bye vs by vs buy

bye by buy

Definitions

  • 1) Obsolete spelling of bee.
  • 2) sports The position of a person or team in a tournament or competition who draws no opponent in a particular round so advances to the next round unopposed, or is awarded points for a win in a league table; also the phantom opponent of such a person or team.
  • 3) cricket An extra scored when the batsmen take runs after the ball has passed the striker without hitting either the bat or the batsman.
  • 4) obsolete A dwelling.
  • 5) sports The position of a person or team in a tournament or competition who draws no opponent in a particular round so advances to the next round unopposed, or is awarded points for a win in a league table; also the phantom opponent of such a person or team.
  • 6) obsolete A dwelling.
  • 7) cricket An extra scored when the batsmen take runs after the ball has passed the striker without hitting either the bat or the batsman.
  • 8) Sports The position of one who draws no opponent for a round in a tournament and so advances to the next round.
  • 9) A secondary matter; a side issue.
  • 10) Sports The position of one who draws no opponent for a round in a tournament and so advances to the next round.
  • 11) (Cricket) A run made upon a missed ball.
  • 12) (Cricket) A run made upon a missed ball.
  • 13) A dwelling.
  • 14) Obs. except in the phrase by the bye. A thing not directly aimed at; something which is a secondary object of regard; an object by the way, etc.; as in on or upon the bye, i. e., in passing; indirectly; by implication.
  • 15) Obs. except in the phrase by the bye. A thing not directly aimed at; something which is a secondary object of regard; an object by the way, etc.; as in on or upon the bye, i. e., in passing; indirectly; by implication.
  • 16) (Golf) The hole or holes of a stipulated course remaining unplayed at the end of a match.
  • 17) In various sports in which the contestants are drawn in pairs, the position or turn of one left with no opponent in consequence of an odd number being engaged.
  • 18) In certain games, a station or place of an individual player.
  • 19) (Golf) The hole or holes of a stipulated course remaining unplayed at the end of a match.
  • 20) in passing; by way of digression; apropos to the matter in hand.
  • 21) you advance to the next round in a tournament without playing an opponent
  • 22) a farewell remark
  • 23) See by.
  • 24) Seeby.
  • 25) See by.
  • 26) An obsolete spelling of buy.
  • 27) Obsolete spelling of by.
  • 28) colloquial Goodbye.
  • 29) colloquial Goodbye.
  • 30) Used to express farewell.
  • 31) (bye/by) By the way; incidentally.
  • 32) (bye/by) By the way; incidentally.

Definitions

  • 1) A town; habitation; dwelling: now extant only in place-names, especially in the north of England, as in Derby (Anglo-Saxon Deóra bȳ, literally ‘dwelling of deer’), Whitby, etc.
  • 2) In cricket, a run made on a ball not struck by the batsman, but which the wicket-keeper has failed to stop.
  • 3) The condition of being odd, as opposed to even; the state of having no competitor in a contest where several are engaged in pairs.
  • 4) A thing not directly aimed at; something not the immediate object of regard: as, by the by (that is, by the way, in passing).
  • 5) In the game of hide-and-seek, the goal: as, to touch the by.
  • 6) A ring; a bracelet.
  • 7) On hand; nearby.
  • 8) Up to, alongside, and past.
  • 9) Aside; away.
  • 10) Into the past.
  • 11) At or to one's home or current location.
  • 12) Near, or up to and beyond, with reference to motion; past: as, to move or go by a church.
  • 13) In consequence of; by virtue of.
  • 14) Near; close to; beside; with; about: as, sit by me; the house stands by a river.
  • 15) According to; by direction, authority, example, or evidence of: as, this appears by his own account; it is ten o'clock by my watch; these are good rules to live by.
  • 16) The modern form of bi-, be-, under the accent, as in byspell, byword, etc.
  • 17) In adjuration: Before; in the presence of; with the witness of; with regard to things, in view of, in consideration of: followed by the name of the being or thing appealed to as sanction: as, I appeal to you by all that is sacred.
  • 18) Through. Through the action or operation of, as the immediate agent or the producing or instigating cause: as, the empire founded by Napoleon; a novel written by Cooper; the victories gained by Nelson; a picture painted by Rubens.
  • 19) With the perception of, as the subject or recipient of the action or feeling: as, he died regretted by all who knew him; this was felt by them to be an intentional slight. Through the means or agency of, as the intermediate agent or instrument: as, the city was destroyed by fire.
