flounder vs founder

flounder founder

Definitions

  • 1) North America Any of various flatfish of the family Pleuronectidae or Bothidae.
  • 2) North America Any of various flatfish of the family Pleuronectidae or Bothidae.
  • 3) A European species of flatfish having dull brown colouring with reddish-brown blotches; fluke, European flounder, Platichthys flesus.
  • 4) (Zoöl.) A flatfish of the family Pleuronectidæ, of many species.
  • 5) (Bootmaking) A tool used in crimping boot fronts.
  • 6) (Zoöl.) A flatfish of the family Pleuronectidæ, of many species.
  • 7) The act of floundering.
  • 8) (Bootmaking) A tool used in crimping boot fronts.
  • 9) any of various European and non-European marine flatfish
  • 10) flesh of any of various American and European flatfish
  • 11) The act of struggling or splashing about, as in mire or other hampering medium: as, with a desperate flounder he freed himself.
  • 12) A tool whose edge is used to stretch the leather for a boot-front on a blocking-board.
  • 13) A flatfish; a fish of the family Pleuronectidæ.
  • 14) intransitive To make clumsy attempts to move or regain one's balance.
  • 15) intransitive To make clumsy attempts to move or regain one's balance.
  • 16) intransitive To flop around as a fish out of water.
  • 17) intransitive To act clumsily or confused; to struggle or be flustered.
  • 18) intransitive To act clumsily or confused; to struggle or be flustered.
  • 19) intransitive To flop around as a fish out of water.
  • 20) behave awkwardly; have difficulties
  • 21) walk with great difficulty
  • 22) To make clumsy efforts with the limbs and body when hampered in some manner; struggle awkwardly or impotently; toss; tumble about, as in mire or snow.
  • 23) Figuratively, to grope uncertainly or confusedly, as for ideas or facts; speak or act with imperfect knowledge or discernment; make awkward or abortive efforts for extrication from errors of speech or conduct.
  • 24) To fling the limbs and body, as in making efforts to move; to struggle, as a horse in the mire, or as a fish on land; to roll, toss, and tumble; to flounce.

Definitions

  • 1) genetics Someone for whose parents one has no data.
  • 2) genetics Someone for whose parents one has no data.
  • 3) The iron worker in charge of the blast furnace and the smelting operation.
  • 4) One who founds, establishes, and erects; one who lays a foundation; an author; one from whom something originates; one who endows.
  • 5) a kind of sand suitable for purposes of molding.
  • 6) One who founds, establishes, and erects; one who lays a foundation; an author; one from whom anything originates; one who endows.
  • 7) An inflammatory fever of the body, or acute rheumatism. See chest ffounder.
  • 8) A lameness in the foot of a horse, occasioned by inflammation; closh.
  • 9) Same as Facing, 4.
  • 10) One who founds; one who casts metals in various forms; a caster.
  • 11) a worker who makes metal castings
  • 12) a person who founds or establishes some institution
  • 13) inflammation of the laminated tissue that attaches the hoof to the foot of a horse
  • 14) One who establishes by endowment; one who provides a permanent fund for any purpose: as, the founder of a college or hospital.
  • 15) One who founds metals, or articles of metal or glass (the material of which is called metal); a caster: as, a founder of cannon, bells, printing-types, etc.
  • 16) A creator; a maker.
  • 17) One who founds or establishes.
  • 18) An originator; one from whom anything derives its beginning; an author: as, the founder of a sect of philosophers; the founder of a family.
  • 19) In farriery, lameness caused by inflammation within the hoof of a horse; laminitis. Also called closh.
  • 20) intransitive To fall; to stumble and go lame, as a horse.
  • 21) intransitive To fail; to miscarry.
  • 22) intransitive Of a ship, to fill with water and sink.
  • 23) intransitive To fall; to stumble and go lame, as a horse.
  • 24) intransitive To fail; to miscarry.
  • 25) intransitive Of a ship, to fill with water and sink.
  • 26) fail utterly; collapse
  • 27) break down, literally or metaphorically
  • 28) sink below the surface
  • 29) stumble and nearly fall
  • 30) In golf, to drive the ball into the ground by turning in the face of the club when striking.
  • 31) Hence To fail; miscarry.
  • 32) To cause internal inflammation in the feet of, as a horse, so as to disable or lame him.
  • 33) Naut., to cause to fill and sink, as a ship.
  • 34) Nautical, to fill or become filled and sink, as a ship.
  • 35) To trip; stumble; go lame, as a horse.
  • 36) To fall; to stumble and go lame, as a horse.
  • 37) (Naut.) To become filled with water, and sink, as a ship.
  • 38) To fail; to miscarry.
  • 39) (Naut.) To become filled with water, and sink, as a ship.
  • 40) To cause internal inflammation and soreness in the feet or limbs of (a horse), so as to disable or lame him.

Examples

  • 1) Germany isn't working, iconic businesses are floundering.
  • 2) But many carers are left floundering after diagnosis.
  • 3) Thousands of expensively trained new doctors are floundering around looking for work.
  • 4) When his recording career began to flounder, he found work singing on the northern club circuit.
  • 5) But when the unspeakable happens and one of the group dies, the rest are left floundering.
  • 6) A lot of businesses floundering right now should invest more in design.
  • 7) The compass was like a fish floundering in a tub, the radio continued to boil like a pan of chickpeas.
  • 8) Froome's pace on the sharp final climb had his rivals floundering before he eased up and finished in the pack.
  • 9) They too have had wilderness years when nobody really understood them and they floundered about, failing to fulfil their full potential.
  • 10) Everyone else is floundering and running around in circles, but you work best when you have to think on your feet.
  • 11) War and the civil rights movement gave her a purpose, and that when they came to an end she was left floundering.
  • 12) Froome attacked about three miles from the finish of the toughest stage of the Tour so far and left his main rivals floundering.
  • 13) Usually the people I write about are floundering.
  • 14) The economy would have floundered whether or not US aid had been withdrawn.
  • 15) For the best part of the first three games they floundered around, playing all their best rugby in the wrong parts of the pitch.
  • 16) So far the'No' campaign has been floundering.
  • 17) A series of setbacks left the yes campaign floundering, and a narrow no lead soon became a substantial one.
  • 18) It was political, a gesture while the President had his back to the wall over healthcare reform and the floundering economy.
  • 19) As he floundered around the ring trying to hitch his trousers up, all the while sweating buckets, it was little wonder that he lost.
  • 20) I'm supposed to go in and write this important column about floundering political dinosaurs at some point between now and Friday.
  • 21) In Baja California, flounder is most often served as a filet stuffed with seafood - filete relleno - or breaded and fried - filete empanizado.
  • 22) Leaving our progressives to flounder is not working for me and have been very busy this morning telling them I am not going to support them if they continue to support all these bad policies of the Bush administration … ..
  • 23) But he could lose his job quickly if the Royals again flounder early in the season.
  • 24) Can the word flounder be spelled using letters from the word wonderful?
  • 25) They have scallops, whiting or flounder (flounder is more exp by 50c?), possibly salmon, shrimp, crab, hmm, what else, it’s been a long time since I went there because I don’t feel so hot when I eat that much deep fried foods.
  • 26) _ -- In speaking of sole, one of course means the flounder, which is coming to be called the American sole, and when filleted does make a fair substitute for the real thing, and it is suitable for cooking in every way that the English sole can be used, except whole.
  • 27) Sometimes a big flat fish, called a flounder, would slip from one of the baskets, in which the men were putting them, and flop out on deck, almost sliding overboard.
  • 28) The flounder is quite comfortable far up the rivers, but it has to go to the shore-waters to spawn, and there is no doubt that the flounder is a marine fish which has recently learned to colonise the fresh waters.
  • 29) ‘The couple kicked their runners off, grabbed two life-buoys and waded in to where the mother and son were floundering in deep water.’
  • 30) ‘What would floundering around in the water have done to him?’
  • 31) ‘A witness said Davis, a good swimmer, began floundering in the water.’
  • 32) ‘Children who had plunged 30 feet off the bridge floundered in the muddy waters, trying to reach dry land.’
  • 33) ‘It was true, the steam ship was pulling away rapidly from the docks, followed by a handful of Spaniards who did not board it quickly enough and were left floundering in the cold water.’
  • 34) ‘I have an image of myself, floundering in the rising water as I try to cling to floating stems, my feathers bedraggled and flying out in all directions.’
