motive vs motif

motive motif

Definitions

  • 1) An incentive to act; a reason for doing something; anything that prompted a choice of action.
  • 2) A motif; a theme or subject, especially one that is central to the work or often repeated.
  • 3) A motif in art, literature, or music.
  • 4) An emotion, desire, physiological need, or similar impulse that acts as an incitement to action.
  • 5) (Mus.) The theme or subject; a leading phrase or passage which is reproduced and varied through the course of a comor a movement; a short figure, or melodic germ, out of which a whole movement is develpoed. See also Leading motive, under Leading.
  • 6) obsolete That which moves; a mover.
  • 7) That which incites to action; anything prompting or exciting to choise, or moving the will; cause; reason; inducement; object; motivation{2}.
  • 8) (Fine Arts) That which produces conception, invention, or creation in the mind of the artist in undertaking his subject; the guiding or controlling idea manifested in a work of art, or any part of one.
  • 9) the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior
  • 10) a theme that is repeated or elaborated in a piece of music
  • 11) a design or figure that consists of recurring shapes or colors, as in architecture or decoration
  • 12) Prevailing design.
  • 13) The design or object one has in any action; intention; purpose; the ideal object of desire.
  • 14) A mental state or force which induces an act of volition; a determining impulse: specifically, a desire for something; a gratification contemplated as the final cause of a certain action of the one desiring it.
  • 15) . Motion; proposition.
  • 16) Synonyms Motive, Reason, Inducement, Incentive, Impulse, consideration, prompting, stimulus. The differences among the first five of these words are suggested by the derivations. A motive is that which moves one to act, addressing the will, as though directly, and determining the choice; it is the common philosophical term, and may be collective: as, the whole field of motive. A reason is that which addresses the rational nature by way of argument for either belief or choice. An inducement leads one on by his desire for good: as, to hold out an additional inducement. An incentive urges one on like martial music. An impulse drives one on, but is transitory.
  • 17) Movement.
  • 18) One who or that which is the cause of something; an originator.
  • 19) Relating to motion and/or to its cause
  • 20) Causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move; as, a motive argument; motive power.
  • 21) Causing an action.
  • 22) Causing or able to cause motion.
  • 23) (Mach.) a natural agent, as water, steam, wind, electricity, etc., used to impart motion to machinery; a motor; a mover.
  • 24) Causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move.
  • 25) causing or able to cause motion
  • 26) impelling to action
  • 27) transitive To prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.
  • 28) To prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.

Definitions

  • 1) A decorative figure that is repeated in a design
  • 2) A recurring or dominant element; a theme.
  • 3) crystallography The physical object or objects repeated at each point of a lattice. Usually atoms or molecules.
  • 4) music A short melodic passage that is repeated in several parts of a work
  • 5) Music A short rhythmic or melodic passage that is repeated or evoked in various parts of a composition.
  • 6) A repeated figure or design in architecture or decoration. synonym: figure.
  • 7) A recurrent pattern either of molecular sequence, usually of nucleotides or amino acids in proteins, or of molecular structure that usually corresponds to specific biological activity.
  • 8) A dominant theme or central idea.
  • 9) A recurrent thematic element in an artistic or literary work.
  • 10) (Dressmaking) A decorative appliqué design or figure, as of lace or velvet, used in trimming; also, a repeated design.
  • 11) (Music) In literature and the fine arts, a salient feature or element of a composition or work; esp., the theme, or central or dominant feature
  • 12) archaic Motive.
  • 13) a unifying idea that is a recurrent element in literary or artistic work
  • 14) a theme that is repeated or elaborated in a piece of music
  • 15) a design or figure that consists of recurring shapes or colors, as in architecture or decoration
  • 16) [F.] A datum, theme, or ground for intellectual action: used as French.
  • 17) A figure.
  • 18) A subject or theme, particularly one that recurs often in a dramatic work as a leading subject.
  • 19) A Middle English form of motive.
  • 20) [F.] In music:

Examples

  • 1) Police sources said that the attack was driven by domestic political motives.
  • 2) But she also had political motives for dismissing volunteers.
  • 3) Detectives said they suspect a commercial motive for the murder.
  • 4) If the person you are meeting is strongly against the idea, question their motives.
  • 5) A suspect was detained but there was no information about a possible motive.
  • 6) Police have remained tight-lipped about a possible motive for his murder and refused to say if anything was stolen.
  • 7) Their true motive is to overturn the biggest democratic vote in UK history.
  • 8) The incentive crowded out the real motive.
  • 9) The apparent motive was the murder of a police sergeant as he was leaving a bank.
  • 10) We must take maximum advantage of the enormous motive forces inherent in the socialist system.
  • 11) Whether there is such a thing as a profit motive at all is highly doubtful.
  • 12) The assailant declared that his motive had been political.
  • 13) The group continued by questioning the motives of the union president.
  • 14) We do not understand the motive for this crime.
  • 15) Police do not think robbery was a motive.
  • 16) We will be looking at all possible motives for this killing.
  • 17) Your ability to read minds and true motives will keep you ahead in all you do.
  • 18) But the rest of the wives are suspicious of their real motives for getting away.
  • 19) More than one had a motive for murder.
  • 20) Here the motive force behind the whole design is fear.
  • 21) The profit motive makes theatre become pedestrian.
  • 22) It is hard not to see a straightforwardly political motive for this exemption.
  • 23) He questioned the motives for the original policy.
  • 24) She felt so free from ulterior motives that she took up his charge with a touch of resentment.
  • 25) He cannot afford to draw the unwanted attention of gossip columnists unless he has some ulterior motive for doing so.
  • 26) It expects very little from fellow human beings and always sees the actions and motives of others through a prism of mistrust.
  • 27) The stronger motive may have determined our volition without our perceiving it; and if we desire to prove our independence of motive, by showing that we _can_ choose something different from that which we should naturally have chosen, we still cannot escape from the circle, this very desire becoming, as Mr. Hume observes, itself a _motive_.
  • 28) I use it here to mean a doctrinaire Marxist whose main motive is hostility to the Stalin regime.
  • 29) [3] The term motive is applicable in all cases where the regular operations of inanimate matter are superseded by the interference of intelligence.
  • 30) MBSS: DB, when people criticize israel for violating international law i would suspect the motive is anger over israel violating international law. if they happen to think that the existence of is israel is an injustice then they say so, as ido.
  • 31) The presence of what we call motive is something that comes and goes intermittently and which may or may not be present from the first awakening of consciousness.
  • 32) That power of the mind which we call motive, differeth from the power motive of the body. for the power motive of the body is that by which it moveth other bodies, which we call strength: but the power motive of the mind, is that by which the mind giveth animal motion to that body wherein it existeth; the acts hereof are our affections and passions, of which I am now to speak.
  • 33) The only people that the "motive" is relevant to is the police when looking for a suspect.
  • 34) I do reserve the right to permanently delete things — particularly when they have little merit and when they are posted by people whose main motive is evidently to undermine my authority and therefore, as far as I’m concerned, damage the project.
  • 35) New partners I don´t need unless the motive is purely acquisitive in nature and impersonal.
  • 36) ‘There's an ulterior motive behind everything they do.’
  • 37) ‘When someone offers you help, must you seek out an ulterior motive behind the gesture?’
  • 38) ‘The key ethical and legal point is the intention - the motive behind the act.’
  • 39) ‘Detectives are hoping to establish the motive for the murder attempt in the coming days, and will examine the possibility that it may have been drug related.’
  • 40) ‘Police have also been carrying out door-to-door inquiries to establish a motive for the murder.’
  • 41) ‘More than a month on, police are no closer to finding his killer, or establishing a motive for the murder.’
  • 42) ‘Either his motive alone was sufficient reason to suspect him, or it wasn't.’
  • 43) ‘In addition to your total lack of evidence, you are unable even to establish a reasonable motive.’
  • 44) ‘Details were released as detectives confirmed they now believe there was a sexual motive behind the girl's kidnap and murder.’
  • 45) ‘Detectives said yesterday that they had not yet established a motive for the double murder, but believed it might have been linked to a domestic dispute.’
  • 46) ‘Mr Locke asks why people are questioning his motives, and the reason is that we have studied him.’
  • 47) ‘There is a difference between a reason and a motive.’
  • 48) ‘And we tell ourselves that it's all right, that for us it's different, that we have an excuse, a reason, a motive.’
  • 49) ‘I confess to having an inherent mistrust of the motives behind the development of GM crops and foods.’
  • 50) ‘From this side of the Atlantic, the motives behind this action appear far more self-serving.’
  • 51) ‘He says he doesn't know what motives could be behind the leak.’
  • 52) ‘There was little attempt to disguise the political motives behind the move.’
  • 53) ‘Normally I am very careful before I ascribe such sinister motives to a government agency.’
  • 54) ‘Of course there are other possible motives for murder besides a disagreement over business matters.’
  • 55) ‘Richardson said that detectives were keeping an open mind about the possible motive for the triple murder.’
  • 56) ‘Police believe robbery was the motive for the attack.’
  • 57) ‘Then think about the grail motive as a background to the Bruckner Adagio.’
  • 58) ‘To cultivate this process, the student should become acquainted with the motive upon which the composition is based.’
  • 59) ‘This is the predominant trichord of most sets and functions as a signature motive.’
  • 60) ‘It's my favourite time of year and I wanted to evoke the coolness and crispness, especially in the opening motive.’
  • 61) ‘For ten minutes, the bass methodically pounds the opening motive into the ground with rigor and exactitude.’
  • 62) ‘In its most common meaning, the term idea is used as a synonym for theme, melody, phrase or motive.’
  • 63) ‘The introduction is based on a short six-note motive that is treated canonically, first in single notes and then in double notes.’
  • 64) ‘This three-note motive can subsequently be detected in almost every bar of the piece, giving it a high degree of unity.’
  • 65) ‘My other quibble is that the vigorous minor-mode motive of repeated notes isn't bowed roughly enough.’
  • 66) ‘The first movement's contours, both its main motive and its overall shape, do suggest climbing.’
  • 67) ‘The harmonic and rhythmic tension in this motive is palpable.’
  • 68) ‘The change of motion is proportional to the motive force impressed; and is made in the direction of the straight line in which that force is impressed.’
  • 69) ‘With the invention of the internal combustion engine, in the late 19th century, new possibilities of motive force became available.’
  • 70) ‘It may be powered by hand, pedal, or some other motive force such as a suitably geared lawn mower engine or the electric motor taken from a discarded washing machine.’
  • 71) ‘Horses continued to provide the main motive force for commercial uses of the plateau such as grazing until the recent past.’
  • 72) ‘The motive force is supplied by sodium or hydrogen ions flowing down a concentration gradient from the outside.’
  • 73) ‘Wind turbines, also known as wind mills, use the wind as their motive force.’
  • 74) ‘As a consequence, the question of whether the new industry should continue to use gasoline as its motive fuel arose.’
  • 75) ‘These flying triangles aren't ready to bear the weight of their own motive energy source.’
  • 76) ‘Its motive force is protection and care, but it does not give enough space to personal liberty.’
  • 77) ‘Fascists themselves claimed that ultranationalism was their motive force, and that the realization of the mobilized national community was their goal.’
  • 78) ‘Rather, it's the essential motive force for a technologically vibrant economy.’
  • 79) ‘Feelings are important because they provide the motive force for thinking and acting.’
  • 80) ‘Nationalist feeling was a far more powerful motive force in China than social radicalism.’
  • 81) ‘It serves as a kind of a triggering mechanism, a motive force of military ideology.’
  • 82) ‘The driving motive force behind any country's sense of achievement and pride in its efforts must come from a focus on entrepreneurship.’
  • 83) ‘While putatively providing the motive force for Mundy's actions, the anger finally overreaches itself.’
  • 84) ‘They sought to uncover the motive force of the class struggle - the key to the real understanding of all history.’
  • 85) ‘It is not a part of the real motive forces of the revolution.’
  • 86) ‘Looking back now, it seems to me that nothing has changed and that it was only a matter of days before profit was re-established as the system's principal motive force.’
  • 87) ‘I think that's part of the motive force for this research, because of the great freedom that children express in their faith.’

Examples

  • 1) Products are contemporary and truly covetable, and motifs and themes are often poignant.
  • 2) Check the direction of the grain and any pattern repeats and motifs.
  • 3) Check that any pattern or motifs are printed straight across the fabric.
  • 4) The card also includes a rose motif.
  • 5) Raging carnal appetite was certainly a recurring motif on Wednesday.
  • 6) Its recurring motif is hair.
  • 7) Mosaic is a pattern of geometric motifs in soft hues, pictured in Coral.
  • 8) The single dominant motif in the course of new Labour was that it was not old Labour.
  • 9) There are many such recurring motifs, simply, objectively introduced but gaining significance each time they reappear.
  • 10) Fragments of personal history are swapped back and forth, each time with variations, like a recurring musical motif.
  • 11) Let's just say images of blood dripping on a snare drum is one of the film's most recurring motifs.
  • 12) The idea of happiness forms the overriding motif in the collection, raised in each story, sometimes with a slightly coercive nudge.
  • 13) In Romanticism, the ruin motif is expressed and interpreted in various ways; here the literal ruin or monument, there the figurative ruin of the self, and elsewhere still the formalistic ruin of the Romantic fragment poem, with all of its unsettled meaning.
  • 14) The novel's central motif comes from the tale of Orpheus, the great musician of Greek mythology, who charmed his way into the underworld and begged the gods with music to bring his wife back to life.
  • 15) If a certain typeface or a certain motif is considered inappropriate because it looks unprofessional, no professional artist/designer would use them.
  • 16) A familiar motif is that they operate at the very fringes of perception.
  • 17) The “new woman” motif is announced in London's description of Grace's efficiency:
  • 18) The nameless gunslinger motif is taken to a very grizzly place as Jonah Hex is shown as a remorseless bounty hunter with a notoriety that instills fear and anger among the folks he meets.
  • 19) Also note: I doubt this was intentional in the Pledge but the One God to Two Goddesses motif is actually also found as the Second Capitoline Triad, though the choice of goddesses was different.
  • 20) ‘In addition to church furnishings and tombs, he specialized in the design of ornamental motifs, which he popularized in a series of engravings, 1548-77.’
  • 21) ‘Included are geometrics, florals and foliates, animals and nature motifs and other decorative repeat patterns.’
  • 22) ‘Crafted in gold or silver, medals were adorned with decorative motifs and appropriate inscriptions engraved by hand.’
  • 23) ‘Using cracked linen as a surface, she painted motifs that conjure up images of Italian frescoes and simulate the effects of time and weather.’
  • 24) ‘The design thus recalls interpenetrating circles as visual motifs found in his decorative work after 1910.’
  • 25) ‘The patterns and motifs are highly complex, ranging from starbursts and amoebic shapes to flowers and birds.’
  • 26) ‘Some critics have suggested a direct connection between the traditional design motifs found in West African art forms and those of slave-descended Southern blacks.’
  • 27) ‘It is decorated with motifs designed by local school children.’
  • 28) ‘She uses a lot of wonderful patterns and motifs.’
  • 29) ‘His recent paintings are not abstract evolutions of ancestral designs but oversized traditional motifs inscribed on a simplified ground.’
  • 30) ‘Some of these he roughly painted over with fish or flower motifs based upon traditional designs.’
  • 31) ‘Stencils are available in a variety of motifs and designs from art and crafts supply stores.’
  • 32) ‘Walking into the lobby, one is met with a mixture of Moorish fittings and Victorian interior design; the square pillars are adorned with Baroque motifs.’
  • 33) ‘Her geometric paintings of the '60s and '80s, based on patterns and structured motifs, owe much to her background in textiles.’
  • 34) ‘Their wood was carved with geometric patterns, especially a spiral motif (symbolising ‘mother earth’) similar to that on Georgian coins.’
  • 35) ‘Its most characteristic theme was the use of sinuous asymmetrical lines based on plant forms; flower, leaf, and tendril motifs are common features, as are female figures with abundant flowing hair.’
  • 36) ‘Particular attention was given to design motifs that were found in several art forms (pottery, architecture, textiles and so on).’
  • 37) ‘It is said that there are over 3,000 batik designs that include Indian, Chinese and Buddhist patterns including indigenous motifs of local fruits and flowers.’
  • 38) ‘Some decorative motifs were redrawn by the teacher to emphasize the kinds of decorative motifs typical of these different cultures.’
  • 39) ‘If you are a very classic dresser, I wouldn't recommend ties with motifs of animals or cartoons because they would probably come off as tacky and unattractive.’
  • 40) ‘Unlike the ceramics produced in other parts of the country, the ceramics from Sitiwinangun are rich in embossed decorations with various floral and plant motifs.’
  • 41) ‘Steamers are also found as a decorative motif on embroidered silk textiles.’
  • 42) ‘Satin mini-skirts abound in a range of wild colors, some embroidered with floral motifs.’
  • 43) ‘She was wearing black jeans, a red jumper with a lion motif and a black bodywarmer when she disappeared.’
  • 44) ‘The business, based in Great Horton, was founded more than 150 years ago and specialises in the manufacture of jacquard machines, which are used to embroider names, motifs and symbols on to textiles.’
