cell vs sell

cell sell

Definitions

  • 1) statistics The unit in a statistical array (a spreadsheet, for example) where a row and a column intersect.
  • 2) US, informal A cellular phone.
  • 3) geometry A three-dimensional facet of a polytope.
  • 4) communication A region of radio reception that is a part of a larger radio network.
  • 5) The smallest organizational unit of a clandestine group or movement, such as a banned political movement or a terrorist group. A cell's leader is often the only person who knows members of the organization outside the cell.
  • 6) A cell phone.
  • 7) A storm cell.
  • 8) A small enclosed cavity or space, such as a compartment in a honeycomb or within a plant ovary or an area bordered by veins in an insect's wing.
  • 9) A narrow confining room, as in a prison or convent.
  • 10) A fuel cell.
  • 11) A small humble abode, such as a hermit's cave or hut.
  • 12) Biology The smallest structural unit of an organism that is capable of independent functioning, consisting of cytoplasm, usually one nucleus, and various other organelles, all surrounded by a semipermeable cell membrane.
  • 13) A geographic area or zone surrounding a transmitter in a cellular telephone system.
  • 14) A small religious house dependent on a larger one, such as a priory within an abbey.
  • 15) A single unit that converts radiant energy into electric energy.
  • 16) A box or other unit on a spreadsheet or similar array at the intersection of a column and a row.
  • 17) Computers A basic unit of storage in a computer memory that can hold one unit of information, such as a character or word.
  • 18) A single unit for electrolysis or conversion of chemical into electric energy, usually consisting of a container with electrodes and an electrolyte; a battery.
  • 19) A small religious house attached to a monastery or convent.
  • 20) (Elec.) A jar of vessel, or a division of a compound vessel, for holding the exciting fluid of a battery.
  • 21) (Biol.) See Cellular theory, under Cellular.
  • 22) Any small cavity, or hollow place.
  • 23) See Air cell.
  • 24) (called also cell genesis, cell formation, and cytogenesis), the multiplication, of cells by a process of reproduction under the following common forms; segmentation or fission, gemmation or budding, karyokinesis, and endogenous multiplication. See Segmentation, Gemmation, etc.
  • 25) Same as Cella.
  • 26) A very small and close apartment, as in a prison or in a monastery or convent; the hut of a hermit.
  • 27) (Biol.) One of the minute elementary structures, of which the greater part of the various tissues and organs of animals and plants are composed.
  • 28) The space between the ribs of a vaulted roof.
  • 29) a small unit serving as part of or as the nucleus of a larger political movement
  • 30) (biology) the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms; they may exist as independent units of life (as in monads) or may form colonies or tissues as in higher plants and animals
  • 31) a room where a prisoner is kept
  • 32) any small compartment
  • 33) According to a second view, which is sometimes called the organism standpoint, the essential primary distinctive characteristic of a multicellular organism is its individuality or unity, while its composition out of cells is an indication of its organization, but not the means through which organization has been brought about; its individuality is directly comparable with, or of the same grade as, that of a unicellular organism, and there is no reason why it may not have arisen, in the remote past, through the growth and increasing complexity of a unicellular ancestor which gradually became multicellular in adaptation to its increasing size and complexity. The unity of the egg is regarded as the same as that of the adult and as regulating instead of being controlled by cell-division, which makes no change in the grade of its individuality. Physiologically it is regarded as a coordinated whole, not as an aggregation of cells.
  • 34) In archaeology, the inner chamber of megalithic structures, which consists of a space walled by large stones and covered with a slab.
  • 35) While there is much to be said in support of each of these opinions, there are grave objections to the acceptance of either of them without compromises with the other, and there is a third view which regards the distinction between the cell standpoint and the organism standpoint as dependent upon the purpose for which the comparison is made, and as in the mind of the interpreter instead of in nature. For many of the purposes of the histologist, the pathologist, the embryologist, and the physiologist the multicellular organism is best considered as a cell-community, while for other purposes it is best considered as a unit or coordinated whole. From the morphological standpoint the cell may properly be regarded apart from the organism, as an individual, but it is not to be forgotten that it is by abstraction that this is done. Physiologically the cell is an individual only when actually isolated and independent of an organism. From this point of view every abstraction is a blunder.
  • 36) In kinematics, a symmetrical combination of an even number of links.
  • 37) In spectroscopy, a small glass vessel with parallel sides designed to hold liquids for examination by transmitted light.
  • 38) One of the multi-nucleate cells which occur in the red marrow of the bones, or one of the ganglionic cells in the deeper layers of the brain-cortex.
  • 39) the dependent nature of the latter and the primacy of the cell; and the resolution of the physiological activities of the multicellular organism into those of the constituent cells. See plastid, Morgan, and person.
  • 40) One of the water-tight compartments into which the space between the inner and outer shells of a war-vessel, or other metal ship, is divided.
  • 41) transitive To place or enclose in a cell.
  • 42) To shut up in a cell; place in a cell.
  • 43) To live in or share a prison cell.
  • 44) To store in a honeycomb.
  • 45) rare, rare To place or inclose in a cell.

Definitions

  • 1) An act or instance of selling.
  • 2) Slang A deception; a hoax.
