comprehensive vs comprehensible

comprehensive comprehensible

Definitions

  • 1) UK A comprehensive school.
  • 2) UK A comprehensive school.
  • 3) An examination or series of examinations covering the entire field of major study, given to a student in the final year of undergraduate or graduate study.
  • 4) an intensive examination testing a student's proficiency in some special field of knowledge
  • 5) An establishment in which cotton-bales are compressed for transportation.
  • 6) Broadly or completely covering; including a large proportion of something.
  • 7) Marked by or showing extensive understanding.
  • 8) So large in scope or content as to include much.
  • 9) (Zoöl.) Possessing peculiarities that are characteristic of several diverse groups.
  • 10) Having the power to comprehend or understand many things.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) Possessing peculiarities that are characteristic of several diverse groups.
  • 12) Including much; comprising many things; having a wide scope or a full view.
  • 13) broad in scope
  • 14) including all or everything
  • 15) Having the power to comprehend or understand.
  • 16) More specifically Having the quality of comprehending or including a great number of particulars or a wide extent, as of space or time; of large scope; capacious.
  • 17) In logic, intensive; relating to logical comprehension.
  • 18) In biology, of a general or synthetic type of structure. See synthetic. 3.
  • 19) Synonyms and Broad, extensive, large, capacious.
  • 20) Comprehending, including, or embracing much in a comparatively small compass; containing much within narrow limits.

Definitions

  • 1) able to be comprehended
  • 2) Readily comprehended or understood; intelligible.
  • 3) Capable of being understood; intelligible; conceivable by the mind.
  • 4) Capable of being comprehended, included, or comprised.
  • 5) capable of being comprehended or understood
  • 6) Capable of being comprehended or included; possible to be comprised.
  • 7) Capable of being understood; conceivable by the mind; intelligible.

Examples

  • 1) At present some comprehensives are neighbourhood schools.
  • 2) If you do not have a comprehensive policy, you must pay for the repairs to your car yourself.
  • 3) His win, like his education policy, was comprehensive but the bar is set low for him.
  • 4) He has promised to outline plans to revive the chain's fortunes when he delivers a comprehensive review in November.
  • 5) There is the purchase price and other things such as fully comprehensive insurance.
  • 6) They are due to attend comprehensive school this year.
  • 7) These add up to a comprehensive list of intelligent behaviours.
  • 8) It is essential that a comprehensive policy is put in place as quickly as possible.
  • 9) They will have to wait until the comprehensive spending review.
  • 10) This is the first comprehensive look at him.
  • 11) The experts are unanimous that getting comprehensive insurance is crucial.
  • 12) He has always done well academically and been in the top sets at his comprehensive school.
  • 13) There are also comprehensive lists of the wildlife he has encountered.
  • 14) For that you need a comprehensive policy.
  • 15) The comprehensive spending review on the same day would promise more billions for the health service.
  • 16) It is worth checking how comprehensive the insurance is before you leave.
  • 17) Some investors may be prepared to pay higher dealing and administration charges for a more comprehensive range of services.
  • 18) At primary school she was bright and engaged but since moving to our local comprehensive she has become lazy and moody.
  • 19) WHAT'S wrong with the local comprehensive?
  • 20) The introduction of comprehensive schools left teachers with the impossible job of teaching a vast range of abilities in the same class.
  • 21) Moving to an inner-city comprehensive was a shock.
  • 22) The forthcoming concert is the first comprehensive performance in Britain.
  • 23) She felt happy and fulfilled there but left in 1969 because of her opposition to the adoption of comprehensive education by the city council.
  • 24) The ECB is in the process of finalising some changes to its bidding process after a comprehensive review.
  • 25) The Academies Bill has the potential to address the inherent problems in comprehensive education.
  • 26) Police forces are bracing themselves for cuts of up to 25% in this month's comprehensive spending review.
  • 27) ‘From a comprehensive list of nearly 1,600 daily newspapers, 500 newspapers were selected using standard interval sampling.’
  • 28) ‘The Guide contains a comprehensive list of businesses and services in the town and contains a very useful street map of Ballinrobe.’
  • 29) ‘Its Explore Kodiak guide has a comprehensive list of outfitters and free activities.’
  • 30) ‘More and more colleges and universities are developing comprehensive diversity plans to guide changes in campus policies and procedures.’
  • 31) ‘Currently the only possible source for a comprehensive list of travellers, as we've already established, lies in the carriers' passenger lists.’
  • 32) ‘The training videos contain comprehensive information on all aspects of good environmental practice at farm level, presented in an interesting and stimulating manner.’
  • 33) ‘It called for constituting a committee to conduct a comprehensive review of all aspects of the party's performance and make recommendations for future plan of action.’
  • 34) ‘That was one element within a comprehensive report.’
  • 35) ‘Both states signed their treaties claiming they were elements of a comprehensive peace.’
  • 36) ‘Though a large volume of literature is available on the issues discussed in the book it is a comprehensive treatise on related aspects of food and nutrition and the editors have taken pain to deal with every aspect.’
  • 37) ‘This comprehensive volume of nearly 600 poems, many accompanied by the Spanish original, bursts with evocative images.’
  • 38) ‘This will include the development of a comprehensive manual for all aspects of driver licencing including that of driving schools and instructors.’
  • 39) ‘The entire nightmare could have been avoided had he kept comprehensive documentation of his dealings with the plaintiffs.’
  • 40) ‘But these are unavoidable aspects of a comprehensive exposition of any subject.’
  • 41) ‘I thought he was fairly comprehensive in his coverage of various issues.’
  • 42) ‘The documentary shows its age, but it provides a fairly comprehensive overview of the legendary director.’
  • 43) ‘Seeing the problems his students faced, Mr. Silman has created the first comprehensive strategic guide in dictionary form.’
  • 44) ‘The result is the first comprehensive analysis of preventable patient deaths linked to infections within 5,810 hospitals nationally.’
  • 45) ‘Some sites offer links to others and through such links a reasonably comprehensive list can be obtained.’
  • 46) ‘Take a peek at our comprehensive guide to dining out in the city.’
  • 47) ‘Its thorough research and comprehensive scope should prove invaluable for anyone seriously interested in the subject.’
  • 48) ‘The design phase is comprehensive in scope, tackling everything from content and design to functionality and user interface.’
  • 49) ‘The Senate Inquiry into mandatory sentencing was broad-ranging, thorough and comprehensive in terms of scope and evidence.’
  • 50) ‘This is a wide ranging and comprehensive survey of children and the experience of childhood.’
  • 51) ‘Making broad scope, comprehensive documentaries about an event the magnitude of World War II is a tall order, often with less than satisfactory results.’
  • 52) ‘Because it is comprehensive in scope and specific in detail, it can eliminate the ambiguities that exist in most partnerships.’
  • 53) ‘The volume does not cover all issues in detail and it was not intended to be comprehensive in scope.’
  • 54) ‘Sir Gawaine's British West Indies collection is part of a wider comprehensive collection of stamps from Great Britain and the British Empire.’
  • 55) ‘The authors make no claims for completeness, indeed are transparent about the gaps, yet this book is impressively comprehensive in scale, scope and analytical range.’
  • 56) ‘Yet, inevitably, the comprehensive scope of Ackroyd's book requires that he sometimes sacrifice elaboration for example, depth for breadth.’
  • 57) ‘Naval historians would do well to familiarize themselves with his style of narrative, his comprehensive coverage, and scope of research.’
  • 58) ‘Unbelievable in its comprehensive scope, the vast material supports a view of Africa as the archetypal artistic environment.’
  • 59) ‘Although debate on the measure was fairly abbreviated, the resulting measure was comprehensive in both its scope and design.’
  • 60) ‘Their collaborative research is quite comprehensive in its scope.’
  • 61) ‘It combines a comprehensive scope, concisely written entries and the best in current biblical scholarship.’
  • 62) ‘The Convention is extraordinarily comprehensive in scope.’
  • 63) ‘This presentation is comprehensive in scope but lacks much historical analysis.’
  • 64) ‘The Guardian's more comprehensive survey also came up with far higher job losses than the government admits.’
  • 65) ‘Almost immediately afterwards, the Under-17s cemented victory in their own league with a comprehensive defeat of visitors Sandbach.’
  • 66) ‘However, this was a very comprehensive victory, a complete team performance.’
  • 67) ‘Brookes added the goal to complete a comprehensive victory for Albion.’
  • 68) ‘With his opponent looking tired, Khan took full advantage landing plenty of powerful shots to secure a comprehensive victory.’
  • 69) ‘But Cameron could not argue that Thursday's decisive victory was comprehensive, because his forward march appears to have ground to a halt at the northern boundaries of Middle England.’
  • 70) ‘After their comprehensive defeat at Scarborough last Saturday, York will be looking to get their Oxbridge ECB Yorkshire Premier League programme back on the rails this weekend.’
  • 71) ‘The Oxford Kings' defense struggled through the first five innings of Sunday's game against the Cambridge Monarchs, allowing the Tabs to take eight runs on the way to a comprehensive victory.’
  • 72) ‘Selby Warriors also won their first game in PN division five, albeit by only a single point, and they will be looking for a more comprehensive victory on Saturday as they visit the hapless Panthers.’
  • 73) ‘Deputy head teacher Patrick Earnshaw, who witnessed the school's comprehensive victory at Kendal Town Hall on Thursday night, said he was extremely proud of his students.’
  • 74) ‘Gloucester were a distant second-best as 12,500 Munster fans roared their side on to a comprehensive victory which gives them an away quarter-final in April.’
  • 75) ‘The last thing they need now is this afternoon's game at Leeds, who will be desperate to recover from the disappointment of Wednesday's comprehensive defeat by Real Madrid.’
  • 76) ‘Last October's comprehensive defeats by the Irish at both senior and under-21 levels on their own soil shows Kelly that the opposition has stepped up a gear.’
  • 77) ‘Hamed, back for the first time since his comprehensive defeat to Marco Antonio Barrera in Las Vegas, looked sluggish and occasionally even disinterested.’
  • 78) ‘Three minutes after Hartson made it three, Petrov made it four and what was looking like a comprehensive victory started heading inexorably towards a humiliation.’
  • 79) ‘Oxford UCCE women's cricket team began this season as they finished the last - with a comprehensive victory over their Cambridge rivals.’
  • 80) ‘Their comprehensive defeat was confounded even further yesterday when they visited Yorkshire Academy in the League Cup quarter-finals.’
  • 81) ‘Salford's comprehensive victory laid down a significant marker ahead of the play-offs and will have created considerable doubt in Leigh minds.’
  • 82) ‘Cork's attack was toothless that day and, in a game that was stuffy for long enough, Tipperary's eight-point victory was comprehensive.’
  • 83) ‘Richmond continued their domination in both league and cup with a comprehensive victory over Dorking in the Surrey Cup quarter-finals.’
  • 84) ‘Blue is the colour in North Yorkshire today after the Conservative Party swept to a comprehensive victory in the county council elections.’
  • 85) ‘Some cost items will differ for different vehicle types, notably comprehensive insurance, but in the main it is reasonable to use fleet size.’
  • 86) ‘Is it possible to take out one insurance policy, preferably comprehensive, that would cover us all to drive either of the cars?’
  • 87) ‘The good news for motorists with fully comprehensive insurance is that they are covered if their car has water damage.’
  • 88) ‘He agreed only after ensuring that he was covered under the defendant's comprehensive car insurance policy.’
  • 89) ‘For example, a 56-year-old driving a 2001 Toyota Avensis received a quote of €735 from Axa for comprehensive insurance.’
  • 90) ‘He thought that all drivers should be made to have fully comprehensive insurance and that driving jobs should be given to local people.’
  • 91) ‘This insurance is designed to protect motorists from payout shortfalls that could arise between the original price paid for a car and the comprehensive insurance payout in the case of loss.’
  • 92) ‘It must be comprehensive insurance, because you're driving someone else's car.’
  • 93) ‘If you happen to own a posh motor, or are particularly accident-prone, then you might consider taking out fully comprehensive insurance.’
  • 94) ‘Motorists with fully comprehensive insurance mistakenly think they have insurance for the contents of their car along with the car itself.’
  • 95) ‘Even those who have fully comprehensive motor insurance while driving in the UK need to check, as most policies only offer third-party cover on the continent.’
  • 96) ‘The cost of comprehensive motor insurance has almost doubled, rising by 86%.’
  • 97) ‘A typical comprehensive and collision policy will usually only cover the fair market value for your car.’
  • 98) ‘It is important that all schools see themselves, and are seen, as part of a comprehensive system of secondary education.’
  • 99) ‘The comprehensive education system was last night seized upon as a key factor in reducing the chances of Scots born between 1967 and 1976 bettering themselves.’
  • 100) ‘Is the comprehensive education system to blame for making these teachers' jobs practically impossible?’
  • 101) ‘The whole point of a comprehensive education system is to encourage the best and brightest pupils not merely to educate those with rich parents who went to private schools.’
  • 102) ‘Before the comprehensive state education systems were established, there had been some local control of schools and some local funds raised for them.’
  • 103) ‘Mike says the play, which criticises the values that prevail in the comprehensive school education system, is ideal for young performers.’
  • 104) ‘New Zealand has a fully comprehensive education system.’
  • 105) ‘Historically, comprehensive secondary education in mixed-ability schools was first introduced by Labour.’
  • 106) ‘Northern Ireland still uses the selective grammar school system that was largely replaced by comprehensive education in Britain in the 1970s.’
  • 107) ‘League tables have led to a systematic attack on comprehensive education.’
  • 108) ‘For her, as for much of the Scottish educational establishment, the comprehensive system is sacrosanct.’
  • 109) ‘The expansion of higher education has been on the back of comprehensive education.’
  • 110) ‘She supports comprehensive education and opposes selection.’
  • 111) ‘I don't believe we'd have the made the progress we have with girls' education without comprehensive education.’
  • 112) ‘We have given long-standing support to comprehensive education and we stand by that.’
  • 113) ‘Supporters of the comprehensive system pointed to the figures as evidence that selective education in the state sector was unnecessary.’
  • 114) ‘Because of the spread of comprehensive education from the mid-1960s, by 1990 only about 7 per cent of local authorities had retained grammar schools.’
  • 115) ‘Catholic students entered University as never before, and were further aided by the introduction of comprehensive education.’
  • 116) ‘He introduced comprehensive education, women's emancipation legislation, and reforms in higher education.’
  • 117) ‘I have fought for comprehensive education all my life, including during the 20 years I have been at Kingsland.’
  • 118) ‘About 12,000 pupils went on to study at the same 400 selective grammar schools or top-rated comprehensives.’
  • 119) ‘The majority of these producers did not attend fee-paying schools; more went to grammar schools or comprehensives.’
  • 120) ‘City academies - independent comprehensives part-funded by the private sector - and specialist schools will not be introduced north of the Border.’
  • 121) ‘The snuffing out of that option, by the ideologically driven determination to replace grammar schools with comprehensives, was a quite explicit piece of social engineering.’
  • 122) ‘All but one of the top 26 state schools nationally were comprehensives.’
  • 123) ‘Some of us were going to private schools or comprehensives, so we didn't have to take it.’
  • 124) ‘In England they have been transforming failed comprehensives into specialist schools and city academies.’
  • 125) ‘We do not argue that public comprehensives jettison their professional and technical programs.’
  • 126) ‘‘There is no point at which grammar schools exceed the performance of comprehensives at teaching able pupils,’ he said at the time.’
  • 127) ‘In the latest set of school league tables, comprehensives are getting results as good as or higher than grammar schools in the ‘value added’ part of the table.’
  • 128) ‘As today's exclusive survey shows, a massive gulf separates Bradford's highest-flying comprehensives from those with lower scores.’
  • 129) ‘People power has forced councillors to rethink plans to change school catchment areas and bar scores of pupils from their local comprehensives.’
  • 130) ‘About half went to fee-paying schools and the rest to state grammars and comprehensives.’
  • 131) ‘A Guardian leak suggests that one of the most scandalous proposals, letting ‘public’ schools take over comprehensives, may be restricted to London.’
  • 132) ‘Plans to rebuild two other comprehensives - Beckfoot and Grange Technology College - plus new special schools will be included in a ‘second wave’ bid to be put in over the next few weeks.’
  • 133) ‘We should be defending mixed local comprehensives.’
  • 134) ‘Laidlaw has given assurances that his schools would remain comprehensives and would take everyone from the catchment area.’
  • 135) ‘More recently, he has declared opposition to comprehensives and support for the return of grammar schools.’
  • 136) ‘More than one in five teachers who taught some maths in comprehensives had nothing better than an A-Level in the subject, and the proportion fell to just over half in the case of RE.’
  • 137) ‘Instead, many went to council-run comprehensives and attended newer universities or none.’

Examples

  • 1) The behaviour of humans is not remotely akin to the passage through time and space of mere objects, entirely comprehensible through the laws of physics.
  • 2) He steps outside his own skin and makes other lives comprehensible to the rest of us.
  • 3) He clearly struggles to make himself comprehensible.
  • 4) Both pledged to simplify the excruciatingly complex world of insurance accounting and make it more comprehensible.
  • 5) Have a business model that is easily comprehensible.
  • 6) The suspicion with which regular army officers were regarded by the forces of the left was entirely comprehensible.
  • 7) But it is important that you find ways to make it more comprehensible and really make it fun and relevant.
  • 8) More important, survivors become comprehensible to themselves.
  • 9) To make matters worse, most terms are barely comprehensible.
  • 10) These men's idealism has a happy simplicity barely comprehensible to the young today.
  • 11) It hardly mattered - it was still barely comprehensible.
  • 12) Again, thinking about learning disabilities in terms of the elements of good information processing makes them more comprehensible.
  • 13) I can't see how he could possibly render it in a more economical and readily comprehensible way.
  • 14) If the policy was transparent and readily comprehensible, so the argument ran, then this would reduce uncertainty about future inflation.
  • 15) Treatments can aim to explore these with the individual (and sometimes his or her partner) so that the problems become more comprehensible.
  • 16) This phenomenon is easily comprehensible from a physiological standpoint, but to the man who makes the discovery for the first time, it is a most wonderful thing.
  • 17) Of course, it needs to remain comprehensible to readers in 2010, which hobbles me considerably.
  • 18) He was not the first to publish a detailed survey of architecture, but his treatise was written in comprehensible language, relatively unencumbered by philosophical verbiage and richly detailed with how-to instruction.
  • 19) How she betrays a political secret; how cruel, yet how comprehensible, is Dacier's conduct, the reader will learn in chapters full of charm.
  • 20) That is the keynote of the Crébillon novel: it is the handbook, with illustrative examples, of the business, employment, or vocation of flirting, in the most extensive and intensive meanings of that term comprehensible to the eighteenth century.
  • 21) To make such a bizarre term comprehensible, think of "White Nationality" as opposed to South African.
  • 22) I can't regard it as entirely successful because a) I didn't get it all myself (and given what I have learned since then would do differently now) and b) the medievals had to remain comprehensible to the readers, and the readership would have had too many default assumptions to overturn.
  • 23) ‘The writing must be comprehensible by a moderately intelligent human being.’
  • 24) ‘Sihad had to calm down before he was able to say anything comprehensible.’
  • 25) ‘The epistemological project feels like the pursuit of a perfectly comprehensible intellectual goal.’
  • 26) ‘He makes the force of the scientific evidence transparently clear and comprehensible to all readers.’
  • 27) ‘Do you see a way of keeping it technical but less obtuse and more transparent, more comprehensible?’
  • 28) ‘This is partly because unit trusts are seen as more accessible and more comprehensible by lay investors.’
  • 29) ‘This forced the judge to intervene and rephrase the question in plain comprehensible English.’
  • 30) ‘The explanation of the science at work was clear, concise and comprehensible.’
  • 31) ‘The subtitles are clear, comprehensible and easy to follow.’
  • 32) ‘The dialogue is crisp and clear, easily comprehensible and audible at all times.’
  • 33) ‘His journalistic skill is evident through his clear prose and comprehensible style.’
  • 34) ‘Whatever might be said against the classic interpretation, it was at least coherent and comprehensible.’
  • 35) ‘Even topics of a serious nature are covered in a simple, lucid manner so as to make them comprehensible to the common man.’
  • 36) ‘One knows that a science is mature when it is no longer comprehensible to the general, intelligent public.’
  • 37) ‘It is all designed to be comprehensible, even if you do not understand IT jargon or technology.’
  • 38) ‘Unfortunately, I think this is used as an excuse to reject the need for a comprehensible plot or characterisation.’
  • 39) ‘Most of it should be pretty comprehensible to non-specialist readers.’
  • 40) ‘You still won't be interesting, but you may be comprehensible.’
  • 41) ‘These kids just can't express themselves in anything like a comprehensible way.’
  • 42) ‘So they rush off in search of more comprehensible things to hate.’
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