  • 35) ‘Nonetheless, a few braver souls plunged into the surf to capture the trio who now floundered in water, which now swallowed them up.’
  • 36) ‘The boys then stood there and laughed at her as she floundered around in the water, her wet hair plastered over her face.’
  • 37) ‘If the deer had floundered, she'd have gone into the water herself.’
  • 38) ‘The others watched him kick and flounder as he struggled up, then saw his feet disappear.’
  • 39) ‘She was floundering in the deep pool, the water getting steadily deeper instead of shallower, her meagre supply of strength rapidly sapping as she struggled.’
  • 40) ‘I saw a sailor floundering in the oil cast waters nearby and headed for him.’
  • 41) ‘She choked, and floundered, but only succeeded in taking in more water.’
  • 42) ‘Not the famous dive, of course, where you flounder about in 5m of water while a score of 2m rays try to suck you to death.’
  • 43) ‘Mentally, it was like floundering through mud.’
  • 44) ‘Halfway there he got into difficulties and left me with two floundering swimmers to occupy my frantic mind.’
  • 45) ‘Kris laughed and watched her flounder around a bit, and scream and giggle.’
  • 46) ‘A person who struggles and flounders over lots of letters as he/she staggers through a paragraph cannot be called a good enough reader.’
  • 47) ‘His conscience flounders in inchoate confusion as he tries to decide what his surface actions should accomplish instead of asking how their long-term consequences will unfold.’
  • 48) ‘Some say that it wards off depression and this may be so, as people who enjoy sharp mental faculties are more likely to be confident and outgoing than those who flounder around in a mental fog.’
  • 49) ‘Once in Ireland, he floundered in a confused situation, victim of Charles I's tricky diplomacy.’
  • 50) ‘However, with these types of historical documents, the risk of not including a preface is that the uninitiated could flounder through confusing language and unfamiliar historical episodes.’
  • 51) ‘Instead we're floundering in a sea of confusion.’
  • 52) ‘While her classmates floundered through Ted Hughes and RS Thomas like a confused flock of sheep, Agbabi leapt from tuft to intellectual tuft, exploring the landscape.’
  • 53) ‘The worthy outcome for students taking a geometry course is not only proving and learning a set of theorems, but acquiring of mental habits that save them from floundering in the conduct of life.’
  • 54) ‘Because four years of mind-numbing lectures have dulled my mental reflexes, I momentarily floundered in a sea of possible replies.’
  • 55) ‘At its lowest it can dissolve our sense of identity and capacity to function as a separate individual, leaving us floundering in confusion, chaos and psychotic breakdown.’
  • 56) ‘Without our history we are nothing - a building without foundations - simply a mess of people floundering about trying to do what makes them happiest.’
  • 57) ‘We are floundering about, trying to find the path, and they have deliberately said east where it's west, north where it's south, up where it's down, green where it's blue.’
  • 58) ‘In fact, the only things he was sure of was that he was far south of Sindark, floundering about in an unknown land where every hand was potentially hostile.’
  • 59) ‘Nor did she want to be in her second year of college, still floundering about for any sense of direction or any idea of what she wanted to do with her life.’
  • 60) ‘They halfheartedly asked a one or two questions and I flailed and floundered for an hour and at last I said ‘Well, that's all I've got.’’
  • 61) ‘As an adolescent, I was floundering in my search for an identity, struggling to assemble some kind of personality I could wear without shame.’
  • 62) ‘Even if your chosen operator flounders from one blunder to another, the industry's ongoing consolidation will almost certainly come to the rescue.’
  • 63) ‘When I'm floundering at a pitch, they think, ‘He must be some kind of genius or something.’’
  • 64) ‘Perhaps fandom has colored my reaction to Season Five, but I found it annoying right out of the gate, and then watched it flounder about for a firm direction.’
  • 65) ‘It allowed her sister to punish her over and over and over again, to watch her flounder, to watch her fail.’
  • 66) ‘He also knows that the repeated attempts by this government to take on the unions in a serious way are floundering.’
  • 67) ‘She was immediately given a part in a big-screen biopic about champion cyclist Graeme Obree, which later floundered after the project ran into financial difficulties.’
  • 68) ‘In Japan, which unfortunately continues to flounder, any negative effect on global trade would be serious for its very many household-name exporting companies.’
  • 69) ‘Perhaps with his assistance, a few of the 32 now being proposed will flounder - though no-one is seriously suggesting that there should be wind farms everywhere.’
  • 70) ‘The emerging markets of eastern Europe represent hoped-for market segments, but, with their economies floundering, penetration of these markets has been difficult.’
  • 71) ‘If that happens, it will be more difficult for the country's floundering $2.4 trillion economy to pull itself out of recession.’
  • 72) ‘Some component firms prospered but many more specialist car component enterprises floundered.’
  • 73) ‘Vast layoffs, pay cuts and a floundering economy have been difficult factors for galleries and publishers to deal with.’
  • 74) ‘They charge that the cutbacks are so severe that the firm will be left floundering once the market recovers.’
  • 75) ‘She experiments, even at the risk of stumbling and floundering.’
  • 76) ‘As obvious as this is, most small businesses still miss a couple of key points and then wonder why their businesses flounder or at best stumble along.’
  • 77) ‘Despite good supporting work from Keener, the film flounders with muddled pacing and a confusing point of view.’
  • 78) ‘For most of the strike the Ghattahoochee Valley workers saw their movement flounder, with only occasional outbreaks of violence.’
  • 79) ‘Championing lower cable prices via legislation is a no-lose proposition for Frank, who may well be content to let the bill flounder.’
  • 80) ‘Sometimes a firm flounders, and its owners seek to recover some fraction of their investment by selling the firm.’
  • 81) ‘The study was spurred by previous observations of feminization in estuarine fish, particularly the flounder, a common flatfish, Matthiessen said.’
  • 82) ‘They seem to have also eaten flounder, whiting, plaice, cod and brown trout too.’
  • 83) ‘They show considerable sequence homology to pleurocidins, antimicrobial peptides of the flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus.’
  • 84) ‘The heaviest flounder, gafftop catfish and sheepshead each is worth a Scout 175 Sportfish center console rigged with a 90 Mercury and a McClain trailer.’
  • 85) ‘The mine is designed to camouflage itself into the ocean sediments, much like a flounder or stingray does.’
  • 86) ‘Among the aquaculture species, microsatellite maps have been published on rainbow trout, catfish, tilapia, and Japanese flounder, but not on Atlantic salmon.’
  • 87) ‘Then we would come down behind the net, making a noise and splashing the water to move the flounder.’
  • 88) ‘We managed to get peeks of banded pipefish, and a peacock flounder at the aptly named Blue Ridge.’
  • 89) ‘Populations of cod, haddock, halibut, red drum and yellowtail flounder are at record lows.’
  • 90) ‘The flounder is common in estuaries and the tidal waters of rivers, and especially abundant in the Baltic Sea.’
  • 91) ‘It is also widely believed that these floats also act as a visual attractor to the ever curious flounder.’
  • 92) ‘Her ‘daddykins’ was currently clenching his teeth, taking turns staring fiercely at Caelia and the bread, opening and closing his mouth like a flounder.’
  • 93) ‘I met my first goldentail moray while free swimming between coral heads, and discovered a peacock flounder with its head in the sand.’
  • 94) ‘I'm a grilled flounder / white wine sort of girl.’
  • 95) ‘And there was a point where I yelled something like, ‘Everyone dance like a flounder!’’
  • 96) ‘Not a man will boast that he himself has pulled in even a flounder, but they are certain their brothers, on more fortunate boats, have prospered from great catches.’
  • 97) ‘I can never get past the whole flounder with bone in.’
  • 98) ‘Not certain how to get past the human barricade, it scampered about for 10 minutes, before fleeing in the distinctive shape of a flounder.’
  • 99) ‘It looked like a flounder, although I couldn't be sure, and it was mounted on a panel, in a trophy-like manner.’
  • 100) ‘The other one is sand sole which I suppose is equivalent to a flounder here.’
  • 101) ‘Not just cod but other groundfish, including flounder, halibut and haddock, were decimated.’
  • 102) ‘Leo led her inside the building, which had a huge flounder painted on it.’
  • 103) ‘Fortunately the flounder is a robust fish which, with careful handling, will easily go back and swim away to fight another day.’
  • 104) ‘It enabled the marae to extend its reservation in order to look after its flounder and oyster beds.’
  • 105) ‘A swarm of seagulls circle aloft, darting down in random attempts to steal a flounder.’
  • 106) ‘So when you see your dog flopping around like a flounder, take a breath.’
  • 107) ‘Guy's obsession for Virginia seems inexplicably foolish when aimed at an actress with a face like a flounder and a talent to match.’
  • 108) ‘He was more like a flounder than an otter, though, as he made his international debut in the 400m freestyle at the Aquatics Centre yesterday (Tuesday).’
  • 109) ‘Neither was it a flounder, which couldn't have pulled so hard unless it was tail-wrapped and weighed 10 pounds.’
  • 110) ‘With flounder, sole, fluke, turbot, halibut, bass, trout, John Dory or orange roughy, we must tread lightly, especially with regard to bitterness.’
  • 111) ‘Using special head organs, the predators can detect even the slightest muscle twitch of a flounder buried in sand.’

Examples

  • 1) The age profile of the founders and chief executives also suggests that experience pays dividends.
  • 2) Grand plans are of course part of the railway business and quite often they founder.
  • 3) The founder will have become so overloaded that important tasks will not get done.
  • 4) He is the rock on which the banking ship has foundered.
  • 5) They had high hopes, but the project foundered.
  • 6) Weeks before the firm was to float an American company approached the founder.
  • 7) Of course, business manuals suggest that taking over from a company founder can be fraught with difficulty.
  • 8) A founder is often not the best person to run a company.
  • 9) But founders often misunderstand the nature of the change the business is going through and consequently misunderstand the nature of the role they are recruiting for.
  • 10) The founders - who become billionaires.
  • 11) But he is the founder of the organization, and the organization has been greatly enriched by his ministry over the years.
  • 12) The founders often spend time at festivals and meeting school groups to give people a chance to learn about the product, and the company.
  • 13) The founder often refers to her business'family '.
  • 14) Deals often founder because people take fixed positions on price, delivery, quantity or other issues.
  • 15) They had gone out at the top, certainly, but respective solo projects then foundered and record deals were soon withdrawn.
  • 16) I want to partner with management (very often founders) to grow their companies.
  • 17) Often the founders or their descendants, they tend to take a longer-term view than purely financial investors and are more concerned with issues such as reputation.
  • 18) Ideas such as a centralised IT procurement look good in theory, but often founder when faced with the scale and complexity of the organisation.
  • 19) As is generally the case with a Daptone release, the album's producer is Bosco Mann, the label founder and Dap-Kings bassist, who also goes by his real name, Gabriel Roth.
  • 20) Rick Rubin's severe, thrashing beat to proper effect; Hov courteously brought his instant-quotation A-game for his label founder's return to rap.
  • 21) The story of Bertram Brown and Freedom Sounds began in 1975 when the label founder / producer took singer Philip Frazer into the studio with the local band, Soul Syndicate, led by guitarist Earl "Chinna" Smith.
  • 22) Dogtopia founder is there for dog day care franchisees - USATODAY. com
  • 23) Dogtopia founder is there for dog day care franchisees
  • 24) The defence of their founder is the first cause, which in every age has exercised the zeal and industry of the civilians.
  • 25) ‘By 1840 business directories in New York City listed thirteen iron founders, and sixteen the following year.’
  • 26) ‘But Mr Milner, director of Keighley iron founders Leach and Thompson, said there were dozens of examples of manufacturers in the district switching jobs overseas.’
  • 27) ‘Wilks was a founder member of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics.’
  • 28) ‘He played table tennis, tennis and cricket, and was one of the founder members of Western Athletics Club when it was established in the late 1970s.’
  • 29) ‘A founder member of the original Bradford Festival committee, Dusty Rhodes, is now leading the Reclaim Bradford Festival campaign to bring the organisation back to local people.’
  • 30) ‘And they were the original founder members of the European Community - a team of six which includes France, but not Britain.’
  • 31) ‘He was also a founder member of Clonmore Development Association, being its first chairman.’
  • 32) ‘The founder member of a branch of an army organisation has been commemorated with a donation towards cancer research.’
  • 33) ‘He was a founder member of many scientific establishments, including the Paediatric Pathology Society and the Society for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida.’
  • 34) ‘But already the founders have established two key areas of need - including facilities for young people.’
  • 35) ‘Theresa Merritt, one of the founder members, said: ‘At the moment we have ten ladies who train regularly every week.’’
  • 36) ‘Plenty of the founder members couldn't make it this close to Christmas, so January's event may well be larger.’
  • 37) ‘A founder member of the Rochdale Art Society, Donald Taylor was very well known for oil and watercolour landscapes, mainly depicting the Lake District, the Pennines, the Yorkshire Dales and Whitby.’
  • 38) ‘She was determined that ‘never again’ should families go through the same ordeal and became a founder member and national coordinator of the National Committee Relating to Organ Retention.’
  • 39) ‘However, the director admits that as a founder member of the theatre's company, appearing in over 20 productions, it's nice to come full circle and give something back to the theatre where his career began.’
  • 40) ‘The 16 founder members decided it made better sense to bury their differences in the area of staff training and promotion of careers in the sector rather than continue the zero-sum game of poaching talent from each other.’
  • 41) ‘When the 11 founder members of the euro fused their currencies in January 1999, European policymakers promised they were launching an economic powerhouse on the world to rival America.’
  • 42) ‘The group founders set the original rules, but they can be changed by vote of the active PMC members.’
  • 43) ‘Archaeologists say they have unearthed Lupercale - the sacred cave where, according to legend, a she-wolf nursed the twin founders of Rome and where the city itself was born.’
  • 44) ‘The names of the founders of some other, specific religious groups can often be found in the main statistical database, although that is not the purpose of that database.’
  • 45) ‘We usually invest $6000n in each company, where n is the number of participating founders.’
  • 46) ‘However, the term is nothing more than ‘a marketing idea used to sell books,’ Slashdot founder Rob Malda believes.’
  • 47) ‘The founder flies of the colony originated from Gainesville.’
  • 48) ‘As the founder female had been inseminated before collection, the flies used in this study can be regarded as a random sample from the wild.’
  • 49) ‘The biggest risk is that almost the entire population is the product of as few as three stallions from the founder group.’
  • 50) ‘Fish exposed to founders trained to take the long route will only exhibit a tendency to take that route when swimming in a shoal.’
  • 51) ‘Differences in the PRKAG3 gene sequences of the founder animals of the intercross were analyzed.’
  • 52) ‘That the Prime Minister's ship almost foundered on that ‘rock’ appears to have made little difference.’
  • 53) ‘The subject is an Afro-Brazilian sailor who saved many lives when his ship foundered along the coast of Brazil.’
  • 54) ‘Rather than asking why the ship foundered, Howell investigates how this maritime disaster acquired wider cultural and social significance in the years before World War I.’
  • 55) ‘So many ships have foundered along this coast, driven onto its reefs by storms or lured there by wreckers' lights, that pieces from Spanish galleons still wash up with the tide.’
  • 56) ‘But before long the boat foundered on a sand-bank and all we could do was wait for the tide.’
  • 57) ‘Nearly a century later, sledding down the Horton, Vilhjalmur Stefansson learned of the Titanic's sinking a full three months and ten days after the ocean liner had foundered in the North Atlantic.’
  • 58) ‘The collector, who does not want to be named, told the Sunday Herald that despite checking with Titanic societies in the US and the UK, no other documents had been found stating that the ship could not founder.’
  • 59) ‘The worst-case scenario is that his ship will founder and spill its load of heavy fuel into the ocean.’
  • 60) ‘A letter written by a Titanic passenger who left the ship before it foundered on its maiden voyage was sold for £13,000 at a Yorkshire auction yesterday.’
  • 61) ‘Some twenty Spanish ships foundered on the west coast.’
  • 62) ‘The Sydney, with superior speed and firepower, raked the German ship, which limped to North Keeling where she foundered on the reef.’
  • 63) ‘It is assumed that the vessel foundered in an instant but violent storm.’
  • 64) ‘When a small boat foundered in the seas to the north of Australia and its passengers were rescued by the MV Tampa, the ship came to symbolise this choice between control and chaos.’
  • 65) ‘If it is not covered, the boat will founder in this tempest, and the ocean will summarily swallow the sailors and their dream.’
  • 66) ‘Barshef says the ships around him all foundered.’
  • 67) ‘In 1629, the Dutch ship Batavia foundered off the coast of Western Australia.’