  • 20) On; upon; especially, through or on as a means of conveyance: as, he journeyed both by water and by rail.
  • 21) In comparison: To the extent of: noting mensuration or the measure or ratio of excess or inferiority: as, largerby a half; older by five years; to lessen by a third.
  • 22) Through the use of; with the aid of, as means: as, to take by force; by your leave.
  • 23) An obsolete variant of bi-, be- (unaccented). See be-.
  • 24) An obsolete variant of bi-, be-.
  • 25) In the measure or quantity of; in the terms of: as, to sell cloth by the yard, milk by the quart, eggs by the dozen, beef by the pound; to board by the week.
  • 26) An obsolete variant of be.
  • 27) Multiplied into: noting the relation of one dimension to another (in square or cubic measure): as, five feet by four, that is, measuring five feet in one direction and four feet in the other.
  • 28) Along (in direction or progress); in or through (the course of); over or alongside of: as, to approach a town by the highway.
  • 29) Not later than.
  • 30) Close to; next to.
  • 31) Up to and beyond; past.
  • 32) With respect to.
  • 33) Through the agency or action of.
  • 34) Toward. Used to express direction with points of the compass.
  • 35) In the period of; during.
  • 36) Used in multiplication and division.
  • 37) At or to.
  • 38) In the name of.
  • 39) With the use or help of; through.
  • 40) In the amount of.
  • 41) According to.
  • 42) Used with measurements.
  • 43) To the extent of.
  • 44) Used to indicate a succession of specified individuals, groups, or quantities.
  • 45) (by oneself) Without help.
  • 46) (by oneself) Without company; alone.
  • 47) (by oneself) Without help.
  • 48) (by oneself) Without company; alone.

Definitions

  • 1) Something which is bought; a purchase.
  • 2) Something that is underpriced; a bargain.
  • 3) An act of purchasing.
  • 4) Something bought or for sale; a purchase.
  • 5) an advantageous purchase
  • 6) intransitive To make a purchase or purchases, to treat (for a meal)
  • 7) transitive To be equivalent to in value.
  • 8) poker slang, transitive To make a bluff, usually a large one.
  • 9) transitive To bribe.
  • 10) intransitive To make a purchase or purchases, to treat (for a meal)
  • 11) poker slang, transitive To make a bluff, usually a large one.
  • 12) transitive To obtain (something) in exchange for money or goods
  • 13) transitive, informal to accept as true; to believe
  • 14) transitive To bribe.
  • 15) transitive To be equivalent to in value.
  • 16) transitive To obtain by some sacrifice.
  • 17) transitive To obtain by some sacrifice.
  • 18) transitive To obtain (something) in exchange for money or goods
  • 19) transitive, informal to accept as true; to believe
  • 20) be worth or be capable of buying
  • 21) make illegal payments to in exchange for favors or influence
  • 22) obtain by purchase; acquire by means of a financial transaction
  • 23) accept as true
  • 24) acquire by trade or sacrifice or exchange
  • 25) To aby; suffer.
  • 26) Toaby;suffer.
  • 27) To bribe; corrupt or pervert by giving a consideration; gain over by money, etc.
  • 28) To purchase all the share or shares of (a person) in a stock, fund, or partnership, or all his interest in a business: as, A buys out B.
  • 29) To be or become a purchaser.
  • 30) To be sufficient to purchase or procure; serve as an equivalent in procuring: as, gold cannot buy health.
  • 31) Hence To get, acquire, or procure for any kind of equivalent: as, to buy favor with flattery.
  • 32) To buy for the owner at a public sale, especially when an insufficient price is offered.
  • 33) To acquire the possession of, or the right or title to, by paying a consideration or an equivalent, usually in money; obtain by paying a price to the seller; purchase: opposed to sell.
  • 34) To be capable of purchasing.
  • 35) Informal To accept the truth or feasibility of.
  • 36) To bribe.
  • 37) To acquire by sacrifice, exchange, or trade.
  • 38) To acquire in exchange for money or its equivalent; purchase.
  • 39) To purchase something; act as a purchaser.
  • 40) Informal To accept the truth or feasibility of.
  • 41) To negotiate or treat about a purchase.
  • 42) To acquire or procure by something given or done in exchange, literally or figuratively; to get, at a cost or sacrifice.