  • 3) Something that sells or gains acceptance in a particular way.
  • 4) obsolete A sill.
  • 5) obsolete A cell; a house.
  • 6) obsolete A throne or lofty seat.
  • 7) Obs. or Scot. Self.
  • 8) obsolete A saddle for a horse.
  • 9) A middle English form of cell.
  • 10) [Some commentators on Shakspere think that the passage in Macbeth, i. 7. 27.
  • 11) A seat, especially an elevated or dignified one; a place of honor and dignity.
  • 12) A Scotch form of self.
  • 13) An obsolete variant of sill.
  • 14) A saddle.
  • 15) An imposition; a cheat; a deception; a trick played at another's expense.
  • 16) sould read, “Valting ambition, which o'erleaps its sell.”]
  • 17) Togive;furnish.
  • 18) To persuade (another) to recognize the worth or desirability of something.
  • 19) To be purchased in (a certain quantity); achieve sales of.
  • 20) To exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent.
  • 21) To bring about or encourage sales of; promote.
  • 22) To give up or surrender in exchange for a price or reward.
  • 23) To exchange ownership for money or its equivalent; engage in selling.
  • 24) To offer or have available for sale.
  • 25) To be approved of; gain acceptance.
  • 26) To attract prospective buyers; be popular on the market.
  • 27) To cause to be accepted; advocate successfully.
  • 28) To be sold or be on sale.
  • 29) To practice selling commodities.
  • 30) (sell a bill of goods) To take unfair advantage of.
  • 31) (sell down the river) To betray the trust or faith of.
  • 32) (sell short) To contract for the sale of securities or commodities one expects to own at a later date and at more advantageous terms.
  • 33) (sell short) To underestimate the true value or worth of.

Examples

  • 1) This may have been a sign that hydrogen was leaking from one of the cells.
  • 2) Iron is important because we need it to make new blood cells that carry oxygen around the body.
  • 3) Or that one of your cells hasn't just decided to become cancerous?
  • 4) These chunks of tissue churn out healthy red blood cells according to the donor's genetic code.
  • 5) Signals are sent to the bone marrow to produce more white blood cells, which can arteries.
  • 6) About a third have leukaemia, which is cancer of the white blood cells.
  • 7) My skin's cell turnover is also slowing down.
  • 8) It is the cell walls and plant starch that isn't absorbed by the body.
  • 9) A study of white blood cells taken from individuals afflicted by spots showed that they had longer protective caps on the ends of their chromosomes.
  • 10) Just one skinless chicken thigh contains more than half of our daily requirement of vitamin B12, which our bodies need to make red blood cells.
  • 11) The activity of this organism inside the plant cells leads to swelling and distorted growth.
  • 12) When a light is shone on the cancerous area the affected cells appear to glow.
  • 13) Why the cells were able to reproduce so spectacularly has not been solved yet.
  • 14) Three prisoners were crammed into a cell designed for one person.
  • 15) They contained not only cells but also all the facilities which were needed for a constructive existence.
  • 16) We begin with the nucleus at the center of a cell.
  • 17) The rays heat the lung tissue and blood cells until they form a seal.
  • 18) So far it has been limited to inserting small numbers of human genes or cells into animals.
  • 19) Smear tests involve a small sample of cells being taken from the cervix.
  • 20) Take the example of plant cell structure.
  • 21) The cell has since divided more than a billion times.
  • 22) The scheme will target the ten areas where cell use is the highest.
  • 23) Cancer cells are not able to recover from this damage and they die.
  • 24) The cells formed new blood vessels where heart disease had ravaged the original ones.
  • 25) The technique involves replacing faulty mitochondria, which provide cells' energy.
  • 26) It can be used to replace faulty mitochondria, which provide cells with energy, inherited from mothers.
  • 27) ~ New 'biofuel cell' produces electricity from hydrogen in plain air -- "A pioneering “biofuel cell” that produces electricity from ordinary air spiked with small amounts of hydrogen offers significant potential as an inexpensive and renewable alternative to the costly platinum-based fuel cells that have dominated discussion about the “hydrogen economy” of the future, British scientists reported here today."
  • 28) As I was going to my cell I saw big bruisers go into his [fellow prisoner's] cell….
  • 29) The gravity cell, while cheap and effective, is inconvenient for general use, owing to the fact that it cannot be easily transported, and the _dry cell_ has largely supplanted all others, because of the ease with which it can be taken from place to place.
  • 30) Each point of the ingrowing lines of the _échelon_ has usually one cell further advanced into the corium than its neighbours, and may be termed the _apical cell_.
  • 31) _Every cell comes from a pre-existing cell_ by a process of division, and _every germ cell comes from a pre-existing germ cell_.
  • 32) This term is employed in contradistinction to the later developed cell, commonly termed the _dry cell_.
  • 33) The zinc is, as a rule, of crowfoot form, as shown, whence this cell derives the commonly applied name of _crowfoot cell_.
  • 34) If the second cell division plane is formed at right angles to the first, a _cell surface_ or _tetrad_ is formed.
  • 35) Lalande cell: -- A type of cell, specially adapted to constant-current work, and sometimes used as a central source of current in very small common-battery exchanges is the so-called _copper oxide_, or _Lalande cell_, of which the Edison and the Gordon are types.