  • 68) ‘Twenty Armada ships were to founder on the Irish rocks.’
  • 69) ‘The vessel foundered at around 3pm but, unusually, the plane failed to conduct the scheduled afternoon flight.’
  • 70) ‘In 1822 the Tek Sing foundered on a reef off the Java coast and sank within minutes.’
  • 71) ‘The South Island was formed, they say, when a canoe full of 150 gods foundered on a reef.’
  • 72) ‘Nothing, of course, came of this, as his proposals foundered on the rock-like conservatism of his profession.’
  • 73) ‘Although several individuals had been keen to buy the house, their plans always foundered when he questioned whether they had the financial resources to carry the project through.’
  • 74) ‘This plan foundered more through the sheer impracticability of the proposals than obstruction by officials.’
  • 75) ‘But the plan foundered when the owner refused to enter into any discussions and the council was unable to make any progress.’
  • 76) ‘But both proposals foundered because of the difficulties in finding groups prepared to donate £2m.’
  • 77) ‘In Scotland, the risky strategy could founder on the traditional perils of the nation's health bureaucracy.’
  • 78) ‘Throughout the 1990s, under the previous administration - which is no longer giving support to this moratorium - those proposals foundered.’
  • 79) ‘The scheme soon foundered, being rejected by the colonial Premiers when they gathered in London for the two Colonial Conferences of 1887 and 1897.’
  • 80) ‘The association suggested the appointment of a further commissioner from a panel representing bus users but the proposal foundered in the absence of more general support.’
  • 81) ‘In the mass mobilisation wars of the 20th century, several public health plans that had foundered for lack of public support in peace time came to seem necessary for the war effort.’
  • 82) ‘A French and German proposal foundered last year on precisely the same issue.’
  • 83) ‘And if shareholders believe a board is biased toward the interests of management, a buyout proposal can quickly founder.’
  • 84) ‘Members of the GMB union at the plant had called out their members on a 24-hour strike after negotiations with management over this year's pay round foundered on a proposed productivity deal.’
  • 85) ‘They mention three controversial proposals that allegedly foundered on contributors' influence.’
  • 86) ‘Attempts to introduce a new price structure have foundered on the implacable opposition of Norwegian-controlled companies.’
  • 87) ‘An attempted comeback last year foundered when he failed again to secure a place on the Tour, and in June he booked himself into a clinic that specialised in depression and drug addiction.’
  • 88) ‘If the current negotiations over a grand coalition should founder, these plans could be quickly revived.’
  • 89) ‘Negotiations, already a year behind schedule, have foundered on divisions between rich and poor nations.’
  • 90) ‘The socialists had an egalitarian dream, the achievement of which inevitably foundered under their managerial inexperience and the unyielding zeal of their convictions.’
  • 91) ‘So our revolution continues, and our ideals must struggle against the human tendencies and the social forces that would cause our experiment to founder and fail.’
  • 92) ‘My mother was an orphan hedgewitch, healer, and midwife of small means until one of my father's horses foundered nearly on her doorstep.’
  • 93) ‘Only a few months later, the handsome sorrel foundered and his bid for a World Championship ended.’
  • 94) ‘The pony, who is locked up so he won't founder, started galloping up and down the fenceline when I switched on the light.’
  • 95) ‘Don't feed straight corn, because goats will founder and have hoof problems, Finch advised.’
  • 96) ‘Keep donkeys off the sweet feed and grain, as they can founder and develop laminitis just as horses do.’
  • 97) ‘Recently, he foundered in his left fore, which was very acute.’
  • 98) ‘The band will doubtless be foundered in the crisp November air.’
  • 99) ‘The foundered journalists standing for around two hours outside were imagining the headlines.’
  • 100) ‘I have many memories of being foundered on that windswept strand in the name of family holiday time.’
  • 101) ‘I was permanently foundered, wearing thermals in and out of bed.’
  • 102) ‘A child returning from playing outdoors in the cold, would be told, "Sit down there and warm yourself. You're foundered".’
  • 103) ‘We're rehearsing in a freezing cold old shirt factory and I'm foundered.’
  • 104) ‘Could you put some heat through the place? It would founder you.’
  • 105) ‘It would founder you; there's goin' to be a frost.’
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