wasp vs bee

wasp bee

Definitions

  • 1) Any of many types of stinging flying insect resembling a hornet or bee.
  • 2) A person who behaves in an angry or insolent way, hence waspish.
  • 3) A member of the dominant American upper-class culture, a white Anglo-Saxon Protestant.
  • 4) Any of numerous social or solitary hymenopterans of the suborder Apocrita, especially of the family Vespidae, that characteristically have a slender hairless body with a constricted abdomen, two pairs of membranous wings, a mouth adapted for biting or sucking, and in the females an ovipositor sometimes modified as a sting.
  • 5) See under Potter.
  • 6) a species of fly resembling a wasp, but without a sting.
  • 7) any one of numerous species of solitary wasps that make their nests in burrows which they dig in the ground, as the sand wasps. See Sand wasp, under Sand.
  • 8) See under Mud.
  • 9) (Zoöl.) Any one of numerous species of stinging hymenopterous insects, esp. any of the numerous species of the genus Vespa, which includes the true, or social, wasps, some of which are called yellow jackets.
  • 10) a white person of Anglo-Saxon ancestry who belongs to a Protestant denomination
  • 11) social or solitary hymenopterans typically having a slender body with the abdomen attached by a narrow stalk and having a formidable sting
  • 12) Figuratively, a person characterized by ill nature, petulance, peevishness, irritability, or petty malignity.
  • 13) Any one of several families, many genera, and very numerous species of aculeate hymenopterous insects, whose wings fold lengthwise in a peculiar manner when the insects rest, which insects are hence collectively called Diploptera.

Definitions

  • 1) A flying insect, of the superfamily Apoidea, known for their organised societies, for collecting pollen, and producing wax and honey.
  • 2) obsolete A ring or torque; a bracelet.
  • 3) obsolete A ring or torque; a bracelet.
  • 4) A contest, especially for spelling; see spelling bee.
  • 5) A gathering for a specific purpose, e.g. a sewing bee or a quilting bee.
  • 6) The name of the Latin script letter B/b.
  • 7) A bee block.
  • 8) A social gathering where people combine work, competition, and amusement.
  • 9) The letter b.
  • 10) Any of numerous winged, hairy-bodied, usually stinging hymenopteran insects of the superfamily Apoidea, including both solitary species and social species such as the honeybees, and characterized by sucking and chewing mouthparts for gathering nectar and pollen.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) a bird that eats the honeybee, as the European flycatcher, and the American kingbird.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) An insect of the order Hymenoptera, and family Apidæ (the honeybees), or family Andrenidæ (the solitary bees.) See honeybee.
  • 13) (Zoöl.) the kingbird (Tyrannus Carolinensis) which occasionally feeds on bees.
  • 14) (Zoöl.) a bird that eats the honeybee, as the European flycatcher, and the American kingbird.
  • 15) (Zoöl.) a beetle (Trichodes apiarius) parasitic in beehives.
  • 16) (Zoöl.) a beetle (Trichodes apiarius) parasitic in beehives.
  • 17) (Zoöl.) a moth (Galleria cereana) whose larvæ feed on honeycomb, occasioning great damage in beehives.
  • 18) (Zoöl.) a two winged fly of the family Bombyliidæ. Some species, in the larval state, are parasitic upon bees.
  • 19) (Naut.) Pieces of hard wood bolted to the sides of the bowsprit, to reeve the fore-topmast stays through; -- called also bee blocks.
  • 20) (Zoöl.) An insect of the order Hymenoptera, and family Apidæ (the honeybees), or family Andrenidæ (the solitary bees.) See honeybee.
  • 21) [Obs.] To be full of fancies; to be a little crazy.
  • 22) (Zoöl.) a two winged fly of the family Bombyliidæ. Some species, in the larval state, are parasitic upon bees.
  • 23) United States A neighborly gathering of people who engage in united labor for the benefit of an individual or family.
  • 24) (Zoöl.) the honey buzzard.
  • 25) (Zoöl.) a large two-winged fly of the family Asilidæ (esp. Trupanea apivora) which feeds upon the honeybee. See Robber fly.
  • 26) (Bot.) an orchidaceous plant of the genus Ophrys (Ophrys apifera), whose flowers have some resemblance to bees, flies, and other insects.
  • 27) a soft, unctuous matter, with which bees cement the combs to the hives, and close up the cells; -- called also propolis.
  • 28) (Naut.) Pieces of hard wood bolted to the sides of the bowsprit, to reeve the fore-topmast stays through; -- called also bee blocks.
  • 29) (Bot.) an orchidaceous plant of the genus Ophrys (Ophrys apifera), whose flowers have some resemblance to bees, flies, and other insects.
  • 30) (Zoöl.) a minute, wingless, dipterous insect (Braula cæca) parasitic on hive bees.
  • 31) (Zoöl.) the larva of the bee beetle. See Illust. of Bee beetle.
  • 32) United States A neighborly gathering of people who engage in united labor for the benefit of an individual or family.
  • 33) a garden or inclosure to set beehives in ; an apiary.
  • 34) [Obs.] To be full of fancies; to be a little crazy.
  • 35) (Zoöl.) a minute, wingless, dipterous insect (Braula cæca) parasitic on hive bees.
  • 36) (Zoöl.) a large two-winged fly of the family Asilidæ (esp. Trupanea apivora) which feeds upon the honeybee. See Robber fly.
  • 37) (Zoöl.) a moth (Galleria cereana) whose larvæ feed on honeycomb, occasioning great damage in beehives.
  • 38) (Zoöl.) the kingbird (Tyrannus Carolinensis) which occasionally feeds on bees.
  • 39) (Zoöl.) the honey buzzard.
  • 40) (Zoöl.) the larva of the bee beetle. See Illust. of Bee beetle.
  • 41) a social gathering to carry out some communal task or to hold competitions
  • 42) any of numerous hairy-bodied insects including social and solitary species
  • 43) A ring of metal, usually an ornament for the arm or neck; a collar or brooch; sometimes, a finger-ring.
  • 44) An insect of the genus Apis; a hive-bee or honey-bee. See Apis.
  • 45) To be somewhat crazy.
  • 46) Any aculeate hymenopterous insect of the division Mellifera or Anthophila, comprising the families Apidœ and Andrenidœ, and including, besides the hive-bees of the genus Apis, the mason-bees, carpenter-bees, bumblebees, etc. See cuts under Anthophora, carpenter-bee, and Hymenoptera.
  • 47) [capitalized] In astronomy, the constellation generally called Apis or Musca.
  • 48) An assemblage of persons who meet to engage in united labor for the benefit of an individual or a family, or in some joint amusement: so called from the combined labor of the bees of a hive: as, a quilting-bee, a husking-bee, a spelling-bee, etc.
  • 49) To be restless or uneasy.
  • 50) Nautical, a ring or hoop of metal through which to reeve stays. See bee-block.
  • 51) Archaic spelling of be.
  • 52) obsolete p. p. of be; -- used for been.
  • 53) (a bee in (one's) bonnet) An impulse to do something; a notion.
  • 54) (a bee in (one's) bonnet) An obsession.
  • 55) (a bee in (one's) bonnet) An impulse to do something; a notion.
  • 56) (a bee in (one's) bonnet) An obsession.

Examples

  • 1) It was another bad year for the common wasp, though pesticides may have been more to blame than the weather.
  • 2) Asked if sadness at home had helped him play the sadness on screen, the actor groans awkwardly, like a wasp dying in a quiet room.
  • 3) wasps that live alone are called solitary wasps.
  • 4) Soon figures were buzzing round like angry wasps.
  • 5) Charges for dealing with wasp nests also vary widely.
  • 6) wasps in groups may sting to defend themselves or their nests if in danger.
  • 7) They like to dig out the nests of wasps and bees and eat the inhabitants.
  • 8) Some bees and wasps reuse beetle tunnels as nest sites.
  • 9) And adults can get dramatic reactions to wasp and bee stings.
  • 10) He says it feels like an angry wasp buzzing in his head he can only get out by hitting something.
  • 11) It looked good on the mannequin in the shop but makes me look a bit like a bee or wasp!
  • 12) They often use old wasps' nests to sleep in.
  • 13) wasps really like the smell, said the blurb.
  • 14) They look like small wasps, but are quite harmless.
  • 15) Formerly "he was a very tall man... with a waist like a wasp.
  • 16) They look like wasps and bees, but pay that no mind.
  • 17) A solitary wasp appearing from what looked like an old nail hole in a plank of wood.
  • 18) I have destroyed two wasp nests nearby but to little noticeable effect.
  • 19) A wasp nest resembles a cardboard pot.
  • 20) Divers have compared the sensation to that of a wasp sting, but it is possible that the toxin could inflict serious injury.
  • 21) Successive governments have regarded the snow as I view the wasp nest in my porch.
  • 22) The treatment for a wasp sting is vinegar There's no scientific evidence behind this.
  • 23) Millions of the insects - far more aggressive than the common wasp - are getting drunk on rotting fruit.
  • 24) And wasp stings are neutral, so there's no reason why an acid such as vinegar should help.
  • 25) When these have turned brown in September, tiny gall wasps will come out of them through a hole that they have made.
  • 26) ‘Another hazard that sometimes faced the picker was disturbing a nest of wasps or some other stinging creatures.’
  • 27) ‘Bites from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets and fire ants are typically the most troublesome.’
  • 28) ‘It didn't kill the wasps, the nest was made of paper so it absorbed the shock and just split open.’
  • 29) ‘Among the Caribs, the girls undergo a similar ritual, except that stinging ants rather than wasps are used.’
  • 30) ‘Most stinging wasps and bees are beneficial and should be preserved unless they pose a direct hazard to humans.’
  • 31) ‘Swarms of bees and wasps would also have nested in the forest.’
  • 32) ‘But this is the time of year that a lot of people usually get stung by wasps or bees.’
  • 33) ‘Common wasps are social insects and live in nests of up to around 10,000 workers.’
  • 34) ‘I myself was stung by some wasps and went into mild anaphylactic shock.’
  • 35) ‘It stung like a million wasps, but suddenly, my hand was back to normal.’
  • 36) ‘A nest of wasps gathered in my mother-in-law's garden shed and I bought a spray and killed them all.’
  • 37) ‘When a nasty wasp stung two of us, the shaman congratulated us, saying it would help mitigate the future contraction of arthritis.’
  • 38) ‘I closed my eyes and held my breath when the wasp stung me.’
  • 39) ‘Once, he was bitten by a horrendous dog, and was also stung by a wasp.’
  • 40) ‘I was cleaning up my flowerbeds for fall when a wasp flew up and stung me on the cheek.’
  • 41) ‘I wouldn't mind, as I remind my wife, but I've never in my life been stung by a wasp.’
  • 42) ‘The latest accident is thought to have been triggered when one of the horses was stung by a wasp, causing it to bolt.’
  • 43) ‘In many eusocial wasps, nests are founded by single females that remain alone until offspring emergence.’
  • 44) ‘When a male wasp crashes into the orchid, it gets covered with orchid pollen.’
  • 45) ‘I could see the anxiety on Zack's face when the wasp buzzed past a second time.’
  • 46) ‘In the garden dill attracts beneficial insects, including bees, parasitic wasps and tachinid flies.’
  • 47) ‘There is also a parasitic wasp that attacks them but they are not effective enough to prevent the damage.’
  • 48) ‘Tussock moth larvae that are not killed by parasitic wasps and predators turn into brightly marked caterpillars.’
  • 49) ‘Each spider was supplied with aphids, flies, plant hoppers, and parasitoid wasps.’
  • 50) ‘The apparent advantage for the eggs is that, buried in the debris, they are less likely to be parasitized by wasps.’
  • 51) ‘In the case of many parasitoid wasps, other compounds come from the venom the mother injects with her eggs.’
  • 52) ‘The wasps parasitized these new hosts, killing nineteen of every twenty flies.’
  • 53) ‘These volatiles can attract the natural enemies of these herbivores, for example, parasitoid wasps.’
  • 54) ‘The main causes of egg mortality are predators and a parasitoid wasp.’
  • 55) ‘Certain types of parasitic insects, most commonly flies and wasps, thrive on other insect hosts.’
  • 56) ‘We believe effective fly control will require the utilization of parasitic wasp species native to Nebraska.’
  • 57) ‘Female parasitic wasps lay their eggs on the caterpillars.’
  • 58) ‘Parasitoid wasps have proved to be an extremely useful model system for testing ideas in this area.’
  • 59) ‘Female wasps parasitize fruit flies by inserting their eggs into fruit fly eggs.’
  • 60) ‘Parasitic wasps and fungal diseases prevent weevils from causing economic injury in most years.’
  • 61) ‘Since their introduction, the beneficial wasps have helped control plant bug populations throughout the Northeast.’
  • 62) ‘Nonetheless, it is parasitized by wasps, flies, and nematodes.’
  • 63) ‘On TV the eggs hatch and the tiny wasps eat the spider alive.’
  • 64) ‘A few days later the egg hatches and the wasp larva eats the cicada alive.’

Examples

  • 1) The team followed 91 honey bee colonies which were exposed to up to 93 different pesticides.
  • 2) It just goes to show that busy bees don't always make honey and chasing the news can be bad for investors' money.
  • 3) The moment we walked in together the men were like bees to honey.
  • 4) Will the bees get through my socks?
  • 5) They work in many situations and bees love them.
  • 6) This is not the only contribution bees make to mankind.
  • 7) Or how to ease a bee sting?
  • 8) There was also a bewildering episode when he insisted on keeping bees on the garage roof.
  • 9) Otherwise they may sneer at the bees in our bonnets.
  • 10) Do they also have jumble sales and spelling bees?
  • 11) And keeping just one hive of bees is a step along the way.
  • 12) She then calls on the bee to bring honey and restore him.
  • 13) But her saucy buzzing hints only led to me getting a bee costume.
  • 14) The result was no apples for us and many bees have starved.
  • 15) How this time the butterfly has to stop floating so the bee can sting.
  • 16) It used to be accepted that anyone can keep bees on their own land.
  • 17) My dad has a bee in his bonnet about buying a place abroad.
  • 18) Leave the large helpings of honey for the bees!
  • 19) She is a very busy bee.
  • 20) Make a solitary bee box, and grow roses and wisteria.
  • 21) What a pair of busy bees they've been.
  • 22) This is more than a bee in one man's bonnet.
  • 23) They wait until a solitary bee visits and then grab hold and hitch a ride to the bee's nest.
  • 24) If bees and insects have to crawl into tiny spaces to reach the pollen, chances are it will suit your garden.
  • 25) Trying to help the beleaguered bee and insect population after last summer's washout we left a section of our grass to grow long this year.
  • 26) _There is nothing I wouldn't do for a bee -- a reasonable bee_
  • 27) We'll have a bee, and get a lot done, 'Maude said; and she pressed into the _bee_ her father and Dick, and Billy, and Fred
  • 28) She has planted what she calls a "bee buffet" in her London garden, including lavender, rosemary, thyme and hawthorne, and plans to start keeping bees there soon.
  • 29) Mr. Changizi illustrates his message with charts and graphs and even a readout that shows how the sound measurements for a book striking a table directly or hitting a "wrinkly paper" on a table resemble the measurements for the sound of the author saying the word "bee" and the word "pee."
  • 30) Where metheglin was making he would linger round the tubs and vessels, begging a draught of what he called bee-wine.
  • 31) She looks too nice a girl to have been stung by the title bee, that's all. "
  • 32) The BUZZ adult spelling bee is Oct. 30 – Journal Times
  • 33) Each bee is an intricate model, but scaled down it would be easy to lose a lot of the detail.
  • 34) Smithsonian entomologist David Roubik points out that the stingless bee, rather than non-native species, has been essential to the pollination of tropical forest plants, and when the bee is in peril, so is the local ecology.
  • 35) Just a tip .. the resume tip may work nicely in a magical computerland, where every little worker bee from the boss to the secretary has extensive skills in the arcane and complicated art of clicking a link in an email.
  • 36) ‘Even accounting for native bee pollinators, honeybees still do most of the pollinating of fruits and vegetables in your garden.’
  • 37) ‘As with any type of wasp, bee, or yellow jacket, please exercise care to avoid getting stung!’
  • 38) ‘Of all the types of bees, honeybees have several advantages as pollinators.’
  • 39) ‘A large, shiny-headed bee hovered over a tangled rose bush and then floated off into the air, the extinguished sound leaving an even deeper silence.’
  • 40) ‘As this type of bee is very important for flower pollination, I think my botanically-inclined readers will enjoy learning more.’
  • 41) ‘The foe not being the bee - the honeybee has never let us down.’
  • 42) ‘They are reactive to honey bees and hence all the foods bees pollinate;’
  • 43) ‘It's an example of self-organizing cooperative behavior, and it's found among ants, bees, and other social insects.’
  • 44) ‘So that touching and feeling is a shared characteristic between honey bees and stingless bees.’
  • 45) ‘There are over 30,000 species of bees and in most of them the bees live solitary lives.’
  • 46) ‘For example, ants, termites, many bees, and some wasps are social insects that form organized communities.’
  • 47) ‘Perhaps the reason is that social bees, which are largely opportunistic, dominate pollinator faunas in northern regions.’
  • 48) ‘In fact I had noticed a solitary bee dancing in the air at the front of the house on quite a few occasions this season.’
  • 49) ‘The best kind of bees is the bumble bee, which are bred for their speed and noise.’
  • 50) ‘Most Australian bees are solitary, but some live collectively, in hives and produce honey.’
  • 51) ‘Wasps and bees can be classified as solitary or social depending on whether they live alone or in colonies.’
  • 52) ‘Stinging insects in the U.S. are bees, yellow jackets, hornets, wasps, and fire ants.’
  • 53) ‘They also kill pollinating insects such as bees and butterflies.’
  • 54) ‘These trees provided food to bats, and many herbivorous mammals, insects, butterflies and bees.’
  • 55) ‘Perhaps it was their ability to be pollinated by bees and other insects, or perhaps the way animals that ate their fruit could disperse seeds in their droppings.’
  • 56) ‘The fly actually has a rather complex little ‘brain,’ as do bees, ants, and other higher insects.’
  • 57) ‘Fennel, dandelions, and chicory are three with beautiful flowers that attract bees and beneficial insects.’
  • 58) ‘Mr. John Donoghue, president of the beekeepers association, gave a slide show of trees and flowers that are good for bees and insects.’
  • 59) ‘Insects such as bees facilitate pollination as they buzz from plant to plant while feeding on nectar or collecting pollen.’
  • 60) ‘He believed in bees; everything the bee did was perfect, from the way it flew and gathered food, to the way it conducted its social habits.’
  • 61) ‘A bee flying home typically pauses at the entrance while a guard bee checks her chemical credentials as a nest mate.’
  • 62) ‘While we waited, the boy who helps there put a box of sugary pastries outside because dozens of gathering bees had filled the shack.’
  • 63) ‘There will be an emergency quilting bee to make them a wedding quilt tomorrow at the Torger's house, but only certain families are being asked to come.’
  • 64) ‘The old-time quilting bee is well remembered, although most quilts were actually solo products.’
  • 65) ‘I've been so busy being investigated, preparing for this lynch bee starting tomorrow that I hadn't had an opportunity to…’
  • 66) ‘Many are now familiar with the One Book, One City program, a sort of mass reading bee, designed to promote civic and literary conversation around a single book read in the same week.’
  • 67) ‘Many woman still desire the type of social interaction that quilting bees offered.’
  • 68) ‘Classes and crops are serving the same social function that quilting bees once did.’
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