  • 36) The building generally he could indicate with certainty, but he professed himself unable to indicate the particular part of it which 'the young woman brought in on the day previous' would be likely to occupy; consequently he could not point out the window from which her cell (her '_cell_!' what a word!) would be lighted.
  • 37) ‘So what that means is that he's locked up at night in a prison cell on his own, so that's solitary confinement.’
  • 38) ‘The change of status would also mean that Tommy has to be transferred from a detention cell to a prison room, which he has to share with other convicts.’
  • 39) ‘At 2pm on Tuesday last all 190 prisoners were locked in their cells as prison officers staged a one-hour walk-out.’
  • 40) ‘Wilders has six body guards and has slept in a prison cell to protect himself against possible attacks.’
  • 41) ‘He was said to have been playing cards with a prison officer outside his cell when the prisoner came up and punched him.’
  • 42) ‘Prison cells, hotel rooms, psychiatric hospitals, nursing homes and hospices are exempt from the ban.’
  • 43) ‘There were four regular prison cells, one padded cell and two used for solitary confinement.’
  • 44) ‘Most prisoners share their cells with one other inmate.’
  • 45) ‘The security and observation regime is quite different, prisoners often sharing cells in conditions of close confinement.’
  • 46) ‘As a result the Governor ordered a search of the prisoners and their cells to be carried out on Monday.’
  • 47) ‘Since 1980, nearly 300 indigenous people have died in custody in prison cells or police lockups.’
  • 48) ‘Where will the Government put the inmates when all the police cells, court cells, and prisons are full?’
  • 49) ‘The offenders have designed and painted artworks throughout the burgled room and in the prison cell.’
  • 50) ‘Rehabilitation had been neglected, Owers reported, with inmates locked in cells for 23 hours a day.’
  • 51) ‘The monks' cells and rooms were carved inside the soft white limestone cliff.’
  • 52) ‘Former inmates lead you through prison cells and tell you powerful stories about the routines and punishments they endured during their captivity.’
  • 53) ‘He was one of 10 convicted prisoners who escaped from the prison on June 8 after holding up prison warders at gunpoint and locking them in a cell.’
  • 54) ‘Copying the works of others protects the solitude of the monastic cell from more intrusive forms of ministry.’
  • 55) ‘He was a man who delighted in escaping from the business of life into his scriptoriolum - a small library attached to his monastic cell.’
  • 56) ‘Since the accommodation for visitors on Mount Athos is more than basic, we had to share one and the same cell in the monastery of Philotheu.’
  • 57) ‘When this occurs, the cytoplasm from the two cells fuses, but the nuclei remain separate and distinct.’
  • 58) ‘The scientists also produced a continuously growing line of cultured embryonic germ cells.’
  • 59) ‘Even mammals have nucleated red blood cells in their bone marrow.’
  • 60) ‘The neoplastic epithelial cells were cuboidal and had round or oval nuclei and inconspicuous nucleoli.’
  • 61) ‘The scientists then used test-tube experiments to show the virus could infect T cells under laboratory conditions.’
  • 62) ‘Then there's the honeycomb shades, so called because in profile they look like cells of a honeycomb strung together.’
  • 63) ‘Once the honey is gooey enough, the bees seal off the cell of the honeycomb with a plug of wax.’
  • 64) ‘The interior of a cell contains structures called organelles that can be compared to the organs in a body.’
  • 65) ‘She then deposits a little into a honeycomb cell, built and tilted upright, so that it won't spill.’
  • 66) ‘Finally, there is a claim it was less a social club than a political cell.’
  • 67) ‘It is an open secret now that the ISI has a political cell.’
  • 68) ‘The extortion then funds the further activities of the terror cell.’
  • 69) ‘Tentatively we can say no to the activity of single cells and yes to that of assemblies.’
  • 70) ‘With a computer and a connection to the Internet, an individual can do more damage than armed terrorist cells or small insurgent movements.’
  • 71) ‘We should do everything we can to disrupt and destroy any cells, any activity that would do us harm in this country.’
  • 72) ‘Much of the military training consisted of small groups gathering together in secret cells.’
  • 73) ‘That makes it easy for a small and secretive terrorist cell to go undetected.’
  • 74) ‘Disrupting terrorist cells is an important component of the government's overall counterterrorism efforts.’
  • 75) ‘Those tracking terrorist cells say the trend toward soft targets, like schools, is undeniable and probably unstoppable.’
  • 76) ‘The police claim the weapons belonged to terrorist cells and were seized in several raids across the Kingdom.’
  • 77) ‘Four bombers blew themselves up but police are investigating whether another member of the terrorist cell is alive and on the run.’
  • 78) ‘Every agent infiltrating a drug cartel is an agent who could be infiltrating a terrorist cell.’
  • 79) ‘In Dewsbury, he gradually emerged as the probable ringleader of the terrorist cell.’
  • 80) ‘He has been linked to a terrorist cell in Hamburg and a flight training school in Florida.’
  • 81) ‘They concluded that terrorist cells could send members on flights without any intention of hijacking the plane just to see whether or not members would be flagged.’
  • 82) ‘They operate through autonomous cells, strict secrecy, and a refusal to engage the enemy's strength.’
