corral vs coral

corral coral

Definitions

  • 1) An enclosure or area to concentrate a dispersed group.
  • 2) A circle of wagons, either for the purpose of trapping livestock, or for defense.
  • 3) An enclosure for livestock, especially a circular one.
  • 4) An enclosure for confining livestock.
  • 5) An enclosure formed by a circle of wagons for defense against attack during an encampment.
  • 6) A pen for animals; esp., an inclosure made with wagons, by emigrants in the vicinity of hostile Indians, as a place of security for horses, cattle, etc.
  • 7) a pen for cattle
  • 8) In Florida and the West Indies, a pen near the shore where sponges are macerated in the course of cleaning them for market. Sometimes colloquially contracted to crawl. See kraal.
  • 9) A strong stockade or inclosure for capturing wild elephants in Ceylon.
  • 10) A pen or inclosure for horses or cattle.
  • 11) An inclosure, usually a wide circle, formed of the wagons of an ox- or mule-train by emigrants crossing the plains, for encampment at night, or in case of attack by Indians, the horses and cattle grazing within the circle. See corral, v. t.
  • 12) To capture or round up.
  • 13) To make a circle of vehicles, as of wagons so as to form a corral.
  • 14) To place inside of a corral.
  • 15) collect or gather
  • 16) enclose in a corral
  • 17) arrange wagons so that they form a corral
  • 18) To drive into a corral; inclose aud secure in a corral, as live stock.
  • 19) Figuratively, to corner; leave no escape to in discussion; corner in argument.
  • 20) To form into a corral; form a corral or inclosure by means of. See extract.
  • 21) To capture; make prisoner of; take possession of; appropriate; scoop: as, they corralled the whole outfit—that is, captured them all.
  • 22) To gather; garner.
  • 23) To drive into and hold in a corral.
  • 24) To take control or possession of.
  • 25) To arrange (wagons) in a corral.
  • 26) To surround and inclose; to coop up; to put into an inclosed space; -- primarily used with reference to securing horses and cattle in an inclosure of wagons while traversing the plains, but in the Southwestern United States now colloquially applied to the capturing, securing, or penning of anything.

Definitions

  • 1) countable A colony of marine polyps.
  • 2) countable A colony of marine polyps.
  • 3) uncountable A hard substance made of the limestone skeletons of marine polyps.
  • 4) countable (colour) A somewhat yellowish pink colour, the colour of red coral.
  • 5) uncountable A hard substance made of the limestone skeletons of marine polyps.
  • 6) countable (colour) A somewhat yellowish pink colour, the colour of red coral.
  • 7) A polyp or colony of polyps of any of the numerous anthozoans that secrete a hard or flexible skeleton, especially the reef-building hard corals.
  • 8) An object made of this material.
  • 9) The hard skeleton of various corals, especially of red corals of the genus Corallium, used to make jewelry and ornaments.
  • 10) A rocklike deposit consisting of the calcareous skeletons secreted by various marine invertebrates, chiefly anthozoans. Coral deposits often accumulate to form reefs or islands in warm seas.
  • 11) A deep or strong pink to moderate red or reddish orange.
  • 12) The unfertilized eggs of a female lobster, which turn a reddish color when cooked.
  • 13) A polyp or colony of polyps of any of various hydrozoans that secrete hard skeletons, such as the fire corals.
  • 14) (Bot.) a genus (Corallorhiza) of orchideous plants, of a yellowish or brownish red color, parasitic on roots of other plants, and having curious jointed or knotted roots not unlike some kinds of coral. See Illust. under Coralloid.
  • 15) See in the Vocabulary.
  • 16) (Bot.) a tropical, leguminous plant, of several species, with showy, scarlet blossoms and coral-red seeds. The best known is Erythrina Corallodendron.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) one of the polyps by which corals are formed. They are often very erroneously called coral insects.
  • 18) (Zo) A small, harmless, South American snake (Tortrix scytale).
  • 19) See under Chain.
  • 20) The ovaries of a cooked lobster; -- so called from their color.
  • 21) (Zoöl.) one of the polyps by which corals are formed. They are often very erroneously called coral insects.
  • 22) (Phys. Geog.) reefs, often of great extent, made up chiefly of fragments of corals, coral sands, and the solid limestone resulting from their consolidation. They are classed as fringing reefs, when they border the land; barrier reefs, when separated from the shore by a broad belt of water; atolls, when they constitute separate islands, usually inclosing a lagoon. See Atoll.
  • 23) (Zo) A small, harmless, South American snake (Tortrix scytale).
  • 24) (Zoöl.) The hard parts or skeleton of various Anthozoa, and of a few Hydrozoa. Similar structures are also formed by some Bryozoa.
  • 25) a hard, red cabinet wood.
  • 26) (Zoöl.) The hard parts or skeleton of various Anthozoa, and of a few Hydrozoa. Similar structures are also formed by some Bryozoa.
  • 27) (Phys. Geog.) reefs, often of great extent, made up chiefly of fragments of corals, coral sands, and the solid limestone resulting from their consolidation. They are classed as fringing reefs, when they border the land; barrier reefs, when separated from the shore by a broad belt of water; atolls, when they constitute separate islands, usually inclosing a lagoon. See Atoll.
  • 28) A piece of coral, usually fitted with small bells and other appurtenances, used by children as a plaything.
  • 29) (Bot.) a tropical, leguminous plant, of several species, with showy, scarlet blossoms and coral-red seeds. The best known is Erythrina Corallodendron.
  • 30) (Bot.) a genus (Corallorhiza) of orchideous plants, of a yellowish or brownish red color, parasitic on roots of other plants, and having curious jointed or knotted roots not unlike some kinds of coral. See Illust. under Coralloid.
  • 31) See under Brain.
  • 32) unfertilized lobster roe; reddens in cooking; used as garnish or to color sauces
  • 33) a variable color averaging a deep pink
  • 34) the hard stony skeleton of a Mediterranean coral that has a delicate red or pink color and is used for jewelry
  • 35) marine colonial polyp characterized by a calcareous skeleton; masses in a variety of shapes often forming reefs
  • 36) A fleshy-leafed crassulaceous house-plant, Rochea coccinea, native of South Africa, bearing bright-scarlet flowers.
  • 37) A child's toy, consisting of a branch of smooth coral with a ring attached, and usually with the addition of small bells and a whistle.
  • 38) A general term for the hard calcareous skeleton secreted by the marine cœlenterate polyps for their support and habitation (polypidom).
  • 39) The unimpregnated roe or eggs of the lobster, which when boiled assume the appearance of coral.
  • 40) Made of coral.
  • 41) Having the yellowish pink colour of coral.
  • 42) Of a deep or strong pink to moderate red or reddish orange.
  • 43) of a strong pink to yellowish-pink color
  • 44) Containing coral; coraled; coralliferous: as, a coral grove.
  • 45) Making coral; coralligenous: as, a coral polyp.
  • 46) Made of coral; consisting of coral; coralline: as, a coral ornament; a coral reef.
  • 47) Resembling coral; especially, of the color of commercial coral; pinkish-red; red: specifically, in heraldry, used of that color when described in blazoning a nobleman's escutcheon according to the system of precious stones. See blazon, n.

Examples

  • 1) Now it was used as a corral for the katiba `s donkeys, when the beasts were not being used by the forage patrols.
  • 2) Poor old Mrs Biddulph is rather like a sheepdog: kind, but determined to round them up and corral them where she can see them.
  • 3) I slide the negatives back into the envelope and head back to the word corral.
  • 4) Jup understood the word corral, which had been frequently pronounced before him, and it may be remembered, too, that he had often driven the cart thither in company with Pencroft.
  • 5) The corral is at the head of a steep little canyon or gulch, back in the hills where all these bigger canyons head.
  • 6) But instead of what's known as a chemo "corral" -- often a windowless infusion room with several patients clustered around a nurse's station -- she settles into a comfortable recliner in a private infusion bay at the new Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Clinical Cancer Center.
  • 7) He runs the camel corral, which is this big fenced area where all the camels chill out.
  • 8) She had stopped them from galloping down the lane, but herding them back into the corral was another thing.
  • 9) ‘There was one debate over where they would all sleep and whether they would all be moved into particular areas so that they would be corralled together.’
  • 10) ‘Cars, which run on a vegetable oil fuel called biodiesel, are corralled together instead of parked outside each residence.’
  • 11) ‘I managed to get out just before the riot squad made a shield tunnel and corralled the crowd.’
  • 12) ‘Make sure that there are ropes set up to control long lines - you know, the kind that corral the crowd and make customers walk back and forth many times before making it to the counter.’
  • 13) ‘After corralling the crowd to their seats, he set the tone with the characteristic wit and charm that people have come to expect from a man in a purple striped shirt.’
  • 14) ‘Anyone can protest, but crowds are corralled by iron gates that keep them checked.’
  • 15) ‘The band used this simple setup to corral the crowd into rapt attention.’
  • 16) ‘It looks like the kind of book you'd find remaindered in the front shelves where they keep all the bargain books corralled together.’
  • 17) ‘And I am corralling my arts students to come see the film.’
  • 18) ‘Today it was Sydney drivers who were being corralled into paying yet another toll, with the opening of the city's newest pay-as-you-go tunnel.’
  • 19) ‘The actresses, who were corralled in the beautiful Fairfax House dining room, where one was pretending to play the piano while the others poked about curiously among the plastic food, were more than willing to share their thoughts.’
  • 20) ‘Trent wanted to speak but he was having trouble corralling the words.’
  • 21) ‘Someone thought to go check out the bathroom but I already had my coat on and was corralling my parents out to the car.’
  • 22) ‘He corralled five directors - yes, five - and several writers and directed them to produce a movie that complemented the psychedelic movement that was transforming popular culture.’
  • 23) ‘As he corralled the delegates toward the building, he couldn't help but gaze at the gate, where a row of forty National Guardsmen stood.’
  • 24) ‘Case packers corral bottles into six groupings of four-packs.’
  • 25) ‘After spending the night in camp, the workers were corralled onto the backs of large trucks and transported south.’
  • 26) ‘Elements of an indigenous landscape are corralled by a regular agricultural pattern.’
  • 27) ‘One further possible explanation has met with great success: bodies called ‘shepherding moons’ may gravitationally corral the particles.’
  • 28) ‘A large rectangular compartment in the base corrals your loose cartridges, screwdrivers, etc.’
  • 29) ‘I once read an article about a guy who corralled a herd of particularly wily mustangs by just quietly pushing them from 3 miles back.’
  • 30) ‘Farmers were busy corralling animals that had climbed over snow banks and strayed from their land.’
  • 31) ‘We went into the woods and beat the trees with sticks until all manner of livestock stampeded out and were corralled into our barn.’
  • 32) ‘By corralling, farmers could take advantage of more of the nitrogen in animal manure.’
  • 33) ‘Hill-slope enclosures may have been occupied by livestock herders who used the gaps between the ramparts to corral animals.’
  • 34) ‘They found and corralled a small wild herd of buffalo, which became the breeding stock for the magnificent beast we have today.’
  • 35) ‘The winning dog had been corralled into a cage.’
  • 36) ‘She once had an eye kicked out by a stallion she corralled, but the loss hasn't stopped her.’
  • 37) ‘What it does is to corral the salmon into cages and then, logically, it has to feed them so that they will grow.’
  • 38) ‘‘Peep, peep, peep,’ sing the little yellow hatchlings corralled by a pencil-line chicken wire fence.’
  • 39) ‘Later on, we'll be corralling steers into the pen, watering horses and tending to repairs - I hope you didn't expect this to be easy work!’
  • 40) ‘The aim was to round up the goats and herd them towards the vermin fence, where they were corralled.’
  • 41) ‘They tried to corral one pig at a time into the corner and herd it up the ramp.’
  • 42) ‘My guess is that she got the cut while I was trying to corral her into her carrier Wednesday night.’
  • 43) ‘Instead, tuna are taken from the wild, enclosed in nets and dragged to shore where they are corralled in pens and fattened on an oil-rich diet.’
  • 44) ‘The Labyrinth was a kind of game created by Daedalus for King Minos of Crete, but the maze served the serious purpose of corralling the violent Minotaur.’
  • 45) ‘As the wagons were corralled into an even tighter circle at the Crescent, the Trust arrived like the cavalry in the nick of time.’
  • 46) ‘Next day, Sully led his army back toward the corralled wagon train on Heart River, reaching the anxious civilians on the evening of July 31.’
  • 47) ‘The Punchestown Boys rode into town saying they were going to build a corral for cattle and horses that would be good for the town.’
  • 48) ‘The adult tick does not feed and may live in and around corrals, barns and cattle loafing areas for a year or more waiting to mate.’
  • 49) ‘Solar-powered gates can be used at the end of residential driveways, on rural access roads, for livestock corrals, and in many other areas.’
  • 50) ‘Excavations in 1958-9 revealed that the site was originally a corral for livestock.’
  • 51) ‘Close to it was a ditched enclosure, interpreted as a corral for livestock awaiting the feasts, perhaps to be slaughtered in sacrificial ceremonies.’
  • 52) ‘Most of the producers own small flocks maintained on homestead pastures and in corrals.’
  • 53) ‘Step outside fire-warmed rooms in this tastefully restored adobe hacienda, and you'll see steam rising from longhorn cattle in the corral.’
  • 54) ‘Before we leased these acres the land was fenced in corrals and the owner boarded horses.’
  • 55) ‘Heading to the barn to let the horses out into the corral, Adam wondered how Clara would react when the dealership delivered her car later in the morning.’
  • 56) ‘There were two rows of tents down each side of the site, several campfires down the centre, a corral of horses up the far end of the clearing and food hanging off the rock face behind the far row of tents.’
  • 57) ‘He wandered over to the corral and called his horse.’
  • 58) ‘I ignored him and started to walk the horse around the corral.’
  • 59) ‘The ravine was a perfect corral for the horses once they were in it.’
  • 60) ‘Billy hauled on the lead reins and drew the horses up in a cloud of dust close to the corral where the fresh horses milled around.’
  • 61) ‘Up by the horse corral, near the river that drained into the pond, a branch could clearly be heard snapping.’
  • 62) ‘They are especially common around ranch buildings and corrals where perches are plentiful.’
  • 63) ‘In a gentle stroll Adam completed his circuit of the ranch buildings and corrals.’
  • 64) ‘Except for small stone corrals, the farmers there build no fences.’
  • 65) ‘During your stay, you can picket your horse using the available tie-out poles, tie your horse to your trailer, or keep your horse in a portable corral.’
  • 66) ‘We end the ride in the corral where the horses are, so we can feed them some hay and have a photo opportunity.’

Examples

  • 1) And you can wake up and snorkel around colourful coral reefs two minutes from your bed.
  • 2) Choose from coral, fuchsia pink and red to banish the winter blues.
  • 3) The ocean temperature was above normal in most areas, prompting mass bleaching of many coral reefs.
  • 4) If your skin tans easily, the likelihood is that a coral colour will suit you so just experiment until you find a good match.
  • 5) Still, no amount of selfie sticks could spoil my enjoyment of jumping off the back of a boat into coral reefs for a quick snorkel before lunch.
  • 6) Spring is all about fresh pink and coral cheek colour.
  • 7) The intense colour of the coral is breathtaking.
  • 8) You are not meant to disturb or touch the fish or coral.
  • 9) Tourists have also been blamed for damaging its coral reefs and marine fauna.
  • 10) Plus it looks terrific with pink and coral accessories.
  • 11) The space programme had finished and images of fish and coral now filled the screen.
  • 12) So too are the coral islands.
  • 13) In the meantime it has some stonking reductions on its iconic coral, turquoise and amber pieces.
  • 14) Marine life is spectacular, with coral gardens and snorkelling straight off the beach.
  • 15) Barrier Reef suffered the worst coral bleaching on record.
  • 16) They are the colour of mountain lakes, or coral seas.
  • 17) The liquid should be thick, with a bright orange coral colour.
  • 18) It is the only coral island in the eastern Caribbean.
  • 19) An otherworldly beach made entirely of twisted, bleached white coral pieces.
  • 20) The gasps told it all - turquoise sea and coral reefs as far as the eye could see.
  • 21) Ten tourists and five crew members remain missing after their boat hit a coral reef during stormy seas on Friday night.
  • 22) coral make them joint 13-8 favourites.
  • 23) It is a big sweep of soft, pale coral sand shelving gently into the Ionian sea.
  • 24) The dive site on the final day was a stunning coral garden known to divers as Dolphin House.
  • 25) I have been scuba diving for more than 40 years and have witnessed the almost total destruction of the hard coral on the planet.
  • 26) The tennis club, perhaps, a flash of coral lipstick being a distinct advantage when seeking the attentions of the instructor.
  • 27) _coral stone_, which grows like clustered trees spreading its branches on all sides as is done by real _coral_, to which this stone bears so strong resemblance that it deceives many who are not very skilful respecting the growth and nature of coral.
  • 28) It is clear that climate change will alter many aspects of what we know as coral reefs; what is less clear is exactly how, or what the results will be.
  • 29) Over time, these layers accumulate and grow into what we call coral reefs.
  • 30) And along most of that border, there's what they call coral fencing.
  • 31) The skirts come in coral, black and taupe and are full and to the ankle.
  • 32) Disease-Hunting Scientist: Dr. Laurie Richardson and black-band disease in coral
  • 33) If someone embellishes this death with three pages of description of coral, is not that Literature?
  • 34) Oct. 16: "Hyperbolic Crochet coral Reef" A recent discovery of geometry in coral reefs is looked at through crochet to honor an ecosystem harmed by pollution and climate change.
  • 35) Rare 3 rows Natural angel skin coral beads necklace
  • 36) ‘Police said seven tourist boats sail every day from Tungkang to the small island, which boasts coral reefs and rich marine life.’
  • 37) ‘The rest of the island is characterized by beautiful sandy beaches, coral reefs, warm clear blue waters and idyllic islands.’
  • 38) ‘Ciguatera poison is made by a microscopic organism that attaches itself to algae growing in the warm waters of coral reefs.’
  • 39) ‘Beyond, near-shore islands and coral reefs provided shelter for an array of terrestrial and marine life.’
  • 40) ‘For years, coral reefs and marine life have helped define the Andaman and Nicobar Islands as an international tourist destination.’
  • 41) ‘Leave winter behind for warm sandy beaches, coral reefs, and bright turquoise waters filled with colorful fish.’
  • 42) ‘Over the long run, the greatest threat facing coral reefs may be warmer waters due to global warming.’
  • 43) ‘The sea around Mafia is a tropical Marine Park ranging from coral reefs, sea-grass beds, mangroves and inter-tidal flats.’
  • 44) ‘The week-long event focuses on protecting the world's coral reefs and marine ecosystems and educating divers on their role in conservation efforts.’
  • 45) ‘Kai Tia Island, situated in the Toey Ngam Bay, is an important habitat for coral reefs and marine life and is also considered a spiritually sacred place.’
  • 46) ‘The world's most biologically diverse marine ecosystems, coral reefs are critical to the health of the oceans.’
  • 47) ‘Shallow-water and deep-water coral reefs reveal beautiful marine life.’
  • 48) ‘Promotions will also be designed to protect the islands' coral reefs, waters and beaches.’
  • 49) ‘‘She said when the boat had been going out there were little islands and coral reefs in sight, on the way back they were all swamped by water,’ said Mrs Needham.’
  • 50) ‘Fancy taking your love for a moonlit swim in the warm waters of the Caribbean, or exploring some of the island's most beautiful coral reefs hand in hand?’
  • 51) ‘Made up of more than 1,000 coral reef islands, the Maldives itself is a magic place created by the Gods.’
  • 52) ‘With its blue waters, white-sand beaches, and pristine coral reefs, Zamami Island off Okinawa looks like paradise.’
  • 53) ‘The depletion of coral reef habitats and marine aquarium fishes has presented a relatively new market in aquaculture.’
  • 54) ‘Even marginally warmer seas will bleach, and then kill, coral reefs, which sustain the greater part of marine biodiversity.’
  • 55) ‘The clean up activity was directed towards collecting whatever litter was found on the ocean floor around Larn Island's coral reefs.’
  • 56) ‘The pieces on this page - not to scale - are only the tip of the mountain of crystal, coral, bead, shell, pearl and sequin baubles available out there for summer.’
  • 57) ‘The precious ingredients, ivory, coral, amber and crystal, have a distinctly magical aura - precious medicine for a precious child.’
  • 58) ‘The sculptures are made of copper and silver decorated with coral, pearl, crystal and stone and are often set on a heart-shaped base.’
  • 59) ‘The area is known as the coral coast and you'll find numerous small shops in Alghero devoted to flogging coral jewellery.’
  • 60) ‘These include jet (fossil wood), amber (fossil tree resin), coral, pearl, and ivory.’
  • 61) ‘This includes opals, turquoise, malachite, pearls, amber, coral, shells, and similar soft or porous materials.’
  • 62) ‘Once in Lhasa I tried to buy a turquoise necklace off a very attractive young woman with high red cheekbones and coral beads in her plaited hair.’
  • 63) ‘The traditional headdress has a wooden framework covered with coral, pearls, amber, and turquoise.’
  • 64) ‘Earrings made of black metal with American diamonds embedded, chains made of gunmetal, coral and jade and pearl bangles add to the gaiety.’
  • 65) ‘Her closed eyes were smeared with a gold makeup across the lids, and a double loop of pink, possibly coral beads fell loosely around her neck.’
  • 66) ‘The jewellery is made from materials, such as coral, quartz and crystals.’
  • 67) ‘Ruby, sapphire, emerald, opal, coral, and pearl are found in abundance.’
  • 68) ‘Their red locks and adornments of coral and pearls flounder on the pitch and whirl of the waves which augment the writhe of their seasnake legs.’
  • 69) ‘In return he was presented with a string of coral beads.’
  • 70) ‘She had done up her hair as was befitting royalty, and had placed a wreath of duskbloomers, a soft purple flower, intertwined with coral and pearls as a crown.’
  • 71) ‘It can be any precious stone, such as turquoise or coral - not ordinary ones you would find on the ground.’
  • 72) ‘The icon of Manjusri remains in the background, placed on an ordinary table, adjacent to other precious things, such as a branch of coral.’
  • 73) ‘I fingered it and put it back; then I took a pearl necklace with a coral shell in the center.’
  • 74) ‘The key colours are bright coral, various shades of purple, peach and green.’
  • 75) ‘Cyclamen flower petals range in colors from pink to white, coral, red, purple, and also a wide array of bicolors.’
  • 76) ‘Jewel colours such as coral and emerald-green showed up often on runways last week, and shoppers should expect to see them in a few months in stores everywhere.’
  • 77) ‘Flower color combines red, coral and white; height is 6 inches to nearly 3 feet.’
  • 78) ‘Other striking varieties feature apricot, scarlet, or coral blossoms framed with lacy white or creamy edges.’
  • 79) ‘A swipe of rosy lip-gloss and coral colored cheeks completed their Cheerleader Barbie look.’
  • 80) ‘On its chest is an explosion of scarlet, an unforgettable hue deeper than coral but brighter than ruby.’
  • 81) ‘Nem had stopped to pull something out of the water, but it proved difficult since the pearly pink and coral white object was buried halfway in the moist sand.’
  • 82) ‘Lotus, a small Lotus-Fairy with short white hair and coral pink skin sprinkled with golden pollen.’
  • 83) ‘Would you choose black, or red, which may imply a tendency towards being daring, dangerous, erotic, or would you choose something more subdued or fun like sky blue or coral?’
  • 84) ‘The camellia family displays pinks in all their many shades, from coral to dark cerise.’
  • 85) ‘No, strong colours such as turquoise or deep coral (another obvious summer choice) often work better as accessories.’
  • 86) ‘I absolutely forbid you to wear your coral stilettos with your beige suit!’
  • 87) ‘Depending on the variety, the flowers are shell-pink or deep coral.’
  • 88) ‘Her dress was sky blue and coral colored that was bell shaped at the bottom.’
  • 89) ‘Once shed, the falling leaves reveal bright coral red tints to all the younger stems.’
  • 90) ‘It comes in a rainbow of glowing colors: sunny yellow, sassy orange, vivid red, flaming coral, hot pink, and deep fuchsia.’
  • 91) ‘Barber suggests a coloured lip balm, in coral or fuchsia, waterproof mascara, fun coloured pencils and a tint with SPF.’
  • 92) ‘Grey is out in favour of coral, mint green, lilac and navy and white.’
  • 93) ‘An African woman's beautiful beaded corset in coral, blues, and white was worn while she stood all day with a pitcher of water on her head as a sign she was ready to endure the rigours of married life.’
  • 94) ‘Since the beginning of the Cenozoic, reefs have become dominated by scleractinian corals and calcareous algae.’
  • 95) ‘They were found in association with several other brachiopods as well as corals.’
  • 96) ‘They are reef fishes that not only rely on the corals for habitat but also food.’
  • 97) ‘Starfish, sea-urchins, clams and corals lie just yards from the shore.’
  • 98) ‘Gorgonian corals stood out like crash barriers for the plankton and detritus that course over the hulk.’
  • 99) ‘At 30m and slightly deeper, a forest of gorgonians and black corals clings to the slope.’
  • 100) ‘Giant gorgonian fans, enormous corals and exaggerated sponges decorated the wall.’
  • 101) ‘Jostling for room, sea anemones, corals and sponges vividly span the floor of an ocean forest.’
  • 102) ‘And organisms such as corals and sea anemones, which simply stay still and grow, have no need of eyes.’
  • 103) ‘Above is a diagram of the septal arrangement in two types of corals.’
  • 104) ‘Like the corals and sponges, many of these fish are long-lived and slow to mature.’
  • 105) ‘The latter case presumably would be the more usual diagenetic history of fossil corals.’
  • 106) ‘The other three corals tested produced mucus with a mixture of these types of molecules.’
  • 107) ‘Flowers, corals, and even animal skin contain pigments which give them their colors.’
  • 108) ‘Sponges and corals grew on rises in this sea, forming reefs that divided up parts of this sea into isolated lagoons.’
  • 109) ‘There's sea water where you could explore starfish and various other corals.’
  • 110) ‘When it comes to invertebrates and molluscs, corals and sponges, the success rate falls considerably.’
  • 111) ‘Like wide fans they sit on the branches of white and pink gorgonian corals.’
  • 112) ‘Elephant ear coral, fan corals and huge barrel sponges all made a fairytale seascape.’
  • 113) ‘As he worked on his catalog he dreamed of traveling the world to see living corals on tropical reefs.’
  • 114) ‘Remove the orange beak of coral from each scallop.’
  • 115) ‘In a food processor, mix the lobster coral with three ounces of butter until well combined and reserve.’
  • 116) ‘Separating the boys from the girls, females, called ‘hens’, are often preferred for their roe or coral.’
  • 117) ‘Once cooked, the roe turns bright orange-red, at which point the roe is referred to as coral and used as a garnish.’
  • 118) ‘The coral can now also be separated from the ‘meat’.’
  • 119) ‘If it doesn't, remove by hand, then rub off any yellow coral that clings to the meat.’
  • 120) ‘These are the vivid orange coral inside the shell.’
  • 121) ‘Scrape out any brown meat from the head, along with the pink coral, and add that to the white meat from the claws and tail.’
  • 122) ‘Using a very sharp knife remove the coral from scallops (the orange part) without damaging.’
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