  • 45) ‘The motif (golf, surf) can be customized to suit the distributor's customer.’
  • 46) ‘He was last seen wearing a baseball cap with a crocodile motif, a black sweatshirt and dark blue jeans.’
  • 47) ‘Several days were then spent learning how to sew the porcupine quills into decorative motifs on the clothing and attaching the silverberry seeds to the fringes.’
  • 48) ‘The man also wears a dark baseball cap with a motif on the front, light brown boots, and carries a dark coloured rucksack on his back.’
  • 49) ‘You can cool off with fabrics that range from simple soft cottons with woven borders to hand-crushed silks with delicate embroidered motifs scattered all over the garment.’
  • 50) ‘According to Galia Dicheva, spokesperson for the royal family, the bride will stick to the Bulgarian traditional-style gown with some folklore motifs on her dress.’
  • 51) ‘As head of the Embroidery Department she achieved international recognition for her designs, patterns and motifs particularly in Germany and Austria.’
  • 52) ‘The decorative embroidery motifs are typical of the period and include a castle, insects and large-scale floral designs probably derived from printed patterns.’
  • 53) ‘He was wearing a light grey hooded top with a sports motif on the front and light grey bottoms.’
  • 54) ‘This distinctively narrative work presents a host of motifs that recur throughout Schreuders' printed works, including mermaids and sculpted figures.’
  • 55) ‘Chapter 1 introduces a series of motifs that recur in subsequent chapters and carry similar associations with them.’
  • 56) ‘There is no attempt to create a genre with recurring motifs like, for example, chick lit's shoes, sex, and Chardonnay.’
  • 57) ‘One of Hitchcock's recurring motifs concerns a woman who suspects a loved one of being a monster.’
  • 58) ‘Themes and motifs interweave and recur, circling around each other, acquiring new associations with each repetition.’
  • 59) ‘The motif of the globe recurs in other works by Georgiades.’
  • 60) ‘Multi-faceted, open-ended and provocative, this is a film whose many parallel scenes, recurring motifs and curious ironies offer plenty of fuel for thought.’
  • 61) ‘Norman is far from cannibalizing his own writing, and there is nothing wrong with recurring motifs and characters that stretch from one work to the next.’
  • 62) ‘The first four episodes build in mystery as we try to piece together recurring motifs of corpses, shared food, reversals of power.’
  • 63) ‘Obsession and addiction are recurring motifs, along with violent sex and occasional acts of extreme cruelty.’
  • 64) ‘She is currently at work on a book studying the sovereignty motif in Heaney's verse.’
  • 65) ‘Together they reveal his visual language and the motifs that recur throughout his work.’
  • 66) ‘A first group explores central themes in more than one of Roth's novels while others devote themselves to one text and the author's sophisticated presentation of themes and motifs.’
  • 67) ‘Hawthorne uses several motifs to express a recurring idea throughout the novel.’
  • 68) ‘There may not be a metanarrative to this book, but certain repetitive motifs are discernible no matter how he retells human history.’
  • 69) ‘In similar fashion he attributed other thematic resemblances between New Comedy and Sanskrit plays to the presence of universal themes and motifs.’
  • 70) ‘Those names, like everything in the book, echo the motif of hunger.’
  • 71) ‘Horses are one of the recurring motifs in Yeats's art, symbolic of loyalty, intelligence and the unbridled freedom of his early childhood.’
  • 72) ‘The Dance of Death, which portrayed men and women of all classes dancing with a skeleton, became a popular artistic motif.’
  • 73) ‘The relationship between land, landscape, and technological progress has always been a dominant motif in the American experience and its telling.’
  • 74) ‘Their elaborate dance of courtship, which cannot call itself by that name, is the film's central motif.’
  • 75) ‘Counterpoint and repetition of motifs provide cohesiveness and musical logic.’
  • 76) ‘His operas reveal careful dramatic planning, and his use of recurring themes and motifs frequently creates conceptual and musical unity within a work.’
  • 77) ‘The arrangements are intelligent without being fussy: tuneful refrains for cello and woodwind, beguiling motifs for piano and vibes, emotional guitar and restrained drums.’
  • 78) ‘Musicologists know that Stravinsky mined collections of Russian folk music for motifs.’
  • 79) ‘The work moves between quiet repetitive phrases for prepared piano and percussion to busy, Gamelan-like motifs for piano and digital synthesizer.’
  • 80) ‘Early on, clustering was used to detect common three-dimensional structural motifs in proteins.’
  • 81) ‘Specifically, we defined two small but functionally important structural motifs within the Rux protein.’
  • 82) ‘Consequently, particular sets of correlated peptides serve to define particular sets of homologous protein motifs within the data set.’
  • 83) ‘Each of the five proteins contains all four motifs, organized in the same order in the linear sequence.’
  • 84) ‘In the absence of sequence motifs and proteins capable of directing transcription, the protein it encodes will remain invisible to selection.’
  • 85) ‘In principle, therefore, comparison of different haplotypes should permit the identification of sequence motifs that determine haplotype specificity.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy