heel vs heal

heel heal

Definitions

  • 1) The lower end of a mast.
  • 2) The end of a violin bow where the handle is located.
  • 3) A similar anatomical part, such as the fleshy rounded base of the human palm or the hind toe of a bird.
  • 4) The rounded posterior portion of the human foot under and behind the ankle.
  • 5) The corresponding part of the hind foot of other vertebrates.
  • 6) The part of the head of a golf club where it joins the shaft.
  • 7) Informal A dishonorable or unscrupulous person.
  • 8) The built-up portion of a shoe or boot, supporting the heel.
  • 9) A tilt, as of a boat, to one side.
  • 10) The after end of a ship's keel.
  • 11) The lower or rearward part, as.
  • 12) One of the crusty ends of a loaf of bread.
  • 13) The part, as of a sock, shoe, or stocking, that covers the heel.
  • 14) Botany The basal end of a plant cutting or tuber used in propagation.
  • 15) Oppression; tyranny.
  • 16) The act of inclining or canting from a vertical position; a cant: as, the ship gave a heel to port. Also heeling.
  • 17) An obsolete spelling of heal.
  • 18) To furnish with a heel or heel-piece, as any foot-covering; put a heel to, as a shoe or stocking.
  • 19) To turn partly over; come to a tilted position; cant: as, the ship heeled over.
  • 20) Tocatchbytheheels.
  • 21) In golf, to strike (a ball) on the heel of the club.
  • 22) Same as heal, 3.
  • 23) To equip or arm. See heeled, 2.
  • 24) To tilt, incline, or cant over from a vertical position, as a ship.
  • 25) In sporting, to come or walk behind one's heels: used of a dog, and chiefly in command.
  • 26) To arm with a gaff or spur, as a cock.
  • 27) To perform by the use of the heels or feet, as a dance.
  • 28) To catch by the heels.
  • 29) Sameasheal,3.
  • 30) To press or strike with the heel.
  • 31) To arm (a gamecock) with gaffs.
  • 32) To repair or replace the heels, as for shoes.
  • 33) Slang To furnish, especially with money.
  • 34) To follow at one's heels.
  • 35) To furnish with a heel or heels.
  • 36) (down at the heel/heels) With the heel worn down. Used of shoes.
  • 37) (down at the heel/heels) Shabby or poor in appearance.
  • 38) (lay by the heels) To put in fetters or shackles; imprison.
  • 39) (to heel) Under discipline or control.
  • 40) (take to (one's) heels) To run away; flee.
  • 41) (on/upon) Immediately following.
  • 42) (on/upon) Directly behind.
  • 43) (heel/heels) Having holes in one's socks or shoes.
  • 44) (to heel) Close behind.
  • 45) (heel/heels) Rundown; shabby; seedy.
  • 46) To tilt or cause to tilt to one side.

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete health
  • 2) obsolete Health.
  • 3) Health; well-being.
  • 4) intransitive To become better.
  • 5) transitive To hide; conceal; keep secret.
  • 6) transitive To make better; to revive, recover, or cure.
  • 7) transitive To cover, as for protection.
  • 8) provide a cure for, make healthy again
  • 9) get healthy again
  • 10) To hide; conceal; keep secret.
  • 11) To cover (the roots of trees and plants), usually in an inclined or slanting position, with soil, after they have been taken out of the ground, and before setting them permanently: generally used with in.
  • 12) To cover, as for protection.
  • 13) A variant spelling of heel.
  • 14) To grow whole or sound; return to a sound state: with reference to a wound, sometimes with up or over.
  • 15) To restore to wholesome conditions; remove something evil or noxious from: purify; cleanse; strengthen.
  • 16) To make whole or sound; restore to health or soundness; cure: as, to heal the sick.
  • 17) To remedy; remove, repair, or counteract by salutary or beneficial means: as, to heal a quarrel or a breach.
  • 18) To restore to health or soundness; cure.
  • 19) To be relieved or eliminated.
  • 20) To experience relief from emotional distress.
  • 21) To recover from an illness or injury; return to health.
  • 22) To ease or relieve (emotional distress).
  • 23) To set right; repair.
  • 24) To grow sound; to return to a sound state; ; -- sometimes with up or over.
  • 25) To remove or subdue; to cause to pass away; to cure; -- said of a disease or a wound.
