malicious vs malevolent vs malignant

malicious malevolent malignant

Definitions

  • 1) Deliberately harmful; spiteful
  • 2) Of, pertaining to, or as a result of malice or spite
  • 3) Law Done with malice.
  • 4) Having the nature of or resulting from malice; deliberately harmful; spiteful.
  • 5) the desertion of a wife or husband without just cause.
  • 6) Indulging or exercising malice; harboring ill will or enmity.
  • 7) (Law) a wanton prosecution or arrest, by regular process in a civil or criminal proceeding, without probable cause.
  • 8) (Law) With wicked or mischievous intentions or motives; wrongful and done intentionally without just cause or excuse.
  • 9) Proceeding from hatred or ill will; dictated by malice
  • 10) having the nature of or resulting from malice

Definitions

  • 1) A malevolent person or agency.
  • 2) having or displaying ill will; wishing harm on others
  • 3) having an evil or harmful influence
  • 4) Having a harmful influence.
  • 5) Having or exhibiting ill will; wishing harm to others; malicious.
  • 6) Wishing evil; disposed to injure others; rejoicing in another's misfortune.
  • 7) wishing or appearing to wish evil to others; arising from intense ill will or hatred

Definitions

  • 1) (Eng. Hist.) One of the adherents of Charles I. or Charles II.; -- so called by the opposite party.
  • 2) A man of extreme enmity or evil intentions.
  • 3) A person of extreme enmity or evil intentions; an ill-affected person.
  • 4) Specifically, in English history, one of the adherents of Charles I. and his son Charles II. during the civil war; a Royalist; a Cavalier: so called by the Roundheads, the opposite party.
  • 5) Harmful, malevolent, injurious.
  • 6) oncology Harmfully cancerous; as a malignant tumor.
  • 7) Having or showing ill will; malicious.
  • 8) Tending to metastasize.
  • 9) Virulent or threatening to life.
  • 10) Characterized or caused by evil intentions; pernicious.
  • 11) (Med.) Tending to produce death; threatening a fatal issue; virulent.
  • 12) Disposed to do harm, inflict suffering, or cause distress; actuated by extreme malevolence or enmity; virulently inimical; bent on evil; malicious.
  • 13) (Med.) a very contagious disease produced by infection of subcutaneous tissues with the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. It is transmitted to man from animals and is characterized by the formation, at the point of reception of the infection, of a vesicle or pustule which first enlarges and then breaks down into an unhealthy ulcer. It is marked by profound exhaustion and often fatal. The disease in animals is called charbon; in man it is called cutaneous anthrax, and formerly was sometimes called simply anthrax.
  • 14) dangerous to health; characterized by progressive and uncontrolled growth (especially of a tumor)

Examples

  • 1) High tackles didn't drip into the culture of the game through malicious intent to hurt opponents.
  • 2) This may be true or a malicious rumour.
  • 3) But not before the game because that is malicious and vicious.
  • 4) They seemed to have not malicious but mischievous intent.
  • 5) We also want to put a stop to malicious and unfounded allegations.
  • 6) Yet she triumphed over all the setbacks and malicious gossip.
  • 7) We have had to change our phone number three times because we were getting malicious calls.
  • 8) There was no malicious intent at all.
  • 9) These are both common ways that people infect their computers with malicious software.
  • 10) The notion that internal pressure was applied is a malicious rumour.
  • 11) How on earth had this bit of malicious gossip reached the post?
  • 12) They will quiz him about wasting police time and malicious calls.
  • 13) The referee said there was no malicious intent.
  • 14) The difficulty is that while the rumours are malicious they are not entirely without foundation.
  • 15) Not all were given as fouls and to my mind none was made with malicious intent.
  • 16) They spread malicious gossip about you.
  • 17) It was very vicious, very malicious.
  • 18) That it's mischievous, not malicious.
  • 19) Ministry of Justice figures put the incidence of malicious allegations at 3 per cent of claims.
  • 20) ‘Lord Steyn was contrasting damages for malicious falsehood with damages for libel.’
  • 21) ‘There was in fact no evidence of malicious attack by any third party, let alone the claimant.’
  • 22) ‘Atkinson pleaded not guilty to malicious wounding but admitted unlawful wounding.’
  • 23) ‘They were accused of lying out of a malicious desire to see the appellants convicted.’
  • 24) ‘Two people are facing possible prosecutions for malicious or criminal damage.’
  • 25) ‘It is the most malicious piece of legislation ever placed on a statute book and it has no place in a civilised country.’
  • 26) ‘To refuse to set aside the statutory demand in the circumstances was not biased or malicious.’
  • 27) ‘The second is whether Jupiter's claim is malicious falsehood has any real prospect of success.’
  • 28) ‘She said they would be charged with breach of the peace and malicious damage offences.’
  • 29) ‘The star was facing charges of assault and malicious damage, which were later dismissed.’
  • 30) ‘The environment was defaced by graffiti and malicious damage that was seldom repaired.’
  • 31) ‘All viruses are malicious, nasty little programs written by misguided people.’
  • 32) ‘The villagers poison most people with malicious lies so I get little business.’
  • 33) ‘Everything conspires to bring out the worst in him as he turns petty, malicious and vindictive.’
  • 34) ‘Final exams are the most evil, satanic, malicious event ever crafted by mankind.’
  • 35) ‘Lucy was brutally taken from us in a malicious, callous and evil way leaving a gap in our lives never to be filled.’
  • 36) ‘The Americans are worried that they'll be the victim of spurious or malicious prosecutions.’
  • 37) ‘Computer viruses and other malicious code should then be less able to cause significant damage.’
  • 38) ‘More info on the malicious script execution security flaw can be found here.’
  • 39) ‘Every teacher ran the risk of being set up by malicious pupils, Mr Jackson said.’

Examples

  • 1) all, it would seem," he hissed slowly like some malevolent alligator.
  • 2) Sharon could feel something in the room, something malevolent, something watching her, savouring the smell of her fear.
  • 3) She poured from both into her tumbler, inhaled on her cigar, and sat there silently watching us from her malevolent little eyes.
  • 4) Her flesh crawled, as if the soft night were studded with unfriendly, even malevolent eyes, watching her every movement.
  • 5) Griffin grinned at her, his face wreathed in an expression of malevolent mischievousness.
  • 6) Related to spam, but even more malevolent, is phishing -- a deliberate attempt to illegally gain access to personal information.
  • 7) She pinpointed the locations of the positive ley lines under the ground, and carefully dowsed the inside of the church for noxious rays, evil emanations, and something she called malevolent attachments.
  • 8) He calls her malevolent, naive and "essentially sour and without hope," and says she "writes as if personality, appearance, and attitude were the only things that mattered."
  • 9) Certainly using the griefer tag is inappropriate as it immediately lumps in the incompetent with the malevolent, which is useless from a design perspective since both groups respond to very different carrots.
  • 10) Malignant: dangerous to health; also used to refer to malevolent people.
  • 11) Behind her, the security cops sported crooked grins while Mother contemplated Kaitlin with what could only be described as a malevolent smile.
  • 12) Still and all, when I say there is something "insidious" about the taste of Dutch Coca-Cola she hs to ask what insidious means -- she knows what it means, but she just has to check, because she doesn't understand why I would choose such a word -- I revised to "malevolent" -- to describe such a benign thing.
  • 13) ‘She had become this all pervading, evil and malevolent influence on my family and life.’
  • 14) ‘That evil is malevolent violence, a curse that is the bane of our human existence.’
  • 15) ‘Even more than the words in the previous paragraph, it suggests an evil, malevolent intelligence at work.’
  • 16) ‘It's important to remember that the elementals were not supposed to be evil or malevolent, just not human.’
  • 17) ‘Can simple coincidence explain these developments, or are more malevolent forces at work?’
  • 18) ‘Uncle John's brand of organised chaos may well be governed by these malevolent forces.’
  • 19) ‘While there is much that is wonderful, nature and man frequently prove malevolent forces.’
  • 20) ‘That whatever malevolent forces had been unleashed could not harm me personally for this very reason.’
  • 21) ‘And this is the case with Dr Octopus who is only temporarily controlled by a malevolent force.’
  • 22) ‘There might even be a prankster, a malevolent force, or a god who chooses to interfere.’
  • 23) ‘He has the fierce, malevolent eyes of a demon, deep, red, and sharklike.’
  • 24) ‘As a witness of the last days of this cruel and malevolent regime, Downfall is clear-eyed and unsentimental.’
  • 25) ‘It was a vicious and malevolent piece of work which was designed to smash the marriage into pieces.’
  • 26) ‘For many years, it saw only the darkest of evil, bathed in the malevolent glow of hellfire.’
  • 27) ‘Its intentions are always malevolent and they are the brave warriors who hope to break the system down with almost anyone's help.’
  • 28) ‘Fratricidal war paved the way for malevolent elements to become brokers.’
  • 29) ‘The 1996 World Cup was a marker of this new, malevolent mood of the cricket fan.’
  • 30) ‘All are threatened with destruction by the malevolent but likable Coyote.’
  • 31) ‘Another spot on the grass which will darken to a malevolent green and then die over-winter, requiring seeding.’
  • 32) ‘From the resultant penalty, Wood went for goal, but on this occasion the malevolent wind steered the ball off target.’

Examples

  • 1) And he spent considerable time researching the genesis of malignant melanoma.
  • 2) This malignant tumour is already equal to our entire national economy and growing rapidly bigger.
  • 3) The most serious and least common skin cancer is malignant melanoma.
  • 4) It is also highly likely to give her malignant skin cancer.
  • 5) There still is a remote chance of malignant change.
  • 6) Then further tests showed a malignant tumour which meant having a mastectomy to remove it.
  • 7) She took herself off to a dermatologist who took a biopsy and diagnosed early malignant melanoma.
  • 8) It turned out to be malignant melanoma.
  • 9) The features of malignant tumours are quite different.
  • 10) He will remain there until next week before tests to see if the tumour is malignant.
  • 11) Doctors had found a malignant melanoma on his face and he was given emergency surgery which left him needing major facial reconstruction.
  • 12) Advances are being recorded not only in the treatment of malignant disease but also in the incidence and outcome of coronary arterial disease.
  • 13) These form 80 per cent of malignant brain tumours and often cause death within a year.
  • 14) They are less dangerous than another common form of skin cancer - malignant melanoma.
  • 15) A malignant brain tumour was diagnosed last September.
  • 16) The man had advanced malignant melanoma - skin cancer - which is very difficult to treat once it has spread.
  • 17) It suggested that increasing use is causing at least 100 deaths a year and 370 cases of malignant skin cancer.
  • 18) It has not all been laughs; in 2000 he discovered he was suffering from thyroid cancer and the malignant growth was close to his vocal cords.
  • 19) _malignant_ and _poisonous_ affections, as scirrhus and other varieties of cancer, and also cases of infectious virus, demand continually, or with but occasional exceptions, the primary galvanic current A B. ☞ In treating these malignant affections, the current should be run through as short a distance of _healthy_ tissue as possible, yet so as fairly to reach the diseased part.
  • 20) ‡ The term malignant is used in describing cancerous tumors (see cancer) because such growths are a threat to the health of the individual.
  • 21) Congressman Foley is the poster child for what we call malignant narcissism.
  • 22) Sure, there was that initial rush of anxiety at hearing the word "malignant" for the first time, but it was already disappearing by the time I got off the phone with the surgeon.
  • 23) APL is characterized by the malignant proliferation of these immature promyelocytes.
  • 24) This trial was the first to report a survival advantage from chemotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma showing a statistically significant improvement in median survival from 10 months in the patients treated with cisplatin alone to 13.3 months in the combination pemetrexed group in patients who received supplementation with folate and vitamin B12.
  • 25) ‘Too often the malignant evil in society shows up in how we treat our children.’
  • 26) ‘The root cause is not so much the drugs trade, as the malignant rat-like nature of the human race.’
  • 27) ‘What evil, malignant Commie menace could be behind this predicament?’
  • 28) ‘But a series of malignant twists of fate sour his life.’
  • 29) ‘The malignant effects of chronic pain in children are multifactorial and relatively unyielding without treatment.’
  • 30) ‘By the very nature of what it is, Empires are malignant, not benign though they cloak this malignancy with shallow kindness.’
  • 31) ‘Yes, the two parties are equivalently malignant this way.’
  • 32) ‘In combination, they've been malignant so many times before.’
  • 33) ‘In my beginnings as a prison activist, I saw the industry of locking people up, as a malignant form of interdisciplinary activity.’
  • 34) ‘But nothing in law or common sense justifies these continued ignorant, racist or malignant attacks on genuine refugees.’
  • 35) ‘There was evidence of deeper and more malignant dry-rot.’
  • 36) ‘This is only the tip of one big malignant iceberg.’
  • 37) ‘To me, the most striking thing about both articles is the sheer, malignant hatred that shines through in each.’
  • 38) ‘The stable food, the potato rotted from the land as the first strains of malignant blight struck, and there was nothing left to eat.’
  • 39) ‘Just as he begins to recover, an old affair resurfaces within the marriage of Paul's parents and becomes aggressively malignant.’
  • 40) ‘We can comment on the malignant horde of media hounds claiming to speak for Michael on this and many other issues.’
  • 41) ‘What lies behind the Tory claim is a malignant xenophobia.’
  • 42) ‘Science in the service of multi - national corporations, becomes malignant rather than benign.’
  • 43) ‘In the most malignant cases, it leads to the rhetoric of genocide.’
  • 44) ‘A more malignant expression of the social crisis is recorded in the suicide rate.’
  • 45) ‘But neither of these processes is suitable for patients with infection or malignant disease.’
  • 46) ‘Leon and Davey-Smith now show how a childhood infection may influence the epidemiology of malignant disease several decades later.’
  • 47) ‘Patients with severe neutropenia with fever or signs of infection and those with evidence of malignant disease should be hospitalized.’
  • 48) ‘In the end they ruled out only such serious illnesses as active or malignant disease which the doctor thought would totally wreck the child's chance of a healthy life.’
  • 49) ‘Cardiac cachexia may mimic the cachexia seen in patients with disseminated malignant disease.’
  • 50) ‘Proper diagnosis and supervision of treatment for Britain's most common malignant disease should not be beyond the resources of our National Health Service.’
  • 51) ‘Visual impairment, neurological disorder, and malignant disease were all independently associated with suicide in elderly people’
  • 52) ‘Primary care clinicians need to be able to discriminate which patients within a relatively unselected population have a higher likelihood of malignant disease.’
  • 53) ‘The term refers to any of a group of malignant diseases of the bone marrow and other bone forming organs.’
  • 54) ‘In April of 1677 Barrow travelled to London where he contracted malignant fever.’
  • 55) ‘The malignant course of the disease is over, and it is now progressing more moderately.’
  • 56) ‘There is also concern over infective and malignant complications.’
  • 57) ‘There is a malignant form of coronary disease among people of Asian origin.’
  • 58) ‘Chemical pleurodesis is an effective treatment for malignant pleural effusion and pneumothorax.’
  • 59) ‘During one, my nurse college mentioned she had seen two cases of malignant hyperthermia.’
  • 60) ‘Biological viruses also ' steal ' virulence genes from other viruses and become more malignant.’
  • 61) ‘Destruction of the proteins essentially cripples p53 and opens the door to malignant transformation.’
  • 62) ‘malignant hyperthermia is not the only inherited disorder associated with faulty calcium signalling.’
  • 63) ‘In view of the malignant nature of the condition this delay could have been life threatening.’
  • 64) ‘Asbestosis is frequently accompanied by malignant tumors, such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma.’
  • 65) ‘The difference between malignant and benign tumours is that malignant tumours have the ability to invade surrounding areas.’
  • 66) ‘We describe a case of a highly malignant primary liver tumor in an elderly woman.’
  • 67) ‘Radioactive implants appear to be a very effective method of treating highly malignant brain tumors.’
  • 68) ‘The dangers of sun worshipping, such as malignant melanoma and accelerated ageing, are well known.’
  • 69) ‘I will address the experimental treatments for the most malignant brain tumors.’
  • 70) ‘malignant melanoma is the least common yet most dangerous form of skin cancer.’
  • 71) ‘In addition, the ability to identify potentially malignant lesions varies with physician training.’
  • 72) ‘The primary reason to investigate a renal mass is to exclude a malignant neoplasm.’
  • 73) ‘He died of malignant mesothelioma of the right lung caused by exposure to asbestos.’
  • 74) ‘In addition, 4 of the 50 tumors were found to be histologically malignant.’
  • 75) ‘She died of overwhelming infection 9 months after the initial diagnosis of malignant lymphoma.’
  • 76) ‘Lymph node infarction is followed by malignant lymphoma in some but not all patients.’
  • 77) ‘Glioblastoma is a rapidly growing malignant brain tumour and usually has a fatal outcome.’
  • 78) ‘During chemotherapy, he learned there also were two malignant lesions on his brain.’
  • 79) ‘Patients who had previously received conjugated estrogens or who had cancer with low malignant potential were excluded from the study.’
  • 80) ‘Nearly everyone has pigmented moles, but only one in a million becomes malignant.’
  • 81) ‘He immediately diagnosed a small rectal lesion, which appeared clinically to be malignant.’
  • 82) ‘To put it in plain English, chemotherapy damages normal cells as well as malignant ones.’
  • 83) ‘Another implication of a linear growth regime is that the most malignant cells should be located at the tumor border.’
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