  • 83) ‘This is said to be important when welding heat-sensitive parts such as miniature battery cells or sensitive electronic devices.’
  • 84) ‘In addition to electrical conduction, the cells are polarized by the force of applied voltage.’
  • 85) ‘A few years ago, the companies involved in the voltage race tried to get more cells in NiCad battery packs to power bigger tools.’
  • 86) ‘Previous approaches to study the seal resistance of cells and electrodes lacked high spatial resolution.’
  • 87) ‘The 8.5g cell generates 100mW of power - enough, Toshiba said, to run am MP3 player for 20 hours.’
  • 88) ‘In our study, we focus on oscillations generated in a single cell.’
  • 89) ‘An internal short can cause the battery cells to overheat, posing a fire hazard to consumers.’
  • 90) ‘Now there is a potential difference between the two cells allowing current to flow.’
  • 91) ‘This seven-ounce magnet was able to support four kilograms of iron using the current from a single cell.’
  • 92) ‘For the experiments presented the capacity compensation was set with the electrode close to the cell.’
  • 93) ‘The copper tube is arranged to form a series of cells called cavities.’
  • 94) ‘These charged particles continue through the cell to the collecting area where they are attracted to a series of grounded plates.’
  • 95) ‘The camera has a tiny light source, miniaturized transmitters, and power cells.’
  • 96) ‘Chemical reactions inside the cell strip electrons from the hydrogen atoms to produce a voltage that can power a circuit.’
  • 97) ‘Although Scotland has the brains to develop them, solar energy and hydrogen cells are all but ignored.’
  • 98) ‘Most designs use photovoltaic cells to convert sunlight into electricity.’
  • 99) ‘He suggested that China and California work together on hydrogen automobile fuel and solar energy cells.’
  • 100) ‘When light was shone on to the tiny cell, an electrical current was generated.’
  • 101) ‘The cells will generate electricity with cloud cover, rain, and even during a snowstorm, though not as much as they will in bright sun.’
  • 102) ‘Other design factors of the current cell contribute significantly to overall performance.’
  • 103) ‘Photovoltaic cells powered an electric pump and light bulbs in Sweden.’
  • 104) ‘Solar collectors can preheat feedstock, and solar photovoltaic cells can produce the electricity for the pumps.’
  • 105) ‘Solar photovoltaic cells use the same silicon-based technology as semiconductors.’
  • 106) ‘The design includes solar panels and photovoltaic cells which will create electricity and a heat pump which will distribute heat throughout the house.’
  • 107) ‘It contains a fuel tank, and a chemical process occurs in the cell that generates electricity by using up the fuel, which is normally methanol.’
  • 108) ‘To achieve this, high efficiency heating would be used together with roof panels fitted with photo voltaic cells to provide electricity for the buildings.’
  • 109) ‘Photovoltaic cells produce electricity by using specially treated materials such as silicon that convert light into power.’
  • 110) ‘As it happens, the periods of intense heat correspond to the periods of peak electricity production from photovoltaic cells.’
  • 111) ‘Solar panels forming the roof of the crop store provide both heat and electricity from photovoltaic cells.’
  • 112) ‘Even on cloudy days, there is a lot of scattered radiation - and so PV cells generate energy even when it's overcast.’
  • 113) ‘However, sometimes the hydrogen is generated directly within the cell from another fuel, such as methanol.’
  • 114) ‘Another method of on-site power generation is the photovoltaic cell.’
  • 115) ‘Konarka says it will enter the market with a photovoltaic cell in late 2004 that will generate solar power at about $2 per watt.’
  • 116) ‘The service operates in local areas known as cells.’
  • 117) ‘The total area within these cells, determines the coverage of a network service provider.’
  • 118) ‘Mobiles located in areas of other cells and operating at the same frequency experience the effect of the tuning signal as an interference.’
  • 119) ‘In densely populated areas, there are more cells, which cover smaller distances, so it is easier to pinpoint the signal of a handset.’
  • 120) ‘The invention is directed to a method for cell selection in a cellular telecommunication system.’
  • 121) ‘Each cell has a base station that transmits and receives signals over just a small fraction of the frequencies to which the network operator has access.’
  • 122) ‘As the initiated say, in telecommunications lies not only cell and telephone issues but also broadcasting and now Internet.’
  • 123) ‘In cities, where mobile cells are quite small, this can locate the car to as close as 100 yards, but in rural areas the cell may be as big as six square miles.’
  • 124) ‘Analysis of mobile phone cells showed him heading north on the M1.’
  • 125) ‘And pagers tend not to jam up in emergencies the way overloaded mobile phone cells do.’
  • 126) ‘However, this time they would be used to test the Gb stack by simulating calls via virtual mobiles, cells and base stations.’
  • 127) ‘It lets you make and receive cell calls over a cordless phone and share that handset with a landline.’
  • 128) ‘At the moment, mobile operators are almost all relying on cell ID as the means to automatically locate users.’
  • 129) ‘Police seized cell phones and cell cards.’
  • 130) ‘These new systems will be able to maintain a session even when a subscriber leaves a cell site or a device is turned off.’
  • 131) ‘I turned my back on him and walked on, fingering the 911 buttons on my cell.’
