raze vs raise vs rise

raze raise rise

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete A Shakespearean word (used once) supposed to mean the same as race, a root.
  • 2) An obsolete form of racc.
  • 3) A swinging fence set up in a watercourse to prevent the passage of cattle.
  • 4) transitive To demolish; to level to the ground.
  • 5) transitive To scrape as if with a razor.
  • 6) tear down so as to make flat with the ground
  • 7) Seerase.
  • 8) To scrape or shave off.
  • 9) To level to the ground; demolish. synonym: destroy.
  • 10) To erase.
  • 11) To erase; to efface; to obliterate.
  • 12) To subvert from the foundation; to lay level with the ground; to overthrow; to destroy; to demolish.

Definitions

  • 1) The act of raising or increasing.
  • 2) An increase in salary.
  • 3) In mining, a rise; a riser; an opening at the back of a level to connect it to the level above.
  • 4) A raising or lifting; removal by lifting or taking away, as of obstructions.
  • 5) A raising or enlarging in amount; an increase or advance: as, a raise of wages; a raise of the stakes in gaming.
  • 6) Something raised, elevated, or built up; an ascent; a rise; a pile; a cairn.
  • 7) A dialectal (Scotch) preterit of rise.
  • 8) An acquisition; a getting or procuring by special effort, as of money or chattels: as, to make a raise of a hundred dollars.
  • 9) To make contact with by radio.
  • 10) To bring up; rear.
  • 11) To gather together; collect.
  • 12) To bring about; provoke.
  • 13) To increase a poker bet or a bridge bid.
  • 14) To cause to arise, appear, or exist.
  • 15) To voice; utter.
  • 16) To cause (dough) to puff up.
  • 17) Nautical To bring into sight by approaching nearer.
  • 18) To improve in rank or dignity; promote.
  • 19) To increase the bid of (one's bridge partner).
  • 20) To alter and increase fraudulently the written value of (a check, for example).
  • 21) Scots To make angry; enrage.
  • 22) To erect or build.
  • 23) To awaken; arouse.
  • 24) To increase in intensity, degree, strength, or pitch.
  • 25) To increase in size, quantity, or worth.
  • 26) To remove or withdraw (an order).
  • 27) To set in an upright or erect position.
  • 28) To end (a siege) by withdrawing troops or forcing the enemy troops to withdraw.
  • 29) To put forward for consideration: synonym: broach.
  • 30) To bet more than (a preceding bettor in poker).
  • 31) To cough up (phlegm).
  • 32) To move to a higher position; elevate: synonym: lift.
  • 33) To breed and care for to maturity.
  • 34) To stir up; instigate.
  • 35) To increase (a poker bet).
  • 36) To accustom to something from an early age.
  • 37) To grow, especially in quantity; cultivate.
  • 38) (Cain/the devil) /hell) To reprimand someone angrily.
  • 39) (raise eyebrows) To cause surprise or mild disapproval.
  • 40) (Cain/the devil) /hell) To behave in a rowdy or disruptive fashion.
  • 41) (raise the stakes) To increase one's commitment or involvement.

Definitions

  • 1) A long broad elevation that slopes gently from the earth's surface or the ocean floor.
  • 2) The distance between the crotch and waistband in pants, shorts, or underwear.
  • 3) The act of rising; an ascent.
  • 4) Chiefly British An increase in salary or wages; a raise.
  • 5) An increase in height, as of the level of water.
  • 6) Informal An angry or irritated reaction.
  • 7) An origin, beginning, or source.
  • 8) The height of a flight of stairs or of a single riser.
  • 9) The degree of elevation or ascent.
  • 10) Occasion or opportunity.
  • 11) An increase in intensity, volume, or pitch.
  • 12) A gently sloped hill.
  • 13) An increase in price, worth, quantity, or degree.
  • 14) Elevation in status, prosperity, or importance.
  • 15) The emergence of a fish seeking food or bait at the water's surface.
  • 16) The first appearance of a celestial object as it ascends above the horizon.
  • 17) Appearance above the horizon: as, the rise of the sun or a star.
  • 18) Increase; advance: said of price: as, a rise in (the price of) stocks or wheat.
  • 19) Any place elevated above the common level; a rising ground: as, a rise of land.
  • 20) Elevation; degree of ascent: as, the rise of a hill or a road.
  • 21) The act of rising; ascent: as, the rise of vapor in the air; the rise of water in a river; the rise of mercury in a barometer.
  • 22) Spring; source; origin; beginning: as, the rise of a stream in a mountain.
  • 23) Height to which one can rise mentally or spiritually; elevation possible to thought or feeling.
  • 24) Elevation in rank, reputation, wealth, or importance; mental or moral elevation.
  • 25) Increase of sound; swell.
  • 26) In base-ball, a peculiar delivery of the ball which makes it rise so that the tendency of the batsman is to strike under it.
  • 27) The difference in diameter, or taper, between two points in a log.
  • 28) To increase in size, volume, or level.
  • 29) To attain a higher status.
  • 30) To move from a lower to a higher position; ascend.
  • 31) To close a session of an official assembly; adjourn.
  • 32) To extend upward; be prominent.
  • 33) To come into existence; originate.
  • 34) To cause to rise.
  • 35) To get out of bed.
  • 36) To ascend above the horizon.
  • 37) To increase in pitch or volume.
  • 38) To increase in intensity, force, or speed.
  • 39) To assume a standing position after lying, sitting, or kneeling.
  • 40) To return to life.
  • 41) To cause (a distant object at sea) to become visible above the horizon by advancing closer.
  • 42) To slant or slope upward.
  • 43) To become apparent to the mind or senses.
  • 44) To increase in number, amount, or value.
  • 45) To puff up or become larger; swell up.
  • 46) To be erected.
  • 47) To rebel.
  • 48) To appear at the surface of the water or the earth; emerge.
  • 49) To become stiff and erect.
  • 50) To uplift oneself to meet a demand or challenge.

Examples

  • 1) Here older homes are being razed to make way for new houses.
  • 2) To see the shop razed to the ground was like suffering a bereavement.
  • 3) Thousands of vacant properties were razed to the ground.
  • 4) Schools have also been razed to the ground.
  • 5) It was razed to the ground by the council.
  • 6) His village was razed to the ground.
  • 7) Cities and castles were razed to the ground.
  • 8) Hundreds of homes have been destroyed and entire towns razed.
  • 9) Much of the city is razed.
  • 10) Another village razed to the ground.
  • 11) He emerged to discover the city razed, and was put to work clearing bodies.
  • 12) Houses belonging to prominent Catholics were razed to the ground.
  • 13) Both suffered extensive damage in the war, particularly the latter which was almost completely razed to the ground.
  • 14) The racing was raised to new global heights, but news was that the track would be razed to the ground.
  • 15) It won her the Turner Prize before being razed to the ground.
  • 16) In one weekend last month 42 churches in Egypt were razed to the ground.
  • 17) The coach's pad in Australia was razed to the ground in a blaze caused by an electrical fault.
  • 18) And now the photographs are of Polish villages instead, razed to the ground and with only the chimneys left standing.
  • 19) ‘Next it was the turn of armoured bulldozers to raze building after building.’
  • 20) ‘A frenzy of hotel building razed old neighbourhoods and transformed city centres.’
  • 21) ‘Military bulldozers yesterday knocked down all the structures in Kadim, and were razing buildings in Ganim.’
  • 22) ‘Troops were razing buildings and killing people as they were encountered.’
  • 23) ‘Who would start a restoration project by razing the building to be restored almost to the ground?’
  • 24) ‘And this week, the Mayfair building was finally razed to the ground.’
  • 25) ‘Temporary facilities have been in place since the former service area building was razed to the ground last October.’
  • 26) ‘Neither our lease nor our budget will allow us to raze our buildings to put in showcase-perfect sustainable materials.’
  • 27) ‘Work began to raze the building in February this year.’
  • 28) ‘The old village was razed to the ground, and very quickly the new town of Abbeyleix became established.’
  • 29) ‘She slaughtered all Roman inhabitants and razed the town.’
  • 30) ‘In 1968, New York City razed the existing buildings and planted grass on the island.’
  • 31) ‘Some three hundred buildings were razed with a property loss estimated at three million dollars.’
  • 32) ‘As if to exact revenge on being chased back to the desert, the border villages and towns were razed to the ground.’
  • 33) ‘I will raze the whole building to the ground, if that's what it takes to prove myself.’
  • 34) ‘If you join, I will have no need to raze your towns and capture your villages.’
  • 35) ‘They talk of ‘carpet bombing’ and razing whole cities to the ground.’

Examples

  • 1) Tonight is all about raising money and awareness for veterans worldwide.
  • 2) We just have to find a different way to raise the money.
  • 3) Vertical introductions are rarely a way of raising prices.
  • 4) The move has raised hopes it could boost investor payouts and launch share buybacks.
  • 5) But his comments raise some interesting questions.
  • 6) Now two petitions have raised enough for her.
  • 7) You can reduce the neck twist by raising one side of your body with a pillow.
  • 8) It also raises the longstanding dilemma of whether gorillas should be in captivity at all.
  • 9) Their disappearances have sent a shiver through liberal civil society and raised fears of a sinister new crackdown.
  • 10) The fog was now thinning, and the crew raised two flags.
  • 11) He says he plans to appeal in a bid to get it raised to five games.
  • 12) Used to be my chemistry teacher before he needed to raise money for medical bills.
  • 13) The move will raise fears over safety by having more women in the frontline.
  • 14) The solutions suggested yesterday raise as many questions as they do answers.
  • 15) She bore him two sons and raised his eldest.
  • 16) This raises the question of when one will overtake the other.
  • 17) The result is an extraordinarily eclectic mixture that has drawn applause but also raised a few eyebrows.
  • 18) The red flags were raised some time ago.
  • 19) You meet where cash is being raised for good causes.
  • 20) You can do your bit to raise awareness by watching.
  • 21) Now she was trying to raise money to set up an arts project.
  • 22) The move raises the prospect that motorists could face fines for overtaking too close to cyclists.
  • 23) The new emphasis on conventional warfare has also raised questions about political control of conflict.
  • 24) No one thought to raise the matter of the financial crisis.
