recession vs depression

recession depression

Definitions

  • 1) A period of reduced economic activity
  • 2) The ceremonial filing out of clergy and/or choir at the end of a church service.
  • 3) The act or an instance of receding
  • 4) The act of ceding back; restoration; repeated cession.
  • 5) The act of receding or withdrawing, as from a place, a claim, or a demand.
  • 6) A procession in which people leave a ceremony, such as at a religious service.
  • 7) (Economics) A period during which economic activity, as measured by gross domestic product, declines for at least two quarters in a row in a specific country. If the decline is severe and long, such as greater than ten percent, it may be termed a depression.
  • 8) the act of ceding back
  • 9) the withdrawal of the clergy and choir from the chancel to the vestry at the end of a church service
  • 10) the state of the economy declines; a widespread decline in the GDP and employment and trade lasting from six months to a year
  • 11) a small concavity
  • 12) the act of becoming more distant
  • 13) A cession or granting back; retrocession: as, the recession of conquered territory to its former sovereign.
  • 14) The act of receding or going back; withdrawal; retirement, as from a position reached or from a demand made.
  • 15) The state of being put back; a position relatively withdrawn.

Definitions

  • 1) biology, physiology a lowering, in particular a reduction in a particular biological variable or the function of an organ, in contrast to elevation
  • 2) economics a period of major economic contraction;
  • 3) geography an area that is lower in topography than its surroundings
  • 4) meteorology an area of lowered air pressure that generally brings moist weather, sometimes promoting hurricanes and tornadoes
  • 5) psychology in psychotherapy and psychiatry, a period of unhappiness or low morale which lasts longer than several weeks and may include ideation of self-inflicted injury or suicide
  • 6) economics, US Four consecutive quarters of negative, real GDP growth. See NBER.
  • 7) geography an area that is lower in topography than its surroundings
  • 8) psychology in psychotherapy and psychiatry, a state of mind producing serious, long-term lowering of enjoyment of life or inability to visualize a happy future
  • 9) economics, US Four consecutive quarters of negative, real GDP growth. See NBER.
  • 10) biology, physiology a lowering, in particular a reduction in a particular biological variable or the function of an organ, in contrast to elevation
  • 11) meteorology an area of lowered air pressure that generally brings moist weather, sometimes promoting hurricanes and tornadoes
  • 12) psychology in psychotherapy and psychiatry, a state of mind producing serious, long-term lowering of enjoyment of life or inability to visualize a happy future
  • 13) psychology in psychotherapy and psychiatry, a period of unhappiness or low morale which lasts longer than several weeks and may include ideation of self-inflicted injury or suicide
  • 14) economics a period of major economic contraction;
  • 15) Astronomy The angular distance of a celestial body below the horizon.
  • 16) A period of widespread poverty and high unemployment.
  • 17) An area that is sunk below its surroundings; a hollow.
  • 18) A period of drastic economic decline, characterized by decreasing aggregate output, falling prices, and rising unemployment.
  • 19) Meteorology A region of low barometric pressure.
  • 20) A reduction in physiological vigor or activity.
  • 21) Meteorology A region of low barometric pressure.
  • 22) A lowering or reduction, as.
  • 23) A mood disorder characterized usually by anhedonia, extreme sadness, poor concentration, sleep problems, loss of appetite, and feelings of guilt, helplessness, and hopelessness.
  • 24) The condition of feeling sad or despondent.
  • 25) The act of depressing.
  • 26) A lowering in amount, degree, or position.
  • 27) The angular distance below the horizontal plane through the point of observation.
  • 28) The condition of being depressed.
  • 29) Astronomy The angular distance of a celestial body below the horizon.
  • 30) (Meteor.) the number of degrees that the dew-point is lower than the actual temperature of the atmosphere.
  • 31) A falling in of the surface; a sinking below its true place; a cavity or hollow.
  • 32) (Math.) The operation of reducing to a lower degree; -- said of equations.
  • 33) (Surg.) A method of operating for cataract; couching. See Couch, v. t., 8.
  • 34) The state of being depressed; a sinking.
  • 35) (Astron.) The angular distance of a celestial object below the horizon.
  • 36) (Surg.) A method of operating for cataract; couching. See Couch, v. t., 8.
  • 37) Dejection; despondency; lowness.
  • 38) (Math.) The operation of reducing to a lower degree; -- said of equations.
  • 39) (Astron.) The angular distance of a celestial object below the horizon.
  • 40) (Meteor.) the number of degrees that the dew-point is lower than the actual temperature of the atmosphere.
  • 41) its apparent sinking, as the spectator goes toward the equator.
  • 42) Humiliation; abasement, as of pride.
  • 43) Diminution, as of trade, etc.; inactivity; dullness.
  • 44) The act of depressing.
  • 45) (Geod.) one which a descending line makes with a horizontal plane.
  • 46) (Astron.) Same as Dip of the horizon, under Dip.
  • 47) (Geod.) one which a descending line makes with a horizontal plane.
  • 48) (Astron.) Same as Dip of the horizon, under Dip.
  • 49) a period during the 1930s when there was a worldwide economic depression and mass unemployment
  • 50) A state of dullness or inactivity: as, depression of trade; commercial depression.
  • 51) Figuratively, the act of lowering or abasing: as, the depression of pride.
  • 52) In surgery, a kind of couching.
  • 53) In gunnery, the lowering of the muzzle of a gun, corresponding to the raising of the breech.
  • 54) In music, the lowering or flatting of a tone: denoted in printed music by a ♭, or, after a ♯, by a ♯.
  • 55) Humiliation, fall.
  • 56) A low state of strength; physical exhaustion.
  • 57) A hollow; a sinking or falling in of a surface; a forcing inward: as, roughness consisting in little protuberances and depressions; the depression of the skull.
  • 58) The act of pressing down, or the state of being pressed down. Specifically
  • 59) Melancholy, despondency.
  • 60) A sinking of the spirits; dejection; a state of sadness; want of courage or animation: as, depression of the mind.
  • 61) In astronomy:
  • 62) The difference between the low barometric pressure and the normal pressure for that locality; the departure of the pressure.

Examples

  • 1) This recession - ``We know about the recession," Sophie interrupted.
  • 2) I'm convinced that we have seen the lows and are now firmly on our way out of our recession.
  • 3) ‘Economic recessions are predominantly the result of insufficient demand.’
  • 4) ‘This obviously buoys the market in good times and smooths its falls in recessions.’
  • 5) ‘As political economists have always emphasised, periodic recessions are endemic to capitalism.’
  • 6) ‘When recessions were a regular feature of the economic environment, they were often viewed as inevitable.’
  • 7) ‘Compared to other post-war recessions, the downturn of 2001 is one of the shallowest on record.’
  • 8) ‘And price wars typically break out during recessions as vendors battle for consumers.’
  • 9) ‘Yes, consumer confidence has proved far more robust than in previous recessions.’
  • 10) ‘The average length of the last 10 recessions has been just under 11 months.’
  • 11) ‘In some ways, this recession has not been as hard on low-wage workers as earlier recessions.’
  • 12) ‘Gold is the only mineral commodity which is expected to benefit from the current global economic recession.’
  • 13) ‘If we want to avert a very deep recession it is absolutely vital that these psychological factors are reversed.’
  • 14) ‘The economy is entering its fourth recession in a decade, with no relief in sight.’
  • 15) ‘Sales and profits increased annually even during the recession of the late 1980s and early 1990s.’
  • 16) ‘In mid-2001, as recession hit, the stock market wobbled.’
  • 17) ‘Figures released this week show US unemployment rising, as recession looms.’
  • 18) ‘He says the economy is in recession after the worst third quarter growth figures in some 50 years.’
  • 19) ‘The country is again sliding into recession at a time when policy makers have few options to revive growth.’
  • 20) ‘The economic impact of the energy crisis has been to aggravate a descent into recession.’
  • 21) ‘Even the opposition parties concede that Kim has done a good job in pulling the country out of recession.’
  • 22) ‘The country is in deep recession, yet the government has cut its spending by about 40 percent this year.’
  • 23) ‘The country was gripped by recession and interest rates were soaring.’
  • 24) ‘The expansion of the Universe is described by a very simple equation called Hubble's law; the velocity of the recession of a galaxy is equal to a constant times its distance.’
  • 25) ‘In 1842 Doppler proved that the colour of a luminous body, like the pitch or note of a sounding body, must be changed by velocity of approach or recession.’
  • 26) ‘The velocity of recession is proportional to the distance from us.’

Examples

  • 1) Only the sound of the bell saved me from complete depression.
  • 2) Kathryn had never been the same since, whilst her father had begun to sink deeper into a pit of depression.
  • 3) Then he spoke in a rush, wanting it over with: `She was having treatment for her depression.
  • 4) By the time Daniel's property was returned, depression had set in.
  • 5) ‘A small number of people suffer from depression so severe that they may need to be admitted to hospital.’
  • 6) ‘Jo took him to a psychologist who prescribed medication for depression.’
  • 7) ‘Seeing a counselor for depression is not something to be ashamed of any more than seeing a physician for a physical ailment.’
  • 8) ‘Clinical depression is generally thought to have a direct link to brain chemistry.’
  • 9) ‘Long-term illnesses, such as diabetes, Parkinsons, or cancer, also may lead to depression.’
  • 10) ‘Scientists have isolated a gene that appears to lead to a higher risk for depression.’
  • 11) ‘People of all ages suffer from depression.’
  • 12) ‘Solutions for clinical depression are available.’
  • 13) ‘He had been battling depression for some time.’
  • 14) ‘Anne visited her GP who diagnosed severe depression.’
  • 15) ‘Tiredness might have played its part, but the sense of dejection and depression emanating from the studio clouded the whole broadcast.’
  • 16) ‘We are too prone to judge ourselves by our moments of despondency and depression.’
  • 17) ‘We're staying several steps ahead of gloom, despair, deep dark depression, and excessive misery.’
  • 18) ‘The general national mood can only be described as one of prolonged depression.’
  • 19) ‘Moodiness contributes to sadness and depression, unpredictable mood swings and fidgeting, especially among the opposite sex.’
  • 20) ‘Feelings of depression and despair are common.’
  • 21) ‘We have unprecedented depression and pessimism.’
  • 22) ‘It felt unsettling because we as the audience are accustomed to sadness, depression and irrational outbursts in typical movies that deal with death.’
  • 23) ‘The mood among local farmers is depression, despair and devastation, and there is no end in sight.’
  • 24) ‘Though a settler-farmer not dependent entirely on farm income for a living, even I am not able to escape this feeling of gloom and depression.’
  • 25) ‘A pretty astounding year for debut albums too, despite the doom and gloom and depression that allegedly is swamping the music industry.’
  • 26) ‘When I came home from Wales I was struck by horrible feelings of doom, depression, general low spirits and a sense of self-loathing.’
  • 27) ‘Everybody gets feelings of sadness or depression and most of these are short-lived and tolerable.’
  • 28) ‘I'm angry because I feel like this generation is being ravished by depression and despair.’
  • 29) ‘Don't allow yourself the luxury of falling into depression and cynicism and despair.’
  • 30) ‘depression, dullness, apathy - these were the beasts I could no longer afford to feed.’
  • 31) ‘Megan drove back to her place feeling exhaustion and depression settle in.’
  • 32) ‘Regular readers will know I was deep in the throes of depression, both seasonal and related to other sources.’
  • 33) ‘He did not kiss the old woman's hand; for, in his fatigue and depression, the necessity to pretend fell away.’
  • 34) ‘Grace found herself being dragged into depression by her own thoughts.’
  • 35) ‘They have developed a close relationship between stock market crashes and the economic recessions and depressions that follow them.’
  • 36) ‘According to him, the original estimate did take into account periodic recessions and depressions in the stock market.’
  • 37) ‘Just as the mass extinctions were associated with climatic shifts, depressions and recessions often reflect changing economic conditions.’
  • 38) ‘It also generates the periodic crises characteristic of capitalism - what we call recessions and depressions.’
  • 39) ‘For example, he considers economic depressions to be the intensification of the competitive process.’
  • 40) ‘They were the first to deal with the issue in a systematic way and to apply their conclusions to the problem of economic depressions.’
  • 41) ‘It has lasted for a long time, through depressions, recessions, slumps, civil wars and world wars.’
  • 42) ‘This turned what might have been a short recession into the greatest depression in the nation's history.’
  • 43) ‘They tolerated the gyrations of the business cycle more willingly, including dozens of recessions and several deep economic depressions.’
  • 44) ‘Yet, the final outcome - an economic depression - would have been exactly the same.’
  • 45) ‘Consistent with the above foundation of basic principle, the advocates of laissez-faire capitalism argue that depressions are not the result of anything inherent in the economic system.’
  • 46) ‘Despite the severity of the depression in the international economy, standards of living did not show correspondingly steep falls.’
  • 47) ‘These are the people responsible for recessions and depressions.’
  • 48) ‘Most of the worst recessions and depressions occur the year following an election.’
  • 49) ‘Running big federal deficits in hard economic times is one of those ‘automatic stabilizers’ that help keep recessions from turning into depressions.’
  • 50) ‘He also argued that economic depressions stimulated goldmining by lowering costs and releasing labour for prospecting.’
  • 51) ‘Only in 1930-31 did it become apparent that the world was in the throes of a prolonged and deep depression.’
  • 52) ‘The prolonged depression of the 1880s increased the pressure for change.’
  • 53) ‘After a prolonged agricultural depression lifted in the 1890s, the worst of rural poverty was finally dispelled.’
  • 54) ‘The severe and prolonged depression of the 1890's resulted in the decline of the slate industry and only a few men were employed.’
  • 55) ‘Slight depression of the clutch stops the tractor's forward motion, while full depression stops the PTO action.’
  • 56) ‘Emergency braking techniques are taught at an early stage of driver training and require rapid and forceful depression of the brake pedal and then the clutch pedal.’
  • 57) ‘The control signal or input for brake release may therefore be generated or relate to accelerator depression, clutch engagement or gear selection.’
  • 58) ‘Complete depression of the pedal removes all output torque, whilst gradual release of the pedal leads to progressive torque introduction.’
  • 59) ‘The depression of the clutch pedal lets the force from the pressure plate's spring to release and allow the discs to move and rotate.’
  • 60) ‘The presence of shallow depressions in the ground surface allows time for water to percolate into the soil and reduces the volume and speed of flow across the slope.’
  • 61) ‘The stone includes a depression on its concave surface where the practitioner's finger was inserted in order to assist in applying force.’
  • 62) ‘The images relayed from the probe were not much more exciting - some low hills and surface depressions.’
  • 63) ‘A lush habitat appears where surface water accumulates in shallow depressions to form seasonal or fairly permanent ponds.’
  • 64) ‘In the idling zone the surface includes a plurality of shallow depressions disposed in an annular zone.’
  • 65) ‘Implants are generally not attached to the underlying structures because they are made with depressions on the under surface to fit over the anatomic areas on which they are inserted.’
  • 66) ‘Magnetic vortices moving back and forth inside depressions on a superconducting surface could serve as single-particle bits for a nanoscale computer.’
  • 67) ‘Specially engineered depressions in the surface of the inner skin eliminate the need for a separate welded-on reinforcement to increase panel rigidity.’
  • 68) ‘Stigmaeopsis mites construct extremely dense oval woven roofs over depressions on the lower surfaces of host leaves.’
  • 69) ‘Reduced infiltration will cause water ponding for longer periods following rainfall on a field with surface depressions.’
  • 70) ‘It would have blended seamlessly into the wall if it weren't for the circular depressions embedded on its surface.’
  • 71) ‘Multiple depressions dotted the surface of the sandy riverbank, as if it had taken on the look of the surface of a golf ball.’
  • 72) ‘The proximal half of the ventral surface forms a long depression.’
  • 73) ‘It is usually sunken into a depression so that the rim is level with the ground.’
  • 74) ‘On the western end of the beach is a large, grassy mound with a shallow depression in the top. This is the site of a prehistoric fortification, or broch.’
  • 75) ‘Using the back of a spoon, make a shallow depression in the centre, and build up the sides as high as you can.’
  • 76) ‘These tiny flowers offer nectar in a shallow median depression on the lip surface.’
  • 77) ‘Nests are usually shallow depressions in a muddy or sandy bottom in which the eggs are deposited.’
  • 78) ‘The original site was a depression adjoining the river, which automatically became a swamp frequented by water birds in the wet times.’
  • 79) ‘It over looked some sort of depression in the land.’
  • 80) ‘Rainfall in the savannah region usually arrives between November and April in heavy bursts from monsoonal depressions or tropical cyclones.’
  • 81) ‘The most significant features of the wet season are thunderstorms, tropical cyclones and rain depressions.’
  • 82) ‘Cyclonic weather with a depression centred over the UK can cause unsettled conditions in both winter and summer.’
  • 83) ‘Frontal systems associated with depressions traveling eastwards across the ocean have a significant influence on the weather in southern South Australia during this season.’
  • 84) ‘In middle latitudes, belts of west-travelling cyclones or depressions bring rain to areas of hundreds of square kilometres.’
  • 85) ‘Angular depressions at the base of siltstone laminae represent casts of halite that was dissolved by lower-salinity waters that introduced silt.’
  • 86) ‘After sunset, as the depression of the sun increases the sky gets darker and darker until no scattered light reaches the observer.’
  • 87) ‘Thus various stages of twilight are defined in terms of the solar depression angle, in degrees.’
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