phase vs faze

phase faze

Definitions

  • 1) A distinguishable part of a sequence or cycle occurring over time.
  • 2) rugby union The period of play between consecutive breakdowns.
  • 3) Any appearance or aspect of an object of mental apprehension or view.
  • 4) That which is exhibited to the eye; the appearance which anything manifests, especially any one among different and varying appearances of the same object.
  • 5) physical chemistry A component in a material system that is distinguished by chemical composition and/or physical state (solid, liquid or gas) and/or crystal structure. It is delineated from an adjoining phase by an abrupt change in one or more of those conditions.
  • 6) astronomy A particular appearance or state in a regularly recurring cycle of changes with respect to quantity of illumination or form, or the absence, of its enlightened disk; as, the phases of the moon or planets. Illustrated in Wikipedia's article Lunar phase.
  • 7) physics Any one point or portion in a recurring series of changes, as in the changes of motion of one of the particles constituting a wave or vibration; one portion of a series of such changes, in distinction from a contrasted portion, as the portion on one side of a position of equilibrium, in contrast with that on the opposite side.
  • 8) genetics A haplotype.
  • 9) An aspect; a part.
  • 10) The fraction of a complete cycle elapsed as measured from a specified reference point and often expressed as an angle.
  • 11) A temporary manner, attitude, or pattern of behavior.
  • 12) The relative configuration, measured in angular units such as degrees or radians, of two orbiting bodies that periodically eclipse.
  • 13) A distinct stage of development.
  • 14) Any of the forms or states, solid, liquid, gas, or plasma, in which matter can exist, depending on temperature and pressure.
  • 15) A discrete homogeneous part of a material system that is mechanically separable from the rest, as is ice from water.
  • 16) Biology A characteristic form, appearance, or stage of development that occurs in a cycle or that distinguishes some individuals of a group.
  • 17) One of the cyclically recurring apparent shapes of the visibly illuminated portion of the moon or a planet.
  • 18) A particular stage in a periodic process or phenomenon.
  • 19) (Zoöl.) In certain birds and mammals, one of two or more color variations characteristic of the species, but independent of the ordinary seasonal and sexual differences, and often also of age. Some of the herons which appear in white and colored phases, and certain squirrels which are sometimes uniformly blackish instead of the usual coloration, furnish examples. Color phases occur also in other animals, notably in butterflies.
  • 20) (Phys. Chem.) A homogenous, physically distinct portion of matter in a system not homogeneous. A phase may be either a single chemical substance or a mixture, as of gases.
  • 21) (Elec.) The relation at any instant of a periodically varying electric magnitude, as electro-motive force, a current, etc., to its initial value as expressed in factorial parts of the complete cycle. It is usually expressed in angular measure, the cycle beb four right angles, or 360°. Such periodic variations are generally well represented by sine curves; and phase relations are shown by the relative positions of the crests and hollows of such curves. Magnitudes which have the same phase are said to be in phase.
  • 22) (Astron.) A particular appearance or state in a regularly recurring cycle of changes with respect to quantity of illumination or form of enlightened disk. See Illust. under Moon.
  • 23) (Physics) the relation at any instant of any cyclically varying physical quantity, such as voltage in an A.C. circuit, an electromagnetic wave, a sound wave, or a rotating object, to its initial value as expressed as a fractional part of the complete cycle. It is usually expressed in angular measure, the complete cycle being 360°.
  • 24) (Physics) Any one point or portion in a recurring series of changes, as in the changes of motion of one of the particles constituting a wave or vibration; one portion of a series of such changes, in distinction from a contrasted portion, as the portion on one side of a position of equilibrium, in contrast with that on the opposite side.
  • 25) a particular point in the time of a cycle; measured from some arbitrary zero and expressed as an angle
  • 26) (physical chemistry) a distinct state of matter in a system; matter that is identical in chemical composition and physical state and separated from other material by the phase boundary
  • 27) Aspect, appearance, or guise; the aspect or presentation in which a thing of varying modes or conditions manifests itself to the eye or the mind, or the stage in its history or development which it reaches at a particular time; an era: as, the war entered on a new phase; the varying phases of life.
  • 28) In mathematics, the angle made with the positive ray of the x-axis by the radius vector from the origin to the point representing a complex number, taken between O and 2 π or between — π and + π; the amplitude or argument a in the trigonometric form of a complex number, ρ (cos α + i sin α).
  • 29) In astronomy, the particular appearance presented by the moon or by a planet at a given time; one of the recurring appearances of the moon or a planet in respect to the apparent form of the illuminated part of its disk.
  • 30) In physical chemistry, one of the different homogeneous substances of which a heterogeneous thermodynamic system consists. If ice and salt are mixed there soon exist three homogeneous substances in the system, namely, brine, ice, and solid salt. All the ice existing at a given moment is one phase, all the solid salt existing at that moment is a second phase, and the brine produced up to that moment is a third phase.
  • 31) In statistical mechanics, the condition of a system with respect to configuration and velocity.
  • 32) In physics, a particular value, especially at the zero of time, of the uniformly varying angular quantity upon which a simple harmonic motion, or a simple element of a harmonic motion, depends.
  • 33) In electricity, the time or angle at which an electric wave reaches a certain relative value, as the maximum or zero.
  • 34) obsolete Passover
  • 35) genetics, informal, transitive To determine haplotypes in (data) when genotypes are known.
  • 36) Common misspelling of faze.
  • 37) To begin—if construed with "in"—or to discontinue—if construed with out—(doing) something over a period of time (i.e. in phases).
  • 38) Abadspellingoffaze.
  • 39) To set or regulate so as to be synchronized.
  • 40) To plan or carry out systematically by phases.
  • 41) Colloq., Archaic To disturb the composure of; to disconcert; to nonplus; -- an older spelling, now replaced by faze.
  • 42) (in phase) In a correlated or synchronized way.
  • 43) (out of phase) In an unsynchronized or uncorrelated way.

Definitions

  • 1) informal To frighten or cause hesitation; to daunt, put off (usually used in the negative), to perturb, to disconcert.
  • 2) Todisturb;
  • 3) To disturb;
  • 4) To disrupt the composure of; disconcert. synonym: embarrass.
  • 5) To cause to become disconcerted or disturbed. A variant form of feeze.

Examples

  • 1) China is in the early phases of this cycle.
  • 2) Hundreds of jobs were cut in the first phase of the restructuring.
  • 3) At the end of next month its accessories hall will open in the first of three phases.
  • 4) More than 90 per cent of the plots in phase one have already been sold.
  • 5) In phase one of her premiership, such reticence was undoubtedly an advantage.
  • 6) The ICT project review will feed into two overlapping phases.
  • 7) That lasted for four days. Then came phase two.
  • 8) Exeter dug in in the face of pressure in the first half, at one stage repelling 18 phases on their line.
  • 9) At the second attempt, I made it into phase one of army training.
  • 10) The changes would be phased in gradually over the next few years.
  • 11) The process normally goes through two distinct phases.
  • 12) This means they will be phased in over time.
  • 13) The battle for position now entered its crucial phase.
  • 14) Inner dials denote the phases of the moon and sun.
  • 15) This would be a phasing from one airport to the other.
  • 16) Output rose quickly as a first phase of processing capacity was built.
  • 17) We are embroiled in a critical phase for the future of the sport.
  • 18) We will do this cardio in two phases.
  • 19) You can get around this by phasing withdrawals.
  • 20) The new laws were to be introduced in three phases.
  • 21) These are the bleak outlines of the next phase of the crisis.
  • 22) Why not phase in change based on contribution years?
  • 23) The first phase should be completed in the middle of the next decade.
  • 24) The curve can be divided into three distinct phases.
  • 25) And now we enter a crucial phase for him.
  • 26) He kept time by observing the phases of the moon.
  • 27) We are going to cycle through the phases over a six-week period.
  • 28) It's common for relationships to have a rocky phase at this stage.
  • 29) Thus the existing, appointed membership of the chamber would be phased out gradually.
  • 30) It's now time for phase three.
  • 31) For investors with a reasonable term left before their retirement or other financial objective, a gradual phasing away from equities can make more sense.
  • 32) The pilot will consist of three phases each about five to six weeks, including a short period within each phase to enable assessment of user feedback.
  • 33) A gradual, phased introduction will allow time for people to factor the additional cost of energy in to their budgets and adapt their consumption patterns as necessary.
  • 34) In order to divide, the cell must re-enter the cycle in S-phase is short for synthesis phase.
  • 35) Well .. actually, beta phase is a term used by Web 2.0 developers for finding bugs and to test new features.
  • 36) Zukowski and Ziegelmeyer said that archeologists requested that the rock be submitted for further laboratory analysis, in what they describe as phase two of their investigation.
  • 37) Intel also is describing new progress in refining what it calls phase-change memory, a technology that is expected to eventually replace existing ways data is stored on memory chips.
  • 38) They're standing by to take care of the immediate and short-term phase, which is tents and tarps and blankets and chlorine tablets.
  • 39) They're now going into what they call phase two, that's the penalty phase, to decide what his punishment will be.
  • 40) ROBERTSON: Well, what the Taliban has been trying to do, according to NATO commanders, is turn from a phase one insurgency, which is small groups of armed men, trying to take control of perhaps a road or a strategic road junction, trying to fight limited skirmishes, to ambush convoys, to turn it into what they call a phase two insurgency.
  • 41) But clearly what needed to take place that I argue did not take place in sufficient detail is that what was going to happen in this country the day after combat operations, the day after what we call phase three.
  • 42) ‘The country hopes to pass the next key threshold of 25 chapters and reach the final phase of the negotiation process, he said after the meeting.’
  • 43) ‘The final phase of the planning process is orders production, which centers on developing the CHS casualty treatment and evacuation plan.’
  • 44) ‘Although agriculture is still caught in the grips of industrialization, corporatization is the final phase of the industrial process.’
  • 45) ‘As the peace process enters its final phase I think we can be hopeful about its outcome.’
  • 46) ‘Once a blockbuster had made a solid purchase on a block, it was relatively easy to complete the final phase of the blockbusting process.’
  • 47) ‘Regardless of the method used, the final phase of the research process is disseminating the findings.’
  • 48) ‘The first phase of the development process will involve the department's planning and building unit publishing a discussion paper on a target areas.’
  • 49) ‘This marks the third and final phase of the development process, decline in development intensity.’
  • 50) ‘Over the study period, two distinct phases could be discerned with respect to population numbers of different age/size classes.’
  • 51) ‘These findings confirm the existence of two distinct phases in vegetative development.’
  • 52) ‘The PHA document is updated as necessary throughout the early phases of the development process.’
  • 53) ‘All businesses go through distinct phases of development, and each shift presents new challenges.’
  • 54) ‘The Taiwanese economy has gone through three distinct phases of development.’
  • 55) ‘‘We are in the administrative phase of the process at the moment, where we are getting the bones of the business together,’ Mara said.’
  • 56) ‘The new-technology approach also places the design control requirements into the appropriate phase of the development process.’
  • 57) ‘Wheat crops should be managed to have a leaf canopy sufficient to intercept most of the sunlight during the final phases of development: ear emergence through to the end of grain fill.’
  • 58) ‘The club's new pitches and dressing-rooms were in the final phase of development and it was envisaged that they would be completed by May, 2004.’
  • 59) ‘The fifth phase, the final development of the project, will feature semi-detached houses.’
  • 60) ‘With this letter, we enter a new phase of the nomination process, in which the opponents have something very substantial to talk about.’
  • 61) ‘In the first phase of his reform process, he has directed each institution to come up with two or three major projects that can be completed by December.’
  • 62) ‘Perhaps Jason is right that it is just children going through a phase which will soon stop but somehow I doubt it; it has been going on for years.’
  • 63) ‘Separation and individuation are normal and healthy phases of infancy.’
  • 64) ‘On the other hand, there remains the issue of identification with the father, which brought to a close the Oedipal phase.’
  • 65) ‘We come now to the vexed questions of the Oedipus complex, childhood amnesia, and the so-called latency period, which is supposed to follow the Oedipal phase.’
  • 66) ‘This phase sees the active development of ideas and a movement towards a more balanced life and diversified set of interests, relationships, and routines.’
  • 67) ‘Future research should include youths from various cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, as well as those in the early and late phases of adolescence.’
  • 68) ‘For males, we also found that their parental bond became somewhat less positive in the transition from the early to the middle phase of adolescence.’
  • 69) ‘Puberty is the first phase of adolescence, the time when sexual maturity becomes evident.’
  • 70) ‘Adolescents' developmental phase and their available ego strength determine their willingness to seek help.’
  • 71) ‘The Good Body treats eating disorders as though they are temporary, adolescent phases but anorexia and bulimia can be fatal diseases.’
  • 72) ‘But in this preoedipal phase of psychological development there is no evidence that masculinity or femininity will follow predetermined routes.’
  • 73) ‘Adolescence is the exciting phase of transition when human beings start developing the cognitive ability to form abstract thoughts.’
  • 74) ‘Am I a rebellious teenager whose going through a phase in life?’
  • 75) ‘As you go through the book we think Holden will change his easy-come-easy-go attitude to life and that his alienation is just a passing phase of adolescence.’
  • 76) ‘So when you told us that day that you no longer wanted to be a lawyer, we thought you were going through a phase.’
  • 77) ‘Leta is going through a phase where she doesn't like to be put down.’
  • 78) ‘It was generally believed that I was going through a phase, or trying to be different.’
  • 79) ‘Judging by the standard of the ‘artwork’ on display these people are not artists - just children going through a phase.’
  • 80) ‘He's going through a phase where he doesn't like to be the center of attention (at least outside of the house).’
  • 81) ‘I convinced myself that she's just going through a phase and that nothing was wrong.’
  • 82) ‘The morning started off with the final phase of the eventing competition, the show jumping.’
  • 83) ‘As these are newer bits, the USEA was interested to learn more about them when considering approving them for use in the dressage phase of eventing.’
  • 84) ‘Davidson was the clear winner of the dressage phase, finishing with a score of 47.21.’
  • 85) ‘In eventing, the first of the two championship divisions, the CCI * for junior riders, began with its dressage phase.’
  • 86) ‘The second condition is that the Sun, Earth and the Moon must also be lined up, corresponding to the phase of the New Moon.’
  • 87) ‘A star chart is simply a printed diagram of the sky on a given night or month, with prominent constellations, planets and phases of the moon marked.’
  • 88) ‘He discovered moons orbiting Jupiter, phases of Venus, sunspots, and features on the Moon that made it seem more like a planet.’
  • 89) ‘They presented a guide to the movement of the planets, the phases of the Moon and even the mythology of some famous constellations.’
  • 90) ‘I have caught many large fish during the full or new moon phase and while the catch rate is not as good as on other nights, trout still take my offering.’
  • 91) ‘The phases of the Moon have often been associated with madness, giving rise to the English word ‘lunatic’.’
  • 92) ‘The residents largely believed, however, in an ancient prophecy that said the city was safe from its enemies during the waxing phase of the Moon.’
  • 93) ‘Our grandparents who planted and pruned according to phases of the moon are early examples of farmers using natural influences to nurture plant growth.’
  • 94) ‘She wrote at length on the four humours and on the temperaments of people according to the phase of the Moon in which they were conceived.’
  • 95) ‘The Prince of Wales's interest in organic gardening has turned an even deeper shade of green with his decision to experiment with planting crops according to the phases of the moon.’
  • 96) ‘These calculations are made according to moon phases, times and tides.’
  • 97) ‘The play is to be staged during the full moon phase of June 2005.’
  • 98) ‘Soon her palm resembled a chart of lunar phases, four thin moons, their tiny scarlet crescents crossing the lines of galaxies and Fate.’
  • 99) ‘The determination of the date of Easter is governed by a computation based on the vernal equinox and the phase of the moon.’
  • 100) ‘You might consider doing this ritual destruction on a New Moon, as it is a phase of the moon commonly held in association with new beginnings.’
  • 101) ‘In a prolific career, Galileo's discoveries, including phases of Venus and moons orbiting Jupiter dealt a death blow to geocentric theory.’
  • 102) ‘I also at a very young age fell in love with the moon in all its phases, though the full moon always drew me out.’
  • 103) ‘Galileo's most critical telescopic discovery was that Venus had phases like the Moon.’
  • 104) ‘Their constantly changing work schedule revolves around the many phases of the moon and the tides.’
  • 105) ‘The project included work on the Earth, Sun and Moon, and investigating the solar system, the phases of the moon and different types of orbit.’
  • 106) ‘Intermolecular interactions are most significant in liquid and solid phases where molecules are very close together.’
  • 107) ‘Similarly, molecules in the gas phase occasionally strike the surface and are captured by the attraction of molecules in the liquid or solid phase.’
  • 108) ‘Such a disappearance of a solid into the gas phase was an intriguing phenomenon.’
  • 109) ‘How can water co-exist at three phases (solid, liquid and gas)?’
  • 110) ‘The triple point of water is the temperature at which gas, liquid and solid phases are in equilibrium - just above freezing.’
  • 111) ‘Because we desire to store digital information, our system should have differing phases corresponding to the differing values of the information.’
  • 112) ‘The interaction strength and the relative phase of the electric field in neighboring particles both depend on polarization and frequency.’
  • 113) ‘Both phy and cry photoreceptors are presumably involved in setting the phase under white light: dark cycles.’
  • 114) ‘The RHIC detectors will soon be able to record energetic photons emitted in quark-antiquark interactions in the plasma phase.’
  • 115) ‘During the low-pressure phase of each sound wave, bubbles expanded rapidly.’
  • 116) ‘The two phases have different electrical resistance, which represents the binary information.’
  • 117) ‘The aluminum nitride material has an interconnected intergranular phase that functions as an electrically conductive phase.’
  • 118) ‘A NEW scheme to help small industries in rural areas to upgrade their electricity to 3 - phase has been announced.’
  • 119) ‘He believes phasing the withdrawal has its benefits.’
  • 120) ‘The development at Newhall Park Road became fully operational in October last year after a three-week move phasing departments from the old site next door to the new building.’
  • 121) ‘Councillors suggested possible solutions of phasing the scheme; considering other schemes; and seeking funding from partners.’
  • 122) ‘I was speaking to some ladies during the week and they told me they would be doing the full course but will be phasing it over three days.’
  • 123) ‘At least with United Utilities local traders were fully consulted and the work was phased to minimise disruption to business.’
  • 124) ‘She however, said the introduction of unleaded fuel would be gradual as it would be phased in slowly beginning this month.’
  • 125) ‘He added that any introduction of defibrillators would be phased in, but the aim was for there to be one machine on every engine.’
  • 126) ‘The company says changes will be phased in gradually, with half the project completed by the end of this year and fully realised by 2005.’
  • 127) ‘The rules will be phased in gradually to cover smaller businesses.’
  • 128) ‘The UK representatives said that although the UK development program is now focused on the provision of high quality technical assistance, it would be phased out gradually over time as local capacity increases.’
  • 129) ‘In order to properly phase the two telescopes, adaptive optics on both telescopes removed the distortion caused by the Earth's atmosphere.’

