minister vs administer

minister administer

Definitions

  • 1) A politician who heads a ministry (national or regional government department for public service).
  • 2) At a diplomacy, the rank of diplomat directly below ambassador
  • 3) Someone who serves others.
  • 4) A person who is trained to perform religious ceremonies at a Protestant church.
  • 5) An authorized diplomatic representative of a government, usually ranking next below an ambassador.
  • 6) A person serving as an agent for another by carrying out specified orders or functions.
  • 7) A high officer of state appointed to head an executive or administrative department of government.
  • 8) Roman Catholic Church The superior in certain orders.
  • 9) One who is authorized to perform religious functions in a Christian church, especially a Protestant church.
  • 10) One who serves at the altar; one who performs sacerdotal duties; the pastor of a church duly authorized or licensed to preach the gospel and administer the sacraments.
  • 11) A servant; a subordinate; an officer or assistant of inferior rank; hence, an agent, an instrument.
  • 12) One to whom the sovereign or executive head of a government intrusts the management of affairs of state, or some department of such affairs.
  • 13) obsolete An officer of justice.
  • 14) A representative of a government, sent to the court, or seat of government, of a foreign nation to transact diplomatic business.
  • 15) the job of a head of a government department
  • 16) a diplomat representing one government to another; ranks below ambassador
  • 17) a person appointed to a high office in the government
  • 18) One who performs service for another, or executes another's will; one who is subservient; an agent, servant, or attendant.
  • 19) In politics: One of the persons appointed by the sovereign or chief magistrate of a country as the responsible heads of the different departments of the government; a minister of state: as, the minister of foreign affairs, of the interior, of finance, of war. of justice, etc.
  • 20) Eccles., in the New Testament, a servant of God, God's word, Christ, or the church; an officer of the church; an attendant or assistant (Acts xiii. 5): translating διάκονος (whence deacon), but sometimes λειτουργός (liturge) orὑπηρέτης (an assistant); hence, any member of the ministry.
  • 21) One who acts as a medium or dispenser; an administrator or promoter: as, a minister of God's will, of justice, etc.; a minister of peace or charity.
  • 22) An officer of justice.
  • 23) A diplomatic representative of a country abroad; a person accredited by the executive authority of one country to that of another as its agent for communication and the transaction of business between the two governments; specifically, the political representative of a state in another state, in contradistinction to an ambassador, who holds a nominally higher rank as in general the personal representative of the sovereign or chief of the state at the court of another sovereign.
  • 24) The catfish, Amiurus nebulosus: apparently so called from the silvery white throat, contrasting with the dark back, and likened to a clergyman's white necktie.
  • 25) transitive To attend to; to tend.
  • 26) transitive (archaic) To afford, to give, to supply.
  • 27) attend to the wants and needs of others
  • 28) work as a minister
  • 29) Toserve.
  • 30) Toperform;render.
  • 31) To perform the functions of a cleric.
  • 32) To administer or dispense (a sacrament, for example).
  • 33) To attend to the wants and needs of others: synonym: tend.
  • 34) To act as a servant, attendant, or agent; to attend and serve; to perform service in any office, sacred or secular.
  • 35) To supply or to things needful; esp., to supply consolation or remedies.
  • 36) To furnish or apply; to afford; to supply; to administer.

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete Administrator.
  • 2) One who administers; a minister or an administrator.
  • 3) transitive To apportion out, as in administering justice.
  • 4) transitive To cause to take, either by openly offering or through deceit.
  • 5) transitive To manage or supervise the conduct, performance or execution of; to govern or regulate the parameters for the conduct, performance or execution of; to work in an administrative capacity.
  • 6) intransitive To minister to, as in administering to the sick.
  • 7) perform (a church sacrament) ritually
  • 8) direct the taking of
  • 9) To manage or conduct as minister, chief agent, or steward; super-intend the management or execution of; control or regulate in behalf of others: as, to administer the laws or the government, or a department of government; to administer a charitable trust, the affairs of a corporation, or the estate of a bankrupt.
  • 10) To afford; supply; dispense; bring into use or operation, especially in the execution of a magisterial or sacerdotal office: as, to administer relief; to administer justice.
  • 11) To give or apply; make application of: as, to administer medicine, punishment, counsel, etc.
