knowledge vs wisdom

knowledge wisdom

Definitions

  • 1) Familiarity, awareness, or understanding gained through experience or study.
  • 2) The sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned.
  • 3) The state or fact of knowing.
  • 4) Archaic Carnal knowledge.
  • 5) Scope of information; cognizance; notice.
  • 6) The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition.
  • 7) Sexual intercourse; -- usually preceded by carnal; same as carnal knowledge.
  • 8) That familiarity which is gained by actual experience; practical skill.
  • 9) That which is or may be known; the object of an act of knowing; a cognition; -- chiefly used in the plural.
  • 10) That which is gained and preserved by knowing; instruction; acquaintance; enlightenment; learning; scholarship; erudition.
  • 11) The state of being or of having become aware of fact or truth; intellectual recognition of or acquaintance with fact or truth; the condition of knowing.
  • 12) Acquaintance with things ascertained or ascertainable; acquired information; learning.
  • 13) Specific information; notification; advertisement.
  • 14) Acknowledgment.
  • 15) Synonyms Prudence, Discretion, etc. (see wisdom); comprehension, discernment.
  • 16) Cognizance; notice; recognition.
  • 17) Practical understanding; familiarity gained by actual experience; acquaintance with any fact or person: as, a knowledge of seamanship; I have no knowledge of the man.
  • 18) A perception, judgment, or idea which is in accord with fact or truth; that which is known.
  • 19) To acknowledge; confess; avow.
  • 20) Toconfess.
  • 21) To confess.
  • 22) obsolete To acknowledge.

Definitions

  • 1) The ability to make a decision based on the combination of knowledge, experience, and intuitive understanding.
  • 2) uncountable An element of personal character that enables one to distinguish the wise from the unwise.
  • 3) The discretionary use of knowledge for the greatest good.
  • 4) theology The ability to know and apply spiritual truths.
  • 5) countable A piece of wise advice.
  • 6) The ability to apply relevant knowledge in an insightful way, especially to different situations from that in which the knowledge was gained.
  • 7) The ability to discern or judge what is true, right, or lasting; insight.
  • 8) Bible Wisdom of Solomon.
  • 9) Wise teachings of the ancient sages.
  • 10) Common sense; good judgment.
  • 11) A wise outlook, plan, or course of action.
  • 12) The sum of learning through the ages; knowledge.
  • 13) the last, or back, tooth of the full set on each half of each jaw in man; -- familiarly so called, because appearing comparatively late, after the person may be supposed to have arrived at the age of wisdom. See the Note under Tooth, 1.
  • 14) The quality of being wise; knowledge, and the capacity to make due use of it; knowledge of the best ends and the best means; discernment and judgment; discretion; sagacity; skill; dexterity.
  • 15) The results of wise judgments; scientific or practical truth; acquired knowledge; erudition.
  • 16) ability to apply knowledge or experience or understanding or common sense and insight
  • 17) an Apocryphal book consisting mainly of a meditation on wisdom; although ascribed to Solomon it was probably written in the first century BC
  • 18) accumulated knowledge or erudition or enlightenment
  • 19) The property of being wise; the power or faculty of forming the fittest and truest judgment in any matter presented for consideration; a combination of discernment, discretion, and sagacity, or similar qualities and faculties, involving also a certain amount of knowledge, especially the knowledge of men and things gained by experience.
  • 20) With possessive pros used as a personification (like “your highness,” etc.).
  • 21) Skill; skilfulness.
  • 22) Human learning; knowledge of arts and sciences; erudition.
  • 23) [In Scripture the word is sometimes specifically used, especially in Paul's Epistles, in an opprobrious sense to designate the theosophical speculations (1 Cor. i. 19, 20) or rhetorical arts (1 Cor. ii. 5) current among the Greeks and Romans in the first century; sometimes in a good sense to designate spiritual perception of, accompanied with obedience to, the divine law (Prov. iii. 13; Acts vi. 3). Sometimes (as in Prov. viii.) it has personal attributes assigned to it.]
  • 24) =Syn.1. Knowledge, Prudence, Wisdom., Discretion, Providence, Forecast, Provision. Knowledge has several steps, as the perception of facts, the accumulation of facts, and familiarity by experience, but it does not include action, nor the power of judging what is best in ends to be pursued or in means for attaining those ends. Prudence is sometimes the power of judging what are the best means for attaining desired ends; it may be a word or action, or it may be simply the power to avoid danger. It implies deliberation and care, whether in acting or refraining from action. Wisdom chooses not only the best means but also the best ends; it is thus far higher than prudence, which may by choosing wrong ends go altogether astray; hence also it is often used in the Bible for piety. As compared with knowledge, it sees more deeply into the heart of things and more broadly and comprehensively sums up relations, draws conclusions, and acts upon them; hence a man may abound in knowledge and be very deficient in wisdom, or he may have a practical wisdom with a comparatively small stock of knowledge. Discretion is the power to judge critically what is correct and proper, sometimes without suggesting action, but more often in view of action proposed or possible. Like prudence the word implies great caution, and takes for granted that a man will not act contrary to what he knows. Providence looks much further ahead than prudence or discretion, and plans and acts according to what it sees. It may be remarked that provision, which is from the same root as providence and prudence, is primarily a word of action, while they are only secondarily so. Forecast is a grave word for looking carefully forward to the consequences of present situations and decisions; it implies, like all these words except knowledge, that one will act according to what he can make out of the future. See cautious, astute, and genius.
  • 25) A wise saying or act; a wise thing.