  • 43) to give a consideration for the right of purchasing, at a fixed price, at a future time.
  • 44) To detach by a consideration given; as, to buy off one from a party.
  • 45) [Obs.] See Againbuy.
  • 46) to purchase stock in any fund or partnership.
  • 47) To acquire the ownership of (property) by giving an accepted price or consideration therefor, or by agreeing to do so; to acquire by the payment of a price or value; to purchase; -- opposed to sell.
  • 48) [Obs.] See Againbuy.
  • 49) to purchase, on a promise, in fact or in law, to make payment at a future day.
  • 50) To purchase the entire stock in trade and the good will of a business.
  • 51) (buy the farm) To die, especially suddenly or violently.
  • 52) (buy time) To increase the time available for a specific purpose.
  • 53) (buy it) To be killed.
  • 54) (buy it) To be killed.
  • 55) (buy the farm) To die, especially suddenly or violently.
  • 56) (buy time) To increase the time available for a specific purpose.

Examples

  • 1) She was given a bye last week as she was too ill to perform.
  • 2) The top two in each get a bye to the second round.
  • 3) He will play one friendly to say bye bye.
  • 4) She has been given a bye through to next week.
  • 5) The fastest man in the world gets a bye from the preliminary round this morning.
  • 6) So they invented a leg bye.
  • 7) Britain gets a bye into the final because it is one of five countries that gives most cash to organise the contest.
  • 8) Good bye, we are not going to do anything.
  • 9) Will Mum come back to say bye?
  • 10) Let's next time say bye at the door.
  • 11) bye Say goodbye to designer shoes and handbags.
  • 12) A leg bye is duly scampered.
  • 13) I won't get to say bye to my parents.
  • 14) If Pakistan ran a leg bye, the other half of the crowd roared.
  • 15) Good bye for now.
  • 16) ♫♫ Let the circle be unbroken, by & by Lord, bye& bye ♫♫
  • 17) In Marshallese, the language of Bikini Atoll, hello and bye alike are conveyed in the word kwe, which also means love.i In English, the expression bye was once similarly fulsome: God be with you.
  • 18) During the first hour I felt pain, but during the rest of the evening pride kindly came to my assistance and from that moment instead of feeling myself little, I grew to a most noble and patagonian [3] nature, from which I could scarcely reduce myself for many days after; and which enabled me at the moment to turn a deaf ear to the contended merits of Demosthenes and Cicero, the Borhavians in medicine, and the &c &c &c &c — and to set and compose verses 'to my Old Oak table', which by the bye is a far better companion to me, as I will make appear, than Dr. A and his son put together.
  • 19) February 11th, 2010 at 6: 42 pm tombaker says: mr. bye bye is ruled by fear. what a shame.
  • 20) An acceptance to an anthology and a personal good-bye from a person who moved away instead of just an invite to the going away party.
  • 21) One was essentially an obituary, a fond and sympathetic good-bye from a fellow writer who admired his talent and thought of him as a friend.
  • 22) Saying good bye is really really really really really really hard but its a little bit easier the more hugs you give and if you know you will see them again … Soon Durnit!
  • 23) • Maybe a playoff bye is like key lime pie: looks great, but not necessarily good for you.
  • 24) ‘All 16 seeded players received byes into the second round.’
  • 25) ‘Where's the justice in eliminating more non-league teams in the qualifying rounds than is necessary, only for league clubs to be given byes in the first round proper of the competition?’
  • 26) ‘Again, there would be a two-day playoff, but without byes.’
  • 27) ‘But nothing says that only one team must skip the first round - you could also give 3 byes in the first round, which will leave you with 13 teams in the second round, or 5 byes or any other odd number.’
  • 28) ‘If the Scots do not win the regular season championship, finishing second is critical, as the top two seeds receive first round byes and semi-final home games.’
  • 29) ‘And as usual, the main ‘race’ threw up a few appetisers, although the holders were one of the four first round byes.’
  • 30) ‘All four teams have fresh legs, thanks to first-round byes followed by the pleasure of playing divisional playoff games at home.’
  • 31) ‘The addition of two wild cards in each league would give the top two finishers first-round byes but make the tournament unwieldy.’
  • 32) ‘As usual, the four teams who had byes played in the conference title games last year.’
  • 33) ‘If a knock-out solution takes effect, nine teams would get byes through to the second round, where they would meet the winners of seven drawn ties to create a last 16.’