  • 12) In law, to manage or dispose of, as the estate of a deceased person, in the capacity either of executor or administrator. See administration, 9.
  • 13) To contribute assistance; bring aid or supplies; add something: with to: as, to administer to the necessities of the poor.
  • 14) To tender or impose, as an oath.
  • 15) To perform the office of administrator: with upon: as, A administers upon the estate of B.
  • 16) To impose, offer, or tender (an oath, for example).
  • 17) To give or apply in a formal way.
  • 18) To direct the taking of (an oath).
  • 19) To have charge of; manage.
  • 20) To apply as a remedy.
  • 21) To mete out; dispense.
  • 22) To manage as an administrator.
  • 23) To minister.
  • 24) To manage (a trust or estate) under a will or official appointment.
  • 25) (Law) To perform the office of administrator; to act officially.
  • 26) To contribute; to bring aid or supplies; to conduce; to minister.
  • 27) To apply, as medicine or a remedy; to give, as a dose or something beneficial or suitable. Extended to a blow, a reproof, etc.
  • 28) To tender, as an oath.
  • 29) To dispense; to serve out; to supply; execute.
  • 30) To manage or conduct, as public affairs; to direct or superintend the execution, application, or conduct of.
  • 31) (Law) To settle, as the estate of one who dies without a will, or whose will fails of an executor.

Examples

  • 1) There was corruption of local or national government officials or ministers.
  • 2) Only ministers are members of the government.
  • 3) New cabinet ministers want to make an impact from day one.
  • 4) ministers need to spread the savings across the workforce.
  • 5) Selling off a chunk of the family silver is a thankless task for a government minister.
  • 6) ministers should come clean if there are problems and there should be an urgent inquiry into what happened.
  • 7) ministers want a competitive process and this is an opportunity for any firm to set out what they can offer.
  • 8) My new, new foreign minister says he doesn't think this is going to work.
  • 9) Belgium: Nato meeting of foreign ministers.
  • 10) ministers now prefer heads of good schools taking over failing ones in own areas.
  • 11) Why do government ministers involve themselves as business salesmen?
  • 12) ministers who had served the old regime resigned.
  • 13) Is the civil servant or the minister in charge?
  • 14) What do older ministers and church members need to be reminded of?
  • 15) Last week she became minister of culture.
  • 16) Sadly no department or minister was given the responsibility of carrying it out.
  • 17) Some ministers want the entire place elected.
  • 18) But it should not be beyond ministers to knock heads together.
  • 19) Government ministers would come to the house and share a drink and talk politics.
  • 20) She sent in a message that she would burst in on the cabinet if a minister did not come out.
  • 21) It prompted calls for the country 's defence minister to resign.
  • 22) Civil servants serve elected government ministers and must be politically impartial What jobs are on offer?
  • 23) I recommend our diplomats and ministers read this book: it will provide them with an intellectual backbone.
  • 24) What's the name of that country 's foreign minister again?
  • 25) ‘The decision not to send a message of support this year brought private criticism from ministers and backbench MSPs.’
  • 26) ‘It seems to me that the way modern politics works, the Prime minister of the day is very reliant on his ministers and backbench for policy support.’
  • 27) ‘Usually when a minister's backbench committee opposes or has serious concerns about a plan, it triggers a rethink.’
  • 28) ‘At the end of a council of education ministers meeting at Parliament, Education minister Kader Asmal said this would now be published for public comment.’
  • 29) ‘In September 1995, he was named parliamentary secretary to the minister of Labour.’
  • 30) ‘With the Council emasculated, enforcement of policy was left to individual ministers and departments without co-ordination.’
  • 31) ‘Official committees consist of the senior officials of departments whose ministers sit on the Cabinet committees.’
  • 32) ‘She said the only person with the authority to change policies in the department was the minister - who even had to get approval from the Cabinet.’
  • 33) ‘The cabinet authorizing the prime minister and the defense minister of Israel to take whatever steps are necessary soon to fight terror.’
  • 34) ‘A private member is any MP other than the Speaker, a minister or a parliamentary secretary.’
  • 35) ‘In my fifth trip back there this Memorial Day, I met with the defense minister, the speaker of the parliament, and others.’
  • 36) ‘The council of finance ministers cannot depart from the rules laid down by the treaty.’