Examples

  • 1) You need to have specialist knowledge about how scars behave.
  • 2) That is often the way people misunderstand divine knowledge.
  • 3) They also could use the knowledge they have about firms and their competitors.
  • 4) Producers are looking for people with engineering knowledge.
  • 5) There he trained native doctors and gained vital knowledge about military medicine.
  • 6) It’s about having people with the knowledge and experience to advise.
  • 7) His character and his knowledge about football is very good.
  • 8) At the end, it comes down to knowledge of life and death.
  • 9) There were large gaps in people 's historical knowledge.
  • 10) We made a distinction there between scientific knowledge and technical knowledge about language.
  • 11) We need to give people the knowledge to make better choices.
  • 12) There is now a great deal of research that shows that specific knowledge makes a huge difference.
  • 13) What can such a person do that cannot be done by a person lacking that knowledge base?
  • 14) The improved flows of information and knowledge make it easier to establish and control overseas operations.
  • 15) Should it now tweak that to explain that some knowledge comes at a cost?
  • 16) They will be questioned on specialist subjects and general knowledge.
  • 17) knowledge about the prospects of promotion and what it will be based on might also be lacking.
  • 18) Science teachers are best at correcting misinformation as they have knowledge of scientific explanations.
  • 19) We asked three older people what financial knowledge they would impart to younger generations.
  • 20) The emphasis here is on specific knowledge.
  • 21) The person of knowledge has always been expected to take responsibility for being understood.
  • 22) knowledge or information about a good can affect demand.
  • 23) One of the difficulties in dealing with it lay in a lack of real knowledge about its extent and depth.
  • 24) The affair became public knowledge.
  • 25) He has been inconsistent on the key issues over the space of a very short time, and his experience and knowledge of international affairs is modest.
  • 26) ‘The goal of science education is not only to help students acquire scientific knowledge, but to understand its development.’
  • 27) ‘All of these plans require insider knowledge in order to carry out the operation in a timely and accurate manner.’
  • 28) ‘The book reveals the author's encyclopaedic knowledge of the hundreds of aristocratic families and their houses all over Ireland.’
  • 29) ‘Michael's experiences left him energized, excited, and eager to apply his newfound knowledge to his own enterprise.’
  • 30) ‘Fortunately, he imparted his knowledge to a generation of postgraduate students.’
  • 31) ‘Unfortunately, the author's knowledge of his subject is not matched by literary grace.’
  • 32) ‘But he is aware that there is a long way to go before knowledge about sexual health is widespread.’
  • 33) ‘He was always fascinated by science and nature and he had an insatiable thirst for knowledge.’
  • 34) ‘His travels had given him a wide knowledge of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance art.’
  • 35) ‘Experts, driven by a belief in their professional knowledge, often cover up their own shortcomings.’
  • 36) ‘To achieve this objective, responders were asked to rate their computer knowledge.’
  • 37) ‘He appears to have very little knowledge with regard to the Internet and IT.’
  • 38) ‘Installing the card and the software was extremely straightforward with no need for specialist technical knowledge.’
  • 39) ‘Held back in her career by dyslexia, she struggled to learn new skills but realised that computer knowledge was the key to getting ahead.’
  • 40) ‘If others with more knowledge of the procedure e-mail me, I'll put out a further update.’
  • 41) ‘Research has shown that those who are least comfortable with computer technology have the least knowledge of it.’
  • 42) ‘In my opinion, a school is far more than an institution which imparts knowledge and wisdom to its students.’
  • 43) ‘Some people say that with age comes wisdom and knowledge, and as such you can live a much richer life.’
  • 44) ‘There is among the people of the nation a hunger for learning and knowledge, in many aspects of their lives.’
  • 45) ‘A scientific fact is knowledge that can be gained by means of scientific research.’
  • 46) ‘These steps opened the doors to the transmission of ideas and knowledge from Europe.’
  • 47) ‘I wondered too if we will ever find a way for a more efficient transmission of knowledge.’
  • 48) ‘Renaissance science also received added impetus from the increased transmission of knowledge between east and west.’
  • 49) ‘As they disappear, so does their ancient culture, their wisdom, their knowledge.’
  • 50) ‘We owe it to the younger generation to pass on the vast lore, knowledge and expertise and let them know the heritage of the county.’
  • 51) ‘He does experimental and anthropological research on the transmission of cultural knowledge.’
  • 52) ‘The people in China have traditional respect for scholarship and knowledge.’
  • 53) ‘The profession must recognise that it does not have a monopoly of either wisdom or knowledge.’
  • 54) ‘This anthology pairs contemporary stories with folk tales, many of which interpret natural phenomena in the light of local knowledge and lore.’
  • 55) ‘Artists are asked to submit works that explore the importance of cultural knowledge and the wisdom of elders.’
  • 56) ‘The fact is that judgments are inevitably based on the knowledge available at the time.’
  • 57) ‘This study aims to contribute to the body of knowledge in these areas.’
  • 58) ‘This would mean that an entire realm of academic knowledge would be inaccessible to students.’
  • 59) ‘Her grasp of scientific truth in all branches of knowledge, combined with an exceptional power of exposition, made her the most remarkable woman of her generation.’
  • 60) ‘One goal for writing this software was to categorize knowledge for easy future retrieval by multiple users.’
  • 61) ‘The server now has enough knowledge to honor a data transfer request from the client.’
  • 62) ‘Technology has evolved; knowledge has evolved - and so has the number of computers online.’
  • 63) ‘Conceptual change has huge consequences for those attempting to organize knowledge for retrieval and use.’
  • 64) ‘However, almost all internalists will agree that knowledge entails justified true belief.’
  • 65) ‘So the true question of objective knowledge is: how can I know the world as it is?’
  • 66) ‘One begins the long epistemological road to true knowledge via desire.’
  • 67) ‘However, we must here recognize that to Kant, consciousness, and thus, knowledge, is specific to the domain of the human being.’
  • 68) ‘As a rationalist, he believed that the only path to true knowledge was through logic.’
  • 69) ‘Police are appealing for witnesses to come forward, including a lorry driver who may have been involved in the incident without his knowledge.’
  • 70) ‘If your computer is permanently connected, the chances are that, sooner or later, an attempt will be made to access it without your knowledge.’
  • 71) ‘The thefts only came to light when one customer noticed that money had been taken from her account without her knowledge.’
  • 72) ‘Without his knowledge, the council released CCTV footage of his actions to the media.’
  • 73) ‘Angry residents claim a mobile phone mast was installed near their homes without their knowledge.’
  • 74) ‘On her deathbed, she apparently signed a new will without my knowledge.’
  • 75) ‘Very often they respond to an emergency call in the knowledge that they may encounter very challenging or dangerous situations.’
  • 76) ‘He also says other executives committed accounting irregularities without his knowledge.’
  • 77) ‘People's knowledge of the fact that they are being observed may make them behave less naturally.’
  • 78) ‘Close friends and family reportedly knew, but his sexuality was not public knowledge.’
  • 79) ‘We have no secrets from one another, and know that we can tell each other anything in the sure and certain knowledge that the other will respond in a loving fashion.’
  • 80) ‘One thing very important to the dying is the knowledge that they will be remembered after they are gone.’
  • 81) ‘Then you could have spyware software running on your computer without your knowledge.’
  • 82) ‘Banks must be more proactive in this area as a lack of public knowledge will only serve to increase consumer reluctance to go online with their bank.’
  • 83) ‘The infected computers can then be used to attack a Web site without their owners' knowledge.’
  • 84) ‘Without their knowledge, innocent computer users may trigger the virus by simply browsing a website.’
  • 85) ‘He denied all knowledge of the bank robbery, but police were able to detain him on a technicality.’
  • 86) ‘They thrive on risk, happy in the knowledge that the greater the risks taken then the greater the potential rewards.’
  • 87) ‘Pakistan were content to bat out for a draw on the last day, secure in the knowledge that they only had to protect their 1 - 0 lead.’
  • 88) ‘If you've got a pension, do you feel secure in the knowledge that your money is in safe hands?’

Examples

  • 1) Yet conventional wisdom suggests that such tactics do not work for luxury goods.
  • 2) In doing so they fool themselves that the wisdom of the people must inevitably support their world view.
  • 3) His success is defying conventional wisdom.
  • 4) There is a man in the Bundesliga who is turning convention and received wisdom on its head.
  • 5) A case in point is the conventional wisdom on inequality.
  • 6) I don't see how anyone can question my wisdom.
  • 7) When you're in a hole stop digging, the conventional wisdom suggests.
  • 8) wisdom was the ability to act on this information and stop smoking.
  • 9) We can learn much from that ancient wisdom.
  • 10) wisdom means foundational knowledge about life and how it all works and fits together.
  • 11) This research contradicts much of the received wisdom on the link between income and happiness.
  • 12) Nor is the wisdom of age restricted to musicians.
  • 13) People are apt to question the wisdom of this.
  • 14) Today he is having a wisdom tooth removed and tomorrow he is back on his bin round.
  • 15) Pop and jazz standards delivered with wit and wisdom by urbane vocalist.
  • 16) This became the accepted wisdom by the end of the day.
  • 17) wisdom makes a particularly big contribution to happiness in old age.
  • 18) The other is the theme of drawing on ancient wisdom to resolve conflict.
  • 19) People have wisdom on their side when they say that football is less and less a physical game.
  • 20) We have lost all wisdom, all sense of touch or smell or fear or recognition.
  • 21) This is not the world of wrestling with the forces of darkness so much as having the wisdom and the insight to change.
  • 22) To him the bird's long face seemed full of patience and wisdom.
  • 23) You have the wisdom and ability to draw a line under the past and convince people to see how good change can be.
  • 24) It means practical wisdom, a sense of yourself and the world that comes naturally to you.
  • 25) That's the wisdom of the people.
  • 26) SPIRIT, by which was "revealed" to them "_The wisdom of God_ ... even the _hidden wisdom_, which GOD ordained before the world."
  • 27) As it says in the beginning, -- "Tending babies is an art, and every art is founded on a science of observations; for love is not wisdom, but love must act _according to wisdom_ in order to succeed.
  • 28) He seems to believe his wisdom is a good substitute for the collective wisdom of his colleagues.
  • 29) I did not always listen, but his wisdom is a part of me today.
  • 30) “But I offer it to you as a piece of ancient wisdom, what we call the wisdom of the East.”
  • 31) Welcoming the South African delegation, which is attending Lome for the first time since its inception in 1957, European Union co-president Henry Lord Plumb paid tribute to what he called the wisdom and courage of President Nelson Mandela and other South
  • 32) And truly the reason may in part be, that people have become doubtful whether colleges are now the real sources of what I called wisdom; whether they are anything more, anything much more, than a cultivating of man in the specific arts.
  • 33) All our days are so unprofitable while they pass, that 'tis wonderful where or when we ever got anything of this which we call wisdom, poetry, virtue.
  • 34) Why that has decayed away may in part be that people have become doubtful that colleges are now the real sources of that which I call wisdom, whether they are anything more -- anything much more -- than a cultivating of man in the specific arts.
  • 35) ‘And a stoic is a person who combines the qualities of wisdom, upright dealing, and courage.’
  • 36) ‘For all her power, he felt she lacked wisdom and judgement, and it was past time she learned her place.’
  • 37) ‘The authors of these guides have years of inside knowledge, wisdom and practical experience to pass on to you.’
  • 38) ‘His knowledge, his passion and his wisdom from years of experience were invaluable to our program.’
  • 39) ‘I waited eagerly for words of wisdom from a man at the very pinnacle of his career, I thought he'd be sure to know what to put right.’
  • 40) ‘So, do you have any word of wisdom, especially to any of the new first years out there?’
  • 41) ‘She still has powerful words of wisdom about the need to find peaceful means to resolve conflict.’
  • 42) ‘That way, new readers can enjoy some older posts, and older readers can get reacquainted with my words of wisdom.’
  • 43) ‘He thought you might have some pertinent words of wisdom that you could impart upon me to help me deal with my troubles.’
  • 44) ‘He is also an accomplished composer and well-used to dispensing words of wisdom.’
  • 45) ‘Just as he was about to deliver his words of wisdom, a team-mate chucked a bucket of water over his head.’
  • 46) ‘Ideally, scholars grow in understanding and wisdom by gaining and sharing knowledge.’
  • 47) ‘And if you have any words of wisdom, or advice about how to make the coming ordeal any less painful, feel free to let me know.’
  • 48) ‘I tried to listen to his short but heartfelt words of wisdom, but nothing came from it.’
  • 49) ‘As if our cheap words and wisdom could somehow rectify the suffering of this world!’
  • 50) ‘They must have a long line for my workshop waiting to hear me impart words of wisdom.’
  • 51) ‘She was pretty sure that she was the one who gave him the words of wisdom that kept him going.’
  • 52) ‘It was the voice of a male, speaking with wisdom behind the simple words.’
  • 53) ‘Then we grow elderly, and we have the greater experience and wisdom of a lifetime with which to understand.’
  • 54) ‘I feel like I'm at the stage of converting bitter experience into wisdom.’
  • 55) ‘If spending on this scale is sensible, its wisdom ought to be demonstrable.’
  • 56) ‘It was only months later, when her father suffered a heart attack, that she questioned the rabbis' wisdom.’
  • 57) ‘The old woman showed great wisdom in asking the question that she did.’
  • 58) ‘The utilitarian wisdom that which benefits the greater number is what is good holds true in this regard.’
  • 59) ‘When sick I want to be cared for by doctors who every day doubt the value and wisdom of what they do and this book will help make such doctors.’
  • 60) ‘He took his wisdom to consist in the fact that he knows that he does not know.’
  • 61) ‘Nobody questions the wisdom behind the decision to set up the commission.’
  • 62) ‘Others, however, question the wisdom of such a decision and argue that it seems an expensive way to boost circulation.’
  • 63) ‘Some economists have questioned the wisdom of such a large investment, the BBC said.’
  • 64) ‘In the wake of such a tragedy, some may even question the wisdom of trying to rebuild the city at all.’
  • 65) ‘But some critics have questioned the wisdom of a costly project that could go horribly over budget.’
  • 66) ‘This has led some commentators to question the wisdom of having the majority of a fund's money invested in equities.’
  • 67) ‘It is for this reason that commentators question the wisdom of the deal.’
  • 68) ‘I question the wisdom of the leaders on both sides who have caused this polarisation.’
  • 69) ‘Some may question the wisdom of arranging a first date at an unfamiliar restaurant.’
  • 70) ‘It was about then that I questioned the wisdom of skipping supper before coming out.’
  • 71) ‘This goes against the technical wisdom of classifying markets by value of free floating stocks alone.’
  • 72) ‘Some of the stories suitably blend the wisdom of the proverbs and the story line.’
  • 73) ‘If you downgrade the source of your wisdom, you downgrade the value of the wisdom.’
  • 74) ‘Again, your Honour, it is a question of the courts deferring to the wisdom of the legislature.’
  • 75) ‘The second human characteristic is a widespread tendency to accept conventional wisdoms, be they religious, economic or scientific.’
  • 76) ‘Allies need to do more about training good minds who are expert on Asia and who are not afraid of challenging conventional intelligence wisdoms.’
  • 77) ‘He said the country was well placed to draw on established moral wisdoms, such as African, Hindu, Islamic, Jewish, Christian and other faiths and securalist views.’
  • 78) ‘In fact everyone must eventually be involved to integrate these wisdoms into our community.’
  • 79) ‘Eventually, Blavatsky brought the spiritual wisdoms of the East and of ancient Western mysteries to the modern West, where they were virtually unknown.’
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