  • 34) ‘Taking the money into account - as well as the prospect of eliminating byes altogether - a proposal to eventually put 16 teams into the playoffs is probably on the horizon.’
  • 35) ‘If the league is going to add one team per conference, it might as well add two teams per conference and eliminate first-round byes altogether.’
  • 36) ‘If the league had 16 playoff teams, byes would be eliminated, and that is very appealing to a cross-section of owners who believe byes give teams unfair advantages.’
  • 37) ‘In my mind, the road team with the best chance to win is Green Bay, but historically, the week of rest has been a major advantage for teams with byes.’
  • 38) ‘Some argue it would take away the huge advantage the top four seeds have from byes and home-field advantage.’
  • 39) ‘Nevertheless, each rebounded to win their division and secure first-round byes.’
  • 40) ‘In the absence of leading seeds with first-round byes, lesser contenders took center stage on opening day.’
  • 41) ‘The top six teams in the field were given byes into the quarter-finals while the bottom four teams must play seeding matches to move on.’
  • 42) ‘The increase to 16 means the end of first-round byes.’
  • 43) ‘With that, college hockey was finally rid of its 12-team format, which awarded byes to the top four teams and a tremendous advantage.’
  • 44) ‘Cricket, with its googlies, boseys, chinamen, silly legs, byes, sundries - the whole argot - was incomprehensible without deep explanation.’
  • 45) ‘Some balls bounced three times before getting to the batsman; others went clean over the wicketkeeper for four byes.’
  • 46) ‘His first ball was a no-ball, his second a full-toss, and his third ripped out of the rough for two byes.’
  • 47) ‘Clark made two stumpings and did not concede many byes, so he may have had a slight grievance.’
  • 48) ‘Jones had earlier had a disastrous morning, as he conceded 13 byes before he got down low enough to take the winning catch.’
  • 49) ‘I have decided that I have run out of adjectives or maybe never had any in the first place so bye for now.’
  • 50) ‘Well, my mom's calling me because we're going to the hospital to visit my grandma, so bye for now, and pray I don't upset her.’
  • 51) ‘But anyway, you've probably got better things to do than listen to me rant, so bye for now.’
  • 52) ‘That's all the screen time I'm allowed, okay, bye!’
  • 53) ‘When I send email, I always wish it on its way with the little phrase, ‘Wheee, bye!’’
  • 54) ‘Yeah… it's kind of late, I'm just going to go to bed now, please don't tell my parents, bye!’
  • 55) ‘Jerry just kinda stood there, and said, ‘Yeah… well, glad to see everything's good, bye!’’
  • 56) ‘She flew up the stairs and stopped at the door, ‘Nice to meet - thanks for - have a nice evening, bye!’’
  • 57) ‘She smacked my shoulder and I smiled, turned, grabbed my bag and said, ‘Well I gotta be off, bye!’’
  • 58) ‘I've just finished recording it in America and can't wait for you to hear it - it won't be long now… bye!’
  • 59) ‘Dad, you have to be safe, but come back home and have a good time and I'll be taking care of mom and the and I just want to say bye.’
  • 60) ‘You just say excuse me, president business, gotta run, bye.’
  • 61) ‘But, well, I've just finished my exams, so I wanted to say hi, and, well bye.’
  • 62) ‘After he said bye, the news lady and I just absolutely lost it.’
  • 63) ‘He came to spend the weekend with us and we had a nice time; lots of drinks and dinosaurs (of the model variety) and a chance to say bye.’
  • 64) ‘The people I did get on with have all phoned to say bye, including my one senior ally who thought I should never have been made to do those dreaded phone calls.’
  • 65) ‘We would leave each other and say, see you later or catch up with you later, but it was never bye.’
  • 66) ‘Your dad left an hour ago but he told me to tell you bye.’
  • 67) ‘‘Yeah, bye, Dan,’ he said as he followed Jenny out the door.’
  • 68) ‘‘Alright, bye,’ Nathaniel's grandson said, then leaving the room.’
  • 69) he had a bye in the first round

Examples

  • 1) I waited behind a tree by the road nearby that cuts through the park.
  • 2) She made no comment on arrival at Heathrow, where she was picked up by a member of the family.
  • 3) As a check, ask yourself, "How would my choice of clothing be perceived by my Heavenly Parents..by my earthly parents...by someone with unchecked lustful thoughts."