  • 132) ‘She was about ready to hit the ‘end’ button on the cell when she heard a clicking sound.’
  • 133) ‘You'll be able to get a Coke from certain vending machines by pushing a button on your cell.’
  • 134) ‘Aziza hit the end button of her cell and groaned again, throwing her phone to the side.’
  • 135) ‘I end the conversation and closed my cell, throwing it onto the passenger seat beside me.’
  • 136) ‘I picked up the cell and pressed the button, waiting for what would come next.’

Examples

  • 1) We could make a third over what we paid for it right now if we sold.
  • 2) One of the three completed villas has already sold.
  • 3) They will help people to manage their electronic lives rather than just sell them products.
  • 4) The online store also sells swimming pools.
  • 5) We buy getting on for a million more cars than we sell.
  • 6) Better volumes and higher selling prices in particular bode well for the second half of the year.
  • 7) His ability to sell a good idea remains undimmed.
  • 8) If your arrears are mounting and negotiation has failed you may have to sell your property.
  • 9) The group includes all goods sold by retailers that predominantly sell food.
  • 10) Nor at this stage either does he mention the buying and selling of blood for medical purposes.
  • 11) But an unscrupulous merchant might still try to sell it.
  • 12) Some fear that they will now struggle to sell the buildings.
  • 13) Many unfinished new plots have already been sold.
  • 14) The show sold out just in time.
  • 15) The consortium will also sell the refined products.
  • 16) His dad ran a business selling vintage cars and his mum worked booking models.
  • 17) The Brazilian remains an enigma and could well be sold this summer.
  • 18) The selling price of that power will be nearly 20 billion.
  • 19) As little white lies go, we have been sold it well.
  • 20) That means nearly one in three funds sold were passive, reflecting a growing disappointment with highly paid fund managers.
  • 21) ‘The leasing driver has the chance to buy the car outright, renegotiate a lease, or they are sold to a car auction.’
  • 22) ‘Is the site being sold to make money for Hackney council?’
  • 23) ‘To clarify, I don't mind waiting until all the puppies are sold to collect money.’
  • 24) ‘Although international donors encouraged the sale, the government failed to explain where the money went, or whom the grain was sold to.’
  • 25) ‘If it was sold to a developer, a considerable amount of money could change hands.’
  • 26) ‘He made his money selling car stickers in a business which became the second biggest in the world.’
  • 27) ‘It was sold to a private collector at the auction.’
  • 28) ‘When the first edition was sold out, the rights in the book were sold to a mainstream trade publisher, who issued it with revisions and a slightly altered title.’
  • 29) ‘A special leather-bound edition will be sold to raise money for emergency workers and their families.’
  • 30) ‘Regardless of which site is chosen, the present further education site is to be sold to raise money for the development.’
  • 31) ‘The filly was sold to a private breeder for a large amount of money.’
  • 32) ‘‘Consider restricting your opening hours or employ a strict policy as to whom alcohol is sold to,’ she advised.’
  • 33) ‘But as property prices soar and demand for second homes rises, unprofitable sporting estates are worth more when broken up and assets are sold off.’
  • 34) ‘As the Depression deepened, farmers across the Midwest began to gather at farms being sold off to break up the proceedings.’
  • 35) ‘But she stopped short of confirming that she would refuse an export licence if the Doncaster-built locomotive was sold to a foreign buyer.’
  • 36) ‘It was a brand new, clean memory stick when it was sold to a reputable dealer.’
  • 37) ‘The dresser was sold to a private buyer in the ‘north country’.’
  • 38) ‘His collection was sold off and dispersed in 1936, examples going to the Museum of London, Tower of London and York Castle Museum.’
  • 39) ‘One phone was sold to the stallholders just 40 minutes after it had been stolen from its owner while another phone was taken from a car while the driver was at a funeral.’
  • 40) ‘The products are then sold to various clients, including farmers, the forestry commission, local authorities and garden centres.’
  • 41) ‘He says the stores that sell them are running stock clearance sales just now and they're to be had for a good price.’
  • 42) ‘That means stocking, promoting and selling hunting products.’
  • 43) ‘Specialist hi-fi stores do sell the high end famous brands as well: Toshiba, Sony, Pioneer, Marantz.’
  • 44) ‘They said the park's units were only supposed to be available for retailers selling bulky items such as carpets, furniture and electrical white goods.’
  • 45) ‘Sizes go up to only 16, but the site sells ranges not available in smaller stores.’
  • 46) ‘Attack the stores and retailers selling undesirable ice cream.’
  • 47) ‘I would also deliver items to stores where people worked to stock and sell them.’
  • 48) ‘You know my supplements are sold on my Web site and they're also sold in retail stores like Whole Foods.’
  • 49) ‘It seems that a company called Brands on Sale, which sells children's Halloween costumes, is now marketing wizard costumes for boys and witch costumes for girls.’
  • 50) ‘Active SCSI terminators are available at any PC store that sells SCSI devices.’
  • 51) ‘We create a sales force that actually sells those products.’
  • 52) ‘Is it showing how you can help someone or the stereotype of the pushy, obnoxious sales associate selling a service or product for which you have no need?’