  • 26) To restore to original purity or integrity.
  • 27) obsolete To cover, as a roof, with tiles, slate, lead, or the like.
  • 28) To make hale, sound, or whole; to cure of a disease, wound, or other derangement; to restore to soundness or health.
  • 29) To reconcile, as a breach or difference; to make whole; to free from guilt; as, to heal dissensions.

Examples

  • 1) So have high heels had their day?
  • 2) They will be kicking their heels for the next three months.
  • 3) You don't have to wear heels.
  • 4) Keep your chest up and get as low as you can with all the weight in your heels to get the most from this one.
  • 5) Like an ankle strap, boots can make heels comfortable simply because you don't have to cling on to them with your toes when you walk.
  • 6) Hard on the heels of the hose comes a delightfully prolonged blast of warm air.
  • 7) Look for wedges and shoes or boots with rubber composite heels and soles.
  • 8) Wear yours with biker boots or heels and pay for a quality pair.
  • 9) Usually wear is across the back of the heel or between the back and the outside.
  • 10) We donned our wellington boots and carried our high heels.
  • 11) The op on his right heel is part of his recovery programme.
  • 12) His compass was in the heel of his shoe and naturally he got lost.
  • 13) Skinny trousers look more modern with kitten heels than platform pumps.
  • 14) Whose foot will this heel belong to?
  • 15) There were dozens of jockeys kicking their heels.
  • 16) That should last you until you can get to the heel bar.
  • 17) She loves shoes and boots with heels.
  • 18) Broad suffered a recurrence of his heel injury bowling in the nets and went to hospital for a scan.
  • 19) Which you know... may have involved a heel or two.
  • 20) ‘Knees are bent and held in front of the chest, with the heels positioned below the hips.’
  • 21) ‘This pointing pulls the heel and ankle bones forward putting a great deal of rubbing on the skin on top of the ankle bones and over the tendon in front of the ankle.’
  • 22) ‘The commonest ankle sprain is when the heel or foot turn inwards in relation to the lower leg, overstretching the ligaments on the outside of the ankle.’
  • 23) ‘Instead, he prescribes taking a stance with your heels directly below your body and focusing on keeping your torso upright.’
  • 24) ‘The balls of your feet should be on the platform, with your heels slightly below.’
  • 25) ‘Instead of merely cushioning the user's foot, the Pump system offers a custom fit while protecting the heel, the ankle and the collar area of the foot.’
  • 26) ‘If I were to try to locate the sensations I'd say they were at the bottom of my leg in my heel / ankle/toes.’
  • 27) ‘The classic swelling of the toes, heels, ankles, and wrists was labelled ‘regular gout’.’
  • 28) ‘This causes the foot to be sharply angled at the heel, with the foot pointing up and outward.’
  • 29) ‘Then push your foot all the way up in the boot - when you flex the ankle, the heel shouldn't slide up more than half an inch.’
  • 30) ‘When the phantom pains are coming on strong the illusion is complete; I can feel my toes, my heel and my ankle even if I can't see them.’
  • 31) ‘The ability, and willingness, to fall forward from your ankles while keeping your heel down is key.’
  • 32) ‘My legs and feet drew a lot of attention, especially my ankles and heels.’
  • 33) ‘Slight changes in pressure in your toes, heels and ankles are enough to manoeuvre you and the board in the correct direction.’
  • 34) ‘Then, she began to wrap it firmly around her ankle, starting at the heel of her foot and going half way to her knee.’
  • 35) ‘Briefly, subjects stood with their heel, calf, buttocks, back, and head fixed with a strap against a vertical backboard.’
  • 36) ‘Grasp the foot of your injured leg with your hand and slowly pull your heel up to your buttocks.’
  • 37) ‘The tendon is attached to the back of the heel and is pulled by two muscles in the calf.’
  • 38) ‘She had broken her shin bone and fractured the inside of her ankle and heel.’
  • 39) ‘Start with both heels on the floor and point your feet upward as high as you can.’
  • 40) ‘From its surprisingly small feet spread white, feathery wings at its heels.’
  • 41) ‘These animals also have spurred heels, but these appear to be a feature of both sexes in the young, the females losing them as they mature.’