  • 25) Clearly the forensic issues raised will cause us to look at other cases.
  • 26) You discover the showbiz side of your personality when friends get together to raise money for a charity.
  • 27) More recently there have been a number of stories raising concern about what is happening in Iran.
  • 28) This autumn the big six suppliers have raised their prices by an average of 9.1 per cent.
  • 29) Sources in both companies moved to damp down fears raised by British trade unions.
  • 30) The companies involved will increase the number of four-star hotels and raise the price of overnight stays.
  • 31) It has raised some questions about some client conflict, where competing brands are run by the same agency.
  • 32) ‘Kim yelled from the platform as she raised her arms and closed her eyes.’
  • 33) ‘I didn't notice that the easel was on a platform raised seven inches above the ground.’
  • 34) ‘Lee tried to throw a punch at his nemesis, but couldn't raise his arm above the level of his belt.’
  • 35) ‘The cargo worker had raised the loader platform level with the luggage hold and stepped into the hold to check everything before the flight.’
  • 36) ‘His injuries are still with him; he cannot raise his arms above his shoulders; he still has a slight limp.’
  • 37) ‘However carried away you get, don't raise your arms above your head.’
  • 38) ‘To this day, he cannot raise his arms above his shoulders.’
  • 39) ‘This pain usually is worse when you raise your arm or lift something above your head.’
  • 40) ‘Holding your left arm steady, raise your right arm above your head.’
  • 41) ‘An equally well worked move resulted in Duffy raising the green flag at the other end.’
  • 42) ‘Grasp a dumbbell in each hand, and raise your arms straight above your head, keeping elbows slightly bent.’
  • 43) ‘Some suggested that the road could be raised above normal flood levels.’
  • 44) ‘The soldiers swept into a police station in the compound and raised a flag above it.’
  • 45) ‘Have the trains been raised or the platforms lowered since the Alice to Darwin leg was built?’
  • 46) ‘He only stood still, fists raised in a defensive stance as he tried to relocate his opponent.’
  • 47) ‘When the stadium plan was put to a vote in the audience, not one hand was raised in support.’
  • 48) ‘Some people stood with their arms raised, as if in blessing, and they swayed slightly as they prayed.’
  • 49) ‘Sit or stand with one arm raised to shoulder height in front of your body, elbow bent.’
  • 50) ‘The feeling of suspicion faded as soon as she breathed the cool air of the night, the cigar smoke fading into a memory as she moved forward, raising her hood over her curls.’
  • 51) ‘They suggest raising the proposed buildings on the site and demolishing and remodelling the existing stone flood barrier on the banks of the Aire to ease the flow in times of flooding.’
  • 52) ‘It is slowly raised upright, a careful job made more arduous by high heat and humidity.’
  • 53) ‘Squeeze with your glutes and hamstrings to push your hips forward and raise your torso back to the upright position.’
  • 54) ‘In 1990 the tree on which they grow was blown over by a cyclone - or the fringes of one - but we managed to raise it up again.’
  • 55) ‘The other two guards were stunned to see their partner raised from the ground, but their shock lasted only a heartbeat.’
  • 56) ‘He wept and lay face down on the ground until the emperor sent his servants over to raise him up and bring him.’
  • 57) ‘But what distinguishes the worst architect from the best of bees is this, that the architect raises his structure in imagination before he erects it in reality.’
  • 58) ‘By raising the mill structure, the work caused the River Sow to back up upstream leading to flooding in the southern part of the town.’
  • 59) ‘After the barn was raised, I built a cowshed and horse stall on the east side.’
  • 60) ‘In April we built propagation tables and raised the frame for the greenhouse.’
  • 61) ‘Basically, it appeared it would be easier to get permission to build a nuclear reactor in downtown Toronto then raise a wind turbine.’
  • 62) ‘But when the slums are burnt down to raise high rise buildings, they are completely quiet, they don't protest.’
  • 63) ‘It collided with the ground, raising up a good deal of dirt and dust.’
  • 64) ‘I think at the time they probably salvaged the shell that was on board and they were hoping to perhaps raise the vessel and restore it and get it going again.’
  • 65) ‘Cousteau raised the vessel and had it transported to France to await restoration.’
  • 66) ‘Divers have been visiting the wreck for the first time since the main part of the ship was raised in 1982.’
  • 67) ‘He thinks that if he can raise the boat he can refloat his dad, but he needs $5,000.’
  • 68) ‘It is up to them to decide whether to raise the ship.’
  • 69) ‘In December the Council raised the vessel, with the use of airbags, then towed it to a slipway before pumping it out.’
  • 70) ‘He even turned his hand to inventing, designing, among other things, a device for raising sunken vessels and a smoke helmet for firemen.’
  • 71) ‘The submarine could not be raised for six weeks, at which time the bodies on board were recovered’
  • 72) ‘He was part of a diving group that were using inflatable equipment to raise a boat which had gone down earlier.’
  • 73) ‘The Manx government spent more than £1 million on the recovery operation, using divers to retrieve the bodies in February and finally raising the boat in June.’
  • 74) ‘It was not until the middle of March that the submarine was raised properly and the bodies of the dead could be recovered.’
  • 75) ‘One thing that fascinated me on hearing that the Russians were bent on raising the crippled sub was exactly how one goes about lifting it, with live torpedoes still aboard?’
  • 76) ‘He said an attempt would be made to raise the submarine from the seabed and that financial assistance will be offered to the families of the dead.’
  • 77) ‘Earlier this year another group found and raised the ship's bell and the name was confirmed.’
  • 78) ‘Nobody is suggesting that munitions be raised to the surface.’
  • 79) ‘Attached were the steel cables that would allow the Kursk to be raised to the surface.’
  • 80) ‘We'll do whatever it takes to recover the bodies and to raise the submarine and to figure it out.’
  • 81) ‘The Japan Coast Guard filmed the body of the ship last week using an underwater camera, and plans to conduct a further probe in late April using divers and submersible vessels before raising it.’
  • 82) ‘Last month experts began the tricky task of raising the first section, the range finder - the first move in what is expected to be at least a three-year operation.’
  • 83) ‘In stark contrast to the days in which this unseen force served, the boats have now been raised as monuments for all to see.’
  • 84) ‘Added to selective breeding is another step, another human act, that of using yeast to raise the bread or ferment the wine.’
  • 85) ‘French pastrycooks make beignets - yeast raised jam-filled doughnuts.’
  • 86) ‘The increase comes amidst reports that all banks are set to raise interest rates after years of offering cheap credit.’
  • 87) ‘It is the fourth time the Bank has raised interest rates since November.’
  • 88) ‘Last week, both the United States Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank raised interest rates.’
  • 89) ‘The Bank of England has raised interest rates four times since last November.’
  • 90) ‘The central bank is likely to raise interest rates in the next two months in response to domestic inflation topping 5%.’
  • 91) ‘It is one of my aims to try to raise the level of awareness of the charity in the area and to encourage recruitment.’
  • 92) ‘The institute found that an increase in credit provision raises the rate of insolvencies.’
  • 93) ‘The bizarre sight of two snorkellers in wetsuits and extreme wet weather gear at the crossroads in Regent Street was aimed at raising awareness of how climate change is increasing the risk of flooding.’
  • 94) ‘Read has been active for 23 years and aims to raise the quality of education and increase the literacy rate in South Africa.’
  • 95) ‘Until now, health officials have had to work hard to raise awareness and increase demand for the flu shots among these groups.’
  • 96) ‘The night is being organised by World Snooker as part of their initiative aimed at increasing participation levels and raising playing standards within snooker.’
  • 97) ‘We have worked hard over the last few months to raise the awareness and interest for broadband and had a meeting on Monday evening to collate all the forms.’
  • 98) ‘His role will be to raise awareness and increase the political will to tackle the disease.’
  • 99) ‘The children and young people of our area are taking the lead in raising awareness of the amount of litter and vandalism on our streets and parks.’
  • 100) ‘Voices raised now stand an excellent chance of being heard.’
  • 101) ‘That nod-and-wink style of governing needlessly raises business risk.’
  • 102) ‘But there are some advantages in taking direct action: it certainly raises public awareness.’
  • 103) ‘Besides, she thought, a little excitement would help raise her spirits.’
  • 104) ‘And part of his brief includes managing the facility and raising its profile within the local community.’
  • 105) ‘The rankings reflect how education systems manage to raise the achievement of less able pupils.’
  • 106) ‘Auchinleck's successful career in the Indian Army had, by 1939, raised him to the rank of maj-general.’
  • 107) ‘Thus by virtue of her humility she was raised to a higher rank.’
  • 108) ‘He deftly sidestepped the falls of Anne Boleyn and Thomas Cromwell and was raised to the peerage.’
  • 109) ‘Thomson was knighted in 1866 and raised to the peerage as Lord Kelvin of Largs in 1892.’
  • 110) ‘In September 1945 he was raised to the peerage, and retired the following March.’
  • 111) ‘You need only know about raising a number to a power -- multiplying it by itself a certain number of times: for example, 2³ (2 raised to the power of 3) = 2 x 2 x 2 = 8.’
  • 112) ‘Evaluate phi and raise it to the power 4 on your calculator.’
  • 113) ‘The recipe in this case is to take each prime p from 2 to infinity, raise it to the power s, then after some further arithmetic multiply together the terms for all p.’
  • 114) ‘They raise serious doubts about her past and present conduct, and whether she should have been allowed to settle in Australia.’
  • 115) ‘There is nothing to forgive anyone for; no one need feel guilty about raising any doubts about the proposal.’
  • 116) ‘He raises some doubts about some of this information.’
  • 117) ‘Reasonable doubt has been raised about the accuracy of the survey.’
  • 118) ‘He instantly raised the alarm and neighbours entered the smoke filled kitchen and pulled her from the dwelling.’
  • 119) ‘The committee also raised doubts about the Ministry's ability to learn the lessons from previous conflicts.’
  • 120) ‘More broadly, this raises not just a practical point but a moral one.’
  • 121) ‘Nowhere during the campaign did I hear or see the question of support for poorer students raised with candidates or in the media.’
  • 122) ‘The group use the hand waves to signal their agreement or disagreement, and a minute-taker speaks only to clarify points raised.’
  • 123) ‘It was only in response to the application that the issue of retroactive child support was raised.’
  • 124) ‘New public management, with its heavy emphasis on networks and partnerships, raises new questions about record keeping.’
  • 125) ‘Other stories in this issue also raise what might be called legacy questions.’
  • 126) ‘Another issue raised by submitters was the extension to the criminal limitation period.’
  • 127) ‘The decision to build a centre was first raised at a local meeting in 2000.’
  • 128) ‘These findings necessarily raise disturbing questions about the validity of the opinions expressed by medical experts in the courts.’
  • 129) ‘We were just in the process of proceeding to a party vote when points of order were raised about the calling of the voice vote.’
  • 130) ‘A point of order was raised earlier concerning the lodging of written questions.’
  • 131) ‘I hope I clarified some of the questions without raising too many others.’
  • 132) ‘Workers claim that they have been harassed and intimidated after complaining about working conditions and raising the issue of unionization.’
  • 133) ‘The ease with which electronic content can be copied and reproduced raises a multitude of copyright, trademark, database and passing off issues.’
  • 134) ‘They will raise an interim invoice in respect of the work that the claims manager will carry out on the case.’
  • 135) ‘Although the computer was used to raise invoices it did not print a sales day book.’
  • 136) ‘We would then raise an invoice for £75k with standard payment terms.’
  • 137) ‘She has not been allowed to see documents to prove a travel warrant was raised.’
  • 138) ‘Invoice discounting provides a company with cash against invoices raised to trade debtors.’
  • 139) ‘Emma campaigned for years, raising a petition and badgering councillors.’
  • 140) ‘The campaign is being led by a teacher who has raised a petition calling on highway chiefs to take action.’
  • 141) ‘They raised two petitions and sent 64 letters of objection.’
  • 142) ‘A petition was raised condemning the council's actions and Smith was voted out of office in that year's elections.’
  • 143) ‘Residents insisted a petition be raised to ensure that all villagers could support the council's position.’
  • 144) ‘We are raising a petition, organising meetings and we are going to write to the Pope.’
  • 145) ‘He also agreed the false invoice raised to cover the donation was unorthodox.’
  • 146) ‘Workers at the factory are raising a petition protesting against the move.’
  • 147) ‘I explained that the only way to do this with the speed they required was to raise a purchase order.’
  • 148) ‘Any further delay in raising a purchase order will make it more likely that this critical phase in the project will not be delivered within your desired time-scales.’
  • 149) ‘Different student clubs within the community are planning events to raise funds and provide resources for the relief effort.’
  • 150) ‘The money raised by this collection was used to paint the corridors of the school.’
  • 151) ‘He had to sell part of the stamp collection to raise funds.’
  • 152) ‘A bring and buy sale at the library on Saturday attracted a lot of support and raised £400.’
  • 153) ‘The royal bodyguard and a navy were maintained and the revenue to support them raised.’
  • 154) ‘The raffle raised £80 to support an orphanage for street children in Romania.’
  • 155) ‘The school raised £50,000 in support of its bid, which will mean a massive funding boost if it succeeds.’
  • 156) ‘Supporters have raised more than £100,000 towards the planned takeover deal.’
  • 157) ‘The money raised provides ongoing support for AIDS orphaned children in Zambia.’
  • 158) ‘The campaign helped the company raise money and generate partnership interest.’
  • 159) ‘The club flourished and became a limited company in 1894 and capital was raised to build a new super stadium at Burnden Park.’
  • 160) ‘The funding to purchase these properties was raised from individual investors who purchased shares in the companies.’
  • 161) ‘She pledged to raise cash to buy play equipment so that residents could build a new play park.’
  • 162) ‘They had built Fort St. David in Cuddalore and they raised an army here and began their ascent to power.’
  • 163) ‘Trustees who run the facility are trying to raise £800,000 to build a roof so it can be used all year and generate more cash.’
  • 164) ‘There is little prospect of raising the required amount.’
  • 165) ‘Put another way, the government cannot raise large amounts of revenue from a tax that can easily be avoided.’
  • 166) ‘Clark hopes to raise up to $50 million from investors in the first year.’
  • 167) ‘He was finally appointed lieutenant colonel and authorized to raise a regiment.’
  • 168) ‘They raised a force of 6,000 to join the army - raw recruits, including many London apprentices.’
  • 169) ‘One of the strangest things that happens to you when you are raising a toddler is how the normally mundane things get you incredibly excited.’
  • 170) ‘A divorced woman raising a youngster is nearly three times more likely to file for bankruptcy than her single friend who never had children.’
  • 171) ‘Traditionally, the mother was the primary caregiver, but recently the father and other family members have been recognized as equally important in raising infants.’
  • 172) ‘King wrote new rules for raising infants - strict four-hourly feeding, no night feeds, potty training from an early age and fresh air day and night.’
  • 173) ‘Infants are raised principally by the mother with the help of extended kin.’
  • 174) ‘An infant is raised by one or two parents and acquires an attachment, usually a strong one, to these people.’
  • 175) ‘They settled in Brooklyn and all of the children were raised and other generations born here.’
  • 176) ‘What's really annoying about this is that it's quite easy to raise a healthy infant on a vegan diet.’
  • 177) ‘You know it's a shame to be raised up in a world where there's nothing but fighting.’
  • 178) ‘We must ensure that the debate begins, and not ends, on how we protect children born and being raised in households blighted by drugs.’
  • 179) ‘Born in Indiana, raised by the 1960s, he has never retreated from the fight against the squares.’
  • 180) ‘Born and raised Mormon, he comes to all his shows dressed as a missionary.’
  • 181) ‘Moses was saved and raised up as an Egyptian; later he set the remaining Israelites free.’
  • 182) ‘Born in Hunan and raised by his grandparents while his parents worked in another region, Tan had a carefree childhood.’
  • 183) ‘Born in Canberra and raised by an adoptive Spanish mother and Paraguayan father, he has no doubt about his loyalty.’
  • 184) ‘He was born in Auckland but raised by his aunt and uncle in Tonga from the age of 1 until he was 7.’
  • 185) ‘It's because women drop out of the workforce, raise children, prefer jobs where they can work at home.’
  • 186) ‘This will reduce the number of latch-key kids, reduce loitering and crime on the streets and decrease the stress on mothers who try valiantly to juggle jobs, while at the same time looking after and raising a family.’
  • 187) ‘Stay-at-home pops like me enthusiastically welcome this affirmation; it validates the decision to let our salaried lives fall by the wayside in favor of raising our kids.’
  • 188) ‘My dad was the only one raising us and he became seriously ill.’
  • 189) ‘He now has no land to grow crops or raise cattle.’
  • 190) ‘In the wild, fruit trees are raised from seed, but when they are domesticated they need to be propagated by taking cuttings and grafting.’
  • 191) ‘Danish agriculture is so different, even though we raise the same crops and face the same challenges as the States.’
  • 192) ‘She explains that she raises beef cattle and grows grain, potatoes, hay, and also tends a small vegetable garden.’
  • 193) ‘He raised cattle and later added pigs and sheep to gain a steadier income to support his family.’
  • 194) ‘To raise the best crop, growers have to find that delicate balance between the two extremes.’
  • 195) ‘Furthermore, how many of us really know that we can raise crops without using pesticides and chemicals, and the benefits of using herbs in cooking?’
  • 196) ‘Once they have achieved that goal, they raise a cash crop.’
  • 197) ‘Many farms also raise poultry and livestock, and almost all farm families have at least one or two pigs.’
  • 198) ‘He didn't grow any crops or raise any animals but still he always seemed to prosper.’
  • 199) ‘Being a farm girl, I felt certain I could raise crops, tend livestock, and hunt game to feed my family.’
  • 200) ‘He comes from Bulgaria, where his family has a small farm and raises a few goats.’
  • 201) ‘A few years ago, the Hills began selling pork, and they're raising beef cattle for the first time this year.’
  • 202) ‘They raised crops and pastured their flocks in Morocco's mountainous inland regions.’
  • 203) ‘A project in the Himalayas diverts 6 million litres of sewage per day that would otherwise be dumped into the Ganges and uses it to raise fodder crops.’
  • 204) ‘If you don't live where citrus grows outdoors, you can raise plants in containers in greenhouses or solariums.’
  • 205) ‘The workers raise chickens, grow their own vegetables, have a fish tank and rent out space for horses.’
  • 206) ‘Manure gives him enough nitrogen, and more than enough phosphorous and potassium, to raise his crop.’
  • 207) ‘The research should also benefit those who raise sheep, since the genetic makeup of sheep is very similar to that of cattle.’
  • 208) ‘Livestock and sheep are raised, and the principal crops are cereals, fruits, citrus, and tobacco.’
  • 209) ‘So when he was raised from death, his friends remembered this, and they believed it.’
  • 210) ‘Jesus claimed to be God and God rewarded him by raising him from the dead - because he was telling the truth.’
  • 211) ‘Dozens of miracles and curses will allow you to wreak havoc on your enemies or even raise them from the dead to fight for you.’
  • 212) ‘Joan is captured by York while raising demonic spirits.’
  • 213) ‘Even our closest allies in the US and UK were shocked and mortified, raising the ghost of the White Australia policy.’
  • 214) ‘Witches are thought to have the power to raise angry spirits, and the anger of a spirit may or may not be justified in the view of the affected family.’
  • 215) ‘The idea of an expanding U.S. commitment, however, is precisely what raises the specter of quagmire for critics, raising ghosts of Vietnam.’
  • 216) ‘In 1836 the British Legion helped raise the siege of San Sebastián, and regular Royal Marines arrived to garrison a nearby port.’
  • 217) ‘In May 1645 Prince Rupert captured Leicester, forcing the parliamentarians to raise the siege of Oxford.’
  • 218) ‘On the approach of the Frankish army he again raised the siege, but this time the Franks gave battle.’
  • 219) ‘The Jeanne D'Arc of this film is no longer the heroic leader who raised the siege of Orleans.’
  • 220) ‘In 244 he seized Eryx in Sicily but was unable to raise the siege of Drepana.’
  • 221) ‘Later that afternoon, I heard another climber raising his partners farther down the mountain on his two-way radio.’
  • 222) ‘She figured she was safe enough to try raising the prison, so she configured the radio and transmitted a hailing.’
  • 223) ‘He raised the U.S. Coast Guard on VHF radio but was unable to provide his coordinates.’
  • 224) ‘Fucose was ligated to bovine serum albumin and antibodies were raised against the conjugate.’
  • 225) ‘It had become a laboratory standard or reference strain for raising antibodies and for challenge in virus neutralization test to detect and assay antibody in serum.’
  • 226) ‘Fucose was complexed with bovine serum albumin to raise antibodies against fucose.’
  • 227) ‘The filter is then probed with antibodies raised against a particular protein.’
  • 228) ‘Transverse taproot sections were treated with antibodies raised against the 23 kDa protein.’
  • 229) ‘With pension promises basically free, companies were also offering pension increases in lieu of salary raises, increasing their obligations.’
  • 230) ‘And employers, faced with falling demand and dwindling margins, cut back on salaries, raises, benefits, and other perks.’
  • 231) ‘I'm sure he was making a really long list of good things to say about me, and adding up a really long row of numbers that will be the raise in my salary.’
  • 232) ‘He kept Baker, but Baker, when refused a raise in salary, sat out the 1915 season.’
  • 233) ‘We gave up six years' worth of salary raises in exchange for stock in the employee stock ownership plan formed in 1994.’
  • 234) ‘Second, when salary raises were distributed, excellence in teaching would be weighed just as heavily as excellence in research.’
  • 235) ‘This means it will be difficult for the salary raise to go through without some departments having to make other cutbacks.’
  • 236) ‘Academics may fancy themselves ‘above’ the sordid world of commerce, but they fight mightily for raises, time off, perks.’
  • 237) ‘Far more than in the past, companies are using their paltry salary pools to reward stars with relatively meaty raises.’
  • 238) ‘In that last salary review, the judges had asked for a raise of $47,000 or 26 per cent.’
  • 239) ‘Rudd says salary was not the issue but admits he wanted a raise.’
  • 240) ‘And the teachers unions are out mostly for pay raises.’
  • 241) ‘Our raises are not keeping pace with inflation.’
  • 242) ‘And police officers get raises because they have a union.’
  • 243) ‘Companies stepped up hiring and gave workers bigger raises in July.’
  • 244) ‘Yearly raises in our profession range from infinitesimal to nonexistent.’
  • 245) ‘The rising cost of health benefits could more than cancel out proposed raises.’
  • 246) ‘His managers have taken 30-percent pay cuts, his workers haven't had a raise in three years.’
  • 247) ‘Conversely, if workers want a raise, they're going to have to fight for it.’
  • 248) ‘Over the next four years, he held more responsible jobs at the company, but these promotions weren't accompanied by raises.’
  • 249) ‘It is usual to agree, before the start of the game, a limit for bets and raises in the poker stage.’
  • 250) ‘In your example, player B did not have enough table stakes to cover future raises, so he went all-in.’
  • 251) ‘I need you to recommend a beginners' poker book, one that explains checking, raises, and the different games.’
  • 252) ‘Although there is a limit on bets and the number of raises per round, there is no limit on the number of rounds.’
  • 253) ‘I had nothing invested so far but jacks were a fair hand, worth calling a raise; or so I thought.’
  • 254) ‘Calling a bet, then digging back into your chip pile and declaring a raise is called a string-raise.’
  • 255) ‘I could have stayed alive in the tournament by making a small raise on the flop rather than going all-in.’
  • 256) ‘You want to limp and fold, while they limp and call your raises when you are in position.’
  • 257) ‘If someone raises your big blind and everyone folds, you're getting 3.5 to 1 on calling the raise.’
  • 258) ‘Second, he must not be sophisticated enough to read right through your semi-bluff raise.’
  • 259) ‘Then betting commences with raises, calls and folds as usual.’
  • 260) ‘Since you owed the pot 15 cents for calling and 25 for your raise, you would put 40 cents into the pot.’
  • 261) ‘After all bets and raises are called, hands are shown, and the winner collects or splits the pot.’
  • 262) ‘Routinely calling each raise from the blind may cost you quite a bit of money.’
  • 263) ‘For example, the more you bend your elbows on a flye or lateral raise, the easier it will be to lift the weight.’
  • 264) ‘When doing front raises, lift the dumbbells no higher than eye level.’
  • 265) ‘Precede this exercise with overhead presses and follow it with side laterals and bent-over lateral raises.’
  • 266) ‘He finishes with either bent-over lateral raises or dumbbell shrugs, alternating weekly between the two.’
  • 267) ‘The overhead press and overhead lateral raise are good movements to make your shoulders wider.’

Examples

  • 1) Pay rises for senior allies caused yet more dismay.
  • 2) It added price rises would hit activity and profits may be squeezed.
  • 3) His image transformation has long given rise to rumours that he has had a nose job.
  • 4) Will the slower pace of price rises allow more people to climb on to the ladder?
  • 5) When the sun rises, the droplets disappear.
  • 6) Stamp duty rises are blamed.
  • 7) Complaints about home care have jumped by a quarter in the past year alone and complaints over residential homes have risen by 21 per cent.
  • 8) The increase reflected rising construction costs and new measures to strengthen resistance to earthquakes, a Games official said.
  • 9) The quantity of electrical household appliances sold rose by 19 per cent on the month and the amount spent rose 24 per cent.
  • 10) Millions of public sector workers face modest pay rises and discontent is likely to grow.
  • 11) The richness and diversity of the forest itself gives rise to a similarly varied fauna.
  • 12) This wave of optimism has resulted in higher prices and rising activity.
  • 13) One conundrum for the government is rising domestic demand.
  • 14) The rise in house prices has been driven by overseas investment.
  • 15) Standards are rising in deprived areas where academies have replaced failing schools.
  • 16) There has also been a dramatic rise in people rolling their own cigarettes.
  • 17) He will have to learn to cope with the increased attention his rising reputation will bring.
  • 18) Rapid economic growth has given rise to what amounts to a gold rush.
  • 19) This is not merely the result of rising fuel costs.
  • 20) The recent round of energy price rises takes effect this month.
  • 21) For both reasons there is a rise in interest differentials in favor of the deficit country.
  • 22) To the left a small party was holding an entrenched position on rising ground.
  • 23) Those wetter conditions often come from the rising temperatures.
  • 24) But bubbling under is a rising movement led by women who are proud of their periods.
  • 25) Climbing the pole or a pay rise?
  • 26) Role ambiguity can also give rise to stress.
  • 27) There is also likely to be some relief for motorists with the cancellation of a planned fuel duty rise.
  • 28) Price of detached homes rises timesonline.
  • 29) There he rose to become financial controller of the group's overseas interests.
  • 30) Sources also said the basketball venue was under threat after a similar price rise to nearly 100m.
  • 31) Electronic cigs work by letting users inhale nicotine vapour and are exempt from any future duty rises as they do not contain tobacco.
  • 32) Setting goals and keeping a journal led to a 27 per cent activity rise over four months.
  • 33) The total number of complaints to financial services groups rose by 59 per cent, largely driven by grievances over payment protection insurance.
  • 34) ‘She didn't see the mist starting to rise from the ground.’
  • 35) ‘His brows rose, and he moved to touch my leg, but I slapped him.’
  • 36) ‘Small flames were beginning to rise, and she moved in towards the fire.’
  • 37) ‘Mists rose silently in sheets from the dewy ground before them, adding to the fog that already hung in blankets around the trekking army.’
  • 38) ‘The ship had risen off of the ground now and was moving forward, out of the hangar.’
  • 39) ‘Then the vehicle suddenly moved and began to rise vertically.’
  • 40) ‘A flock of birds rose from the green mist and took to the air.’
  • 41) ‘The dogs which but a short while ago had been barking and howling were silent, and a thick, damp mist was rising up from the hollow.’
  • 42) ‘Thin mist was rising into the air every time she panted.’
  • 43) ‘The mist started rise higher into the sky and the surroundings became clearer.’
  • 44) ‘He was still tensed, ready to move, his chest rising and falling with each breath.’
  • 45) ‘Your hands continue to rise, now tracing my hairline.’
  • 46) ‘The breakfast hall floor has large slabs of Devon stone, sections of which had risen up because of water damage.’
  • 47) ‘A faint curl of smoke rose at his feet, the remains of the fire that had died down late into the night.’
  • 48) ‘Apart from the occasional hissing jet of steam rising up into the morning air and smoke and flame from several burning vehicles, the world was completely still.’
  • 49) ‘He saw a great cloud of black smoke rising up into the morning air.’
  • 50) ‘A plume of black and grey smoke was slowly rising into the air.’
  • 51) ‘Here is just an endless succession of long boring tasks, and then there's the heat and the clouds of flies that rise from the river and make everything twice as hard.’
  • 52) ‘She turned, and saw just a stream of bubbles rising where he had been.’
  • 53) ‘The sun had finally risen above the horizon, lighting up her path.’
  • 54) ‘The sun had risen above the horizon, and threw a faint light over the mountains.’
  • 55) ‘Her eyes watched the stars dance as the full moon rose over the horizon.’
  • 56) ‘We reached the beach just as the sun was rising over the horizon in the east.’
  • 57) ‘They woke early in the morning when the sun had not risen above the mountains, and the moon was still visible.’
  • 58) ‘The full moon rose just after the sun went down, its shimmering reflection laying a carpet for me to sail on.’
  • 59) ‘The sun had just risen above the mountains, and the trees swayed in the gentle breeze.’
  • 60) ‘The moon was rising and the sun setting when she first glimpsed what she assumed was the oasis.’
  • 61) ‘The hot sun had risen, and the sand was burning his body.’
  • 62) ‘Here, or further along the coast when on his way by ship from Lima to Panama, Masefield might have seen the sun rising over the mountains.’
  • 63) ‘If the whole population was wiped out by Asian bird flu tomorrow, the sun would still rise; it is part of the external physical world.’
  • 64) ‘She stepped out of the tower, just as the sun was rising.’
  • 65) ‘As I nestle into my bedroll and blanket, I gaze up at the sky and see that a couple of stars have come out and also a gibbous moon has risen in the north.’
  • 66) ‘A waxing crescent moon rose in the eastern sky over the sleeping village.’
  • 67) ‘The suns rose bright over the treetops, bathing them in a soft golden glow.’
  • 68) ‘The sun was rising and the clouds looked beautiful.’
  • 69) ‘On the third day Amanda woke as the sun was rising.’
  • 70) ‘The sky began to darken even as the sun was rising.’
  • 71) ‘By the time we were done talking, the sun was rising.’
  • 72) ‘She looked out of her window to see the sun rising.’
  • 73) ‘It is still too early, I think in mock amusement, the fish haven't risen yet.’
  • 74) ‘Like the shark rising from the briny deep, the challenges of change management have risen to the surface.’
  • 75) ‘They would be looked down upon by others who rose in the society to be successful individuals.’
  • 76) ‘Allan is clearly a spineless kind of fellow - a philanthropic friend to the poor but lacking drive and the ability to rise in his profession.’
  • 77) ‘During more than 20 years in the profession, he had risen to the post of deputy head at a school in the north of England and was happy with his workload and responsibilities.’
  • 78) ‘He will rise in society and throw off his base origins.’
  • 79) ‘He had risen from a humble family to be the most powerful leader in Japan.’
  • 80) ‘This will leave technical staff unable to rise beyond a certain position in their company unless they get a business degree.’
  • 81) ‘Despite this he has risen to a position of great responsibility, and has gained the trust of the Emperor himself.’
  • 82) ‘I have not risen to this position through blind luck.’
  • 83) ‘The hero rises into a position of respect and often power relative to his original community.’
  • 84) ‘His great-grandfather had risen to the position of Inspector General of Artillery under Napoleon.’
  • 85) ‘He rose rapidly through the administrative ranks of the Third Republic.’
  • 86) ‘Despite resistance at grass roots level, Blair rose within the Labour Party and by the end of the 1980s he was viewed as a future leader of the party.’
  • 87) ‘Women have also risen to senior levels in the civil service but have so far failed to secure a role in politics.’
  • 88) ‘She has an air of American pragmatism that complements her relentless determination to succeed and rise above her class.’
  • 89) ‘In its general aspect, modularity is the process whereby concretely given individuals struggle to rise above their own limits by means of a script of self-fashioning drawn from the media.’
  • 90) ‘By no means is it an original movie, but it is a well constructed one that often rises above its stupendous flaws and contradictions.’
  • 91) ‘As such, his film may feel like a television movie at times, but it's power is such that it rises above any budget constraints.’
  • 92) ‘Back then, he struggled to rise above racial issues and stereotypes that suggested that a black man couldn't or shouldn't succeed in that field.’
  • 93) ‘Too many of the jokes seem obvious and over-used, while most (if not all) of the characters struggle to rise above the cliches foisted upon them.’
  • 94) ‘The pain was something he had to endure, that he had to rise above.’
  • 95) ‘Yet her spirit remained strong and, so long as she could continue her painting, Frida frequently rose above her predicament to triumph against adversity - living as colourful a life as many of her paintings.’
  • 96) ‘They almost carry the film through themselves, rising above the overly preachy, unsubtle material.’
  • 97) ‘Another way the movie tries to rise above its own dry plot is to stay fairly fast-paced.’
  • 98) ‘Nevertheless, the film rises above the small problems.’
  • 99) ‘Whether we long for romance, escape from poverty, or recognition of our inherent worth, we all find something in common with the girl who rose above oppression and obscurity to become a princess.’
  • 100) ‘There are times when this doesn't rise above the level of superior student production, particularly in the awkward doubling and some of the crowd scenes.’
  • 101) ‘Elgar's Sea Pictures seldom rise above the fustian level of their poetic texts, and among the six Chausson items only two or three were memorable.’
  • 102) ‘I concede that the score by the young and promising composer seldom rises above the serviceable.’
  • 103) ‘The depiction of rural life generally is crass and seldom rises above the level of caricature.’
  • 104) ‘But too much of the album sounds overly familiar, and seldom rises above the norm.’
  • 105) ‘Wilson remained essentially a southern Democrat, not rising above the prejudices of the day.’
  • 106) ‘The author concludes that many economists of great stature from both the neoclassical and institutionalist schools were not able to rise above the leading prejudices of their day.’
  • 107) ‘He rose above that controversy while his colleagues at Cambridge University were divided into hostile camps.’
  • 108) ‘The relationship between Peters and his controller rarely rises above mutual contempt.’
  • 109) ‘However, it spends too much time mocking the films that it claims to be above without ever actually rising above them, and that is a disappointment.’
  • 110) ‘Why was this bad-tempered, miserly, sleepless bachelor so capable of rising above both religious and scientific prejudices, with practical and theoretical insights that are still valuable today?’
  • 111) ‘It rises above the hazy mist of its nostalgic premise with sharp writing, complex and unpredictable characterizations, and a dry, witty sense of humor.’
  • 112) ‘Yes, that's a lot of boilerplate sitcom zaniness, but the show frequently rises above the usual humdrum with sharp writing and great character work.’
  • 113) ‘Good writing, of course, is able to rise above literal, biographical material.’
  • 114) ‘Eventually this band rises above such comparisons and dismissals and takes on its own shape.’
  • 115) ‘What is the difference between revolution and murder and how can you rise above apathy in a world where there is nothing left to believe in?’
  • 116) ‘The film also rises above the rest because it sports an above average cast.’
  • 117) ‘His mockery of bourgeois values and high society, both of which he rose above through personality and style, illuminated the dandy's appeal to Depression-era audiences.’
  • 118) ‘This was part of the most sickening aspect of Irish-American life in those days: the assumption that if you rose above an acceptable level of mediocrity, you were guilty of the sin of pride.’
  • 119) ‘I had such low expectations that the film rose above my assumptions of banality.’
  • 120) ‘When no answer came, Beth rose from her chair and went to kneel beside his.’
  • 121) ‘Giving a deep sigh, she rose from the chair and walked into the sitting room.’
  • 122) ‘When Baker grabbed Daisy's necklace, John rose from his chair.’
  • 123) ‘She clapped her hands together as she rose from her chair.’
  • 124) ‘He rose from the chair, leaving Miss King weeping.’
  • 125) ‘When she saw me, she rose from her chair and put her hand to her chest.’
  • 126) ‘Dave nodded, but seemed distracted by something else, for Christopher had risen from his meditation suddenly, and he was coming out.’
  • 127) ‘Eugénie and Lise Anne have just risen from their dinner.’
  • 128) ‘Clara relaxed and smiled at Adam who had risen from the table.’
  • 129) ‘The other four had risen from the table and joined her at the door.’
  • 130) ‘Greg noticed that Sam's father had risen from his seat and headed upstairs.’
  • 131) ‘We rose by degrees, in ones and twos, horror in every gaze.’
  • 132) ‘Brushing his hair back slowly she rose and walked from the room.’
  • 133) ‘A leaf fell onto her hair as Alex rose slowly to his feet.’
  • 134) ‘My brother sighed heavily and ran a hand through his hair before slowly rising from the floor.’
  • 135) ‘Fussing with her hair, Gwendolyn rose from the couch and gave a wobbly curtsy.’
  • 136) ‘She paused and looked back as the two men rose and stood beside the table.’
  • 137) ‘He rose and stood impassively, gazing over her right shoulder.’
  • 138) ‘Giles rose and moved to sit on the edge of the coffee table.’
  • 139) ‘She rose and moved to gather the bottle of whiskey from the stool near the door.’
  • 140) ‘Ted rose early the next morning and took a taxi to the Museo Nazionale, cool, echoey, empty of tourists despite the fact that it was summer.’
  • 141) ‘She rose early one morning, determined to make it up to Emmy.’
  • 142) ‘They rose early the next morning, and Rhia sensed that the soldiers seemed well-rested and eager to resume their journey.’
  • 143) ‘The next morning, Gil rose early, shaved quickly and rode away before the rest of the camp began to stir.’
  • 144) ‘He rose early in the morning, most of the time about four, and was unable to return till around eleven at night.’
  • 145) ‘Saturday came around, and we were in Hyde Park early in the morning, rising earlier than the city's postmen and milkmen.’
  • 146) ‘Jane rises early the next morning, and on her way downstairs, comes upon Grace Poole sewing rings on the curtains in Mr. Rochester's room.’
  • 147) ‘I left early the next morning before anyone had risen.’
  • 148) ‘This morning Jean had risen before dawn, feeling refreshed.’
  • 149) ‘The next morning they will rise early and head into Stockholm.’
  • 150) ‘I really was tired, and if I had to rise early the next morning, I wanted to be well rested.’
  • 151) ‘Of course, alcohol was not in short supply and I suppose that may also have contributed to my inability to rise on Sunday morning.’
  • 152) ‘Driving back to Galway, the family can rise early on Sunday morning and take a boat trip to the Aran Islands.’
  • 153) ‘In the mornings they would rise early so they could ride rented bicycles on the boardwalk.’
  • 154) ‘Vanessa was strictly a night-owl; slow to rise in the morning and able to party all night.’
  • 155) ‘The next morning, I rose at what I thought was an early hour, nearly 5 o'clock, but Meredith was already up.’
  • 156) ‘The next morning, Jane rises early and surveys the long hallways of the house; everything is very stately and imposing, dark and heavy.’
  • 157) ‘The next day was Friday, and I rose at my usual early hour.’
  • 158) ‘Lee rose at 0600, and pulled on a pair of sweats, and a T-shirt for his morning run on the beach.’
  • 159) ‘The two sisters rose at the same hour, dressed in the same manner, and entered their sitting room at the same moment.’
  • 160) ‘There was, therefore, considerable disappointment that when the Dail rose for the summer recess nothing had been done.’
  • 161) ‘The courts sit from 11 am to 1pm, then rise for lunch and sit again from 2pm to 4pm.’
  • 162) ‘Before the Dail and Seanad rose for the summer recess, Dempsey formulated a series of proposals for the reform of the Oireachtas.’
  • 163) ‘An angel reported that Jesus had risen from the dead.’
  • 164) ‘He died on the cross and is said to have risen from the dead three days later.’
  • 165) ‘We were all startled by the transformation, as if a man had risen from the dead.’
  • 166) ‘The angel told the friends that Jesus had risen from the dead!’
  • 167) ‘The Virgin has risen from her tomb, from which lilies and roses now blossom.’
  • 168) ‘Can you tell me anything about this supposed folklore hero that's risen from the dead to lead them to independence?’
  • 169) ‘Some say, if that's the case, why don't they rise up and overthrow the government themselves?’
  • 170) ‘Future generations will have to find some other way to rise up against their parents.’
  • 171) ‘She asks for everyone to rise up against this evil.’
  • 172) ‘Their father, who was determined to overthrow the queen, was influencing the eldest daughter, trying to get her to rise up against her mother.’
  • 173) ‘You can rise up and destroy the ones who took away what you love.’
  • 174) ‘Once he is there, Eugene will announce himself to be a fraud, Napoleon will declare himself, and the people will rise up for their emperor.’
  • 175) ‘The children eventually rise up against their tormentors.’
  • 176) ‘Part of me would like to believe that things like this will strike a chord within us all, making us rise up and say ‘NO, we will not have it!’’
  • 177) ‘And now 11 years later, that is where he remains to this very day, plotting to rise up and take the throne.’
  • 178) ‘She paused momentarily as if she was going to add her opinion, but in the end, decided not to rise up against the authority of the principal.’
  • 179) ‘He proclaimed himself King, calling for Scotland to rise up to his banner and help him reclaim the old bloodline.’
  • 180) ‘He was impressed by how families rose to the challenge in different ways.’
  • 181) ‘I can imagine another future, though - one in which individual and collective responsibility rises to the challenge.’
  • 182) ‘The men whose lives are celebrated in this enlightening book had their moment and rose to its challenge superbly.’
  • 183) ‘Having said that, these kids are rising to the challenge.’
  • 184) ‘Interestingly, other companies are also rising to the challenge.’
  • 185) ‘They all deserve credit, however, for rising to the show's challenges.’
  • 186) ‘While the campaign is just beginning, some students are rising to the challenge.’
  • 187) ‘It paid off in spades, and I am grateful to them both for rising to such a huge challenge.’
  • 188) ‘The Victorians rose to this challenge with a characteristic determination that seems daunting to us today.’
  • 189) ‘There have been times when we have been amazed when a student rose to meet a challenge.’
  • 190) ‘However, American processors seem to be rising to the challenge.’
  • 191) ‘For my firm, rising to the challenge has required implementing procedures not necessary for smaller homes.’
  • 192) ‘We are providing the opportunity to supply the fibre and they are rising to the challenge with detailed business plans.’
  • 193) ‘Here the artist rises to the challenge of equaling in visual terms the musicians' balance between skillful technique, extreme discipline and spontaneous emotional inflection.’
  • 194) ‘It shouldn't work, but it does; Lynn rises to the challenge, fighting back without losing her cool, owning a song that doesn't even play to her strengths.’
  • 195) ‘She rises to the formidable challenge of bringing together her three very different, marginalized figures for thoughtful comparisons and synthesis.’
  • 196) ‘Can we rise to the challenge of cleaning up the world's oceans and protecting marine biodiversity?’
  • 197) ‘Indeed, he seems to bring out their best, challenging them to rise to the high watermark he has set.’
  • 198) ‘Knowing that she was being baited, she couldn't help but rise to the challenge anyway.’
  • 199) ‘Policy makers, business and even users will have to find ways to rise to a number of challenges.’
  • 200) ‘The Mejerda River, which rises in Algeria, drains into the Gulf of Tunis.’
  • 201) ‘The longest river in the country is the Medjerda, which rises in Algeria and flows through Tunisia to the sea.’
  • 202) ‘Niall swept his hands in front of them, and a strong wind immediately rose.’
  • 203) ‘He moved his hand in front of him, a strong wind rising around him.’
  • 204) ‘I will sleep, I think; for the sheets of shimmering water are growing dark and angry, and the wind is rising.’
  • 205) ‘The wind had risen, the ropes cracking and straining even louder as the sails filled to capacity.’
  • 206) ‘A cool wind was rising, causing the leaves to whisper against each other, their glossy darkness shimmering.’
  • 207) ‘A strong voice rang out, easily audible even though the wind had risen momentarily.’
  • 208) ‘The wind was rising in the darkening sky, viciously whipping up the sea around the ship.’
  • 209) ‘Tristan abruptly backs away, the wind rising and stinging his face.’
  • 210) ‘The wind had risen and was slowly dragging the boat along.’
  • 211) ‘Richly embroidered silks surrounded the man, whipped about in the strong gusts of wind that seemed to rise from the canyon.’
  • 212) ‘The winds began to rise around Elisa, making her clothes billow and tossing her hair back.’
  • 213) ‘He shook a tear from his eye as a wind began to rise and dust began to blow at a dangerous rate.’
  • 214) ‘Within time high winds rose roughening the waves to a height of up ten feet and more.’
  • 215) ‘Over the ruins of the castle rose an unearthly wind, carrying with it an inhuman wail.’
  • 216) ‘The land rises abruptly to highland ridges with mountain summits as high as 3000 feet.’
  • 217) ‘From the edges of the valley, the land rises abruptly in steep high buttes.’
  • 218) ‘The land rises progressively toward the south.’
  • 219) ‘The land rises gradually to the north and does not reach an altitude of more than 3,000 feet.’
  • 220) ‘From the duns, the terrain rises steadily toward the main ranges of the Himalayas.’
  • 221) ‘In the Kurdish Country of the northeast, the land rises steeply into the Zagros Mountains.’
  • 222) ‘The land began to rise higher and higher, and I saw that in the very center, was a black spire.’
  • 223) ‘That afternoon the land began to rise again, and the Cæsar's Road began to show more ruts.’
  • 224) ‘Flat alluvial fields rise up from the river to meet undulating slopes and escarpments that have been in cultivation since the sixteenth century.’
  • 225) ‘Siegendorf is a small village in Burgenland about forty miles south of Vienna where the great Hungarian plain rises up to meet the foothills of the Alps.’
  • 226) ‘Far into the distance behind her were hills, and in front of her was a lake with mountains rising behind it.’
  • 227) ‘The Coast Mountains rise steeply from the fjords and channels on the coast, and glaciers are found at higher elevations.’
  • 228) ‘To the north, the street gently rises up the slope; the southern one is a level and pedestrianized path.’
  • 229) ‘The ground rises in hills on all sides, so that every spot is a sheltered nook.’
  • 230) ‘On the other side of the river the mountains rose steeply again, and the road vanished into the wood immediately on the other side.’
  • 231) ‘Up from Baikal's shore, mountains rise sharply for a vertical mile, towering high as the canyon rim above the Colorado River.’
  • 232) ‘The curving paths and ramps conjure up images of a Tuscany landscape as they rise towards the visitors center.’
  • 233) ‘Some 1000m directly below me ran a river along the bottom of the valley and the mountains rose from there around me.’
  • 234) ‘The very top roof of the main structure rose in a steep slope to be cut off into a flat, even, rectangular-shaped roof.’
  • 235) ‘Before them, a great structure of green stone rose seamlessly from a basin of grass.’
  • 236) ‘The battered masonry walls rise dramatically from the landscape.’
  • 237) ‘Barely a thousand feet high, it rose dramatically from the surrounding landscape.’
  • 238) ‘Steep cliffs rose on either side of the gorge, which was spanned by a suspension bridge.’
  • 239) ‘I realized that we were at a cliff that rose hundreds of feet high.’
  • 240) ‘The military structures of the base rose up all around them, shrouded in the green mists.’
  • 241) ‘At the center of the room was a raised platform, a tower like structure that rose about 20 feet into the air.’
  • 242) ‘Thirty grayish white pillars surrounding the building rose so high that I couldn't help but wonder if they'd used magic to set them up.’
  • 243) ‘In daily use for more than 300 years, the landmark rises from the churchyard in Allouville-Bellefosse.’
  • 244) ‘There were far fewer buildings on this side of the stream, save for a small courthouse-like building with a tall stone tower rising from its gables.’
  • 245) ‘On the left side there was a steep drop as the dam rose at least a few hundred feet up into the sky.’
  • 246) ‘The film, in color, opens with a view from above of waves breaking on a beach; a distant mountain rises out of the mist.’
  • 247) ‘The cliff walls rose several hundred feet above the floor of the pass.’
  • 248) ‘The view is not of the standard Chicago skyline in which gleaming skyscrapers rise like the Emerald City from the glassy expanse of Lake Michigan.’
  • 249) ‘The twin volcanoes, Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea, each rise well over 13,600 feet on an island 80 miles wide.’
  • 250) ‘In the distance to one side, the dark forms of mountains rose upwards.’
  • 251) ‘He pulls the covers from his body, stands, and feels the hair rising on his arms.’
  • 252) ‘Fear prickled at the nape of her neck as the hairs there rose.’
  • 253) ‘His eyes narrowed and she felt hair rising on the back of her neck.’
  • 254) ‘You can feel the hairs rising at the back of your head.’
  • 255) ‘I tried to ignore the hair rising on the back of my neck, and the prickling that ran down my spine.’
  • 256) ‘I could feel the hairs rising on the back of my neck and the chills running down my spine.’
  • 257) ‘The lights dimmed and Chuck felt his hair rising.’
  • 258) ‘I felt the hairs rise on the back of my neck as he hesitantly brought his arms to embrace my figure, supporting my body as he returned the kiss.’
  • 259) ‘I paused, the hair rising on the back of my neck and down my arms.’
  • 260) ‘The sound of that name made hairs rise on the back of my neck.’
  • 261) ‘Sandra felt her arm hairs rise slowly as her arms were covered with goose bumps.’
  • 262) ‘She felt all her hairs rising as she continued to stare at the static of the television and listen to its noise.’
  • 263) ‘The hairs on my arms rose as I looked up into his dark eyes.’
  • 264) ‘Immediately, the boy stiffened, the hair on his arms rising.’
  • 265) ‘He was riding down a slope leading to the ranch when he felt the hairs on his neck rising and that old feeling of danger sweep through him like a cold winter breeze.’
  • 266) ‘A tingling sensation on the back of Jonathan's neck caused the hairs to rise in excitement.’
  • 267) ‘She heard something else that made the hairs on her arms rise: the sound of a laugh.’
  • 268) ‘Andrea's eyes met me once or twice, the hairs on her skin rising like porcupine needles.’
  • 269) ‘His claws extend involuntarily and the hair on his neck rises.’
  • 270) ‘Every move he made looked so lethal and made the hair on her arms rise.’
  • 271) ‘The triangular four-story building will rise on the site of a former strip club, another step in a major downtown renewal initiative.’
  • 272) ‘Trees started to become rarer and buildings kept rising.’
  • 273) ‘Indeed, taxi drivers take tourists from airport to city centre via the riverside building site out of which the palatial new house is rising.’
  • 274) ‘Neat pastel houses rose amid Mediterranean landscaping, with a park, community center, and childcare complex.’
  • 275) ‘After about 1900, though many rowhouses continued to rise, they were more likely to be in outlying sections of a city.’
  • 276) ‘It grew gradually like bread dough rising in a bowl on a radiator, until it filled her up and made her feel slightly sick with excitement.’
  • 277) ‘Making the bread is a living process, similar to yoghurt, where the dough rises and develops with the yeast.’
  • 278) ‘The downstairs rooms were moderately clean by the time the dough had risen the second time.’
  • 279) ‘Goosebumps rose on her skin immediately and she stopped struggling almost all together because of the extreme cold.’
  • 280) ‘He kissed her on the back of her neck and her breathing quickened as the goosebumps rose on her skin.’
  • 281) ‘Goose bumps were rising on her skin, her breath shallow.’
  • 282) ‘While the sink was filling, she pulled on the nightdress and the jumper, noting the goosebumps rising on her skin.’
  • 283) ‘She instantly turned around upon feeling goosebumps rising on her skin.’
  • 284) ‘The ache in her arm grew where the he had grabbed her before and she could already feel a bump rising and a bruise forming.’
  • 285) ‘Blisters rose across her arms, then broke open and peeled back under the heat of the October winds.’
  • 286) ‘Reaching down I could feel a deep long gash running the length of my leg and I could already feel the bump rising steadily on my head.’
  • 287) ‘She had a bump rising on the back of her head, her neck was slightly bruised, and her ankle was a bit swollen, but other than that she was fine.’
  • 288) ‘Suddenly, she felt goosebumps rise on her arms and she shivered.’
  • 289) ‘A blast of cold air greeted them and Olivia felt goosebumps rise on her arms.’
  • 290) ‘My shoulders tensed instantaneously, terrified tremors running through me, goose bumps rising on my exposed flesh.’
  • 291) ‘I pity your fingers, because I can already sense blisters rising.’
  • 292) ‘I lay on the ground, panting and felt the bumps rising on my arm.’
  • 293) ‘She shuddered again, the goosebumps rising on her stomach.’
  • 294) ‘A cool breeze made goosebumps rise on his arms, and he shivered.’
  • 295) ‘The weather outside chilled me, and goosebumps rose in a matter of seconds as the wind blew my hair all around.’
  • 296) ‘Goosebumps rose on my skin as I strode across the polished floor, toward the stairs.’
  • 297) ‘Shaken by his proximity and the truth of his words, Daphne feels goosebumps rising on her skin.’
  • 298) ‘The floor was very stony, and her feet, covered only in silken slippers, began to get sore and she could feel a blister began to rise.’
  • 299) ‘I screamed as the rollercoaster slid down the first dip, my stomach rising into my mouth.’
  • 300) ‘However Amy had no time to ponder over this, for as soon as the doors closed, she felt her stomach suddenly rise as the elevator zoomed upwards.’
  • 301) ‘She swallowed hard as her gorge rose at the sight of the busted-up fighter and the stench of burnt flesh.’
  • 302) ‘As the amount of gold coins in circulation increases, prices rise - but only very, very slowly.’
  • 303) ‘Since 2001, the cost of the provincial game has risen from €5.8 million to €11.2 million.’
  • 304) ‘During the past 18 months, the cost of a barrel of oil has risen from less than $40 to more than $70.’
  • 305) ‘This month the shares have risen from a lowly 8p to 19p.’
  • 306) ‘The number of buyout firms doing business in Tokyo has risen from a single local fund in 1997 to at least 69 local and international funds today.’
  • 307) ‘League revenues have risen from $600 million to $2 billion in the past 10 years.’
  • 308) ‘They reported that yields had risen from the normal 600 kilos per hectare to an average of 2500 kilos per hectare, a four times increase in yield.’
  • 309) ‘Unemployment has risen from 3.3 per cent in 2001 to an estimated 6.7 per cent in 2005.’
  • 310) ‘Yields of corn have risen from about 30 bushels per acre in 1940 to around 120 bushels per acre today.’
  • 311) ‘The number of Protestant megachurches has risen from just 50 in 1980 to nearly 900 now.’
  • 312) ‘Technology stocks rose strongly last week as investors continued to bet on a resurgence in the sector.’
  • 313) ‘As with all open-top cars, levels of physical discomfort - such as noise and wind buffeting - rise in relation to speed.’
  • 314) ‘Factory output rose strongly in December and January, as companies continue to use a greater share of their production capacity.’
  • 315) ‘Indeed, as the dollar has dropped in recent weeks, both the stock and bond markets have risen strongly.’
  • 316) ‘Meanwhile, health-care costs continued to rise, cutting into business profits.’
  • 317) ‘The average spend per child is continuing to rise year-on-year.’
  • 318) ‘But if costs continue to rise at this pace, he says he'll have to cut staff.’
  • 319) ‘Poverty continued to rise until 1995, when a modest decrease began.’
  • 320) ‘Basic supply and demand analysis tells us that in any of these situations, the price of sugar will rise.’
  • 321) ‘The economy is booming, salaries are rising, companies are swelling to global size.’
  • 322) ‘Slowly but surely, the water level is rising, and pathetic river and sea defences aren't going to do anything to stop more flooding.’
  • 323) ‘As the seas rose, new coral islands grew from the underlying shelf platform.’
  • 324) ‘And yet, we have a whole bunch of people, serious, accomplished scientists, telling us that the seas will rise in some places while deserts will be created in others.’
  • 325) ‘Wiley figured the water level must have risen from all the rain they had received the day before.’
  • 326) ‘Even a midsize or small river can overflow into streets if a storm causes the water level to rise quickly.’
  • 327) ‘The sea is rising, the city is sinking, and the damage to its historic buildings, bridges and artworks is becoming increasingly apparent.’
  • 328) ‘It is assumed that they must have journeyed overland, before the seas rose and created islands out of the land bridge.’
  • 329) ‘As the river rises or recedes, water continually moves into or drains from the pools in the flood plains, flowing in channels or tributaries which connect to the banks of the river.’
  • 330) ‘The water level had risen slightly, and it didn't look good.’
  • 331) ‘Over the next two days, the level of the creek rises but the restored channel successfully contains the flow.’
  • 332) ‘I look at the water level, which has risen to only a few inches below the bridge.’
  • 333) ‘Climatologists believe that sea levels are rising faster in Dublin bay than the readings from tidal records would suggest.’
  • 334) ‘Over the course of the millennium, the sea level could rise by 20 feet.’
  • 335) ‘If sea levels rise even a few inches, as is predicted, over the next century, salt water will inundate the freshwater marshes.’
  • 336) ‘In July and August of that year, the monsoon waters rose in the Narmada and submerged villages.’
  • 337) ‘The water was rising fast and she didn't know if she would be able to find any high ground before she reached the town.’
  • 338) ‘Pa, Al, and Uncle John measure how fast the water is rising.’
  • 339) ‘Last November, 400 villagers were at risk of drowning as the waters rose around them.’
  • 340) ‘It's warm, the spring tide is rising, we're going over a shoal.’
  • 341) ‘This type of fishing method is also practiced throughout the year but increases in intensity when the river rises or recedes.’
  • 342) ‘Felix was growing upset now, his voice rising in pitch and volume.’
  • 343) ‘I objected, my voice rising in pitch of its own accord.’
  • 344) ‘She yelled, her voice rising in pitch until she was screeching.’
  • 345) ‘But then the charade falls down, and I tell Bryan the whole story, my voice rising in pitch as I get more and more upset.’
  • 346) ‘His voice was rising in volume and pitch; perhaps he hadn't finished his lifetime's crying just yet.’
  • 347) ‘My voice has been steadily rising in pitch, despite my best efforts to control it.’
  • 348) ‘His voice rises in pitch as he says it, turning the last syllable of his question into something akin to a squeak.’
  • 349) ‘Jeremiah's voice had risen to a strained pitch.’
  • 350) ‘Arlan's voice had risen to an angry pitch, all of his frustration and pain pouring out.’
  • 351) ‘The filthy thug laughed giddily, his voice slowly rising in pitch until it became an ear-piercing shriek.’
  • 352) ‘My voice began to rise in pitch from apprehension.’
  • 353) ‘The familiar sound of a bus engine grows louder, rising in pitch, as it approaches, only to drift lazily away.’
  • 354) ‘She parroted his earlier words, her voice rising by an octave.’
  • 355) ‘There was a long pause, and when it was over Mom's voice had risen up an octave or two, as though she were nervous or upset about something.’
  • 356) ‘Her voice rose steadily in pitch as she withdrew further, back now against a wall.’
  • 357) ‘James's voice rose in pitch as he thought about how much money he would be wallowing in.’
  • 358) ‘Magdalena's voice rose excitedly in pitch, but not in volume.’
  • 359) ‘Unfortunately, my voice had risen five octaves higher than I had expected it to and this just made him laugh harder.’
  • 360) ‘Her voice rose impressively through the octaves.’
  • 361) ‘His hopes rose when he learned that some leaders had ‘gone to ground’.’
  • 362) ‘Full fledged panic rose through her and she let out a loud scream.’
  • 363) ‘An odd feeling rose up inside of me as I watched, and I wasn't sure I liked it.’
  • 364) ‘A slow panic rose in his chest, shortening his breaths as he thought this.’
  • 365) ‘Again, the familiar panic rose, but I fought against it, keeping my smile in place.’
  • 366) ‘She stood there with a triumphant smile on her face and anger rose in him.’
  • 367) ‘That odd anger rose up in him again, because her rejection seemed wrong, unfair.’
  • 368) ‘Cornelius felt jealousy and anger rising within him.’
  • 369) ‘He felt his anger rising, but did what he was told.’
  • 370) ‘She felt panic rising in her, and she opened her eyes.’
  • 371) ‘Mike's eyes widened and he felt the anger rising in him.’
  • 372) ‘Cooper felt the anger and irritation rising up in him.’
  • 373) ‘He spread his arms, excitement rising through him.’
  • 374) ‘Fear is rising in me, to a point where I can almost not bear it.’
  • 375) ‘When Andrew entered my room, I could feel my temper rising quickly.’
  • 376) ‘She felt panic rising in her throat but tried to ignore it.’
  • 377) ‘I felt anxiety rising inside of me as I knew what to anticipate.’
  • 378) ‘My curiosity rising, I waited for a reaction, but there was none.’
  • 379) ‘I blinked a few times, embarrassment rising in my chest again.’
  • 380) ‘He didn't respond, and Helen felt panic rising in her chest.’
  • 381) ‘I soon found my mood rising as my feelings for Denny began to fade.’
  • 382) ‘His spirits instantly rose at the sound of Jessi's voice.’
  • 383) ‘She felt her heart rise a little as he winked back.’
  • 384) ‘He'd been worried that the windows were double-glazed and more difficult to break but his spirits rose when he saw that they were ordinary glass.’
  • 385) ‘He bowed slightly, nervously biting his bottom lip, and Tanaki felt the colour rising in his face.’
  • 386) ‘She could feel the colour rising in her cheeks and her grip on the sheets tightened.’
  • 387) ‘She felt her colour rising again, but she was once more determined to get her own way.’
  • 388) ‘Louis felt the colour rising in his cheeks but there was nothing he could do to stop it.’
  • 389) ‘A red tint rose up in Kelly's cheeks as he referred to her as a child.’
  • 390) ‘A soft red hue rose in his cheeks, making him look younger than he probably was.’
  • 391) ‘He was highly amused when colour started to rise in Darius' cheek.’
  • 392) ‘The colour rose in her cheeks, reddening even her ears poking through her blonde hair.’
  • 393) ‘Blue eyes blinked in shock, then the colour rose ever so slowly into her face.’
  • 394) ‘The color in Isabella's cheeks rose as she grew increasingly ashamed of her mother's behavior.’
  • 395) ‘Finally opening her eyes, she noted that, other than the shallow rise and fall of his chest, there was no movement coming from him.’
  • 396) ‘Ian put the bag down and watched Justin lying there, nervously checking the rise and fall of his chest.’
  • 397) ‘They were both almost completely motionless, save the rise and fall of their chests as they breathed.’
  • 398) ‘The only movement coming from his body was a slow trickle of blood from his left temple and the rapid rise and fall of his lungs.’
  • 399) ‘As we got further out the waves got calmer, but for right now they were choppy and making the boat lurch from side to side, pitching with each rise and fall of a wave.’
  • 400) ‘She mimicked the sound of his breath, making her chest rise and fall like his.’
  • 401) ‘She began to concentrate on Carl's breathing, the slow rhythm of the rise and fall of his chest, the sound of the ocean tide in the distance.’
  • 402) ‘Every bump, rise, and swell of the waves affects your watercraft.’
  • 403) ‘After a meteoric rise comes the inevitable fall.’
  • 404) ‘As she began her rise in the political world, the media began to take notice.’
  • 405) ‘If he keeps being cast as such one-dimensional, charisma-free characters, his fall may be as quick as his meteoric rise.’
  • 406) ‘The meteoric rise of Jack Vettriano is nothing short of phenomenal.’
  • 407) ‘But his meteoric rise in the drug world inevitably set him up for a fall.’
  • 408) ‘It has been a rapid rise for the former revenue official from Raheny in north Dublin.’
  • 409) ‘If anything its enormous decline has beaten its meteoric rise back in the halcyon days.’
  • 410) ‘Both films are tragedies dealing with the rise and fall of a man within a sordid industry.’
  • 411) ‘His rapid rise, it seemed, was continuing apace.’
  • 412) ‘Is it a challenge to stay level headed given you've had a meteoric rise in terms of your acting career?’
  • 413) ‘The rapid rise of the republic challenges every new generation of historians to formulate new explanations.’
  • 414) ‘The film does, indeed, force people to examine the events surrounding the rise and fall of Hitler.’
  • 415) ‘China's rise is all the more remarkable for its speed.’
  • 416) ‘Maria's single-minded rise through the company's ranks mirrors the renaissance of the German postwar economy.’
  • 417) ‘It coincided with the rise of Thatcher and Reagan, and the loosening of capital restrictions world wide.’
  • 418) ‘You want tales from the Old South about slavery and empowerment, the rise of the civil-rights movement and the promise of integration?’
  • 419) ‘How do you explain the rise of indigenous movements in Bolivia and the rest of Latin America?’
  • 420) ‘In a sense, the rise of alternative movements is a response to the current weakness of the working class.’
  • 421) ‘Unlike that of Bohemia in the 19th century, opera in Slovakia did not become identified with the rise of a national movement.’
  • 422) ‘The decline of European Turkey was as steep as its rise.’
  • 423) ‘Shrugging me off, he ordered me to go stand by the massive pine topping the largest of the graveyard's sloping rises.’
  • 424) ‘It was a land of scattered hills and rises.’
  • 425) ‘Down the path and over the rise of the last hill the army went, as if nothing had ever happened.’
  • 426) ‘Christy stared mutely out the window as the church's steeple loomed into view over the rise of the next hill.’
  • 427) ‘He positioned the house on a hill looking across the valley to the verdant rise of Hog Mountain.’
  • 428) ‘Will squinted as the silhouette of what looked like a small cottage and barn came into view just over the rise of a green hill about a quarter mile away.’
  • 429) ‘On Sunday morning, I see a woman ahead of me on the trail, just cresting a rise.’
  • 430) ‘Finally, she crested a rise and the town came into view.’
  • 431) ‘When they reached the crest of the rise, Karl gasped.’
  • 432) ‘The cart stood exposed at the crest of a long rise in the road.’
  • 433) ‘As Peter crested the rise, he threw his brother a quick salute.’
  • 434) ‘Rilla takes Tess by the arm and leads her over the rise, then helps her down the hill and inside the little cabin.’
  • 435) ‘She crested the rise and stood before the two men, flushed with the effort.’
  • 436) ‘The hill was only a slight rise, leading to what looked to be a basin of land.’
  • 437) ‘As they came up over the rise, the large amount of brush they had hiding the trailer came into view.’
  • 438) ‘Looking down at the camp from a rise in the distance, the three of them immediately caught sight of Kefari and Ashwood.’
  • 439) ‘In the ever darkening of approaching night he noticed very little in way of cover, and the mansion itself stood on a slight rise in the distance.’
  • 440) ‘Melissa and Dave climb a small rise and step back onto the rutted dirt road.’
  • 441) ‘After climbing a steep rise for about twenty minutes the road crested, then began to slope downwards, taking a more westerly direction.’
  • 442) ‘I nodded, then turned toward the rise and walked to the top.’
  • 443) ‘Businesses know U.S. consumers can shoulder a rise in energy prices and that domestic demand should keep increasing this year.’
  • 444) ‘Increasing use of email has already prompted a rise in the price of posting a letter.’
  • 445) ‘Is the corporate spending increase enough to sustain the price rise?’
  • 446) ‘Sales activity fell by 11 per cent in the quarter to August and surveyors noticed a rise in the amount of unsold property on the market.’
  • 447) ‘Second, the company is a high energy user and the rise in energy prices over the past year is a potentially material negative for both margins and costs.’
  • 448) ‘Others are not so happy about the rise in price this year, given that this sort of extremely young wine should really be dirt cheap.’
  • 449) ‘Higher fuel prices can cause unwelcome rises in inflation, restrict economic growth and are unpopular with voters.’
  • 450) ‘The price rise - if successful - will be the sixth increase since December.’
  • 451) ‘There was also a significant rise in the amount of private client activity among brokers.’
  • 452) ‘One part of the explanation is the oil price rises of 1973 and 1979.’
  • 453) ‘The earnings of gold-mining companies should jump if the price of gold rises.’
  • 454) ‘The outcome was a consistent rise in prices across the tourism sector.’
  • 455) ‘The continued demand from first-time buyers is likely to lead to price rises in that segment of the market.’
  • 456) ‘With the rise in wage costs and prices, increased inflation led to lower competitiveness.’
  • 457) ‘A further rise of 0.5 per cent is predicted in the latter part of the year.’
  • 458) ‘The drop stems mainly from slower growth in wages and salaries, smaller increases in benefits, and a bigger rise in net interest payments.’
  • 459) ‘Organic growth accounted for 29 per cent of the rise in sales.’
  • 460) ‘The Metropolitan police chief wants mobile phone companies to make it more difficult to swap SIM cards between handsets as a step to halt the rise in phone related muggings.’
  • 461) ‘It is no wonder then that over the past ten years, India has been one of the few countries to show a rise in share of world services exports.’
  • 462) ‘The rise of central banks stabilized the banking system and smoothed the growth of the money supply.’
  • 463) ‘The incipient rebellion was quickly quashed, however, when journalists received email notification of the enormous salary rises which will accompany the deal.’
  • 464) ‘But analysts say compromises on wage and pension rises are likely.’
  • 465) ‘In terms of wages, 69 percent of exporters surveyed expect to pay a wage rise in the next 12 months.’
  • 466) ‘This was Edward's advice to me, when I received a particularly miserable salary rise, scarcely a rise at all.’
  • 467) ‘The union is calling for a six per cent increase in the pay budget and for individual rises of at least 3.5 per cent.’
  • 468) ‘The huge salary rise took place after the government approved the Buckley report on salaries for executives of commercial semi-state companies.’
  • 469) ‘Every time you get a pay rise, increase the standing order by an equivalent amount.’
  • 470) ‘However, I waited until this April before jumping in, when my pay rise lessened the blow of starting to pay into a pension.’
  • 471) ‘The score anticipated Schoenberg's technique in Gurrelieder and Pierrot Lunaire, indicating the rises and falls of the voice with relative pitches.’
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