Examples

  • 1) He was not the slightest bit fazed.
  • 2) He is not fazed by anything and just gets on with his life.
  • 3) But he is not fazed by anything.
  • 4) The jungle nonsense won't faze her.
  • 5) He wasn't at all fazed by the fact thousands of people were listening.
  • 6) The hustle and bustle of the race won't faze him.
  • 7) If he feels he has an important role it won't faze him.
  • 8) He didn't get fazed by anything.
  • 9) He won't be fazed by it at all.
  • 10) He certainly won't be fazed by anything.
  • 11) But he says he won't be fazed.
  • 12) Anyone who can handle a smartphone won't be fazed.
  • 13) He just looks like he could get you out of trouble and wouldn't be fazed by anything.
  • 14) He was noted for keeping calm under pressure and if anything fazed him, it was well hidden from the viewers.
  • 15) The environment won't faze them.
  • 16) That game won't faze me.
  • 17) He's chilled, relaxed and not fazed by anything.
  • 18) It won't faze him in any way, shape or form.
  • 19) There was a lot made of him coming from Tottenham but that didn't faze him one bit.
  • 20) Had we come here straight from the UK, we might have been just a little bit fazed.
  • 21) ‘The way the Portuguese starlet is going, you cannot imagine anything fazing him.’
  • 22) ‘The trick is that Juan graduated from a hard school and nothing fazes him.’
  • 23) ‘But nothing fazes Richard, so he'll be up for it.’
  • 24) ‘That kind of experience means that, later in your career, very little fazes you.’
  • 25) ‘I pretend that nothing fazes me and I outrightly dismiss those things I cannot understand.’
  • 26) ‘Nothing ever fazes her and she'd be a fantastic mom if she weren't totally opposed to the idea.’
  • 27) ‘She's been on the stage since the age of three so nothing fazes her at all.’
  • 28) ‘This is another reason my new duties have not fazed me.’
  • 29) ‘If I had lost everything I would have started again and that never fazed me.’
  • 30) ‘Midway through he took a crisp right hook, which barely fazed him.’
  • 31) ‘It wasn't just the size of the Celtic support that fazed him, apparently, but also their expectation levels.’
  • 32) ‘It doesn't faze her that many times her fellow riders are one-third her age.’
  • 33) ‘The task ahead is formidable but unlikely to faze her.’
  • 34) ‘He says the amount doesn't faze him at all, although he admits the investment is reaching ‘a farcical level’.’
  • 35) ‘If you start thinking about it too much it can faze you.’
  • 36) ‘I, on the other hand, am constantly dumping and getting dumped, and none of it seems to faze me.’
  • 37) ‘But if it didn't work out, I just don't think that would faze me too much.’
  • 38) ‘It is an odd situation but I'm sure he will want to perform on that stage and he is such a great professional that things are unlikely to faze him.’
  • 39) ‘There were people dancing and bumping into you and it didn't even faze you.’
  • 40) ‘Even the dominance of his competitors does not appear to faze him.’
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