  • 4) STS-117:¬† Manifesting of FDRD will slip by 2 weeks to 31 March, but the Compatibility and Cargo Integration Reviews will only slip by¬†1 week.
  • 5) Me: “So the confidence interval for the parametric equation can be found by the log of the hazard ratio plus or minus the Z-score times one divided by…”
  • 6) His argument can be understood as follows: since Anomalous Monism insists that mental events have physical properties that can be related, by strict law, to the effects of those events, and also insists that such events 'mental properties cannot be so related, it is only ˜by virtue™ of its physical (i.e. strict lawlike) properties that a mental event causes what it does.
  • 7) Undoubtedly Ronald Dworkin will want to correct what seems like a clear error when he writes, "Only the most naïve theories of statutory construction could argue that such a result [forbidding action such as that taken by the University of California, Davis Medical School] is required by… the Civil Rights Act of 1964."
  • 8) This spirit is strengthened by the courage and inspiration of our leaders and colleagues in South Africa's jails - on Robben Island and elsewhere; by revolutionaries of the calibre of James April, by the vast mass of silent, invisible supporters of the struggle who form part of the ANC underground all over South Africa; by~ the militant morale of activists and leaders released at the end of their long terms of imprisonment.
  • 9) The truth is, that the accumulation of the animal spirits must be thrown off by exercise, whether the parent or teacher wills it or no; and if the children are not taught to do this _by rule_, as in dancing, they will do it without rule, and perhaps beyond the proper limit, both as to time, place, and quantity.
  • 10) Learning, and Ignorance of the Antients, told him at last, _That if Mr. _Shakespear_ had not read the Antients, he had likewise not stollen any thing from 'em; _ (a Fault the other made no Confidence of) _and that if he would produce any one Topick finely treated by any of them, he would undertake to shew something upon the same Subject at least as well written by_ Shakespear.
  • 11) ‘malaria can be controlled by attacking the parasite’
  • 12) ‘they substantiate their opinions by the use of precise textual reference’
  • 13) ‘they plan to provide further working capital by means of borrowing’
  • 14) ‘I heard by chance that she has married again’
  • 15) ‘Anderson, by contrast, rejects this view’
  • 16) ‘she ate by candlelight’

Examples

  • 1) I buy something to eat on the way home, cook it, watch TV, read a book.
  • 2) In a way...' `They're looking to buy something through an associate of yours.
  • 3) Two and a half billion dollars tended to buy respectability, regardless of how such a fortune was amassed.
  • 4) If you haven't gotten ten to at least say they'll buy, where do you get your hubris to proclaim that thousands actually will buy?
  • 5) Whandall understood that the word buy was an insult.
  • 6) He said media reports wrongly characterize what he called "buy and sell" shops as pawnshops in stories about police raids.
  • 7) The enormous investment is worthwhile not only for the opportunity at a title buy but also to persuade James to re-sign this summer.
  • 8) "We've been looking at what I call the buy-versus-make situation to see whether there isn't ultimately a more economic solution," he told analysts Thursday.
  • 9) And yet the word "buy" is significant; for we are elsewhere bidden, "buy wine and milk without money and without price," and "buy of Christ gold tried in the fire," &c.
  • 10) WTF would YOU know about ‘expensive liquor’ when all you are allowed to buy is PAVLOV?
  • 11) I'm half way through this month's Saveur and dreaming about the tamales that I use to buy from a lady on a country road out in Marble Falls.
  • 12) Nuhiva's bumping along astern there, though what she can buy is beyond me.
  • 13) I hope Lindsey and McCain buy a house and and enjoy their golden years together
  • 14) ‘In order to buy the house some money that my Grandfather had stashed away for myself and my brothers was used as part of the deposit.’
  • 15) ‘There was talk of marriage and of pooling their money to buy an even grander house.’
  • 16) ‘Several institutional investors are also still buying into the sector and see property as a safer bet to match long-term annuity liabilities.’
  • 17) ‘Investors buying into the market are finding attractive returns.’
  • 18) ‘Then look at the share of houses that are being bought for investment purposes only.’
  • 19) ‘A reporter at a police station was told that if she was buying a house she could obtain the police information she wanted from from her realtor.’
  • 20) ‘We are of the view that time is now to look for money to buy up the bumper harvest.’
  • 21) ‘I know one smart one who saved all her money from 2 years of bar work and bought herself a house in a nice subdivision in Pattaya.’
  • 22) ‘It was their intention to buy up the supply and then sell it in coffee shops.’
  • 23) ‘The best thing that a young person can do is to stay in school and invest the money that they have: buy a house, own land.’
  • 24) ‘Did you log on and buy up the maximum allocation of six tickets per person?’
  • 25) ‘Let's buy up tracts of vulnerable mangrove lands and begin securing at least the future.’
  • 26) ‘The cooker they bought six months ago no longer has a light in the oven so they can see if their roast is done.’
  • 27) ‘I've just started buying property and bought my first about six months ago.’
  • 28) ‘The money may not buy much but you will get paid back your original investment.’
  • 29) ‘The yen that are bought, are then exchanged for U.S. dollars, or euros, or other currencies.’
  • 30) ‘If they can sell a large home and buy into a village, it frees up capital for them to buy a new car, travel, or go overseas.’
  • 31) ‘More importantly, I had some exciting bruises to flash around, and heaps of people felt sorry for me and bought me drinks.’
  • 32) ‘Then he said that he's going to support me through college and buy me a car and whatever - if I did what he wanted.’
  • 33) ‘He said people bought him drinks during the night but he would only take a sip and then put them aside.’
  • 34) ‘Several of the clubs had been approached by developers interested in buying them out - one steward describing them as ‘circling sharks’.’
  • 35) ‘Alternatively, they may be happy to buy the house with you on the understanding that you will buy them out of their share later when you can afford it or that they get a share of any growth in value when you sell up.’
  • 36) ‘The same people who complain of our speed in spreading salvation and saving men would all want to buy shares, become our partners or buy us out.’
  • 37) ‘Once the period of investment expires, the businesses are either sold outright to strategic investors, or the company they invested in buys them out.’
  • 38) ‘Without broad demand, like you get from working people with the confidence to spend, investors are motivated to use sudden money to pay down their debt and sometimes, as I said, to remove their competition by buying them out.’
  • 39) ‘Of course, this wouldn't keep people from buying them out of town, but presumably its backers would like to see similar law enacted in other cities, too.’
  • 40) ‘It was pointed out that a compensation deal was not going to cost the taxpayer anything, as it would be the bigger European producers that would be buying them out.’
  • 41) ‘They talk to Izzy about buying her out of the business, and what a shock, she rants and storms out, knocking Steph over in the process.’
  • 42) ‘Your little company may be nothing but a flea in a corporate elephant's patch of jungle but just how much might the elephant be willing to pay to be rid of you, or to buy you out?’
  • 43) ‘Well, dagnabit, if you cant beat them, you can have them buy you out.’
  • 44) ‘It attracts someone's attention, they buy you out and spend billions in development.’
  • 45) ‘When you see a sold stock run, you will think of everything bad: It's going straight to $40, someone is going to buy them out, they're going to cure cancer tomorrow, etc, etc.’
  • 46) ‘Such ‘discounts’ can attract the unwanted attention of opportunists and arbitrageurs who buy up the shares and then attempt to make a quick profit by forcing companies to buy them out for a higher price.’
  • 47) ‘Angling organisations have for years forecast serious threats to salmon stocks and now are calling on the Government to reduce the quota given to drift net fishermen or to buy them out completely.’
  • 48) ‘My parents and the parents of all my childhood neighbors and rural classmates have moved to town to ‘retire’ once their kids are old enough to buy them out.’
  • 49) ‘If somebody else innovates and it becomes successful they might try to buy them out or jump on the bandwagon, but if innovation threatens that guaranteed income they squash it and that's that.’
  • 50) ‘Watchdogs are calling for an investigation after it emerged that firms are effectively bribing staff with thousands of pounds in cash offers to buy them out of their pension schemes.’
  • 51) ‘Even if you couldn't afford to buy them out totally, you could become a seriously difficulty to them continuing to manufacture the weapons.’
  • 52) ‘If they try to keep people out or buy them out, it could get very ugly, very quickly.’
  • 53) ‘The company has decided it would be cheaper to buy them out rather than send them the dividend.’
  • 54) ‘There are signs that it is already too late, with more than 5,370 infantry soldiers buying themselves out of the army in the past three years rather than be posted back abroad.’
  • 55) ‘I bought myself out of the army and came here 23 years ago and have loved every minute of it.’
  • 56) ‘He bought himself out to please his wife, a childhood sweetheart who hated the idea of being a service wife.’
  • 57) ‘After four years, Denise bought herself out of the Army and sought medical help for the turmoil she was experiencing.’
  • 58) ‘Normally, obstacles were put in your way should you want to buy yourself out, but this was an emergency.’
  • 59) ‘Condemned to celibacy because married servants were expensive and inconvenient, their proverbial cupidity arose as often as not from saving to buy themselves out of service and into family life.’
  • 60) ‘Some rioters tried to keep the focus on the blatant unfairness of Lincoln's draft laws in which, for 300 dollars, the rich could buy themselves out of the service.’
  • 61) ‘He obtained leave to visit his dying father and then bought himself out of the army with a small legacy from a great-aunt.’
  • 62) ‘He had only bought himself out of the army in 1981, so had had a lucky escape from being dispatched 'to a party way down South'.’
  • 63) ‘‘It used to be the case that soldiers bought themselves out of the armed forces.’’
  • 64) ‘Labour politicians who accept hospitality and sponsorship insist they can't be bought.’
  • 65) ‘Some will argue this means that he can't be bought by lobbyists.’
  • 66) ‘He says his money shows that he can't be bought.’
  • 67) ‘I have made my contempt and disgust for them so plain and apparent that they can't buy me off without the appearance of accepting my insult.’
  • 68) ‘The money buys loyalty as well as the basic necessities.’
  • 69) ‘At the risk of sounding cliché-ish: Money can't buy loyalty, or love or affection.’
  • 70) ‘It has been known for centuries that money does not buy happiness.’
  • 71) ‘The old saying money cannot buy happiness certainly rings true for one of the most controversial men in rugby league.’
  • 72) ‘Money may not buy us love, or even happiness, but it can go a long way toward buying things for which we have, as yet, no other currency.’
  • 73) ‘Money doesn't buy happiness and most of the time the best people are the people that you mob pass on the street everyday.’
  • 74) ‘Marketing types know that clever renaming only buys you something when the competition is on the margins of a product's value.’
  • 75) ‘Disbelief turns to disappointment as I discover that the £150 price tag buys you genuine mink-lined underwear.’
  • 76) ‘And wealth buys you clean water, sanitation, and healthcare.’
  • 77) ‘It buys you the am/fm and the ability to hook up your VCR to the stereo.’
  • 78) ‘Good intent is not the currency of history; it buys you nothing.’
  • 79) ‘It buys him first bemusement, then solicitation, and finally enmity and a serious whack upside the head.’
  • 80) ‘And if one does get dropped, a bit of spare change buys you another.’
  • 81) ‘It buys you things like commercials and the ability to travel where you want.’
  • 82) ‘This sum buys you two hours a month clustered in half-hour telephone appointments, and a follow up.’
  • 83) ‘This buys you an Aromatic Back Massage, a Mini-Facial, a file and polish and a one-course lunch in the brasserie.’
  • 84) ‘Being a veteran buys you no credibility and no respect.’
  • 85) ‘While that does not make him the owner - which would be illegal under the rules - it buys him a lot of influence.’
  • 86) ‘An ad on this channel buys you notoriety, recognition and helps you reach 10,000 customers a day!’
  • 87) ‘In fact in my experience, the fact is that our friendship and our commitment on so many things buys us the right to say to our, you know, our best friend, we think you've got it wrong on this one.’
  • 88) ‘He knew that every good thing in this world, and in the next, was bought with blood and sacrifice.’
  • 89) ‘But the support of the other members of the world community will be more dearly bought.’
  • 90) ‘He surrendered in October, but it was a prize too dearly bought.’
  • 91) ‘If there have been improvements in the NHS, they have been dearly bought.’
  • 92) ‘We should not look back unless it is to derive useful lessons from past errors, and for the purpose of profiting by dearly bought experience.’
  • 93) ‘It is dearly bought, requires sacrifice to keep, and represents a way of life.’
  • 94) ‘It is a rare, though dearly bought, opportunity.’
  • 95) ‘‘I used to be a much snootier reader," she admits, " but I'm buying for a lot of different stores and a lot of different readers, so I have to be far more egalitarian.’’
  • 96) ‘Now that he buys for them he doesn't go overseas but he still works ridiculously long hours.’
  • 97) ‘In her present position, she buys for the museum shop and marks inventory.’
  • 98) ‘We accept the premise that parents must be convinced to buy into any reform agenda.’
  • 99) ‘To tell you the truth, I bought into that as well - and boy were we wrong.’
  • 100) ‘He had to make things up on the spot of course and fortunately, the teacher had bought it.’
  • 101) ‘How one takes the story as it progresses to its surprise conclusion depends a great deal on whether one buys into the film's particular brand of Christian mysticism.’
  • 102) ‘But to buy into his sinister conclusions means buying into his level of contempt for the present authority.’
  • 103) ‘Again, we will never actually get to do it but we can buy into the philosophy by buying into the brand!’
  • 104) ‘More and more investors are buying into the global reflation story, one enhanced by aggressive rate cuts by major central banks.’
  • 105) ‘But because North Americans have been conditioned to equate success with owning a huge, new house with a huge yard, we keep buying into the illusion.’
  • 106) ‘Those who purchase goods in a world market are also buying into the ideology of the world capitalist economy.’
  • 107) ‘It's just that I'm concerned there may be women out there who are actually buying into this heart-on-my-sleeve lovelorn weeping.’
  • 108) ‘In the meantime one or two member states have said they did not consider themselves to be fully buying into that.’
  • 109) ‘The latter groups are so worried about elections and ratings that they are mucking up clear thinking, and our society is buying into their flawed theories.’
  • 110) ‘‘When I started doing research for my dissertation I discovered that women weren't really buying into it,’ she said.’
  • 111) ‘We've got a self-improvement system which is pretty unique in the bus industry and the staff are buying into it.’
  • 112) ‘Competitors aren't buying into such a radical concept.’
  • 113) ‘It requires that the viewer exhibit a fair amount of willing suspension of disbelief, but buying into the essential premise is more than half the battle.’
  • 114) ‘Investors looking for profitable buys are also among the first potential buyers, as well as people living in other parts of Bradford.’
  • 115) ‘Save your trades and bargain buys for starting pitchers and position players.’
  • 116) ‘British bargain buys are too few and far between.’
  • 117) ‘He has consistently proved to have the happy knack of picking up bargain buys and nurturing them into top class players and he is ready to follow the same formula at Maine Road.’
  • 118) ‘One of the first big buys, or big bargains that the store set up today was a 75 percent sale on men's shirts.’
  • 119) ‘However, shopping wisely - with an eye on bargain buys - should soften the blow to your bank balance.’
  • 120) ‘He's had to rely on bargain buys, on his fantastic eye for young talent and on his players consistently overperforming.’
  • 121) ‘We have already seen auctions and so called bargain buys, these are the words of the desperate.’
  • 122) ‘Yet the question remains, is the sector an attractive buy to investors?’
  • 123) ‘The palate can be varied, but at its best the soft summer fruit, leather and spice make it a bargain buy.’
  • 124) ‘Our picks are both in buys and short sales and 95% of the stocks we recommend have options, which allow you to trade with a smaller amount of cash.’
  • 125) ‘Educational buys and other pilot programs are of little value.’
  • 126) ‘And he did not keep detailed records of his alleged drug buys.’
  • 127) ‘Hearings last month revealed he often wrote notes about his alleged drug buys on his legs.’
  • 128) ‘She described going to a drug buy in a pub to get more stuff.’
  • 129) ‘They didn't meet a damn person that might tip them to a job, a drug buy, or anything else.’
  • 130) ‘He never asked Felix to wear a wire, never marked the money he gave Felix for drug buys.’
  • 131) ‘Good chance they're carrying weapons and drugs, having just made a big buy in the city.’
  • 132) ‘Gun cleaning products are often purchased as impulse buys.’
  • 133) ‘There are now more mobile upgrade purchases than new buys in the UK.’
  • 134) ‘For instance, the fund may join a consortium of investors organized to fund a quick buy and sale of a piece.’
  • 135) ‘But for those who believe in watching the buys and sales of insiders it is an interesting move, particularly when it is backed up by another key company official's deals.’
  • 136) ‘Across the UK in 2004, directors' dealings remained consistently above a ratio of five buys to every sale - more than double the average historic ratio.’
  • 137) ‘We must program and structure our buys so that private sector producers can bid competitively and set up their production processes intelligently.’
  • 138) ‘At least 25 percent of knife sales are impulse buys, so concentrate on high-margin models in your premium space.’
  • 139) ‘And because these stocks often are volatile, investors can score with well-timed buys.’
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