  • 53) ‘Perhaps you are a salesperson or sales executive responsible for selling goods or products for one or many companies.’
  • 54) ‘Mixtures containing these are available from companies selling spices and seasonings.’
  • 55) ‘In my outline of the different venues available to sell your work I have not mentioned books or magazines.’
  • 56) ‘We are going into every retail store that sells the shirts and removing them.’
  • 57) ‘This interesting business opportunity, often using the web as a sales forum, sells ex-company cars, lease cars and PCP cars direct to the public and to employees.’
  • 58) ‘I carried on looking at different shops selling their wares.’
  • 59) ‘The store sells clothing, household goods, small furniture and garden implements.’
  • 60) ‘Our stock is small simply because supermarkets sell popular books cheaper than we can buy them.’
  • 61) ‘If I sold at that price there is nowhere in the country I could get something similar.’
  • 62) ‘They are more than dumb pieces of suede, fashioned by Spanish craftsmen and sold at a bargain price in a long forgotten shoe shop in Sevilla.’
  • 63) ‘These were difficult to obtain on the open market and sold at premium prices.’
  • 64) ‘Had it sold at that price, it would have been the granite city's most expensive ever house.’
  • 65) ‘Both were sold at below purchase price as part of a deck - clearing exercise, causing a few raised eyebrows in the City.’
  • 66) ‘Not only is gas cheaper than ever, once adjusted for inflation, but it is also frequently sold at a price similar to a liter of water.’
  • 67) ‘Our £200,000 appeal is so that Socialist Worker can be bought, read and sold at a price workers and students can afford.’
  • 68) ‘Loads of members, loads of rare goods all sold at great low prices.’
  • 69) ‘They also (surprising to me) found that pink tomatoes sold at a higher price than the red ones.’
  • 70) ‘Second-hand clothing from the United States, sold at bargain prices, has become popular.’
  • 71) ‘The applications come from IBM and other vendors, and can be bundled and sold at a compelling price.’
  • 72) ‘The freshest herring was salted and sold at good prices for human consumption.’
  • 73) ‘Coal continues to be subsidized, dug out of the ground and sold at unbelievably low prices.’
  • 74) ‘Increased demand may simply mean the same quantity sold at a higher price, or even a smaller quantity at a still higher price.’
  • 75) ‘Had Mr Power sold at the price offered to him by institutions last week, he would have had £12m in his pocket.’
  • 76) ‘But when it came to houses sold at 2 million or more, the London borough of Richmond jumped one place to number five in the country.’
  • 77) ‘It sold at the rate of a thousand copies a day in its first few weeks.’
  • 78) ‘A Van Gogh self-portrait sold at auction in New York in 1998 for $71 million.’
  • 79) ‘In June last year, a similar ticket sold at auction at Sotheby's in London raised a staggering £2,760.’
  • 80) ‘A medal awarded to a 19th Century Bolton soldier has sold at auction for almost three times more than it was expected to fetch.’
  • 81) ‘Our Dorking store has sold out of videos and other stores are saying that stocks are running low.’
  • 82) ‘Linda told us that she took a bag full of Socialist Worker Miners' Strike specials and T-shirts, sold out of all of them, and even took orders for more.’
  • 83) ‘I'm hoping they just sold out of the black and white, because I'd hate to think the color one was more popular.’
  • 84) ‘All the clothing vendors rapidly sold out of sweatshirts, fleece pullovers and other warm gear.’
  • 85) ‘Not surprisingly, the store had sold out of them by the time he went back to get it on Sunday so he spent his day driving around trying to find somewhere that stocked it.’
  • 86) ‘The argument was settled the next day when we sold out of our newsletter in one hour.’
  • 87) ‘Judging from response so far there are already a lot of anglers using the new floats as we completely sold out of the first production batch within a week!’
  • 88) ‘A lot of fabric prints are discontinued by stores once they have sold out of them.’
  • 89) ‘Had to wait 45 minutes for a bus and by the time I got there the bakery on the Via Portuense had completely sold out of focaccia.’
  • 90) ‘On their first day they sold out of what they had, not expecting the turnout they got.’
  • 91) ‘Parts of the UK even sold out of red hairspray as supporters rushed to do something with their hair to raise cash.’
  • 92) ‘The response from the shop keeper was that he had already sold out of such furs.’
  • 93) ‘When her own store had sold out of a special pair of shoes Trisha wanted to buy, Rachel made an unprecedented visit to the Dolcis branch in Bury and bought the shoes herself.’
  • 94) ‘One happy landlord estimated that he had sold 5,000 pints, while another had sold out of champagne and a number of spirits within hours of the victory.’
  • 95) ‘The concession stands were practically empty - sold out of sweets and cold drinks - with only popcorn and coffee to offer punters.’
  • 96) ‘In the last week-and-a-half the shop has completely sold out of the kind of designer shirts that it says it would struggle to sell in its Knightsbridge store.’
  • 97) ‘We totally sold out of Christmas trees and decorations.’
  • 98) ‘The range on show was of course impressive, but this being the final day of the festival many of the smaller brewers had sold out of beer so a fair amount of the stalls were closed.’
  • 99) ‘But when they tried to buy petrol before setting off yesterday, every filling station they visited had sold out of unleaded.’
