adapt vs adept

adapt adept

Definitions

  • 1) Adapted; fit; suited; suitable.
  • 2) obsolete Fitted; suited.
  • 3) transitive To make suitable; to make to correspond; to fit or suit; to proportion.
  • 4) intransitive To change oneself so as to be adapted.
  • 5) transitive To fit by alteration; to modify or remodel for a different purpose; to adjust: as, to adapt a story or a foreign play for the stage; to adapt an old machine to a new manufacture.
  • 6) transitive To make by altering or fitting something else; to produce by change of form or character: as, to bring out a play adapted from the French; a word of an adapted form.
  • 7) make fit for, or change to suit a new purpose
  • 8) To fit by alteration; modify or remodel for a different purpose: as, to adapt a story or a foreign play for the stage; to adapt an old machine to a new manufacture. To make by altering or fitting something else; produce by change of form or character: as, to bring out a play adapted from the French; a word of an adapted form.
  • 9) Same as immunize.
  • 10) To make suitable; make to correspond; fit or suit; proportion.
  • 11) Sameasimmunize.
  • 12) Adapted; fit; suitable.
  • 13) To cause to be able to survive and reproduce under certain conditions. Used in the passive.
  • 14) To make suitable to or fit for a specific use or situation.
  • 15) To become adapted.
  • 16) To make suitable; to fit, or suit; to adjust; to alter so as to fit for a new use; -- sometimes followed by to or for.

Definitions

  • 1) One fully skilled or well versed in anything; a proficient; as, adepts in philosophy.
  • 2) A highly skilled person; an expert.
  • 3) One fully skilled or well versed in anything; a proficient.
  • 4) Synonyms Adept, Expert. An adept is one who possesses natural as well as acquired aptitude or skill in anything: as, an adept in the art of governing; an adept in diplomacy, lying, cajolery, whist-playing, etc. An expert, on the other hand, is one whose skill and proficiency are more conspicuously the result of practice or experience, or of an intimate acquaintance with a subject. The term is mostly limited to one possessing special skill or knowledge in some branch, and regarded as an authority on it: as, an expert in alienism, chemistry, penmanship, etc.
  • 5) One who has attained proficiency; one fully skilled in anything; a proficient or master; specifically, in former times, a proficient in alchemy or magic; a master of occult science, or one who professed to have discovered “the great secret” (namely, of transmuting base metal into gold).
  • 6) Well skilled; completely versed; thoroughly proficient
  • 7) Very skilled or accomplished. synonym: proficient.
  • 8) Well skilled; completely versed; thoroughly proficient.
  • 9) Well skilled; completely versed or acquainted.

Examples

  • 1) Could such a device be adapted for domestic use?
  • 2) You learn to adapt and change.
  • 3) We had to adapt to the changes in her lifestyle, but we managed it.
  • 4) They are great players, so it has been easy for me to adapt to play with them.
  • 5) You have to adapt to the changed demands in each place, and that's especially true for jockeys.
  • 6) That is how he made us adapt to his playing style.
  • 7) That allowed him to adjust and adapt his sprawling tale.
  • 8) We bring in a new agenda that other people adapt and use.
  • 9) So is there any talk about possibly adapting that second book?
  • 10) Elsewhere buildings were adapted for surprising purposes.
  • 11) Small companies are already adapting to change.
  • 12) Instead he wrote and adapted plays for the stage.
  • 13) His treatment was awful and he had no idea how to adapt a book.
  • 14) In part this reflects changes to adapt to new conditions.
  • 15) He has struggled to adapt his playing style to the hard courts.
  • 16) In the summer they can be adapted to use as gardening vehicles or refuse trucks.
  • 17) You have to be able to adjust and adapt and take your own game forward in a different environment.
  • 18) He knows which players can adapt to his playing style after an assessment of his first three months in charge.
  • 19) His design has been used or adapted by many of the suppliers that have sprung up in the past few years.
  • 20) It is to be adapted as a film in France.
  • 21) Is he keen on films being adapted into plays, then?
  • 22) Most carried on, adapting their purposes to the war effort in many ways.
  • 23) In fairness, perhaps he needs more time to adjust and adapt.
  • 24) His films have been adapted for schools in Australia.
  • 25) There is always more we can do to raise awareness, as crime groups adapt and change.
  • 26) He's got a good ability to adapt and adjust.
  • 27) Also, adapting film successes for the stage is a road trodden too often.
  • 28) In this way forms are modified, and can be adapted to their purpose and become more perfect.
  • 29) If the ability to adapt is limited, the possibility to be a foster parent reduce.
  • 30) You can not do that in Latin base languages so people adapt the English word or have to describe the object or concept.
  • 31) ‘Individual countries can no longer adapt monetary policy to suit their particular economic situation.’
  • 32) ‘An existing in-house induction programme was adapted for the company's overseas staff.’
  • 33) ‘In the current investigation, a number of existing measures were adapted for use.’
  • 34) ‘The building's original gymnasium space and kitchens were adapted for Church use.’
  • 35) ‘The minibuses are specially adapted for wheelchair users and the timescale to obtain a replacement is four to six months.’
  • 36) ‘Many of them flourish in a broad range of habitats, and nearly all of them are adapted for wide dispersal.’
  • 37) ‘The long claws, strong leg and shoulder muscles of these bears are well adapted for digging dens and food.’
  • 38) ‘Before the internal combustion engine was adapted for use in fishing boats, human strength was the only means of conquering the seas.’
  • 39) ‘I also reserve the right to modify and adapt elements of the winning design both now and in the future.’
  • 40) ‘In modern Africa large oil drums are often adapted for the purpose.’
  • 41) ‘She then adapts the design to suit the individual.’
  • 42) ‘Birds use them for flight, and they are exquisitely adapted for flight in their subtlest details.’
  • 43) ‘We use a unique approach to training, adapting our delivery to suit individual groups.’
  • 44) ‘We will make these available in a format that you can download, so you can modify or adapt them as needed.’
  • 45) ‘Indeed, the procedures and trappings of the hunt were adapted for military purposes.’
  • 46) ‘The first pair were adapted for feeding, the next four were walking legs, and the most posterior pair formed large swimming paddles.’
  • 47) ‘The ability to adapt organisational culture to suit individual needs takes many shapes and forms.’
  • 48) ‘After several years of tests, they are now modifying and adapting the system to their individual enterprises.’
  • 49) ‘But, for a historian, he seems incredibly obtuse about the process of historical change, particularly the way each culture adapts ideas to suit its own purposes.’
  • 50) ‘Computer manufacturers routinely gave machines to schools at a discount or without cost, but adapting them to educational purposes proved difficult.’
  • 51) ‘If one is to enjoy any return on the investment, one must be smart, work diligently and adapt to local conditions.’
  • 52) ‘They adapt to the conditions here, the climate, the training, the food.’
  • 53) ‘It is willing to adapt to new world conditions, and to absorb new technologies and investments.’
  • 54) ‘These archetypes defy history and adapt to local conditions in order to live on.’
  • 55) ‘As the game went on they did adapt to the conditions and raised their game accordingly but to no avail.’
  • 56) ‘A decent game of football was never likely as both teams struggled to adapt to the atrocious conditions.’
  • 57) ‘Without this the species would be unable to adapt to changing conditions and would eventually perish.’
  • 58) ‘TS Moorhouse blamed part of the problem on motorists who failed to adapt to the conditions.’
  • 59) ‘Being able to adapt to any hill conditions or terrain is what makes good skiers great.’
  • 60) ‘Unless batsmen have a plan worked out in their minds and adapt to the conditions they're playing in, they will make lots of mistakes.’
  • 61) ‘Some of these individuals might be at an advantage over their predecessors, because they might be more able to adapt to new conditions.’
  • 62) ‘Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that plants use to adapt to water-limited conditions.’
  • 63) ‘Even die-hard manufacturing experts believe that British industry needs to adapt to the new conditions.’
  • 64) ‘These must be understood so plans can evolve and adapt to different conditions.’
  • 65) ‘If this happens, it would be crucial that species could adapt to the new conditions.’
  • 66) ‘That's why I had to adjust my game and adapt to the team I was with, so with that I just became a shooter.’
  • 67) ‘There is a good deal in this case and other writings about the need for the law to adapt to modern social conditions.’
  • 68) ‘If that's the case, then what they need to learn to do is figure out a way to adapt to this change in market conditions.’
  • 69) ‘They were able to adapt to whatever the political situations or life conditions demanded.’
  • 70) ‘He should've adapted to us rather than trying to make us adapt to him.’
  • 71) ‘The musical, which wowed the crowds when it visited Bradford last year, is adapted from the 1961 film.’
  • 72) ‘The Notebook and The Proof, by Agota Kristof, is a trilogy which has been adapted from novel to stage.’
  • 73) ‘As with any film that is adapted from a novel, the movie often does not do the book justice.’
  • 74) ‘Though the film was adapted from the stage musical of the same name, all of the songs have been cut.’
  • 75) ‘However, I remember her chiefly for the stage play The Woman in Black, which was adapted from one of her books.’
  • 76) ‘One of my favourite films of 2001 was Wu Yen, which is adapted from a folk tale that was also made into a Cantonese opera.’
  • 77) ‘Some of the most successful films of all time have been adapted from popular novels.’
  • 78) ‘When I first read the musical, which was adapted from the book by some guys in New York, I was very aware of how big it felt and how American it seemed.’
  • 79) ‘I normally stay away from movies which are adapted from books I've read and enjoyed.’
  • 80) ‘It's also a departure, his first period piece and his first film adapted from pre-existing material.’
  • 81) ‘The film, adapted from the novel by Robert Harris, is based in fact.’
  • 82) ‘The show runs until January 25 and is adapted from the much loved classic book by Philippa Pearce.’
  • 83) ‘The same can be said of any number of films adapted from fiction and nonfiction sources.’
  • 84) ‘Lord of the Flies is another in a long line of films adapted from various print material.’
  • 85) ‘The story has been adapted from Hans Christian Andersen's classic original and had songs interwoven for the stage version.’
  • 86) ‘The character of Selina Davis in Jazz - which is adapted from a short story by Jean Rhys - is a prime example.’
  • 87) ‘Like Minority Report, it was heavily adapted for the screen, but in a way that's necessary.’
  • 88) ‘It was adapted for theatre by Marcy Kahan, from Nora Ephron's original screenplay.’
  • 89) ‘City of Spades is adapted for radio by Biyi Bandele and Directed by Toby Swift.’

Examples

  • 1) We have proved highly adept at using technology to stress ourselves.
  • 2) This could have been the headline for a less adept politician.
  • 3) He is a very skilful player who is adept at using the personnel at his disposal.
  • 4) Sport helps young people to become more adept at working with others.
  • 5) The car insurance sector has proved adept at changing but flood insurance is static and failing the public.
  • 6) You are adept at keeping people 's interest.
  • 7) It is not obvious; players are adept at fooling themselves as well as coaches.
  • 8) In time, you will both become adept at spotting just when they are going to peak.
  • 9) They proved adept at learning English and willingly exchanged things of value for trinkets.
  • 10) If arts venues prove themselves too adept at making money, will funding gradually be withdrawn?
  • 11) At home she's also become adept at treading on eggshells and putting the best face on things.
  • 12) These artists seem equally adept at performing with or without a band, and in or out of character.
  • 13) They are less adept at looking up from their needles without dropping a stitch as they talk, but they are having fun.
  • 14) And I am as adept as most people when it comes to attempting to fix my car.
  • 15) That said, he's adept at proving people wrong.
  • 16) Most men, though, seem to be adept at avoiding violence from other men by the time they reach adulthood.
  • 17) When you see some of the work that students produce, you think it's amazing that young people are so adept at the subjects concerned.
  • 18) WORDS ACCENTED ON THE LAST SYLLABLE: address _address'_ adept _adept'_ adult _adult'_ ally _ally'_ commandant _commandänt '(ä as in arm) _ contour _contour'_ dessert _dessert'_ dilate _dilate'_ excise _eksiz'_ finance _finance'_ grimace _grimace'_ importune _importune'_ occult _occult'_ pretence _pretence'_ research _research'_ robust _robust'_ romance _romance'_ tirade _tirade'_
  • 19) T'Lar, the most learned of them all, had recently and without comment ceased to use the title "adept."
  • 20) Mr. Williams was known as an adept improviser who effortlessly switched between classical, jazz and pop styles.
  • 21) He/she probably meant to use the word adept having or showing knowledge and skill and aptitude.
  • 22) Williams was known as an adept improviser who effortlessly switched between classical, jazz and pop styles.
  • 23) I think a little friendly guide to the new system might help, for us oldsters who are not what you could call adept users.
  • 24) The other two chiefs are a Negro and a Hindoo; the adept is a Malay.
  • 25) If you depend on that and the guy is any kind of adept, you are getting cut, and maybe fatally.
  • 26) Other main characters are Queen Jehanne, former top Night Court "adept" ie former top courtesan of Terre Ange and second wife of King Daniel Courcel, her lover and dabbler in magical arts Raphael de Mereliot, elderly Ch'in wizard Lo Feng and his factotum disciple and martial arts expert Bao who are honored guests of the Angeline court, as well as quite a few others that you will encounter in the fullness of time.
  • 27) ‘Other countries are more adept at keeping their judges in check.’
  • 28) ‘She has never driven a car but was very adept at handling a pony and cart.’
  • 29) ‘Emergency nappy changing is a skill most mothers become quite adept at.’
  • 30) ‘He also was very adept at picking up on people's weaknesses and teasing them, ruffling some feathers.’
  • 31) ‘Your average city worker is very adept at avoiding anyone who looks like they might be giving out leaflets.’
  • 32) ‘He doesn't claim to know it all and is very adept at handling guests on his show who think they do.’
  • 33) ‘But he was also adept at deploying nearly everything that came to hand for promoting evolutionary theory.’
  • 34) ‘Hummingbirds are very adept at sipping nectar from any or all these plant groups.’
  • 35) ‘But, next season, players will become more attuned to what he is going to do and become more adept at stopping him.’
  • 36) ‘He's very adept at seeing a play develop, and that gets him to the right spot at the right time.’
  • 37) ‘He is very adept at using his body to shield defenders from making plays on the ball.’
  • 38) ‘He was also adept at promoting the scheme to the Australian populace by presenting it as a symbol of national pride.’
  • 39) ‘We're quite adept at picking out what it is we don't like about other human beings.’
  • 40) ‘There was also a mounted element of crossbowmen equally adept at reconnaissance and pursuit.’
  • 41) ‘He had grown very adept at using the crutches and now spent less time in bed than ever before.’
  • 42) ‘For Italy it was a day of bitter disappointment as they ran out again battered and bruised by more adept opponents.’
  • 43) ‘It is tempting to suppose it was the result of adept management.’
  • 44) ‘These wars were difficult affairs against enemies who were as technically adept as the Normans themselves.’
  • 45) ‘It was indeed lucky that none of these bandits seemed to be very adept with a sword.’
  • 46) ‘Performances are enhanced by an intelligent musical score and adept cinematography.’
  • 47) ‘Some Hindi-film adepts, including author-screenwriter Suketu Mehta and Internet Movie Database staffer Michel Hafner have offered help.’
  • 48) ‘I will leave that judgment to other kung-fu adepts.’
  • 49) ‘To begin with, they are adepts of conspiracy theory, obsessed with information, disinformation, propaganda and its country cousin, mind control.’
  • 50) ‘Usually there'd be a few other permutations of ‘face’ thrown in, with the true adepts raising the whole enterprise to something of an art form.’
  • 51) ‘In England, Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, and in France, Marie Paul Lavoisier presided over such salons and made a name for themselves as scientific adepts.’
  • 52) ‘Certain adepts are supposedly able to prepare the soup in a way that minimizes this slipperiness, but I can't say that I have ever dined with any.’
  • 53) ‘But he also believes that some of its adepts contributed significantly to the ideology of the 1960s - and not only in Australia.’
  • 54) ‘As knowledgable adepts in Arabic and Farsi, for instance, they are in an excellent position to understand nuances that hard-nosed businessmen may not.’
  • 55) ‘Is one religion more valuable than another, just because its adepts adhere to one school of thought over another?’
  • 56) ‘For such a normally quick tempered and impatient people they have shown themselves adepts at procrastination and brinkmanship.’
  • 57) ‘Some people would call it a property of those they call adepts but this is just an elitist illusion.’
  • 58) ‘The very concepts of ‘nature’ and ‘human nature’ now can be held up against the light shed by ancient medical writers, religious adepts, and the Christian Fathers.’
  • 59) ‘Like Taine, Cezanne had only contempt for the adepts of a dry, linear style, whom he associated with ascetic, religious (that is, nonsensuous) spirituality.’
  • 60) ‘The painter's orphic sleight of hand was abetted by arcane titles that conjure profligate aristocrats, sexual libertines, adepts of the dark arts and drugged esthetes.’
  • 61) ‘Instead, it surely refers to a state of total stillness and even abnegation, an ideal that religious adepts of all disciplines have long aspired to.’
  • 62) ‘It is reported that some cases of Levitation appear to be spontaneous, while spiritual or magical adepts are said to be able to control it consciously.’
  • 63) ‘Technical adepts reconfigured Soviet-manufactured radios to receive short wave from abroad, broadcast as part of the cold war.’
  • 64) ‘But true adepts would never have been concerned with anything so vulgar as financial gain.’
  • 65) ‘He became an adept in the cryptologic art, until then almost unknown, and exercised it on behalf of the parliamentary party.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy