in the flow of invisible electric currents in space and in our atmosphere.’
  • 102) ‘It's a peculiar sort of pain, like a current of electricity is grinding between the broken ends of bone.’
  • 103) ‘Then measure the voltage and current by attaching your volt meter to the two pieces of metal.’
  • 104) ‘As discussed previously, voltage is measured in volts, and current is measured in amps.’
  • 105) ‘A first detector detects an average of the AC current applied to the charge member.’
  • 106) ‘Obtaining adequate power requires total currents greater than 10,000 amperes.’
  • 107) ‘These tactics can modify the magnitude and phase relationship between voltages and currents in the power system network.’
  • 108) ‘This is why there is not a people in which these three currents of opinion do not coexist, turning man toward divergent and even contradictory directions.’
  • 109) ‘The courts' response is generally slow, often several years behind the current of popular opinion.’
  • 110) ‘They also provide a glimpse of the powerful social currents that shape the course of language usage in society.’
  • 111) ‘Rather than operating from a critical distance, I seem to be swayed by the emotional currents of events like the soccer and music.’
  • 112) ‘None of this will really be surprising to readers, as he has been writing for longer than most about the demographic and economic currents driving these events.’
  • 113) ‘In this context, it is possible to detect two strong currents in public opinion that could be driving the next sea change in the world's perception of America.’
  • 114) ‘He was thereby only following the prevailing current of public opinion.’
  • 115) ‘It is not always a reliable guide to the broader political currents coursing through the Continent.’
  • 116) ‘The general anarcho-syndicalist currents were leading radical forces until the first war.’
  • 117) ‘The idea that at any given moment living revolutionary parties contain all sorts of currents, tendencies and trends, not all of them revolutionary, some ultra-left, is hardly new.’
  • 118) ‘Though rap music has produced a variety of sub-genres in the last 25 years, it has recently divided itself into two general currents.’
  • 119) ‘Indeed, the currents of public opinion are running the other way.’
  • 120) ‘A lot of the tendencies and currents of the times favored the building up of an aristocracy based on the ownership of city property.’
  • 121) ‘As for widespread sentiment opposing the decision, the Court had a duty to rise above raging currents of public opinion.’
  • 122) ‘In Europe at least, there are three distinct currents.’
  • 123) ‘Activists from Islamist, secular, communist and socialist currents from across the globe sat together sharing their views, and absorbed in friendly conversation.’
  • 124) ‘One of the things you do is write poetry for yourself and of course, one of the themes you explore in that poetry is the changing social currents.’
  • 125) ‘Like ocean waters, intellectual currents are always in motion.’
  • 126) ‘It is argued that attention to both these philosophical currents is important in order maximize the value of electronic delivery.’
  • 127) ‘It took Trotsky to persuade him that the rising must be called in the name of the soviets, which represented the different currents of the workers' movement.’

Examples

  • 1) I don't like currants or raisins or anything like that.
  • 2) The white bordered by the red currant is also down the side of the chest of the shirt.
  • 3) Mr. Red House made a speech after dinner, and said drink to the health of everybody, one after the other, in currant wine, which was done, beginning with Mrs. Bax and ending with H.O. Then he said –
  • 4) I 'm sure there 's nothing in currant jelly or tea to hurt you.
  • 5) currants, by-the-bye, both black and red, are also native plants; the black currant is by no means rare in this State, and very much resembles the varieties cultivated in gardens; the wild red currant is chiefly confined to the northern parts of the country, and it is precisely like that which we cultivate.
  • 6) The currant is very hardy, and will grow in any soil or situation, even under the drip of trees.
  • 7) One stage of this disease is on the gooseberry or currant, that is, we find it now on the white pine and going to the gooseberry or currant.
  • 8) The most formidable of these is popularly known as the currant worm.
  • 9) Let it be taught at theological seminaries that the currant is a "means of grace."
  • 10) The juice of the red species, if boiled with an equal weight of loaf sugar, forms an agreeable substance called currant jelly, much employed in sauces, and very valuable in the cure of sore throats and colds.
  • 11) ‘The domesticated grapevine provides fresh fruit, dried raisins, sultanas and currants (according to the vine variety), wine, vinegar, grape juice, and a light salad oil obtained by crushing the pips.’