  • 100) ‘One large supermarket had sold out of bread stocks by midday and supplies of flour were disappearing from the shelves.’
  • 101) ‘Tickets for the play's 24 performances sold out in less than two days, the majority of them bought by one of the youngest audiences the theatre can recall.’
  • 102) ‘Of the 24 professional performances, six sold out, and a further eight filled at least 85 per cent of the seats.’
  • 103) ‘It's only the evening performances which are sold out.’
  • 104) ‘A few tickets remain for the matinee performance at 1.30 pm Saturday but the evening performance is sold out.’
  • 105) ‘It is only the evening performances that are sold out ahead.’
  • 106) ‘Both Saturday performances of the Monday-Saturday show have sold out and the Friday performance is almost full.’
  • 107) ‘Word of mouth quickly spread, performances sold out, and the show's original run was extended.’
  • 108) ‘Please note, Monday's performance has sold out already, and prompt booking is recommended for the rest of the week.’
  • 109) ‘Tickets for Sting's Royal Albert Hall performance are sold out already?’
  • 110) ‘Despite this being a work that takes literally days to perform, every performance was sold out months in advance.’
  • 111) ‘The matinee performance on Tuesday was sold out and people were turned away as all 253 seats were full.’
  • 112) ‘Performance sold out, but some limited view seats or returns may be available from the box office’
  • 113) ‘Both performances were sold out as parents packed the hall to see their children take centre stage.’
  • 114) ‘Tickets are selling well and the Friday and Saturday night performances are sold out.’
  • 115) ‘I have to sit with the usherettes because the performance has been sold out for weeks.’
  • 116) ‘Expected to run six weeks, it became the first show in the history of Los Angeles theater to sell out 300 consecutive performances.’
  • 117) ‘It sounded too good to be true, even as I handed over the six pounds for the front row seat (the last one left in a sell out final performance).’
  • 118) ‘The premiere was a popular and critical success, with scheduled performances sold out almost immediately.’
  • 119) ‘Lots of press coverage was good news for the show and the ten performances sold out.’
  • 120) ‘The warm glow doesn't last, of course, but the beginning of the fringe is a good time to catch shows before the best ones start to sell out and the performers get too knackered to remember their jokes.’
  • 121) ‘Convenience goods are generally sold through many retail outlets so that buyers have easy access to the product.’
  • 122) ‘In addition to catalog sales, Venus sells through its Jacksonville retail outlet and also distributes wholesale to surf shops and speciality stores worldwide.’
  • 123) ‘Gateway sells through retail outlets, whereas Dell's business relies on the factory direct model.’
  • 124) ‘It's a bit like the changes and options opening up in banking - you can sell through retail outlets, by telephone or online.’
  • 125) ‘She would then reproduce the scenes on mugs, coasters, mousepads, postcards, and other items, which she would sell through high-end retail outlets and gift stores, mainly to tourists.’
  • 126) ‘As a producer of windows and doors that are sold through home improvement outlets, we are interested in this information.’
  • 127) ‘Their highly individual woven fabrics, made from wool and organza, are also sold through outlets such as Liberty and Co.’
  • 128) ‘These insurance products are sold through authorized insurance brokers.’
  • 129) ‘Around two-thirds of products are sold through advisers.’
  • 130) ‘So, the bulk of their milk continues to be sold through established outlets.’
  • 131) ‘This past September, the company expanded its reach to include San Francisco and New York, primarily selling through Asian marketing outlets.’
  • 132) ‘We have an uncluttered retail environment to sell through, and that's a big enabler.’
  • 133) ‘Esk Valley is only a small-scale producer, with wines sold through selected independent wine merchants.’
  • 134) ‘Why must CDs be sold through official - and more expensive - outlets?’
  • 135) ‘These devices will avoid Intel's usual channels for its products and instead will be sold through electronics shops in the US.’
  • 136) ‘Most industry observers figure the record companies will eventually have to strike deals with every credible Net outlet, much as they currently sell through Tower Records or Kmart.’
  • 137) ‘The company will continue to provide retail registrations internationally through the Network Solutions business and will sell through its many resellers in the UK.’
  • 138) ‘A further option is to sell through certain specialized shops, on the basis that the product requires sales expertise in that area.’
  • 139) ‘He sold through the local supermarket chains, which were then still the backbone of the American grocery industry.’
  • 140) ‘The British economy also benefits when the product returns to these shores and is distributed by a British distributor, and sold through a British store.’
  • 141) ‘He applied to Richmond Council to build houses and offices on the site, but the application was refused, so he sold up to property developers who have since submitted a succession of planning applications.’
  • 142) ‘The owners are selling up to a property developer and will retire rich.’
  • 143) ‘This limits movement around the market for existing home owners who are looking to sell up, grinding the property chain to a halt.’
  • 144) ‘We plan to live at my place for two to three years, then sell up and buy a property abroad.’
  • 145) ‘So we quit our jobs, sold up everything, and came here.’
  • 146) ‘The fact that women end up on the street selling themselves cheaply to get money for drugs is tragedy in itself.’
  • 147) ‘During the time I spent living rough, I met many homeless people, girls and boys, who had started selling themselves for money.’