  • 42) ‘If you can (and your horse will stand for you), try drying off their heels with a hair dryer on a cool setting after the once weekly wash.’
  • 43) ‘Cows' heels would not seem to be plump, fruitful, delicious or in any way edible but, strangely enough, they are considered a delicacy by some, especially in Barbuda.’
  • 44) ‘They are a plain looking, solid sort of shoe with a chunky heel, quite rigid support and come in an infinite range of colours and limited editions.’
  • 45) ‘Mine are presently a half-inch above the heel of my shoes.’
  • 46) ‘A shoe with a distinct heel will be much, much easier to walk in.’
  • 47) ‘The authors recommend shoes with low heels or better still, none at all.’
  • 48) ‘Shoes should have adequate arch support and cushioned heels.’
  • 49) ‘Are women as focused on those things as they are with getting, say, the newest Gucci shoes with bamboo heels?’
  • 50) ‘As for the sole, the wedge heel has crept into men's shoe styles.’
  • 51) ‘A low heel is more professional than flats or high heels.’
  • 52) ‘I step on it with the heel of my shoe - I certainly didn't miss them.’
  • 53) ‘He scuffed a pit in the snow with the heel of his shoe.’
  • 54) ‘Instead of the flats women normally wore, the heel of the shoe was extended a good deal so it appeared that they wearer would be walking on their toes.’
  • 55) ‘He crushed his cigarette stub out beneath the heel of his shoe.’
  • 56) ‘The heel of her shoe broke off, but she ran up the stairs anyway.’
  • 57) ‘As the heel of my shoe tapped against the ground it made a click like noise, which echoed through the long narrow corridor.’
  • 58) ‘I spun around on the heel of the shoes and almost collapsed into a bar stool, but luckily the counter was there for me to catch.’
  • 59) ‘No one returns a pair of Gucci shoes claiming that the heel isn't durable.’
  • 60) ‘He ground the heel of his shoe into the feebly sparking wire and scowled.’
  • 61) ‘In interviews with police officers I wore a skirt, blouse, tights, shoes with a slight heel, and a little make-up.’
  • 62) ‘It started when I kicked my right ankle with the heel of my left shoe.’
  • 63) ‘Wood floors must be adequately protected from damp and soft timbers can be easily gouged by heels, chair legs and animal claws.’
  • 64) ‘As he stood with one foot on the top step, it was quite obvious that he had a hole the size of a silver dollar in the right heel of his maroon sock.’
  • 65) ‘Changing out of his painting clothes after a somewhat disappointing day in his studio, he noticed the worn spot on the heel of his sock.’
  • 66) ‘Your sock's heel should fit snugly around your heel.’
  • 67) ‘The heel is a double knitted fabric, which I think helps the sock to stay up since it pulls the fabric in at the ankles.’
  • 68) ‘The three inch brown suede heels seemed like sneakers on her joyous feet.’
  • 69) ‘She wore a short black dress, her black walking heels, and a tight red cardigan with just the middle button done up over the dress.’
  • 70) ‘People don't seem to understand that modeling is not just getting on the catwalk and walking in heels.’
  • 71) ‘She looked perfect, wearing a vintage summer dress with heels, her blonde hair framing her face in gentle waves.’
  • 72) ‘She was wearing an off white gown with matching heels, and her hair hung down over her shoulders.’
  • 73) ‘I strained in my heels to make our lips meet but he turned his head before they could.’
  • 74) ‘She wanted to look into his eyes but that would mean raising her head and if she did that, because he was so near and she was wearing heels, her lips would be mere centimetres from his.’
  • 75) ‘She was quite tall, wearing a long black dress with heels, and her hair was cut into a short ‘bob’.’
  • 76) ‘She slipped on a pair of heels, twisted her hair up in a clip, and gracefully walked out of her room.’
  • 77) ‘Standing there in front of the mirror in my dress and heels, with my hair and make-up done, I felt way overdressed for anything.’
  • 78) ‘I stood there a moment longer, teetering on my heels, my stomach lurching and twisting, waiting for him to turn around and see me.’
  • 79) ‘She was jogging in a pair of bright red heels, matching tank top, and a white, linen skirt.’
  • 80) ‘She was dressed in a gray wool skirt and white shirt and black heels, not very fashionable, very plain, even for my taste.’
  • 81) ‘She wore a red tank top with a dark blue jean miniskirt accompanied with black heels.’
  • 82) ‘She purred before turning in her mini skirt and heels and heading down the hall.’
  • 83) ‘He dived into my closet and re-emerged with a floating black skirt, a dark scarlet tank-top, and black heels.’
  • 84) ‘By time I made it to the stairs, I slipped on my heels and felt a hem in my dress tear.’
  • 85) ‘She wore a tailored black pantsuit, black heels, and double strands of pearls around her neck and one wrist.’
  • 86) ‘She sort of remembered wearing the camisole and heels maybe once or twice, but the pants and scarf seemed to be brand new.’
  • 87) ‘Her clothes matched with her hair, consisting of a short black skirt, green shirt, and black heels.’
  • 88) ‘I closed my eyes a moment, rubbing the center of my forehead - just between my eyebrows - with the heel of my palm.’
  • 89) ‘Claire sniffles, rubbing at her eyes with the heel of her palm.’
  • 90) ‘He rubbed his eye with the heel of his palm and smiled widely.’
  • 91) ‘The young cadet clutched his head, hammering the heel of his palm against his forehead.’
  • 92) ‘The palm heel should rest just above the horizontal line linking the eyebrow with the base of the ear.’
  • 93) ‘He closed his eyes, pressing the heels of his palms to his forehead.’
  • 94) ‘I closed my eyes, pressing the heel of my palm against my forehead.’
  • 95) ‘He leaned back against the wall, shut his eyes, and gently bashed the heel of his palm into his forehead.’
  • 96) ‘The older fighter stood there in an empty stance as if he were simply holding a conversation, until the moment she struck at his chest with the heel of her left palm.’
  • 97) ‘He struck her in the chest with the heel of his palm and Liz staggered backwards.’
  • 98) ‘Pressing the heels of my palms against my eyes I tried to shut out the threatening tears and held my breath to keep from weeping.’
  • 99) ‘She shoved the heels of her palms into her eyes as fresh tears flowed.’
  • 100) ‘It's executed with the inside edge of your hand where your thumb is, not the meaty part near the heel of the palm.’
  • 101) ‘Luckily, the heel of her palm caught her before she hit the stone ground.’
  • 102) ‘Before slamming the heel of his palm into the front door he closes his eyes to imagine the silence that will sweep over his eagerly awaiting audience as he walks onto center stage.’
  • 103) ‘I fell quiet, rubbing the heels of my hands over my face.’
  • 104) ‘The sting of fingernails in the heel of my hand told me that my fist was clenched.’
  • 105) ‘Kneel at his or her feet, put the heel of one hand above his or her navel, put the other hand over your fist with the fingers of both hands pointing toward his or her head.’
  • 106) ‘He stopped and smacked himself in the forehead with the heel of his hand.’
  • 107) ‘He sighed and dropped his forehead against the heel of his hand, digging the spoon into his bowl.’
  • 108) ‘Irons from the 1930s, for example, had a center of gravity high on the clubface and well toward the heel.’
  • 109) ‘The iron's center of gravity is toward the heel and higher than in the company's more forgiving irons.’
  • 110) ‘On the first tee, he hit a shot off the heel and almost hit somebody's head in the gallery.’
  • 111) ‘Some golfers hit it off the heel because they dip their upper bodies toward the ball during the swing.’
  • 112) ‘In a poor set-up position, the heel of the putter is off the ground; my left wrist is arched and my left elbow is well away from my side.’
  • 113) ‘This causes the heel of the clubface to make contact with the ball first, producing sidespin and, presto, a slice.’
  • 114) ‘I have no idea why the club is not working for you, but there is no harm in adding some lead tape to the back of the head, a little toward the heel.’
  • 115) ‘Jeff said at first it felt uncomfortable, as if his hands were higher and the heel of his club was off the ground.’
  • 116) ‘To maintain the loft, feel as if the heel of the club leads the shot.’
  • 117) ‘As a result, the heel of the club was digging into the sand.’
  • 118) ‘Adding weight to the heel area helps the clubface rotate, or close, through impact.’
  • 119) ‘The guy had caught it so far in on the heel that the ball had literally rolled between his legs.’
  • 120) ‘He seized the heel of black bread that was resting next to the bowl, scraped out the inside, and dipped it in the soup.’
  • 121) ‘She plopped down her bowl of stew and heel of crusty bread, holding the mug of cider in her hand as she sat.’
  • 122) ‘He had just finished soaking up the last of his roast beef with a heel of bread.’
  • 123) ‘Such behaviour is just unfathomable to me, like throwing out the heel of the bread or cutting the fat off rashers.’
  • 124) ‘Diana was counting the tiny cracks branching off of the main one when a dirty hand thrust a heel of bread under her nose.’
  • 125) ‘Chief Executives have gone from heroes in gray pinstriped suits to heels in orange jumpsuits.’
  • 126) ‘In fact, if you are dining there he will lend you a pair of flip-flops to get back to your chair while he heels your soles.’
  • 127) ‘Once your puppy is heeling properly, it's time to teach him to sit.’
  • 128) ‘Now I let it off the chain and it follows me everywhere, obediently heeling.’
  • 129) ‘Three weeks ago, Mary appeared on the TV programme, teaching a dog how to heel to a TV theme tune.’
  • 130) ‘They swiftly heeled a scrum on the champions' line, and Thomson cleverly waited while he assessed his options.’
  • 131) ‘Within ten minutes, the ball is heeled by the Scottish forwards and sent out to the wing.’
  • 132) ‘Such preliminary use of a foot would be a new skill to today's players, though much of the time it would merely amount to heeling the ball with the feet in a concerted rucking drive.’
  • 133) ‘As the wind increased, the yacht heeled over to a precarious angle and its bow was being continually submerged by the oncoming swell.’
  • 134) ‘The worst thing, we agreed, was putting on the oilskins in such conditions, whether on a fishing boat or a yacht heeled well over and battering her way into a difficult sea.’
  • 135) ‘Even as he spoke, the ship heeled over in the rising wind, and he moaned.’
  • 136) ‘As the galley righted itself, another wave struck from the other side, and the ship heeled over so far its mainsail almost touched the water.’
  • 137) ‘As he was waiting, the boat suddenly heeled over.’
  • 138) ‘As the conditions worsened, said Mr Pritchard, the boat heeled over on to her side twice, injuring two crewmen.’
  • 139) ‘Suddenly the boat heeled to an angle of 45° under a gust of wind from the port side, catching me unprepared and out of position.’
  • 140) ‘The wind caught the sails with a dull boom and the ship heeled about, tacking into the westerly breeze sweeping across the lake.’
  • 141) ‘When we hit bad weather in the open ocean, and the whole boat was heeling at an angle not conducive to sleep or gravity, the trainees would often get scared, and panicky - which sometimes translated into aggression and violence.’
  • 142) ‘‘The yacht was heeling over at 35 degrees, and the effort to get up the steps was beyond belief,’ she says.’
  • 143) ‘Julia, who had never set foot on a ship before, clutched the rigging in alarm when the ship first heeled over with the stiff breeze.’
  • 144) ‘Entering a small type of entrance, the ship was about to anchor when we heeled over for a brief instant.’
  • 145) ‘The boat heeled over hard as they hit the opposing wind that circulated in harbour.’
  • 146) ‘A great gasp went up as the ship listed heavily, and looked as though she would heel over completely.’
  • 147) ‘The two vessels clung together for less than a minute before the Umpire heeled to port and went down.’
  • 148) ‘My favourite memory of a tall ship is standing at the helm of the Lord Nelson under full sail, feeling her heel over in a stiff breeze until her port deck was awash.’
  • 149) ‘Placed too high up on a sailboat's mast, the radar might miss seeing a nearby target on the windward side when a boat is heeled over.’
  • 150) ‘Of course if the weather is very cold when your plants arrive, this is the only option for them, since if it's too cold for planting then it's also too cold to heel plants in.’
  • 151) ‘They're bare roots and so far I've left them packed in their plastic bags and in the garage, but as I don't have their permanent containers yet I will need to heel them in today.’
  • 152) ‘Find a way to heel it in in such a way that the amount of sun and wind the root ball receives is minimal.’

Examples

  • 1) This presidentelect says he wants to heal the wounds of a divided nation.
  • 2) It is time to rally and help them heal hidden wounds.
  • 3) It is possible that a lack of rest did not allow the injury to heal completely.
  • 4) It strikes when the immune system goes into overdrive trying to heal injury or infection - and can be deadly.
  • 5) Time will, to some extent, heal these wounds.
  • 6) Most bruises do, of course, heal without a scar.
  • 7) Family Lives will help put you in the right frame of mind to heal the rift (familylives.
  • 8) We seek to restore and heal a nation.
  • 9) That injury is healing and he is gradually getting better.
  • 10) The problem is that denial is no way to heal pain.
  • 11) The sun is now in place to heal family quarrels and resolve a cash situation.
  • 12) It is clear that the wounds from this period have not fully healed.
  • 13) It was found that their burns healed in half the time it normally takes.
  • 14) Zinc is needed to heal wounds and fight off infection.
  • 15) You cannot force him to heal the rift but you can try to strengthen your relationship.
  • 16) You are a scarred yet healed adult.
  • 17) We found out that it had healed around infected bone and so it just snapped on impact.
  • 18) He held back after the injury healed.
  • 19) The hot sun helps to heal aches and pains and recharge batteries.
  • 20) The scars on the family did not heal.
  • 21) After three months the scar will be fully healed and you should be back to normal.
  • 22) Have all of the wounds healed now and do you keep in touch?
  • 23) Sharing ideas can help heal a family rift.
  • 24) These scars may not heal when demand recovers.
  • 25) And she could be disabled for life if the injury fails to heal properly.
  • 26) And only time would heal the pain.
  • 27) As skin ages, its ability to heal and repair itself declines.
  • 28) It also helps heal burns, research found.
  • 29) It heals by repair; therefore it is not going back to being 100 per cent.
  • 30) ‘But when I was bitten, while picking some herbs to heal a sick friend, they made me one of their Elders.’
  • 31) ‘Although he does not prescribe medicines, he plays a significant and positive role in healing sick people.’
  • 32) ‘Pulses of ultrasound are also sometimes used as a treatment for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and to heal fractures and wounds.’
  • 33) ‘The Jesus who heals the sick people is by no means described as someone who fulfils a pre-established programme.’
  • 34) ‘The Guru helped to heal many sick people, naturally coming in contact with so many people every day, the Guru was also infected and taken seriously ill.’
  • 35) ‘We have time to rest and recover and heal our injuries.’
  • 36) ‘There was no harm in trying to heal a sick man who wanted to get better.’
  • 37) ‘He soon gained a reputation as a man who could heal sick people.’
  • 38) ‘We now have six days to rest, recover and heal the injuries.’
  • 39) ‘It will probably take a while for him to recover his strength and heal his wounds.’
  • 40) ‘He healed another sick woman and brought one back to life.’
  • 41) ‘She gently ran her hand over the injury, using her power to heal the wound.’
  • 42) ‘We believe that recovery is a process that heals the whole person therefore, we take a holistic approach to treatment.’
  • 43) ‘It restored a downed Warrior to a minimum level of health and energy, and healed any physical injuries.’
  • 44) ‘What a patient weighs on a scale does not adequately represent his or her health or ability to heal a wound.’
  • 45) ‘The disciples aren't able to heal a lad who is suffering from what sounds like epileptic seizures.’
  • 46) ‘She was severely wounded and he couldn't heal her with what little training he had had.’
  • 47) ‘She begs Jesus to heal her daughter, but it sounds as if he doesn't have time for her.’
  • 48) ‘She also developed a skill for healing people by using flowers and herbs.’
  • 49) ‘He could return if he takes the veterans' minimum deal, his troublesome knee heals and there is a need after the club explores other options.’
  • 50) ‘And it has nothing to do with how the little tear in his knee heals.’
  • 51) ‘You can make yourself more balanced and well-rounded by dabbling in these other areas while your knee heals.’
  • 52) ‘It's very hard to tell, I suppose it comes down to how successful the surgery is and how quickly the knee heals.’
  • 53) ‘Hours of surgery and several months of rehab later, the knee wasn't healing well.’
  • 54) ‘He wasn't sure if the bullet wound had healed yet, but he was hoping it had.’
  • 55) ‘The round caused him to stagger back slightly, but the wound simply healed and the bullet was pushed out.’
  • 56) ‘The bullet wounds had healed, but the vaccine hurt his head to the extent that he felt like throwing up.’
  • 57) ‘Understanding what you're up against as you heal and adopting healthy coping strategies will help get you there.’
  • 58) ‘Fortunately, once a sufferer finds out what is wrong with them and sticks to a gluten-free diet, the intestine can heal and good health returns.’
  • 59) ‘You know you're going to heal and hey look at that, that blood is good and red and healthy isn't it so you're going to heal very quickly.’
  • 60) ‘When that joint heals, he'll get a new right knee.’
  • 61) ‘The girl's legs are usually bound together from ankle to knee until the wound has healed, which may take anything up to 40 days.’
  • 62) ‘His hand healed and it gave his knee extra time to rest as well, and last night against the Hornets it showed.’
  • 63) ‘With the knee protected in a knee brace, a partial tear of the tendon can heal within several weeks.’
  • 64) ‘I think we'd better get that bullet out of your shoulder before it heals.’
  • 65) ‘Her cheek and teeth had healed, but she couldn't dig the bullet out of her leg.’
  • 66) ‘I'm usually so active and independent but now I'll be house bound until my arm heals.’
  • 67) ‘The people - the people I've known who have had to deal with this, they've had to struggle against the way in which the amputation took place, the way in which it heals.’
  • 68) ‘Consequently when the wound in his hand healed Albert volunteered to re-enter the fray and returned to the Western Front with the Machine Gun Corps.’
  • 69) ‘Of course, his wife will also be pregnant because that obviously will heal the psychological torment and guilt John feels over the loss of his son.’
  • 70) ‘Thirdly, we should do what will go a long way to heal the agony of the Hindus.’
  • 71) ‘From now until I die, I will be nothing more to my pride than a means to heal pain and agony.’
  • 72) ‘Looking at my siblings, who had been separated for 38 years, I wondered if time would heal the pain we all shared.’
  • 73) ‘There are architects in our time, however, who evoke healing experiences of time.’
  • 74) ‘‘Time heals all pain,’ she said, shortly, because she prefers keeping her private life out of the public eye.’
  • 75) ‘It is an attempt to heal the pain of families torn apart by the Korean War 50 years ago.’
  • 76) ‘By our love, and only by our love for one another, are we going to be able to approach God and to heal pain.’
  • 77) ‘Such phrases and the music had helped her to recognize again that the one whose birth we celebrate is none other than the one who bears our sorrows and heals our pain.’
  • 78) ‘She teaches me that healing my own pain doesn't mean losing sight of the pain of others.’
  • 79) ‘Time healed my pain and your mother's… gave us the ability to understand that what we had done was for the best.’
  • 80) ‘Love, and the expression of it, is a medicine to heal the pain of oppression, hatred, lovelessness and colonization.’
  • 81) ‘If I could use God's love to help me heal my own pain, maybe I would grow too.’
  • 82) ‘I was adorned with condolences and words of pity and sorrow, but no words could heal the pain in my heart.’
  • 83) ‘I know that time will heal my pain, but how will I ever be able to trust him again?’
  • 84) ‘The young woman was crying so deeply that no kind words or gentle touches would heal the pain.’
  • 85) ‘He had healed her body, but no one could heal the pain in her heart.’
  • 86) ‘For many Muslims, it has been a haven where they could come to heal the traumas and persecution they experienced in their home countries.’
  • 87) ‘Tender loving care helps to heal the mental trauma caused by a lifetime of pain and confinement.’
  • 88) ‘I think a number of us are really encouraged to go back and really work with the people, and help to heal the situation.’
  • 89) ‘But Foot was seen as a conciliator, who would heal divisions in the party.’
  • 90) ‘Would a Truth and Reconciliation Commission help to heal the racial divide in Bermuda?’
  • 91) ‘Now, the June meeting marks another chance to start healing half a century of brotherly hatred.’
  • 92) ‘Last week's EU summit should have been an ideal opportunity to heal rifts after the trauma of the ‘No’ votes.’
  • 93) ‘The tragedy offers an opportunity to heal the rift between the United States and the UN and bridge the Atlantic divide.’
  • 94) ‘Their departure will allow two new people the opportunity to attempt to heal the sluggish economy.’
  • 95) ‘Enlargement is more than just an historic opportunity to heal the post-war division of Europe.’
  • 96) ‘Liu also reiterated the need for China and Japan to continue talks to heal their rift over bilateral history.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy