steel vs steal

steel steal

Definitions

  • 1) Steel gray.
  • 2) Something, such as a sword, that is made of steel.
  • 3) A quality suggestive of this alloy, especially a hard, unflinching character.
  • 4) A generally hard, strong, durable, malleable alloy of iron and carbon, usually containing between 0.2 and 1.5 percent carbon, often with other constituents such as manganese, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, copper, tungsten, cobalt, or silicon, depending on the desired alloy properties, and widely used as a structural material.
  • 5) (Metal.) a variety of steel produced from cast iron by the puddling process.
  • 6) An instrument of steel (usually a round rod) for sharpening knives.
  • 7) (Zoöl.), [Prov. Eng.] the goosander, or merganser.
  • 8) (Metal.) a fine variety of steel, originally made by smelting blister or cementation steel; hence, ordinarily, steel of any process of production when remelted and cast.
  • 9) (Metal.) a hard, tenacious variety containing a little chromium, and somewhat resembling tungsten steel.
  • 10) (Metal.) a kind of steel having a lower proportion of carbon than ordinary steel, rendering it softer and more malleable.
  • 11) A weapon, as a sword, dagger, etc.
  • 12) a trap for catching wild animals. It consists of two iron jaws, which close by means of a powerful steel spring when the animal disturbs the catch, or tongue, by which they are kept open.
  • 13) (Metal) A variety of iron intermediate in composition and properties between wrought iron and cast iron (containing between one half of one per cent and one and a half per cent of carbon), and consisting of an alloy of iron with an iron carbide. Steel, unlike wrought iron, can be tempered, and retains magnetism. Its malleability decreases, and fusibility increases, with an increase in carbon.
  • 14) (Firearms) A mill where steel is manufactured.
  • 15) (Metal.) See in the Vocabulary.
  • 16) Fig.: Anything of extreme hardness; that which is characterized by sternness or rigor.
  • 17) An instrument or implement made of steel.
  • 18) (Med.) A chalybeate medicine.
  • 19) A piece of steel for striking sparks from flint.
  • 20) (Metal.) See under Blister.
  • 21) of carbon.
  • 22) Steel made from the ore by a direct process.
  • 23) An obsolete form of steal, stale.
  • 24) A cylindrical or slightly tapering rod of steel, sometimes having fine parallel longitudinal lines, used for sharpening carving-knives, etc.
  • 25) of manganese. The parts subjected to extension do not contain more than
  • 26) Such steel rolled in the shapes adapted for these uses, such as angles, tees, channels, I-beams, T-beams, Z-bars, and deck-beams.
  • 27) A modified form of iron, not occurring in nature, but known and manufactured from very early times, and at the present time of the highest importance in its various applications to the wants of man.
  • 28) A single span of the Forth Bridge is nearly as long as two Eiffel Towers turned horizontally and tied together in the middle, and the whole forms a complicated steel structure weighing 15,000 tons, erected without the possibility of any intermediate support, the lace-like fabric of the bridge soaring as high as the top of St. Paul's. The steel of which the compression members of the structure are composed contains
  • 29) A mirror.
  • 30) of carbon and
  • 31) Something made of steel.
  • 32) A piece of steel for striking sparks from flint to ignite tinder or match.
  • 33) A strip of steel used to stiffen a corset, or to expand a woman's skirt.
  • 34) Very firm or strong.
  • 35) Of a steel gray.
  • 36) Made with, relating to, or consisting of steel.
  • 37) Toiron(clothes).
  • 38) To make hard, strong, or obdurate; strengthen.
  • 39) To cover, plate, edge, or point with steel.
  • 40) To make hard or strong; hence, to make insensible or obdurate.
  • 41) To overlay, point, or edge with steel
  • 42) To cause to resemble steel, as in smoothness, polish, or other qualities.
  • 43) (Elec.) To cover, as an electrotype plate, with a thin layer of iron by electrolysis. The iron thus deposited is very hard, like steel.

Definitions

  • 1) The act of stealing.
  • 2) The act of stealing.
  • 3) Baseball A stolen base.
  • 4) Slang A bargain.
  • 5) Basketball An act of gaining possession of the ball from an opponent.
