poison vs venom

poison venom

Definitions

  • 1) A drink; liquor.
  • 2) A substance that is harmful or lethal to a living organism.
  • 3) Something that harms a person or thing.
  • 4) A substance that causes injury, illness, or death, especially by chemical means.
  • 5) Chemistry A substance that inhibits another substance or a reaction.
  • 6) Something destructive or fatal.
  • 7) That which taints or destroys moral purity or health
  • 8) (Zoöl.) one of the superior maxillary teeth of some species of serpents, which, besides having the cavity for the pulp, is either perforated or grooved by a longitudinal canal, at the lower end of which the duct of the poison gland terminates. See Illust. under Fang.
  • 9) (Bot.) poison sumac.
  • 10) (Bot.) a dermatitis-producing plant often lumped together with the poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) in common terminology, but more properly distinguished as the more shrubby Toxicodendron quercifolium (syn. Toxicodendron diversilobum), common in California and Oregon. Opinion varies as to whether the poison oak and poison ivy are only variants of a single species. See poison ivy, above.
  • 11) (Bot.) a poisonous climbing plant (formerly Rhus Toxicodendron, or Rhus radicans, now classified as Toxicodendron radicans) of North America. It is common as a climbing vine, especially found on tree trunks, or walls, or as a low, spreading vine or as a shrub. As a low vine it grows well in lightly shaded areas, recognizable by growing in clusters of three leaves. Its leaves are trifoliate, rhombic-ovate, and variously notched. Its form varies slightly from location to location, leading to some speculation that it may consist of more than one species. Many people are poisoned by it, though some appear resistant to its effects. Touching the leaves may leave a residue of an oil on the skin, and if not washed off quickly, sensitive areas of skin become reddened and develop multiple small blisters, lasting for several days to several weeks, and causing a persistent itch. The toxic reaction is due to an oil, present in all parts of the plant except the pollen, called urushiol, the active component of which is the compound pentadecylacatechol (according to Charles H. Booras). See Poison sumac. It is related to poison oak, and is also called mercury.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) Same as Poison gland, above. See Illust. under Fang.
  • 13) (Bot.) The tree which yields this seed (Strychnos Nuxvomica). It is found on the Malabar and Coromandel coasts.
  • 14) Any agent which, when introduced into the animal organism, is capable of producing a morbid, noxious, or deadly effect upon it
  • 15) (Biol.) a gland, in animals or plants, which secretes an acrid or venomous matter, that is conveyed along an organ capable of inflicting a wound.
  • 16) (Bot.), [U. S.] The poison sumac (Rhus venenata)
  • 17) (Bot.) a poisonous umbelliferous plant (Conium maculatum). See Hemlock.
  • 18) (Bot.) a poisonous shrub formerly considered to be of the genus Rhus (Rhus venenata), but now classified as Toxicodendron vernix; -- also called poison ash, poison dogwood, and poison elder. It has pinnate leaves on graceful and slender common petioles, and usually grows in swampy places. Both this plant and the poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans, formerly Rhus Toxicodendron) have clusters of smooth greenish white berries, while the red-fruited species of this genus are harmless. The tree (Rhus vernicifera) which yields the celebrated Japan lacquer is almost identical with the poison sumac, and is also very poisonous. The juice of the poison sumac also forms a lacquer similar to that of Japan.
  • 19) anything that harms or destroys
  • 20) Hence, that which taints or destroys moral purity or health or comfort: as, the poison of evil example.
  • 21) A drink; a draught; a potion.
  • 22) Any substance which, introduced into the living organism directly, tends to destroy the life or impair the health of that organism.
  • 23) Poisonous.
  • 24) transitive To cause something to become much worse
  • 25) transitive To use poison to kill or paralyse somebody
  • 26) transitive To pollute; to cause some part of the environment to become poisonous
  • 27) transitive To cause someone to hate or to have unfair negative opinions
  • 28) spoil as if by poison
  • 29) add poison to
  • 30) kill with poison
  • 31) kill by its poison
  • 32) administer poison to
  • 33) To act as, or convey, a poison.
  • 34) To have a harmful influence on; corrupt.
  • 35) To pollute: synonym: contaminate.
  • 36) Chemistry & Physics To inhibit (a substance or reaction).
  • 37) To kill or harm with poison.
  • 38) To put poison on or into.
  • 39) To injure or kill by poison; to administer poison to.
  • 40) To put poison upon or into; to infect with poison
  • 41) To taint; to corrupt; to vitiate

Definitions

  • 1) A poison wielded by an animal, usually injected into an enemy or prey by biting or stinging; atter.
  • 2) figuratively Feeling or speech marked by spite or malice.
  • 3) Malice; spite.
  • 4) A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider, or scorpion, usually transmitted to prey or to attackers by a bite or sting.
  • 5) Spite; malice; malignity; evil quality.
  • 6) Matter fatal or injurious to life; poison; particularly, the poisonous matter which certain animals, such as serpents, scorpions, bees, etc., secrete in a state of health, and communicate by biting or stinging.
  • 7) feeling a need to see others suffer
  • 8) toxin secreted by animals; secreted by certain snakes and poisonous insects (e.g., spiders and scorpions)
  • 9) Something that blights, cankers, or embitters; injurious influence; hence, spite; malice; malignity; virulency.
  • 10) Poison in general: now an archaic use.
  • 11) Coloring material; dye.
  • 12) The poisonous fluid secreted by some animals in a state of health, as a means of offense and defense, and introduced into the bodies of their victims by biting, as in the case of many serpents, or stinging, as in the ease of scorpions, etc.
  • 13) To infect with venom; to envenom; to poison.
  • 14) rare To infect with venom; to envenom; to poison.

Examples

  • 1) It could leave millions defenceless against common illnesses such as food poisoning.
  • 2) Chicken has bacteria which can cause food poisoning.
  • 3) He thinks it causes food poisoning.
  • 4) The trend of serving chicken livers rare is exposing the public to the risk of food poisoning, research suggests.
  • 5) If you must buy bagged leaves, always wash them well to reduce the worst of the food poisoning risk.
  • 6) Other injuries included chemical poisoning.
  • 7) The tech giant will trawl anonymous confidential data to spot people at risk of kidney disease, blood poisoning and organ failure.
  • 8) This poisoning of young minds is a crime of major proportions.
  • 9) You might have a little touch of food poisoning.
  • 10) She tried to kill him by poisoning him and considered more than one way of doing so.
  • 11) Deaths from chemical poisoning alone exceeded a thousand.
  • 12) They can also cause a form of acute food poisoning if they are ingested.
  • 13) The bacterium causes urinary infections but can also lead to blood poisoning.
  • 14) The blue colour could be caused by poisoning.
  • 15) The potential for poisoning adds a certain nervous edge to the morning's foraging.
  • 16) The concept is that worker ants take the bait back to the nest, thus poisoning the entire colony.
  • 17) ‘Second-hand smoke contains about 4,000 chemicals, 200 poisons, and over 40 cancer-causing compounds.’
  • 18) ‘Because of ‘chemical drift’ those poisons are carried by the wind into towns and cities.’
  • 19) ‘The idea of using ‘friendly’ bacteria to combat poisons has been around for a number of years and is already used in animals such as pigs and chickens.’
  • 20) ‘There are ways to achieve that sense of the base, the infected, the elemental without necessarily introducing poisons into the environment!’
  • 21) ‘Trees could be engineered to grow in polluted landfills and absorb poisons, or even be designed to capture more carbon dioxide, diminishing global warming.’
  • 22) ‘Local residents see a clear connection between children's illnesses and the poisons that permeate their neighborhood.’
  • 23) ‘Modern chemical pesticides are poisons, developed during the second world war, and are used worldwide in agriculture.’
  • 24) ‘He argues that there are dangers in natural foods too, which balance the dangers caused by artificial chemical poisons.’
  • 25) ‘Having served on the staff of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for 16 years, she was well aware of government's role in promoting and defending chemical poisons.’
  • 26) ‘The assumption is that we need professional help to rid our rotten bodies of all the poisons and harmful chemicals accumulated during the season of overindulgence.’
  • 27) ‘Now they will try to discover if someone has been putting poison down to reduce the rabbit population.’
  • 28) ‘It's arguably the most deadly poison in the world.’
  • 29) ‘Had I access to a dram of poison, I would have greedily swallowed it.’
  • 30) ‘Nicotine is a strong, fast acting poison and it is usually applied as a 0.5% solution in water.’
  • 31) ‘A small amount of the material recovered from the Wood Green premises has tested positive for the presence of ricin poison.’
  • 32) ‘The green color comes from copper sulphate, a common agricultural poison.’
  • 33) ‘Only a fool, a joker or a someone attempting suicide will knowingly swallow poison if it is known to be deadly.’
  • 34) ‘As we've discussed here not long ago, the dilution of the deadly poison is such that I can chug down any amount of homeopathic water and not notice it at all.’
  • 35) ‘Homeowners should install a good carbon monoxide detector to make sure none of this deadly poison is present in their homes.’
  • 36) ‘Keynes' dream to overthrow the classical order of Adam Smith was greatly influenced by Marx's poison.’
  • 37) ‘Stupid laws contaminate those charged with enforcing them at the first level and then become exponentially more costly as their poison spreads through other layers of the economy.’
  • 38) ‘It takes no time at all for them to spread their poison and to implicate others in what they have done, if only by coverup.’
  • 39) ‘He does not have the means to spread his poison beyond the confines of this small country.’
  • 40) ‘Our silence for long years has encouraged Holocaust deniers, revisionists, baiters and haters to spread their poison.’
  • 41) ‘Philip III is even described as a Catholic Galen, charged with the task of purging the poison and corruption of heresy from the mystical body of Christian Spain.’
  • 42) ‘In some cases, of course, they are the same people spreading this poison.’
  • 43) ‘Bradford's Tory council let them book a public room to spread their racist poison.’
  • 44) ‘What's particularly insidious about deflation is that output doesn't necessarily have to contract for its poison to spread through the economy.’
  • 45) ‘I've gotta ban that woman from the Net before her poison spreads to everyone!’
  • 46) ‘The poison spread by the BNP will make everyone's lives worse.’
  • 47) ‘We share their concern and resolve to work together to eliminate the monster of fascism injecting and spreading the poison of hate in our society, our country.’
  • 48) ‘An important reason for this is that those who spread the poison of hatred and brutality have not been reined in during the last fifty years or so.’
  • 49) ‘Would the act required of Hamlet, fulfilled, not spread the poison further?’
  • 50) ‘This is a poison spreading through the body politic of the country.’
  • 51) ‘Today, I think the rhetoric coming from the right wing media is the toxic poison that is spreading this culture war into our body politic so quickly.’
  • 52) ‘By the time he returned to Siler City, however, the poison spread by his original letter was already growing more toxic.’
  • 53) ‘In this story, Florida itself has been ‘closed,’ the poison of the space program having corrupted the entire state.’
  • 54) ‘The hearings helped purge the poison from the American body politic.’
  • 55) ‘When he first became Director of the Court New Zealand plays were ‘box office poison’.’
  • 56) ‘He tried to poison us like lower animals, like the mice that pester storybook villages, the insects that fly around the heads of those that I read about.’
  • 57) ‘Towards the end, as he's dying of an undefined illness, we realize he picks up chicks by poisoning their pets but acting so super nice and stuff.’
  • 58) ‘The snake's venom poisoned the wolf and raven's blood.’
  • 59) ‘Calgary's other local short is Breakfast In Bed by Christopher Hutchens, a bizarre story of a husband who poisons his wife - with a twist.’
  • 60) ‘When more conventional means to control them fails, he devises an elaborate revenge which culminates in his poisoning the dogs.’
  • 61) ‘Fears that someone could have been poisoning the rabbits have prompted the investigation after visitors spotted bodies lying about on the ground.’
  • 62) ‘In 1993, he got himself into bother after poisoning the vet's dog.’
  • 63) ‘I knew this and felt guilty about poisoning people with the nicotine.’
  • 64) ‘Before that two chital or spotted deer were poisoned.’
  • 65) ‘Remember when they poisoned rabbits, it was horrible.’
  • 66) ‘However, preliminary results indicate that the dogs were poisoned.’
  • 67) ‘He poisoned his wife in January of that year and was eventually caught on an ocean liner to Canada in the July, becoming the first man to be caught using radio.’
  • 68) ‘A north Cotswold couple are warning pet owners of the dangers of using slug pellets in their gardens after their dog was poisoned.’
  • 69) ‘It was written and signed in June 1910 five months after he poisoned his wife.’
  • 70) ‘The dogs were poisoned as they sniffed their way along the beach and disturbed the creature.’
  • 71) ‘A scientist who served seven years in prison for trying to poison his wife has secured a job teaching ethics, university officials said today.’
  • 72) ‘Even dirty bombs are a myth, such devices, even if they could be made, would be unlikely to deliver enough radiation to poison one person.’
  • 73) ‘The real ones are far worse but I dare not mention them lest their owners or fans of the owners come around one night and burn my house down or poison my dog.’
  • 74) ‘That law will remain in force, only now your duty will be to shoot or poison the fox.’
  • 75) ‘One neighbourhood solved the problem by systematically poisoning the stray dogs with pesticides.’
  • 76) ‘On the Australian mainland, they killed them by giving them poisoned food and clothing contaminated by diseases they had never before experienced.’
  • 77) ‘Scary reports are all over the media here in southern California about some nutball who poisoned some baby food.’
  • 78) ‘In June 2002, following threats that their food would be poisoned, the men were unable to eat for a period of seven days.’
  • 79) ‘There are of course chemicals that can be bad if their containers not properly disposed of and there is therefore a risk of contaminating groundwater or poisoning the environment.’
  • 80) ‘If a barrel of apples contains just one poisoned apple, and you cannot tell outwardly which apple is the poisoned one, you must toss out the entire barrelful.’
  • 81) ‘Witness how eagerly we accept the idea that our food is being poisoned by the suspect motivations and carelessness of industry, government and science.’
  • 82) ‘A North Yorkshire training company has been chosen to act as a safeguard against terrorists trying to poison the food chain.’
  • 83) ‘Would any other industry be allowed to get away with selling contaminated and poisoned products to consumers and then blame them if they get sick?’
  • 84) ‘Police in India are investigating the death of a Bradford businessman's father after he ate poisoned sweets on a train.’
  • 85) ‘Now, the evidence that I have put to this Court is a complaint to the Commissioner of Police with an analysis from the government department showing that my food had been poisoned.’
  • 86) ‘The supervisor, obviously worried about all the complaints, announced to the horrified children that the food might be poisoned.’
  • 87) ‘Michael never cooked, and if he did, the food would probably be poisoned.’
  • 88) ‘It's chilling to consider that he felt the world to be so hostile that he believed his food was being poisoned and so stopped eating and so starved to death.’
  • 89) ‘Anyone could walk in at any time and release a bio-agent that would spread from the chickens to humans, thus poisoning the food supply for who knows how many people.’
  • 90) ‘I thought for a moment as to whether to eat the food, in case it was poisoned.’
  • 91) ‘Society is confronted daily with the anti-human nature of large-scale capitalist farming, which pollutes the environment and poisons the food supply.’
  • 92) ‘When they are finished, my crockery and glassware are shattered, my kitchen shelves and cupboards are broken, the food in my pantry is poisoned, and even my house is wrecked.’
  • 93) ‘The soul stirs and this awakening then initiates karma or action; a seed is sown for some future effect, for some future fruit, be that a sweet apple or one that is poisoned.’
  • 94) ‘In other cases, they will eat an egg or pheasant which has been poisoned and put out as bait.’
  • 95) ‘Barons and lords glanced furtively at each other from down the table, ladies and nobles picked disinterestedly at their food as if suspecting it had been poisoned.’
  • 96) ‘But this is still not all there is in combat, as you can poison your weapons or arrows to do even more damage.’
  • 97) ‘The Sultan's army was primarily light cavalry armed with crossbows that shot poisoned arrows.’
  • 98) ‘I was especially wary of them this time, now that I knew their swords were poisoned, and dodged them as they attempted to advance on me.’
  • 99) ‘He was focusing more on the men who were standing behind Aric, about to shoot poisoned arrows, no less, at the king.’
  • 100) ‘This plan calls for Hamlet and Laertes to have a mock sword fight, but Laertes will be using a real poisoned sword.’
  • 101) ‘That was easy, only three hundred poisoned darts were aimed at the traveler as he passed.’
  • 102) ‘During the rigged tournament, Claudius and Laertes give Hamlet a blunted sword while Laertes' weapon is sharpened and poisoned.’
  • 103) ‘Shamans say its very breath has power, and that the sound it utters when it gasps can send poisoned darts flying, as from a blowgun.’
  • 104) ‘Duke Kingston developed a fever on their way back to the castle, and they soon figured out that the arrows had been poisoned.’
  • 105) ‘I learned how to poison arrows, and how to set explosives in them.’
  • 106) ‘These they hunt with blowpipes made from hardwood, from which they can shoot poisoned darts great distances with amazing accuracy.’
  • 107) ‘But if someone made the effort to poison the arrow, it probably isn't a very good sign.’
  • 108) ‘And, if your opponent is indeed guilty of abusing those around him: It won't be long before he fatally poisons his campaign with destructive behavior.’
  • 109) ‘But I simply cannot remain silent and sit here and listen when a party that is trying to attain power at any cost poisons the relationship between the two peoples of this country.’
  • 110) ‘Their bitterness poisons their attitude and their outlook on life.’
  • 111) ‘The sizeable coaching staff is just one complaint on the list of gripes which is steadily poisoning the atmosphere in Dunfermline these days and fans would be in uproar if yet more back-up was employed.’
  • 112) ‘The city's protection of ‘the prefab block’ over private housing is poisoning the atmosphere and becoming a political mood killer.’
  • 113) ‘I believe their parents are definitely opposed to their daughters' stance, and may possibly be ready to sue the producer for poisoning the social atmosphere.’
  • 114) ‘I don't pretend to be able to explain the bizarre political attitudes now poisoning much of Europe.’
  • 115) ‘A massive management reshuffle followed the scandal and while the changes poisoned the atmosphere, the newsroom was not tamed.’
  • 116) ‘We sorted it out, but it poisoned the atmosphere.’
  • 117) ‘In any case most observers believed the atmosphere was so poisoned that any ceasefire would be as meaningless as those which preceded it.’
  • 118) ‘The bombings poisoned the political atmosphere and deepened the social divide’
  • 119) ‘What I think it will do is poison the atmosphere in the American scientific and academic community in a way which is absolutely unconscionable.’
  • 120) ‘It is not just adverse events that can poison a positive working atmosphere.’
  • 121) ‘This assumption is the opposite of the odium theologicum that too often poisons the atmosphere of the church.’
  • 122) ‘That's definitely poisoning the atmosphere on both sides.’
  • 123) ‘I can feel the evil being moving closer and poisoning the atmosphere.’
  • 124) ‘The delays are poisoning the political atmosphere and daily making the prospects more and more dispiriting.’
  • 125) ‘Several former employees complained she could be imperious and unpleasant, which they say poisoned the work atmosphere.’
  • 126) ‘Just the perception of unfairness is often enough to poison the atmosphere.’
  • 127) ‘If getting to young people before attitudes are irredeemably poisoned is the key, then All Saints, the area's secondary school, seemed to be providing a model.’
  • 128) ‘The cells worked well initially, but any traces of carbon monoxide in the hydrogen fuel quickly poisoned the catalyst.’
  • 129) ‘The catalysts are easily poisoned by lead, however, which clogs their reactive surfaces.’
  • 130) ‘And that soaks into tissue very readily, with the acid part doing its damage along the way, and the fluoride merrily poisoning enzymes and wreaking havoc.’
  • 131) ‘It also poisons the enzyme which converts thyroxine to the more metabolically active T3 hormone.’

Examples

  • 1) He reserves his venom for the real enemy.
  • 2) The last thing you want is an angry ex roaming around online spitting venom about you.
  • 3) But most of the venom is directed at her birth father.
  • 4) He has enough venom to unsettle any top batsman.
  • 5) Do they spit venom or emit noxious smells?
  • 6) Lacking venom, it uses muscle power to crush its victim!
  • 7) One bite contains enough venom to kill as many as 100 people.
  • 8) Not too heavy, despite bee venom that boosts collagen.
  • 9) The snake 's venom causes agonising pain and can kill within hours.
  • 10) Bee venom can be used to treat many conditions, from arthritis to shingles.
  • 11) It offers a moisturiser containing bee venom at 150 a jar.
  • 12) He then wanted to know when the busy bees would deliver enough venom for a top-up.
  • 13) I often have a spoonful of honey with bee venom in it.
  • 14) It has become more vindictive and hyperbolic by the day, with much of the personal venom being directed at him.
  • 15) A single drop of its venom is enough to kill 100 people.
  • 16) He wins turnovers, hits rucks with real venom, and he is a wonderful link between forwards and backs.
  • 17) ‘Amazingly, one of the toxins resembles an enzyme found in potent snake venoms.’
  • 18) ‘In addition, they differ in their binding ability to proteinases in crude snake venoms.’
  • 19) ‘Cobra attacks its prey by spitting poisonous venom called neurotoxin.’
  • 20) ‘Centipedes' modified front legs are poison claws, which they use to inject a highly toxic venom.’
  • 21) ‘Is it true that there is a new treatment for brain tumors involving scorpion venom?’
  • 22) ‘But for children with insect venom allergy, an insect bite can cause more severe symptoms.’
  • 23) ‘Blood tests showed that he died of spider venom poisoning.’
  • 24) ‘There are approximately 2,000 species of scorpions; of those, only around 40 to 50 contain deadly venom.’
  • 25) ‘Stingrays have a spine at the base of their tail that contains a venom gland.’
  • 26) ‘Males have hollow spurs connected to venom glands on the ankle of each hind leg.’
  • 27) ‘He noted that bee venom could be poisonous to both animals and humans.’
  • 28) ‘He watched as it pierced through the protection and injected its venom.’
  • 29) ‘Patients with bites from snakes with neurotoxic venom should be observed for at least 24 hours.’
  • 30) ‘Do all populations of Mojave rattlesnakes have neurotoxic venom?’
  • 31) ‘Ricin is twice as deadly as cobra venom and there is no known antidote.’
  • 32) ‘Inside the beans of the castor plant is a toxin seven times more deadly than cobra venom.’
  • 33) ‘The dragon has wounded him, and his poisonous venom is killing the brave Beowulf.’
  • 34) ‘In conclusion, whole honeybee venom was found to suppress arthritic inflammation in the rat.’
  • 35) ‘A number of researchers have suggested that venom toxins are modified saliva proteins.’
  • 36) ‘Are there special properties in tarantula venom that other spiders might not have?’
  • 37) ‘Once again Grace spoke quietly, with absolutely no venom or malice, or any emotion at all.’
  • 38) ‘That's why our country is in the mess it is in right now, even our so-called religious leaders are full of venom.’
  • 39) ‘But the debates were good ones and, on the whole, discussions were held without rancour or venom.’
  • 40) ‘When did I stop liking people, and begin to hate them with such venom?’
  • 41) ‘His eyes flickered to Leopold, erasing any doubt that his comment had been full of venom.’
  • 42) ‘Her voice was full of venom, and there was a very large hint that she did not like her job.’
  • 43) ‘Elizabeth, learning of his dislike, makes it a point to match his disgust with her own venom.’
  • 44) ‘The woman glared up at Natasha with pure venom and hatred in her dark green eyes.’
  • 45) ‘They were filled with such venom and hatred that Bryan was even too stunned to respond.’
  • 46) ‘Let them be shielded from the shafts of malice, and protected against the venom of personal vituperation.’
  • 47) ‘Adrianne spat, venom dripping from her words.’
  • 48) ‘Here is a man who was supposedly praying one minute and spewing venom the next.’
  • 49) ‘My answer came with such venom dripping from every word, I surprised myself.’
  • 50) ‘Pity to waste good viper venom on an audience of one.’
  • 51) ‘Gabrielle looked up from her book and shot him a look of pure venom.’
  • 52) ‘She shot Leonard a look of pure venom as she turned for the exit.’
  • 53) ‘Pure venom shone in her eyes before she whipped around splashing through the water.’
  • 54) ‘Father Malachi spoke with venom in his voice that Judy would be jealous of.’
  • 55) ‘There wasn't enough venom in my voice to make the question an accusation.’
  • 56) ‘His eyes filled with cold, deadly venom, and a short snarl escaped his lips.’
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