  • 12) ‘Aim for several small meals with suitable snacks such as mini savoury sandwiches, a currant bun, fruit or vegetables or unsweetened breakfast cereal in between meals to meet your child's nutritional needs.’
  • 13) ‘The truly delectable dessert is prepared with currants (small seedless raisin) that are grown in Europe, the US and Chile and is said to be rich in vitamin C and minerals.’
  • 14) ‘Dried fruits such as currants or sultanas are frequently added to this basic mix.’
  • 15) ‘The dough was rolled and folded several times around chunks of fat to create rich layers, each fortified with a healthy dose of sugar, currants, and dried fruit.’
  • 16) ‘The fruit content is no longer confined to currants, sultanas and raisins.’
  • 17) ‘Last year I made one based very vaguely on her recipe, using raisins, currants, cherries, home-made candied lemon and orange peels, and an apple and a pear.’
  • 18) ‘Tuna tartare, served in hollowed-out lemons, is vitalized with an unexpected foursome of currants, pine nuts, fava beans, and sun-dried tomatoes.’
  • 19) ‘With leeks, currants, and cranberries, it's such a treat.’
  • 20) ‘I pass it on to you only on the condition that you try making it first with something neat and non-wet, such as raisins, currants, dried apricots, citrus zest, or candied ginger.’
  • 21) ‘This potato and chickpea paste is rolled out like dough and filled with sautéed onion, pinenuts, currants, allspice, and tahini.’
  • 22) ‘Oatmeal or kasha with currants and fresh fruit made for tasty breakfast fare, but one morning I craved protein and was cheerfully brought a plate full of scrambled eggs upon request.’
  • 23) ‘Mix in the bread crumbs, currants, pine nuts and 1/2 of the grated carrot.’
  • 24) ‘The porter gives the cake a dark complexity that complements the sweetness of the raisins and currants, as well as the bitterness of the mixed peel.’
  • 25) ‘I experiment with a cherry currant port sauce to put over a dessert.’
  • 26) ‘This year, carve a buttery, cider-glazed version showcased with roasted apples and eye-catching grapes and currants.’
  • 27) ‘‘I'm lost,’ she tells a policeman plaintively and then she sings a song so beautifully she is given a currant bun as a reward.’
  • 28) ‘Combine the butter, sultanas, currants, sugar, mixed spice, cinnamon, ginger, bicarbonate of soda and water in a saucepan.’
  • 29) ‘Now, the true Bath bun is soft, like a marriage between a brioche and an Easter hot-cross, but encrusted with currants and gritty nibs of sugar.’
  • 30) ‘It was made with beef, mutton, raisins, currants, prunes, wine and mixed spices.’
  • 31) ‘Some currants are host to the White pine blister rust, and should not be planted near white pines.’
  • 32) ‘Screens made from bamboo and birch branches as well as plantings (golden currant, white abutilon, and New Zealand flax) create privacy.’
  • 33) ‘Along the walls and raised beds I planted ferns, vine maple, Indian plum, ocean spray, snowberry, currants, and other low-maintenance shrubs.’
  • 34) ‘You also might want to experiment with some specialized design techniques, such as using pruning to create a pleached tunnel of ironwood trees or a living fence of espalier currants.’
  • 35) ‘Fruit trees such as apples, currants and gooseberries should do well and, to be more exotic, you could try nectarines and cherries.’
  • 36) ‘Peaches, pears, cherries, plums, grapes, currants, and raspberries were also commonly grown.’
  • 37) ‘The field day will focus on grapes, although growing raspberries, currants, blackberries, plums, cherries, and Asian and European pears also will be discussed.’
  • 38) ‘Cabbage and carrot are also among the most important vegetable crops, while apples, pears, currants, strawberries and raspberries are the popular fruit crops.’
  • 39) ‘These border beds might also be used for small fruits like currants or raspberries or for medicinal or flavoring herbs.’
  • 40) ‘Botrytis is common on apples, grapes, strawberries, raspberries and currants, while vegetables affected include beans, brassicas, cucumbers, lettuce, peas, potatoes and celery and carrots in store.’
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