  • 37) ‘Last week Putin, who has reduced his parliamentary contacts to the leaders of the pro-Kremlin United Russia majority, ordered his ministers to talk more to opposition.’
  • 38) ‘The beleaguered Prime minister has ordered his ministers to push ahead with the radical moves.’
  • 39) ‘Education ministers have now been ordered to spearhead the nationwide action on juvenile offending demanded by Blair's office.’
  • 40) ‘The minister of health has ordered prices reduced by 50 percent.’
  • 41) ‘Nor is McConnell exactly in favour: he was the education minister who signed the order to revoke the right of schools to opt out of local authorities.’
  • 42) ‘The battalion was acting under the orders of the interior minister, Luis Echevarria, who became Mexico's president in 1970.’
  • 43) ‘Government ministers have ordered that no rise should be greater than five per cent, while also demanding the council meets legal requirements for spending in areas such as education.’
  • 44) ‘Hospital chiefs will be ordered by health minister Malcolm Chisholm to cut back spending on agency nurses, some of whom earn more than £1,600 a week.’
  • 45) ‘First we say that Justice Bleby incorrectly formulated the test for an intention to create legal relations in the context of a church and a minister of religion.’
  • 46) ‘This is a most refreshing new look at the book of Ecclesiastes, by the minister of Ravesby Presbyterian Church, Sydney.’
  • 47) ‘Dr. Gentry is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church in America.’
  • 48) ‘Christians said there were definitely crime syndicates involved, and ministers of religion were complicit in the crimes.’
  • 49) ‘The main talents were the three Caldwell brothers, sons of the Reverend James Caldwell, minister at the Presbyterian Church.’
  • 50) ‘Many came from Scotland where they had been ordained as Presbyterian ministers in the Scottish church.’
  • 51) ‘He was invited to speak in Belfast by Rev Ruth Patterson, the first woman ordained a minister in the Presbyterian Church.’
  • 52) ‘And what of evangelicalism with its positive and perky successful ministers and churches and their how-to sermons?’
  • 53) ‘Priestley, a nonconformist Presbyterian minister, was supported in his scientific studies by the patronage of the Earl of Shelburne, in whose house Priestley was tutor.’
  • 54) ‘Guthrie also referred to another controversy, one stemming from remarks on pluralism by a Presbyterian minister and interfaith leader.’
  • 55) ‘It had not been easy to do as he wished, for his father was a Presbyterian minister who very much wanted his son to follow him in the religious life and perhaps become a missionary.’
  • 56) ‘My father was a Presbyterian minister, which means we didn't have any money.’
  • 57) ‘His father was a Presbyterian minister and, together with his mother, was devoted to the community.’
  • 58) ‘Neu MacQueen is a Presbyterian minister and founder of Sunday Software Ministries.’
  • 59) ‘Douglas Greenham, a member and minister of the church from 1996 to 1999, opened the meeting with prayer.’
  • 60) ‘In the face of voluntary church membership, ministers engineered revivals to recruit congregants.’
  • 61) ‘William Tennent, therefore, established a small school for Presbyterian ministers in a log cabin on the farm he owned in Bucks County.’
  • 62) ‘In the meantime, many Presbyterian ministers have said they will continue to bless gay couples.’
  • 63) ‘A number of Presbyterian ministers grew increasingly sceptical of the enduring value of revival.’
  • 64) ‘He settled down and became the minister of the Salem Presbyterian Church, marrying Delilah Jane Cruise a short time later.’
  • 65) ‘Last week, Baroness Symons, a Foreign Office minister, announced that Ambassador Craig Murray would go back to Tashkent.’
  • 66) ‘And since this purported sale was between two sovereign governments, the minister of foreign affairs would have to be involved.’
  • 67) ‘Foreign Office minister Lord Triesman will represent the government at the ceremony in Khao Lak.’
  • 68) ‘The ministry, bombed and then looted during the US-led war on Iraq, was re-opened without a minister, ambassadors or diplomatic muscle.’
  • 69) ‘Instead, ambassadors, ministers and diplomats are picking over the bones of what was a growing community working to create a better Europe.’
  • 70) ‘Foreign office minister Lady Symons said there would be ‘very vigorous discussions’ with the US about securing a fair trial.’