  • 6) Archaic or Prov. Eng. A handle; a stale, or stele.
  • 7) An act or a case of: theft: as, an official steal; specifically, in baseball. a stolen or furtive run from one base to another: as, a steal to third base. See steal, transitive verb, 9.
  • 8) In golf, a long putt which wins a hole.
  • 9) Same as stale.
  • 10) transitive To draw attention unexpectedly in (an entertainment), especially by being the outstanding performer. Usually used in the phrase steal the show.
  • 11) sports, transitive To dispossess
  • 12) transitive To get or effect surreptitiously or artfully.
  • 13) transitive, baseball To advance safely to (another base) during the delivery of a pitch, without the aid of a hit, walk, passed ball, wild pitch, or defensive indifference.
  • 14) transitive, colloquial To acquire at a low price.
  • 15) transitive To copy copyright-protected work without permission.
  • 16) intransitive To move silently or secretly.
  • 17) transitive To illegally, or without the owner's permission, take possession of something by surreptitiously taking or carrying it away.
  • 18) To present or use (someone else's words or ideas) as one's own.
  • 19) Baseball To advance safely to (another base) during the delivery of a pitch, without the aid of a base hit, walk, passed ball, or wild pitch.
  • 20) To draw attention unexpectedly in (an entertainment), especially by being the outstanding performer.
  • 21) To steal another's property.
  • 22) To get or take secretly or artfully.
  • 23) To give or enjoy (a kiss) that is unexpected or unnoticed.
  • 24) Baseball To steal a base.
  • 25) To move, happen, or elapse stealthily or unobtrusively.
  • 26) To take (the property of another) without right or permission.
  • 27) To practice, or be guilty of, theft; to commit larceny or theft.
  • 28) To withdraw, or pass privily; to slip in, along, or away, unperceived; to go or come furtively.
  • 29) To get into one's power gradually and by imperceptible degrees; to take possession of by a gradual and imperceptible appropriation; -- with away.
  • 30) to march in a covert way; to gain an advantage unobserved; -- formerly followed by of, but now by on or upon, and sometimes by over; as, to steal a march upon one's political rivals.
  • 31) To accomplish in a concealed or unobserved manner; to try to carry out secretly.
  • 32) To withdraw or convey clandestinely (reflexive); hence, to creep furtively, or to insinuate.
  • 33) To gain by insinuating arts or covert means.
  • 34) To take, and carry away, feloniously; to take without right or leave, and with intent to keep wrongfully.
  • 35) (steal (someone's) thunder) To use, appropriate, or preempt the use of another's idea, especially to one's own advantage and without consent by the originator.

Examples

  • 1) He stepped over to it and grasped the steel handle.
  • 2) These meals are prepared in stainless steel or glass containers.
  • 3) The hut has a steel frame and shutters that open outwards and upwards to provide shade.
  • 4) This pleasing effect softens the hard steel lines and shields the precipitous drop to the road below.
  • 5) The deals made him a leading force in the iron and steel industry.
  • 6) Off we went through shabby lanes of light industrial shops in cold concrete with steel shutters.
  • 7) She nods at the stainless steel bin by the coffee counter.
  • 8) The opportunity for our generation to have something more than a steel mill job means something.
  • 9) There are so many towns where we used to make cars or steel.
  • 10) The drive and lawns are framed with steel edging.
  • 11) It blamed the slump in the steel industry.
  • 12) In captivity they run into a wall of concrete and steel.
  • 13) It is not only British steel plants that have thrown in the towel.
  • 14) At least another 7,000 jobs were dependent on the steel plant.
  • 15) Step through the glass doors and modern design abounds: wood and stone blend with glass and steel.
  • 16) The group also said that it was prepared to cut production by up to 15 per cent to maintain steel prices.
  • 17) Association is understood to be seeking a cap of 10 per cent on crude steel output growth this year to stabilise prices.
  • 18) It also recycles metal and supplies steel mills in China and India.
  • 19) The "northern iron" of (Jeremiah 15: 12) is believed more nearly to correspond to what we call steel
  • 20) It is also not impossible that artists may have already invented what we call steel pens.
  • 21) "Paul Watson has said before that he's willing to give any Japanese vessel what he calls a steel enema by ramming his ship into the stern of any Japanese vessel," Mr Inwood said.
  • 22) He could not say that imperial overstretch in Iraq inflicted lasting damage on our soldiers and our military infrastructure -- what he called the steel in our ship of state -- and that our standing has been diminished in the eyes of the world.
  • 23) The entrance of this house is decorated by a piece of art in steel which is called “Family”.
  • 24) Then again you probably think that production of steel is a clean business.
  • 25) Eighty thousand people worked in steel in the 1940s; by 1987, 4,000 remained.
  • 26) When the rich get too rich and steel from the lower classes.
  • 27) It was still necessary to encase the top of the tunnel in steel pipes and test the escape capsule, but Sougarret was no longer nervous.
  • 28) ‘This shining metal was not raw iron but hard steel, which bent the softer wrought-iron blades of the Gauls.’
  • 29) ‘Adding carbon to iron to make steel does make it stronger and tougher, up to a point.’
  • 30) ‘Carbon steel is an alloy of iron with small amounts of Mn, S, P, and Si. Alloy steels are carbon steels with other additives such as nickel, chromium, vanadium, etc.’
  • 31) ‘Alloy steel, copper, lead, zinc and base metals are basic raw materials used in a variety of industries.’
  • 32) ‘Its blade was strong steel, the handle gold with a jewel set on each side of the handle.’
  • 33) ‘Iron alloyed with carbon is steel and this steel can be alloyed with a variety of ferro alloys to modify its properties.’
  • 34) ‘Their cycles have been rejected by many countries in the west as they are not made of steel but an alloy which is not very strong.’
  • 35) ‘It was a hulking grey structure of steel, with some massive boilers at one end.’
  • 36) ‘However, the full effect of nitriding will not be realized unless alloy steel is selected.’
  • 37) ‘As is the case with steel, titanium is alloyed with other metals to increase its strength.’
  • 38) ‘Iron and steel are highest, copper and aluminum are lowest, brass and the like are in the middle.’
  • 39) ‘The main weakness of steel, as a structural material, is its tendency to corrode.’
  • 40) ‘As I stood there, I reached out and took my father's hand, and stared at all the boxes of steel, iron and brass.’
  • 41) ‘The primary use of zinc is in galvanizing other metals, especially iron and steel.’
  • 42) ‘A magnet is the device that attracts certain types of metals, like iron or steel.’
  • 43) ‘Because they were made of iron rather than blue steel, they quickly rusted out.’
  • 44) ‘The roof had a sandwich panel structure, with two layers of steel surrounding a polystyrene-type material.’
  • 45) ‘It is drawn in much the same way as the brass we know, but the idea that steel is hard often interpreted to mean bad.’
  • 46) ‘He went on to remind me that China consumes more steel, copper and iron ore than any other country in the world.’
  • 47) ‘They will be used in interpreting the mechanical behavior of the ferritic steels used as structural materials in existing nuclear fission plants, as well as those proposed for future fusion plants.’
  • 48) ‘The big Castlewellan player showed nerves of steel to hammer the ball through the uprights and square the match.’
  • 49) ‘It's all very well playing great football but you also need a bit of strength and steel about you to make sure you don't concede goals like that.’
  • 50) ‘Tristan grabbed me right back from him and anchored me to his side with the strength of steel.’
  • 51) ‘It is this determination that keeps the daredevil mountaineers with nerves of steel on the go.’
  • 52) ‘Except this time, the competition does not involve steely shots on the fairways, but nerves of steel on the property market.’
  • 53) ‘Requiring nerves of steel, speed sky diving involves plummeting from a plane at more than 300 mph.’
  • 54) ‘They were right, it was dangerous, don't be tempted unless you have a head for heights, nerves of steel or no common sense at all.’
  • 55) ‘It takes nerves of steel to bite your tongue and say nothing because we'd rather be paid than end up having an argument for nothing.’
  • 56) ‘What takes nerves of steel is becoming a politician with a message these days.’
  • 57) ‘Candidates need nerves of steel - and that's just to get through the selection procedure.’
  • 58) ‘You need nerves of steel and a large dose of blind faith to pull off a party in a disused, underground tube station.’
  • 59) ‘It takes guts and nerves of steel to do it, because millions can be made or lost in seconds.’
  • 60) ‘Taking the most damaging pictures requires precision timing and nerves of steel.’
  • 61) ‘Daredevils with nerves of steel are being sought for the ultimate charity challenge.’
  • 62) ‘Ian Holmes showed nerves of steel as he comfortably tucked away the penalty kick.’
  • 63) ‘Golf requires nerves of steel, great skill but not a hell of a lot of fitness.’
  • 64) ‘There are British athletes with nerves of steel who can get up there and deliver.’
  • 65) ‘It is just not true that you need nerves of steel to invest in this economic climate.’
  • 66) ‘What has particularly impressed Pauw, who won 87 caps for Holland, is the steel and resolve of her side.’
  • 67) ‘I suppose at half time it looked very poor for us and the only thing we could do was get a bit of the courage and the steel in the previous games but it wasn't to be.’
  • 68) ‘It's all because I'm mentally steeling myself in preparation for next Monday.’
  • 69) ‘Stiffening, his hand gravitating to his sword hilt, Ikeda steeled himself, preparing for any situation.’
  • 70) ‘When that was confirmed I realised I had actually been steeling myself in preparation.’
  • 71) ‘This Sunday would have been her 22nd birthday, and the family are steeling themselves what they know will be a very difficult day.’
  • 72) ‘The mauve glow of the sky outside tugged at Danielle's heart even as she steeled herself.’
  • 73) ‘Even though she had steeled herself before coming, she wasn't prepared for what she saw.’
  • 74) ‘Though he had steeled himself for this moment, Charlton was not prepared for what he saw.’
  • 75) ‘Nursery school supporters in Middleton are steeling themselves for the next round in their fight to keep Sunny Brow open as a ‘stand-alone’ pre-school facility.’
  • 76) ‘We desperately want to see him home again, but we are steeling ourselves for the worst.’
  • 77) ‘Ministers are steeling themselves for a tough battle over the Government's plans for identity cards as the legislation providing for a national scheme heads towards a vital Commons vote.’
  • 78) ‘Wilkie is steeling himself, though, for the prospect of being left out of the closing games of the season by Duffy as the manager tries out the central-defensive pairing he could employ in the final.’
  • 79) ‘I still remember steeling myself to down the glass of the vile red stuff like a sailor knocks back a jigger of rot gut and then shakes all over at the horror of the liquid landing on his stomach.’
  • 80) ‘It will be Dyson's third appearance in the Open and he feels he will be far better equipped to cope with the pressure after steeling himself to tournament play over the past four years.’
  • 81) ‘Another glass of wine was downed as I steeled myself to approach a group of rather important-looking men and women.’
  • 82) ‘I was doing well that day, having gotten up early and steeled myself to give the eulogy.’
  • 83) ‘Some nations have steeled themselves and forbidden parents from hitting their children.’
  • 84) ‘He wheeled round to face me and I steeled myself for a confrontation.’
  • 85) ‘Ready for the off he travelled downstream and steeled himself as he approached the edge of the drop.’
  • 86) ‘I thought it was a protest over something or other and steeled myself for a list of complaints.’
  • 87) ‘The Allied high command anticipated that a successful landing would cost 10,000 dead and perhaps 30,000 wounded, but were steeling themselves for much heavier casualties.’

Examples

  • 1) There are whoops of joy when defendants accused of receiving stolen goods are freed from prison.
  • 2) He was arrested for allegedly handling stolen goods.
  • 3) The show was nearly stolen from the two captains by a former one.
  • 4) They may say the car is a steal but expect to knock them down further.
  • 5) Then they drove victims to banks to get cash or stole from their homes.
  • 6) Plants are the most stolen items followed by garden gadgets and furniture.
  • 7) What is wrong with stealing the secrets of the successful?
  • 8) They say he made up the allegation after stealing money from them.
  • 9) Now he is hoping to steal a march on his rivals for the team.
  • 10) He was acquitted of handling stolen goods.
  • 11) It was as if he were trying to steal the show in each case.
  • 12) She arrives just as a stolen car leads to a footballer suspected of playing away.
  • 13) Neither the thief nor the stolen items have been found.
  • 14) He also wants more protection from rival companies which try to steal his secrets.
  • 15) The man claimed he stole money to pay for his addiction to cocaine.
  • 16) But on his very first day a thief steals the bicycle essential for the job.
  • 17) Companies are trying to steal a march on their rivals by making it easier to use their services.
  • 18) The robbers allegedly stole 2,500 in cash from him.
  • 19) To stop them fighting for good, she takes the stolen cash and sets fire to it!
  • 20) He admitted handling stolen goods and was jailed for 20 months.
  • 21) They allegedly stole a set of keys and lived in the detached three-bed home for almost a month.
  • 22) ‘In instances where property is stolen, thieves can and will be traced, and dealt with accordingly.’
  • 23) ‘A 72-year-old grandfather has been convicted after police investigating a ram-raid gang found stolen property at his home.’
  • 24) ‘Documents, purses and property were stolen in a spate of attacks.’
  • 25) ‘Also charged with burglary and handling stolen property, Irvine was refused bail because of an irregularity in his visa.’
  • 26) ‘He said police would like to hear from anyone with information about burglaries or stolen property.’
  • 27) ‘Police have warned householders not to leave easy pickings for burglars following a spate of crimes where property was stolen after windows and doors were left unlocked.’
  • 28) ‘Any sensible legal system has to rely in part on sanctions brought to bear after people have stolen property or looted corporations.’
  • 29) ‘The newspaper was trying to stir up a row about the morality of allowing criminals to ransom stolen property.’
  • 30) ‘The numbers are then held on a database which is only accessible to the police, so that stolen property can be identified and returned to its owner.’
  • 31) ‘He was found guilty of the charge of receiving stolen property and received a 30-day jail sentence, which was suspended.’
  • 32) ‘If you rent, buy renter's insurance, which pays for damaged, destroyed or stolen personal property.’
  • 33) ‘All three were charged with stealing personal property in broad daylight and causing a nuisance to society.’
  • 34) ‘Music companies are the first to wage a wide-scale attack against people who steal digital property over the Net.’
  • 35) ‘On the night of 6-7 February 1988 the flat was burgled and a considerable amount of property was stolen.’
  • 36) ‘An officer arrived the next day just as the builders discovered the thieves had returned and stolen some of the new tiles.’
  • 37) ‘Those who are fans of gangster movies will know that the practice of selling stolen property is known as fencing.’
  • 38) ‘Where property is stolen, no beneficial interest passes to the thief.’
  • 39) ‘The villain who was stealing the property was let off by the police.’
  • 40) ‘Each is charged with seven felony counts of selling stolen property.’
  • 41) ‘Now, there's nothing wrong with recycling an idea from an artist you admire, so long as you're not simply stealing that idea and passing it off as your own.’
  • 42) ‘Not only that, they are more likely to take bribes, sleep their way to the top, steal the ideas of a colleague and pass them off as their own or to resort to character assassination.’
  • 43) ‘‘We're not giving the details out at present because if we did that, others would steal the ideas before we launched,’ said Spowart.’
  • 44) ‘One of the advantages of being a manager with responsibility for appointing staff is that you get to see lots of other people's CVs and can steal good ideas for presentation and phraseology.’
  • 45) ‘A judge at the High Court in London rejected allegations by two historians that Brown had stolen ideas from their book The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail.’
  • 46) ‘The idea is stolen wholesale from the United States, where civic engagement is a part of everyday life and local democracy a thriving concept.’
  • 47) ‘But since you won't see that until midseason, Fox went ahead and stole the idea.’
  • 48) ‘So, instead, like all good creative types, I stole an idea.’
  • 49) ‘Research institutions that would normally be loath to patent are doing so defensively in order to prevent the corpocrats stealing their ideas.’
  • 50) ‘You definitely want to prevent anybody from stealing your brilliant idea.’
  • 51) ‘Headteachers are renowned for stealing good ideas from other schools and I am all for that.’
  • 52) ‘Their greatest fear: someone else might steal their idea.’
  • 53) ‘I hope Peter Levinson doesn't mind too much if I steal his idea, but I just came across this quote, and it's too good to pass up.’
  • 54) ‘I'm not saying what it's about because I don't want anyone to steal the idea.’
  • 55) ‘I wonder how long it will take for the government to steal the idea and start pushing it?’
  • 56) ‘I can't tell you too many details, cos someone out there might steal my ideas before I have time to finish my recipe book!’
  • 57) ‘So in the time-honoured tradition of capitalism, I'm going to steal their idea and offer my own solutions, at a cut rate of course.’
  • 58) ‘Christofi refused to name the exact bacteria for fear rival microbiologists might steal the idea, which the university patented late last month.’
  • 59) ‘Other manufacturers steal the idea and Stevenson loses a three-year court battle to have his patent honoured.’
  • 60) ‘If we let other countries steal those ideas from us and then make them at a fraction of the cost, you know, that is undercutting our industry.’
  • 61) ‘Ben and Liz have been eyeing each other up for a while and during the afternoon they share a few sweet stolen kisses while Kristy dozes in the shade.’
  • 62) ‘Brian took advantage of the opportunity to steal a quick kiss, only making her cheeks tun a brighter red.’
  • 63) ‘As a matter of fact, the husband-to-be is even allowed to steal a kiss as he presents his wife-to-be with a bouquet of roses.’
  • 64) ‘So as I walked through the tunnel beneath the platforms I saw Mary and Howard stealing their kiss and standing on the platform I remembered the moment the express train flew through.’
  • 65) ‘A Skipton man was fined by magistrates for assaulting a policewoman on the from Leeds train - by trying to steal a kiss.’
  • 66) ‘Now her boyfriend Adam Brown, 21, is keeping a close watch on possible rivals to make sure they don't try and steal a kiss from his girl.’
  • 67) ‘She goes to a local dance, where she's swept off her feet by a handsome and worldly pilot who steals a kiss as they walk outside.’
  • 68) ‘In one of the rare moments of calmness, Joe sang Unchained Melody and some of the lucky ladies in the front row stole a kiss from Ireland's most eligible bachelor.’
  • 69) ‘He would have stolen a kiss on her cheek, but she pulled away gently to smile at him.’
  • 70) ‘Before Sasha could do anything, Dylan stole another kiss.’
  • 71) ‘Adam wrapped his arms around her waist and then gently stole a kiss.’
  • 72) ‘Before entering the classroom, Darien stole a kiss, which Josie didn't refuse.’
  • 73) ‘After they tackled the door and left, not a moment after, did the door reopen and Spencer stole another kiss.’
  • 74) ‘He was sure she was too overcome with emotion to answer, and while she sat in stunned silence, he stole a chaste kiss.’
  • 75) ‘The young woman, whose first name was Elizabeth, blushed and stole a quick kiss.’
  • 76) ‘He didn't give me a chance to answer before he pressed his lips against mine and stole a quick kiss.’
  • 77) ‘After a few days, the curious glances and whispers subsided when students saw Mark and Joy holding hands or stealing a brief kiss in the hallways.’
  • 78) ‘She's a real tease, taunting him to steal a kiss or cop a feel.’
  • 79) ‘The puppy love story in the film - Chava falls in love with a girl more or less his age and they steal kisses once or twice - is too pat and conventional.’
  • 80) ‘It all happened too quickly, the way he stole that tender first kiss.’
  • 81) ‘In the Triangular series being played in Australia Pakistan stole a run in the last ball of the match before the ball got to the keeper, to beat India by one run and thereby hangs a tale.’
  • 82) ‘United's Chris Smith spotted a half-chance and raced in to steal possession and prod the ball home.’
  • 83) ‘They won their final five games, and since the rest of the conference went to sleep, they stole home-field advantage for the play-offs.’
  • 84) ‘Lauer added a deserved third eight minutes into the third period after Scott Allison had stolen possession and danced clear of Storm's bewildered defencemen.’
  • 85) ‘Much of Keighley's good work was, however, wasted by careless play in the rucks which led to stolen possession by the eager Wheatley Hills forwards.’
  • 86) ‘When his teammates stole the ball, he was ready to cherry-pick the play at half court and go in for the uncontested dunk.’
  • 87) ‘Scarborough failed to find their jumper in the line-out and Yarnbury stole possession.’
  • 88) ‘Henin-Hardenne gets right round the net post to steal advantage again and sweeps the ball past the Russian on the next point to break.’
  • 89) ‘Players can, however, steal the ball out of the hands of their opponents as long as they do not make contact with the player himself.’
  • 90) ‘As in the first period Newbury started vigorously but it was Kern Yates who added to the score with a try after Sedgley stole the ball in a maul.’
  • 91) ‘However, his colleagues failed him moments later, and to their cost, as the visitors stole an advantage.’
  • 92) ‘The object of this drill is to pass the ball to each other without the defensive man touching, deflecting, or stealing the ball.’
  • 93) ‘The first thing is that your kids need to understand that stealing the ball and or taking it from the defender is not the prime objective.’
  • 94) ‘It wasn't long before the Cougars were over, Colin Pickles brilliantly stealing the ball in a one-on-one tackle and racing in at the corner.’
  • 95) ‘In a game, if the dribbler turns his back to the basket and his defender, the next closest defender should leave his man and go steal the ball.’
  • 96) ‘The line-out was stolen and the ball whipped out to Smith.’
  • 97) ‘Every time he stole the ball, he would make a hurried turnover.’
  • 98) ‘The last line of defence, Magnus Hedman, rushes out, gets down early and steals the ball of the Bayern striker's toe.’
  • 99) ‘Back on court playing marking, Deenside managed a quick steal.’
  • 100) ‘Scotland gave away a single steal in the sixth and then a further three in the seventh when Martin's last draw shot was too light and wrecked on front stones.’
  • 101) ‘He tried to steal third base in the fifth inning, only to discover it was already occupied by a teammate.’
  • 102) ‘The number of bases that are stolen against a pitcher will be proportional to the number of pitches that it takes him to dispose of a batter.’
  • 103) ‘He is a complete player that has enough speed to steal bases and cover right field for the Philadelphia Phillies.’
  • 104) ‘Payton then attempted to steal second base and the shortstop was caught off guard.’
  • 105) ‘In the ninth inning of a tie game, he was thrown out trying to steal third base with one out when he already was in scoring position.’
  • 106) ‘He stole quietly into Mass at St Aidan's in Enniscorthy, and did not concelebrate the Easter homily at 12.30 yesterday on Roe Street in Wexford town.’
  • 107) ‘I'd stolen quietly toward her door deciding almost in mirthful amusement that she might indeed be napping.’
  • 108) ‘Quietly, she stole out of bed and made her way to the door.’
  • 109) ‘I stole quietly to my Grandma's bedroom and flipped the lamp on, simultaneously grabbing the phone.’
  • 110) ‘My question still had not been answered, however; who could the shadowy figure stealing quietly through the forest have been?’
  • 111) ‘Within moments, the two friends were on their mounts and stealing quietly away into the night.’
  • 112) ‘Did he quietly steal away, never letting the beast know he was there?’
  • 113) ‘She stole quietly from her bed in the small room in the small apartment.’
  • 114) ‘He had been stealing furtive looks in her direction for the whole time his conversation with the other girls was taking place.’
  • 115) ‘She stole a quick look at her wardrobe and picked a long flowing skirt that ended a little below her ankles, she wore an off-shoulder and she wore her hair in a French braid.’
  • 116) ‘As I neared Trey's Porsche, I stole a quick look over my shoulder.’
  • 117) ‘Calla stole a quick look behind her and saw that there was nothing there.’
  • 118) ‘He stole a quick look at Julie who only smiled and shook her head.’
  • 119) ‘Words on the blue T-shirt worn by a young woman in our coach, I swear I stole looks at it only to get these words down correctly.’
  • 120) ‘A grandmother trots past flat-footed, the baby jogging on her back stealing the look of me.’
  • 121) ‘Wished you had something new and unique to wear that will steal a look from those around, when you go to a party?’
  • 122) ‘I stole a look at one of the hijackers, who could only have been about 17, with acne scars on his jaw and neck.’
  • 123) ‘She stole a look in Nathan's direction and met his eye, slightly tipping her head in James's direction.’
  • 124) ‘He finished with my skates and I continued to steal looks at him as he tied my cousin's skates.’
  • 125) ‘Maya stole a look at her mother's and Jenny's face.’
  • 126) ‘She stole a look at Eric, but he was expressionless.’
  • 127) ‘It was only later, by stealing a look into her medical chart that I found out her new diagnosis: lymphoma.’
  • 128) ‘Those lucky enough to steal a glimpse while the church was closed for renovations had reported that his frescoes were truly magnificent.’
  • 129) ‘Helicopters, carrying photographers determined to steal a glimpse of the occupants, hovered low overhead.’
  • 130) ‘I can only assume that Harry has somehow managed to make his way to David Hockney's studio and steal a glimpse of The Massacre and the Problems of Depiction.’
  • 131) ‘While the servants were cleaning up, I noticed that Itrenore was stealing some looks toward me.’
  • 132) ‘I opened the passenger door and stole a glimpse from behind.’
  • 133) ‘I stole a glimpse of her face from the corner of my right eye.’
  • 134) ‘Only seven left, and at just £10 a pop, an absolute steal.’
  • 135) ‘I know it's a lot, but for an established information brokerage with underworld contacts and everything it's an absolute steal.’
  • 136) ‘At the price of $34.00, this rare item is an absolute steal.’
  • 137) ‘She scrounged together the money, but then saw the most gorgeous pair of boots on sale - a steal at $400.’
  • 138) ‘On that basis, at just a tenner, the XFX corded pad is an absolute steal, representing a comfortable and technically excellent product at a top-notch price.’
  • 139) ‘The ticket price includes a glass of wine - a steal at $8.’
  • 140) ‘We started with a pound of fresh mussels - a steal at $4.95.’
  • 141) ‘IT wasn't exactly a steal for the buyers but the auction of Martin Cahill's former home didn't represent daylight robbery by the sellers either.’
  • 142) ‘Moreover, a £5,000 wage for ‘part-time’ York councillors is a steal, given the demands on their time.’
  • 143) ‘It all gets going at 10 p.m., and at $45, including an Elevation promo CD, this is a steal.’
  • 144) ‘The tax is only $8 and that's a steal for the show you'll get.’
  • 145) ‘Admittedly, I have not yet tasted one with the multi-layered complexity of the great Burgundies, but even so a drinkable Pinot Noir for under a tenner is a real steal.’
  • 146) ‘You normally get a free one-year no quibble guarantee from the manufacturer of electrical goods anyway, so a one-year free warranty might not be quite such a steal.’
  • 147) ‘Mention the starting price of 22,000 and this starts to sound like the steal of the century - but there's a but.’
  • 148) ‘There is always a table d'hôte and, at $6.95 for lunch, it's a steal.’
  • 149) ‘On a cosy little cul-de-sac off O'Malley Park, it's got to be a steal!’
  • 150) ‘Served with lettuce dripped with delicious balsamic vinegar and a few kalamata olives, it was a steal for $3.50.’
  • 151) ‘It is not only a steal for those interested in setting up homes with aesthetic designs but also an opportunity for the upcoming artists to reach out to the masses.’
  • 152) ‘On the Friday night, we ate a superb meal: the champagne five-course dinner - a steal at £25 a head.’
  • 153) ‘With the government picking up the pension liabilities, it would be a steal.’
  • 154) ‘And the art of the steal - gun-toting thieves make off with a masterpiece while shocked museum - goers watched.’
  • 155) ‘We also rang New Idea to see if they were spitting chips over the steal, but they didn't get back to us.’
  • 156) ‘His steal of third base in the fourth and deciding game of the ALDS didn't get as much pub as I thought was warranted.’
  • 157) ‘Novikoff, called the Mad Russian, one day made a great steal of third base.’
  • 158) ‘Four singles, two of them in the infield, a steal, a wild pitch, a hit batsman, four more runs.’
  • 159) ‘No matter how maddening a baserunner might be, a steal remains 90 feet.’
  • 160) ‘Lacy argued that he was misled by Stello when the arbiter pumped him out at second during an apparent steal attempt.’
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