  • 148) ‘In the course of his conversations with her, he told her that back in the day, things were so hard that he used to sell himself to make money!’
  • 149) ‘You sold yourself for money to help your sister.’
  • 150) ‘Finally, through intimidation and violence the girl, separated from family and now dependent on the recruiter and pimp for drugs and money is expected to pay back her debt by selling herself for sex.’
  • 151) ‘Instead he berates him for abandoning his country and selling out to make money.’
  • 152) ‘He believes the group has demonstrated that ‘independent drinks companies’ have a real alternative to selling out to one of the global drinks giants.’
  • 153) ‘It is another thing entirely to be a corporate whore, selling out to the highest bidder because the CEO fattens your campaign chest.’
  • 154) ‘She's a dance and drama teacher at a Catholic high school, and aspires to age graciously without selling out to the complacent middle class.’
  • 155) ‘Many Europeans see this as selling out to agribusiness and international pressure.’
  • 156) ‘I feel we have been sold out by the interim management team led by Mr Dawson.’
  • 157) ‘In his acceptance speech, Patrick talked about the raw deal given the fishermen, that they were sold out by the government.’
  • 158) ‘A lot of us are angry because we don't know what's happening and the people who have put quite a lot of years into the company feel they have been sold out.’
  • 159) ‘My brother is a strong person, but they felt they had been sold out.’
  • 160) ‘This was a youth meeting, youth must be the ones speaking to work this out, and the adults had sold us out again by managing this problem, and not addressing it head on.’
  • 161) ‘Lecturing us on how to keep our linen cupboards tidy, we are being sold the idea that cleaning is cool and that a few crumbs under the toaster is an indication of failure.’
  • 162) ‘With an eye on the commissions earned from these products brokers were cashing in on the equity craze at a time when the world was being sold the idea of building a share portfolio.’
  • 163) ‘Politicians have been sold the idea that it is a big wealth-creating industry that must be cherished at all costs and now refuse to face the downside.’
  • 164) ‘If there's no way to sell a particular good idea, then you put it on the back-burner and look at something else.’
  • 165) ‘When we are offered a television, we are as much being sold the idea behind it as the physical reality of it.’
  • 166) ‘Firstly, with this modern mobile stuff, consumers have been sold the idea of the Internet on their phone.’
  • 167) ‘Why do you need to sell others on the idea of being a parent?’
  • 168) ‘It's too soon to try to politically sell such an idea - mainly because it is a very complicated sale.’
  • 169) ‘He was as smooth a talker as any merchant in the city streets and knew how to sell many an idea to men.’
  • 170) ‘Well I argue that anyone who's persuaded a two-year-old to eat spinach can sell anything.’
  • 171) ‘Is it any surprise that so many people can be sold irrational ideas, systems, devices, and philosophies?’
  • 172) ‘What is being sold here, in short, is the idea of control.’
  • 173) ‘Just how one sells something like this, I have no idea… so I thought I'd tell its story here and see if anyone has any suggestions.’
  • 174) ‘The project aims to turn brainpower into big business by attracting new investment and selling Manchester as a city of ideas - a so-called Ideopolis.’
  • 175) ‘For the moment at least, there is no talk of incentives on the Irish market, so here it will have to sell on its merits alone.’
  • 176) ‘I just read this claptrap from someone who is selling a ‘new’ idea for moving a vehicle.’
  • 177) ‘Style and image is everything when you're trying to sell something as nebulous as an idea.’
  • 178) ‘We'll look at the tough sell facing our commerce secretary in Beijing.’
  • 179) ‘For one, getting capital from skittish investors proved a tough sell.’
  • 180) ‘Still, in Leadbetter's opinion, the sell here is the method, the program, the environment.’
  • 181) ‘MBTs fulfilled all the conditions and they proved an easy sell.’
  • 182) ‘Part of the sell was that it would breathe life into the other two-thirds and drive local economic development.’
  • 183) ‘For the most part, though, foreign films have become a tough sell, and their decline is hardly a mystery.’
  • 184) ‘Buying a second home in the Desert Southwest was not an easy sell to Sue.’
  • 185) ‘Though the irony was glaring, it was a tough sell to ad agencies.’
  • 186) ‘We are, as Adam said, different from advertising in terms of the call to action and the straight sell.’
  • 187) ‘While this message was hugely popular among Russians, it was a tougher sell in the outside world.’
  • 188) ‘By the end of the no-pressure sell, the four other guests had booked a consultation.’
  • 189) ‘The average rider reads these, guarding against the eventual sell.’
  • 190) ‘It's not an easy sell, but you have to work on people that are role models to different generations.’
  • 191) ‘Because we don't come at you with our content with a hard, commercial sell.’
  • 192) ‘The lack of a software standard also makes DAPs a complicated sell.’
  • 193) ‘All but one of the 14 analysts covering the company had a sell on it.’
  • 194) ‘Once you have a highly-acceptable product, it's mostly an emotional sell.’
  • 195) ‘It's an easy sell there, because that's where the commodity has value.’
  • 196) ‘Just as important to the sell are shapely female models suggesting that Cigarettes are babe-catchers.’
  • 197) ‘But so much of it is a real-life cartoon, that little kids seem a natural sell.’
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