  • 71) ‘In January, Liberal Democrat MP Malcolm Bruce urged Foreign Office ministers to back Gregory's plea against her sentence.’
  • 72) ‘The Durban Summit drew more than 5000 ministers, ambassadors and delegates.’
  • 73) ‘Ben Bradshaw (an ‘out’ Labour MP) was, until earlier this year, a junior minister at the Foreign Office.’
  • 74) ‘The Bulgarian diplomat was the only minister of a foreign country invited to ceremony, which coincided with his visit to the US.’
  • 75) ‘In 1987, Mullin himself became a notably thoughtful Labour MP and served for a while as a minister at the Foreign Office.’
  • 76) ‘A leading opponent of the war in Afghanistan took on Foreign Office minister Peter Hain in a debate in Brighton last week.’
  • 77) ‘Please also write to Bill Rammell MP, the Foreign Office minister responsible for relations with Colombia.’
  • 78) ‘In pursuing its aims, the Society has provided a platform in London for heads of governments, ministers, diplomats, academics and business leaders.’
  • 79) ‘Canada has taken its bid to clean up politics to new levels, publishing details of expenses claimed by ministers, ambassadors and other senior officials on government websites.’
  • 80) ‘Peter Hain is the foreign office minister given instructions from Prime minister Tony Blair to bang the drum a bit, even if it involves him going slightly off-message.’
  • 81) ‘Washington's explanation that there is a system where a foreign government's ministers are not even searched is like rubbing salt into the wound.’
  • 82) ‘But Foreign Office ministers admitted yesterday that there was little point in the short term in campaigning hard on the euro.’
  • 83) ‘They are assisted by the ministers for foreign affairs and a member of the Commission.’
  • 84) ‘He returned to the Foreign Office as minister for Europe.’
  • 85) ‘For nature is the minister of the Divine will not an instrument obedient to the command of man.’
  • 86) ‘Beelzebub is slowly entering the boys, and through the use of Jack as a minister of evil, delivering the boys to insanity and corruption.’
  • 87) ‘There may also be room for optional characters, like a Horse Doctor to minister to Old Ball, or a supernumerary mummer who will be called Patsie.’
  • 88) ‘I spend a lot of time attending and ministering to others while no one particularly cares about my needs (emotionally or otherwise)’
  • 89) ‘I can pretty much say that every continent I've heard from, from people that he's ministered to, people that don't know him.’
  • 90) ‘In is vital that we continue to minister to people like Fionnaigh.’
  • 91) ‘There are many of us who have chosen to remain nonpartisan and chosen it as an opportunity to minister to both sides of the bird, and to care about the whole country at large.’
  • 92) ‘What shall we do, then, to minister to the Russians, to assist them on the arduous road to ‘reform’?’
  • 93) ‘As healers, we take courses in age-specific competencies and diversity to better prepare us to minister to the people who come to us for care.’
  • 94) ‘They would have experience; and by that experience they would be able to minister consolation to those who were in any manner afflicted.’
  • 95) ‘At cataclysmic events in the community (births, illnesses, deaths) the women were present to minister aid and comfort.’
  • 96) ‘I lovingly ministered care for my friend in his time of need.’
  • 97) ‘She introduces the narrator to Jerome Strozzi, an aging priest who ministers to society's throwaways.’
  • 98) ‘As much as they might complain about some of their parishioners, parish priests ministered at some point to almost every person in France, particularly at key transitional moments in their lives.’
  • 99) ‘Priests from religious orders and the diocesan priests both ministered in that part of Down.’
  • 100) ‘In the early nineteenth century, there were not enough priests to minister to the burgeoning Catholic community in the United States.’
  • 101) ‘Many ‘ordinary priests’, ministering to rural communities far removed from the episcopal and monastic centres, must have suffered as many hardships as the members of their flock.’
  • 102) ‘He returned to Zambia in 1997 and ministered as a parish priest in Kabanana, in the Archdiocese of Lusaka until 2004, when he decided to take a sabbatical.’
  • 103) ‘A spokesperson for the diocese said yesterday no priest currently ministering in the area was under investigation.’
  • 104) ‘So does being able to receive the sacraments from the several priests and deacons who are allowed to minister on death row.’
  • 105) ‘The newly ordained priest will minister for the next two years at the church.’
  • 106) ‘In the rural areas, priests ministered to a largely illiterate population and, among them, were viewed with some deference for their literacy, their links to local elites, and their contacts with the wider world.’
  • 107) ‘It currently has almost 400 priests worldwide, ministering to an estimated one million members in more than a thousand churches and chapels.’
  • 108) ‘That meant in practice that the Roman Catholic priests who ministered to the Acadians were paid by the King of France, and appointed by the Bishop of Quebec, and France expected them to play both a political and an ecclesiastical role.’
  • 109) ‘She was mother of Joe Kearney who ministered as a priest in Knock for a number of years.’
  • 110) ‘I also know many ex-seminarians and former priests who have married who would still love to minister as priests.’
  • 111) ‘In another report, a pastor and his wife ministering in the southwestern city of Galle were riding in a bus when the tsunami first hit.’
  • 112) ‘No doubt a theological education helps - but it must never be a prerequisite that prevents potential pastors from ministering.’
  • 113) ‘Similar comments were made by all the other pastors where I ministered.’
  • 114) ‘He says one of his reasons for leaving was his fear of dying with no cleric from his own religion to minister to him.’
  • 115) ‘I know people who have given up church responsibilities to create more time to minister to people outside the church.’
  • 116) ‘He remembers when he began to minister to the people of Strangford there was a congregation of some 25-but that figure has now reduced to just two local church goers.’
  • 117) ‘Will you continue as faithful stewards of the mysteries of God, preaching the Gospel of Christ, and ministering his holy sacraments?’
  • 118) ‘It is a thing plainly repugnant to the word of God and the custom of the primitive Church, to have public prayer in the Church, or to minister the sacraments in a tongue not understanded of the people.’
  • 119) ‘But thirteen years have passed, and Augustine was now responsible for ministering the word and sacraments to his people.’
  • 120) ‘With deep humility and abandonment to the Lord, she remained close to Jesus and so could continue ministering his love, his grace, and his transforming power to everyone she met.’
  • 121) ‘The church was able to thank God for his faithfulness and say ‘Thank you’ to those who have ministered the Word over the years.’
  • 122) ‘Transformed by the Eucharist we have received, we are sent to minister Jesus' presence to the lonely, downtrodden, and oppressed.’
  • 123) ‘To be an encourager, is to be the Holy Spirit's chosen instrument to minister God's grace to his often beleaguered saints.’
  • 124) ‘Having reduced the language to writing they ministered the gospel to this isolated people group.’
  • 125) ‘What are we seeking to do as we prepare to minister God's word to God's precious people and those others who are always to be found in their midst?’
  • 126) ‘At their ordination, priests receive power to minister the life of God through the sacraments so that all believers might be empowered to give that life to the world.’
  • 127) ‘His hopes were focused on those churches where the Word of God was faithfully ministered - ‘not dry Calvinism, God save us from that!’’

Examples

  • 1) The painkiller should have been administered direct to her spine.
  • 2) His parents have to get up twice a night to administer the drugs.
  • 3) He must instead administer justice in ways that distance him from their blame.
  • 4) He admitted cruelty and administering a drug to an animal.
  • 5) None of this was administered by a doctor.
  • 6) Firms also have a patchy record in administering justice.
  • 7) But doctors administered the injection and then failed to monitor him properly after surgery.
  • 8) Another measure would financially penalise doctors who administer costly drugs.
  • 9) It would allow doctors to administer lethal doses of medication to those with a terminal illness and only six months to live.
  • 10) When his choking became unbearable, our nurse administered a drug to help him relax.
  • 11) There must be a fairer and more efficient way to administer justice in the 21st century.
  • 12) It is always worthwhile seizing an opportunity to emphasise that justice should be administered by courts of law and not by the court of public opinion.
  • 13) It might also encourage people who fear they may not be able to administer the drug in future and thus do it earlier than they would wish.
  • 14) A society that cannot afford to administer its own justice cannot claim to be such: big or otherwise.
  • 15) The patient - not the doctor - would administer the drugs.
  • 16) Of course it's the Tours who are administering drug testing.
  • 17) In the Middle Ages a manor was a legal and judicial entity through which justice was administered.
  • 18) Some of his relations died and left a lot of money, so folks tell, and George is what they call administer of the estate.
  • 19) Augustana's 2006 NSSE scores for student-faculty interaction were below the average benchmark for first-year students attending similar institutions, but Abernathy hopes that the needle will move next year, when the campus will again administer the survey.
  • 20) Polly's health, and that I look to her to help me get settled without overstrain to my wife -- in short, administer a dose of duty, and she may see her way to coming.
  • 21) And I think, as parents, one of the things that we have to administer is tough love.
  • 22) Furthermore, we need a tax system which is not difficult to comply with or administer, which is regarded as fair, and which limits opportunities to divert income and reduce tax liabilities.
  • 23) If half-baked political theories and weaving a movement from nothing inspire people to seek to administer, that is fine ... but we are not looking for a guru.
  • 24) Turned down the ultimatum from "The Anglican Communion" that a committee of bishops from abroad must come to the U.S. and "administer" on behalf of the anti-gay conservatives.
  • 25) Doctors' ethics prohibit them from taking part in an execution, so the prison must ask one of its employees to mix up the drugs, and then "administer" them.
  • 26) I have not taught enough to be any kind of administer in education and for the record, have absolutely no interest in ever becoming administer, but I have taught more than the current Secretary of Education.
  • 27) ‘The site is operated by the Pew Center on the States, a research organization administered by the University of Richmond.’
  • 28) ‘All student organizations are administered by representatives.’
  • 29) ‘Who will administer the department's business?’
  • 30) ‘The reality is that, once the company had appointed him to administer its business there was nothing very much left for her to do in her capacity as director.’
  • 31) ‘It will continue to administer the existing business in Salisbury.’
  • 32) ‘There is no doubt that the governmental department administering the railway industry, has the right to make adjustments to prices within the industry.’
  • 33) ‘Yang will continue to devote ‘a sufficient amount of his time and attention’ to direct and administer the group's business, the company said.’
  • 34) ‘The Old Company followed suit in February 1797, although it continued to administer the business from Berwick.’
  • 35) ‘Land boards, composed of elected and appointed members, administer the allocation of tribal land.’
  • 36) ‘However, the electric council which administers the industry has insisted on gradual rate increases in an effort to avoid social upheaval against the measure.’
  • 37) ‘Zhou suggested closing some small-scale animal farms in poor condition in order to better administer the industry.’
  • 38) ‘In addition English Heritage looks after guardianship monuments, administers the management and consent procedures for Scheduled monuments, and provides support for archaeological advisers in local authorities.’
  • 39) ‘Police training promoted and administered by domestic violence organizations have brought about undeniable improvements in the way police respond to domestic violence calls.’
  • 40) ‘The project is administered by a community organization in Cape Breton.’
  • 41) ‘Skylink will manage and administer the airports.’
  • 42) ‘I just thought that I was helping someone else administer the website.’
  • 43) ‘California requires any organization that administers a gift annuity program to provide adequate reserves for any annuities sold in California or to California residents.’
  • 44) ‘Some, as Telberg suggests, say it's self-preservation: the holders will be required to join whatever organization ultimately administers it.’
  • 45) ‘Some might want to outsource the entire recruitment function to a dedicated team that manages and administers all of the company's recruitment activity from our premises.’
  • 46) ‘Part 1 is a very serious part of this legislation, and in my view is a very serious departure from the usual way in which the Government administers its affairs.’
  • 47) ‘After legislation is passed, laws are administered through regulatory agencies (eg, state boards of nursing).’
  • 48) ‘In sum, at both national and European levels, self-regulation may be a useful adjunct to statutory regulation administered by a public agency, but cannot replace it.’
  • 49) ‘There is a recognised division of responsibility in administering the law - no one can, for example, be simultaneously judge, prosecutor, and public defender.’
  • 50) ‘Does the public believe that the court is administering the existing law fairly?’
  • 51) ‘The natural regulator for administering laws relating to investments is the Australian Securities and Investments Commission.’
  • 52) ‘It is charged with administering the electoral laws of Australia on behalf of the Australian people.’
  • 53) ‘With reform now underway, it is critical, if forests are to be well-managed and poverty reduced, that local people be given far more say in how those resources are administered.’
  • 54) ‘Attorney Generals admitted it had not even asked the States - which make and administer the criminal law - for their views on possible gaps.’
  • 55) ‘And if players are unwilling to take responsibility for naming names then they can hardly complain about those who attempt to administer the laws.’
  • 56) ‘I'm old and tired and I don't want to administer these laws.’
  • 57) ‘The challenge for those who draft and administer laws is to do so in ways that promote stability and predictability while affording reasonable flexibility.’
  • 58) ‘It is the courts who administer the law, and MPs who make the law.’
  • 59) ‘We asked the Government departments responsible for administering the subordinate legislation their views on these particular pieces of delegated legislation.’
  • 60) ‘The military, however, also had problems administering the law.’
  • 61) ‘He was, in our respectful submission, doing nothing more and charged with nothing more than administering the law.’
  • 62) ‘Regulators, she said, should be given the mandate and resources to administer the implementation of government policy.’
  • 63) ‘I actually don't have a problem with the law itself, nor indeed in most occasions, with the way in which the courts administer the law.’
  • 64) ‘They were to keep the peace and defend the realm from attack, administer the law equitably and impartially, and uphold true religion and the Church.’
  • 65) ‘He explained about the process of adapting to globalization and how we should administer our human resources in the modern world.’
  • 66) ‘I could do nothing, in the face of the present attitudes and philosophies of those who administer our laws.’
  • 67) ‘The drug and placebo were administered at school.’
  • 68) ‘Nurses are taking over tasks from junior doctors administering intravenous drugs, doing endoscopies, preoperative assessment, and some prescribing.’
  • 69) ‘As a young child, Spear helped the local veterinarian with the livestock, including giving blood transfusions and administering medications.’
  • 70) ‘The nurse administers preoperative medications ordered by the anesthesia care provider or surgeon.’
  • 71) ‘New York institutions, the study found, were slow to administer drug therapies that effectively fight the illness.’
  • 72) ‘Though much of the current focus is on drugs, bar codes are also being used to increase the safety of medical devices used to administer those drugs.’
  • 73) ‘For example, your question might be whether it is ethical for nurses to administer placebo medication.’
  • 74) ‘Misread radiographs and pathology specimens, laboratory errors, and mistakes made in administering radiation therapy also threaten the safety of patients.’
  • 75) ‘Nurses usually prepared and administered intravenous drugs on the wards, but cytotoxic drugs were prepared centrally by the pharmacy department.’
  • 76) ‘The study drug was administered intravenously at weekly intervals for 5 doses.’
  • 77) ‘The nurses administer anti-inflammatory medications intramuscularly or per rectum rather than using narcotics, if possible.’
  • 78) ‘Medical skills are needed to start intravenous lines, set up intravenous infusion sets, and measure out and administer the appropriate drugs.’
  • 79) ‘In the 20th century, physicians administered electroshock therapy or injected high doses of insulin to induce seizures.’
  • 80) ‘The steroid is administered intravenously in a dosage of 1 to 2 mg per kg every six to 12 hours.’
  • 81) ‘Radiation therapy is administered two ways: externally or internally.’
  • 82) ‘Four child therapists who were trained and supervised by an experienced cognitive behavioural therapist administered all therapy.’
  • 83) ‘The preoperative nurse or the anesthesia care provider administers a prophylactic antibiotic as requested by the surgeon.’
  • 84) ‘The drug is administered intravenously once a month.’
  • 85) ‘We found that emergency facilities ranged widely from the provision of simple analgesia to that of intravenously administered drugs and full resuscitation facilities.’
  • 86) ‘It was noisy and filled with high-tech equipment for monitoring indicators of medical status and administering medications or other treatments.’
  • 87) ‘And the old English common law treated the servant as a member of the family and that's why the master could administer corporal punishment for example.’
  • 88) ‘But I'm not sure I agree with police being able to administer corporal punishment!’
  • 89) ‘A curious person in court then wanted to know if the man had anything to say while he was administering the punishment.’
  • 90) ‘Her mother and elder sisters administered these punishments.’
  • 91) ‘From the founding of Botany Bay to 1967, the punishment was administered as the ultimate penalty of the law, in great frequency during the convict era but much less so later.’
  • 92) ‘In both, a civil action had been brought against a teacher who had administered corporal punishment.’
  • 93) ‘At common law teachers are in loco parentis and may administer corporal punishment in respect of the conduct of the child at, or on its way to or from school.’
  • 94) ‘And he used to administer corporal punishment every morning to the boys.’
  • 95) ‘To address these social problems we have to do more to address what has gone wrong instead of only administering punishment to those who fail.’
  • 96) ‘‘I volunteer to administer the punishment,’ she announced, raising her hand.’
  • 97) ‘In the words of the prosecuting lawyer Richard Horwell, ‘The plan was not only to find the thieves but to administer punishment’.’
  • 98) ‘I assumed she was ill, but now that I find her here, I can tell that she was skipping class, and it is my job to administer the correct punishment.’
  • 99) ‘Besides she is his, shouldn't he be the one to administer any punishment?’
  • 100) ‘The monotheists among them were deputed to administer this punishment.’
  • 101) ‘All that's left is to decide whether she or her father should administer the punishment.’
  • 102) ‘Physical punishment is administered, although parents tend to be indulgent with young children.’
  • 103) ‘Law enforcement officers and medical staff watched whilst the punishment was administered.’
  • 104) ‘Similar regulations on the Continent are either being ignored or blatantly flouted, with no punishment being administered by the member state.’
  • 105) ‘On the more practical side, we also have an Animal Protection Law, which administers effective punishments for misuse, abandoning and torture of animals.’
  • 106) ‘Ma chose to defend his department chiefs rather than administering reasonable punishments and sincerely apologizing for the blunders.’
  • 107) ‘The Sacrament will be administered by the priests at the ceremonies.’
  • 108) ‘Male pastoral workers are allowed to work in parishes; deacons can administer the sacraments of baptism and marriage.’
  • 109) ‘Parish directors and lay ministers are asked to prepare candidates for baptism or marriage, then to step aside when a priest arrives to administer the sacraments.’
  • 110) ‘Maureen Power read the list of candidates for Confirmation and then the Bishop administered the sacrament with the sponsors by the side of the boys and girls.’
  • 111) ‘I felt as if I'd interrupted a priest administering last rites.’
  • 112) ‘The freedom of churches to administer the sacraments is as fundamental a religious liberty as there can be.’
  • 113) ‘But if you're a sacramental church, you need priests to administer the sacraments.’
  • 114) ‘The means to accomplish this were literate sermons, adhering closely to the liturgy of the church; catechising the young; and administering the sacraments.’
  • 115) ‘His fate seemed sealed when aides administered the Sacrament of Anointing, or last rites, on Thursday.’
  • 116) ‘Bishop William Lee will administer the sacrament in St. Patrick's Church at 11 a.m.’
  • 117) ‘Parish priest Fr Francis McAteer administered the Last Rites at the scene.’
  • 118) ‘Bishop Donal McKeown administered the sacrament of confirmation to children in the Parish on Thursday.’
  • 119) ‘In these either the Congregational minister in situ or from outside or a lay officer of the church has administered the infant baptisms.’
  • 120) ‘Father Noel Dunphy administered the Sacrament to the children from the four schools in the parish.’
  • 121) ‘The clergyman administered the Last Rite upon the departed.’
  • 122) ‘His Lordship Dr. Bill Murphy Bishop of Kerry will administer the Sacrament to girls and boys who have been preparing for this special occasion for some time.’
  • 123) ‘Bishop Laurence Ryan is only administering the Sacrament of Confirmation in 16 Parishes in 2002.’
  • 124) ‘The Bishop of Killaloe visited the parish to administer the Sacrament of Confirmation on the pupils of the local schools.’
  • 125) ‘A number of these revisions allow a presbyter to administer some rites of renewal, particularly the renewal of baptismal vows at the Easter Vigil.’
  • 126) ‘They had to preach, administer the sacraments and look after the spiritual welfare of the people.’
  • 127) ‘Chief Justice John Marshall administers the oath of office to Andrew Jackson on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol on March 4, 1829.’
  • 128) ‘Before administering the oath of an attorney, Judge Hilberman reminded me of four important values we should strive to uphold as attorneys.’
  • 129) ‘Politicians spoke, judges administered the oaths and newly naturalized citizens cheered.’
  • 130) ‘As a retired military officer, Don was able to actually administer the oath of enlistment to his son, which must have been a proud moment.’
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