faint vs feint

faint feint

Definitions

  • 1) The act of fainting.
  • 2) rare The state of one who has fainted; a swoon.
  • 3) An abrupt, usually brief loss of consciousness, generally associated with failure of normal blood circulation.
  • 4) The act of fainting, or the state of one who has fainted; a swoon. [R.] See fainting, n.
  • 5) One of the colored lines (usually pale) on writing-paper.
  • 6) plural The impure spirit which comes over first and last in the distillation of whisky, the former being called the strong, and the latter, which is much more abundant, the weak faints. This crude spirit is much impregnated with fetid essential oil (fusel-oil); it is therefore very unwholesome, and must be purified by rectification.
  • 7) A fainting-fit; a swoon.
  • 8) Performed, done, or acted, in a weak or feeble manner; not exhibiting vigor, strength, or energy; slight; as, faint efforts; faint resistance.
  • 9) Lacking distinctness; hardly perceptible; striking the senses feebly; not bright, or loud, or sharp, or forcible; weak; as, a faint color, or sound.
  • 10) Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to swoon; as, faint with fatigue, hunger, or thirst.
  • 11) Wanting in courage, spirit, or energy; timorous; cowardly; dejected; depressed.
  • 12) So weak as to be difficult to perceive;
  • 13) Lacking clarity or distinctness.
  • 14) Done with little strength or vigor; feeble.
  • 15) Lacking conviction, boldness, or courage; timid.
  • 16) Likely to fall into a faint; dizzy and weak.
  • 17) Small in degree or amount; meager.
  • 18) Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to swoon.
  • 19) Performed, done, or acted, in a weak or feeble manner; not exhibiting vigor, strength, or energy; slight
  • 20) Lacking distinctness; hardly perceptible; striking the senses feebly; not bright, or loud, or sharp, or forcible; weak.
  • 21) Wanting in courage, spirit, or energy; timorous; cowardly; dejected; depressed.”
  • 22) indistinctly understood or felt or perceived
  • 23) deficient in magnitude; barely perceptible; lacking clarity or brightness or loudness etc
  • 24) intransitive To lose consciousness. Caused by a lack of oxygen or nutrients to the brain, usually as a result of a suddenly reduced blood flow (may be caused by emotional trauma, loss of blood or various medical conditions).
  • 25) Having an intense feeling of weakness or exhaustion; inclined to swoon: as, faint with hunger; faint and sore with travel.
  • 26) To become faint to the view; become gradually dim or indistinct; fade; vanish.
  • 27) Having little spirit or animation; dispirited; dejected; depressed.
  • 28) Having little clearness or distinctness; hardly perceptible by or feebly affecting the senses; indistinct; deficient in brightness, vividness, or clearness, loudness, sharpness, or force; not well defined; feeble; dim: as, a faint light; a faint color; a faint resemblance.
  • 29) To become faint, weak, or exhausted in body; fail in strength or vigor; languish; droop; especially, to fall into a swoon; lose sensation and consciousness; swoon: sometimes with away.
  • 30) Feigned;simulated.
  • 31) To become weak in spirit; lose spirit or courage; sink into dejection; despond; droop.
  • 32) To make faint; weaken; depress; dishearten; deject.
  • 33) Oppressive: applied to the atmosphere.
  • 34) Having or showing little force or earnestness; not forcible or vigorous; not active; wanting strength, energy, or heartiness: as, a faint resistance; a faint exertion.
  • 35) Weak by reason of smallness or slenderness; small; slender.
  • 36) Having little courage; cowardly; timorous.
  • 37) Feigned; simulated.
  • 38) To fall into a usually brief state of unconsciousness.
  • 39) Archaic To weaken in purpose or spirit.
  • 40) To become weak or wanting in vigor; to grow feeble; to lose strength and color, and the control of the bodily or mental functions; to swoon; -- sometimes with away. See fainting, n.
  • 41) To decay; to disappear; to vanish.
  • 42) To sink into dejection; to lose courage or spirit; to become depressed or despondent.
  • 43) obsolete To cause to faint or become dispirited; to depress; to weaken.

Definitions

  • 1) That which is feigned; an assumed or false appearance; a pretense; a stratagem; a fetch.
  • 2) A movement made to confuse the opponent, a dummy
  • 3) The narrowest rule used in the production of lined writing paper (C19: Variant of FAINT)
  • 4) fencing, boxing, war An offensive movement resembling an attack in all but its continuance
  • 5) A body movement that is intended to divert another's attention, often by being deliberately left uncompleted.
  • 6) A military attack or maneuver that is meant to divert attention away from a planned point of attack.
  • 7) A deceptive action calculated to divert attention from one's real purpose. synonym: wile.
  • 8) A mock blow or attack on one part when another part is intended to be struck; -- said of certain movements in fencing, boxing, war, etc.
  • 9) any distracting or deceptive maneuver (as a mock attack)
  • 10) plural See faint, n., 2.
  • 11) An assumed or false appearance, or simulation; a pretense of doing something not really done.
  • 12) A movement made with the object of deceiving an adversary or throwing him off his guard; an appearance of aiming at one part or point when another is the real object of attack, as in boxing, fencing, battle, or a contest of any kind; a mock attack.
  • 13) fencing, boxing, war (of an attack) directed toward a different part from the intended strike
  • 14) obsolete Feigned; counterfeit.
  • 15) To make a feint, or mock attack.
  • 16) deceive by a mock action
  • 17) Sameasfaint,2.
  • 18) Counterfeit; seeming; feigned: same as faint, 1.
  • 19) To make a feint; make a pretended blow, thrust, or attack at one point when another is intended to be struck, in order to throw an antagonist off his guard.
  • 20) Same as faint, 2.
  • 21) To do or perform as a feint.
  • 22) To deceive with a feint.
  • 23) To make a feint.

Examples

  • 1) Not for the faint of heart, but ridiculously cheap.
  • 2) It is a faint hope.
  • 3) For the first time, all the European nations can look at these fixtures not with faint hope but with proper expectation.
  • 4) I become dizzy and faint when I walk past them because the urge to knock them over is so unbelievably strong.
  • 5) This list is not for the faint of heart.
  • 6) Such things have a faint whiff of murder.
  • 7) None of us had the faintest idea what was about to take place.
  • 8) When the writing is at its most mundane we feel faint biblical echoes in the background.
  • 9) There may also be the faint patter of drizzle on canvas.
  • 10) To catch and carry out those who fainted in the heat.
  • 11) One volunteer fainted when they discovered a body.
  • 12) There was one faint hope that they would see the light.
  • 13) Beech trees are showing the first faint signs of spring.
  • 14) This is no time for faint hearts.
  • 15) Most would agree that the spuds would carry the faint whiff of moral complicity.
  • 16) The sudden change of focus gave me a moment's faint nausea.
  • 17) There's a scratching noise and your voice is so faint.
  • 18) Her face had a little faint colour in it, and the very exhaustion after the examination gave it a peaceful look.
  • 19) Typically, apart from faint nausea, the drug has not the slightest effect on me.
  • 20) I almost fainted with shock!
  • 21) I became faint and weak.
  • 22) What to say I'm feeling a little faint.
  • 23) _Even the youths shall faint and be weary, and the young men shall utterly fall: but they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk and not faint_.
  • 24) The little store of sovereigns in the tin box seemed to be the only sight that brought a faint beam of pleasure into the miller’s eyes, —faint and transient, for it was soon dispelled by the thought that the time would be long—perhaps longer than his life, —before the narrow savings could remove the hateful incubus of debt.
  • 25) Gives him what he calls a faint picture of his horrible uneasiness, riding up and down, expecting the return of his servant as soon as he had dispatched him.
  • 26) Senator Dole attributed some of this, what he called faint - hearted Republicans, to the president's standing in the polls.
  • 27) So quietly did the little stream drip and ripple its way through the cãnon that it spoke only in faint and occasional gurgles.
  • 28) So spoke Brissenden, faint from a hemorrhage of half an hour before — the second hemorrhage in three days.
  • 29) I love him turning away in faint disgust – that strikes me as exactly true to life.
  • 30) I could feel my knee through my clothes, swelling, and swelling, and I was sick and faint from the pain of it.
  • 31) I never thought to love him, but, you see, I do, she concluded, a certain faint triumph in her voice.
  • 32) ‘I lie there listening for a few minutes and, just as I'm at the point of giving up and going back to sleep I hear it again - a faint noise, barely audible at all.’
  • 33) ‘As I get closer, there's a faint gleam behind the stained-glass windows of the 13th-century abbey.’
  • 34) ‘I just lay there listening to the faint beat of his heart.’
  • 35) ‘Richard stayed silent, nothing stirred and he could hear his heart beating nervously and the faint crackle of the flames.’
  • 36) ‘I could still detect the faint smell of bleach.’
  • 37) ‘As they got closer Zoe could see faint outlines of buildings.’
  • 38) ‘A faint rustling was heard close to where they were.’
  • 39) ‘I strained my ears and was about to give up when the faint sound of a rumbling engine became perceptible.’
  • 40) ‘The sound was so faint untrained ears could have barely heard it.’
  • 41) ‘Last night on the evening air a faint whiff of garbage floated down the street making the heat even more unbearable.’
  • 42) ‘Everywhere they look in the sky, they see a faint glow.’
  • 43) ‘Bat calls have to be incredibly loud so that the faint echoes can to be detected.’
  • 44) ‘On a small, precarious headland the faint traces of a monastic cell can be seen.’
  • 45) ‘A faint trace of wood smoke wisps through the air.’
  • 46) ‘There was just a faint scent of lavender and mothballs about her.’
  • 47) ‘The only sound is the faint whisper of the air-conditioning.’
  • 48) ‘Even now, years later, with a little help from my imagination I can open up that suitcase and still smell their faint aroma.’
  • 49) ‘l've been listening to the faint hum of London traffic and the random bangs and crackles of fireworks in nearby parks and gardens.’
  • 50) ‘All of the marks on the sides are very faint.’
  • 51) ‘He had short black hair and a very faint black moustache, a London accent and a thin build.’
  • 52) ‘Reports last week suggested that there is now a faint hope of an end to these absurdities.’
  • 53) ‘I always have this faint hope that I might stumble across some great find at the flea market.’
  • 54) ‘And there's a touch of faint hope in Mr Ward's comment that the bank was considering appealing.’
  • 55) ‘Well, with 13 million creatures who have yet to be named is there a faint chance that you might run out of possible names?’
  • 56) ‘In short, the whole point of the pub is that you go to relax and talk to people in the faint hope that when you emerge, your mind feels unburdened.’
  • 57) ‘United desperately need to win at the Riverside Stadium to maintain their faint hopes of clawing their way back into the title race.’
  • 58) ‘I am therefore in the weeks ahead going to be putting up my old academic papers on Blogspot in the faint hope of introducing them to a wider audience.’
  • 59) ‘Yes, on one hand he's accepting perhaps the reality, but also on the other hand, he's still trying to see if there is a faint hope he can hang on in there.’
  • 60) ‘His tenure closed with a win at Hampden, but it was a hollow victory as faint hopes of qualification for the next World Cup were extinguished.’
  • 61) ‘Volunteers' title hopes took a blow when they lost 4-3 at home to Hounds, who still harbour faint hopes of the championship.’
  • 62) ‘With a minute to go, Henry pulled his fifth and final foul and left the court, taking with him Kingston's faint hope of winning the game.’
  • 63) ‘So on Saturday I went to the Bayshore Winners with the faint hope they would carry the same merchandise.’
  • 64) ‘All the while he is in faint hope he can make it home to his beloved.’
  • 65) ‘There remains a faint hope that he has been released and is attempting to make his way through the jungle.’
  • 66) ‘Today's results extinguished their faint hopes that they could prise back control of the Senate.’
  • 67) ‘It was all going nowhere and we were clinging to the faint hope that Kildare might muster something.’
  • 68) ‘Is there a touch of faint hope in Mr Ward's comment that the bank was considering appealing?’
  • 69) ‘He eked out his drinking water until Tuesday morning, waiting in the faint hope of being found.’
  • 70) ‘Only rain could have rescued the home side and a light cloud cover may have raised faint hopes of a miracle but it was all over after India had bowled just 12 balls.’
  • 71) ‘I saw a faint glimmer of hope; a chance to derail the topic.’
  • 72) ‘The acquisition of Edmark was greeted with faint enthusiasm when it was first announced.’
  • 73) ‘Hundreds of mourners gather daily, shedding torrents of tears and managing a few faint smiles as they remember their loved ones.’
  • 74) ‘They received the faint answer of ‘yes’ and their fears were assuaged; if only for a moment.’
  • 75) ‘Ask about the income from playing the instrument, he will give you a faint smile as reply.’
  • 76) ‘I made the obvious joke about him looking forward to progressing to the next stage and consuming solids, which got me a faint smile from Quentin.’
  • 77) ‘If that seems like faint praise… well, it is.’
  • 78) ‘When a panic attack strikes, most likely your heart pounds and you may feel sweaty, weak, faint, or dizzy.’
  • 79) ‘My hands were trembling, I almost reached for the phone to call Nick because I felt so faint and dizzy.’
  • 80) ‘The wine rarely loses its faint iodine background flavour and is often high in alcohol.’
  • 81) ‘She often had to stop up to 40 times during a training session and had to pull out of major competitions because she felt dizzy or faint.’
  • 82) ‘They have three or four of these episodes a year when they feel dizzy or faint, but they just pick themselves up and carry on.’
  • 83) ‘If conscious, the person may feel faint or be very weak or confused.’
  • 84) ‘If you become dizzy or faint while sitting, take several deep breaths and bend forward with your head between your knees.’
  • 85) ‘Bren didn't hear, dizzy and faint from the nausea and endless retching.’
  • 86) ‘Finally another man went down to check and found him weak and faint from exertion and lack of air.’
  • 87) ‘This is when you stomach empties too quickly after eating, causing a drop in blood sugar and making you feel dizzy and faint.’
  • 88) ‘If you feel faint, sweaty, dizzy or confused you may be suffering from an insulin reaction.’
  • 89) ‘He had woken up feeling dizzy and faint, a distant rushing sound in his ears.’
  • 90) ‘‘I was putting my arm under pressure but I was losing so much blood I was beginning to feel very faint,’ she said.’
  • 91) ‘Lydie had never felt so faint in all her life.’
  • 92) ‘Lights danced in front of her eyes, and she felt faint from lack of blood.’
  • 93) ‘The girls would be faint at the sight of such destruction.’
  • 94) ‘Jane awakens again later in the afternoon, faint with hunger and still numb from emotion.’
  • 95) ‘He felt faint from the lack of oxygen he was now receiving.’
  • 96) ‘When Kirstle reached her room, panting and close to a faint, her heart almost skipped a beat when she saw the young lady sitting in a chair by her fire.’
  • 97) ‘Get the person to lie down on his or her back and elevate the feet higher than the head to keep adequate blood flow to the brain, which will prevent fainting.’
  • 98) ‘It was concluded that the pilot had fainted or lost his horizon.’
  • 99) ‘Geneva was beginning to faint from lack of oxygen, and when he let go of her, she fell to the floor, desperately trying to see who was fighting the men to save her.’
  • 100) ‘He then began to hyperventilate and allegedly fainted and hit the car in front of him.’
  • 101) ‘When blood pressure drops, less blood flows to the brain, leading to fainting.’
  • 102) ‘The surgery in May came after she had started to suffer alarming ‘blue’ spells, in which she would faint through lack of oxygen.’
  • 103) ‘Pacemakers are usually used to treat an abnormally slow heartbeat (heart block) which can cause dizziness, fainting or blackouts.’
  • 104) ‘My back was hurting badly and I was fainting, losing my senses.’
  • 105) ‘The victim has signs of shock, such as fainting, pale complexion or breathing in a notably shallow manner.’
  • 106) ‘The child may tire easily and may even faint from physical activity.’
  • 107) ‘Hip fractures were not associated with fainting or the use of sedatives or alcohol.’
  • 108) ‘Call the doctor if your child faints more than once in a month.’
  • 109) ‘During either stage, the investigator stops the test if the volunteer faints or develops low blood pressure.’
  • 110) ‘Common signs of pulmonary hypertension are shortness of breath with activity, feeling tired, fainting and chest pain.’
  • 111) ‘Physical activity, even if it's not very strenuous, may trigger extreme fatigue, dizziness or even fainting.’
  • 112) ‘The patient hadn't fainted; she'd had a stroke and this was the woman who had been so kind to me.’
  • 113) ‘I'd do it myself, but I faint at the sight of a needle.’
  • 114) ‘Don't go if you faint at the sight of blood.’
  • 115) ‘"I have to go… the incense, it's making me faint.’
  • 116) ‘Since the age of 14 he had been fainting and losing consciousness regularly at school.’
  • 117) ‘The flame of the soldiers' fire grew faint, white mists rose in the fields, the cannon in the forest ceased and the birds began.’
  • 118) ‘If I didn't find food soon I was going to collapse in a dead faint.’
  • 119) ‘Suddenly Tina let out a high-pitched wail, jumped from her cot and collapsed in a dead faint onto the floor.’
  • 120) ‘As soon as the kiss ended, Jane collapsed in a dead faint on the front steps.’
  • 121) ‘I never got any farther than saying Mikasho, for my mother had collapsed in a dead faint.’
  • 122) ‘Catalyne soon tired and collapsed in the middle of the street in a dead faint, the young king rushing to her side as the remaining enemy closed in on them.’
  • 123) ‘Once free of danger, she collapsed under a tree in a dead faint.’
  • 124) ‘Irene shut the door and collapsed on the floor in a dead faint.’
  • 125) ‘She collapsed to the ground in a dead faint, and Vixen caught her as she fell.’
  • 126) ‘If Prudie's beloved showed up in a skirt and pumps, she would probably wind up in a dead faint, but that's what makes horse races, no?’
  • 127) ‘Oreste stumbles, recovers, stumbles again - and measures his length on the ground in a dead faint.’
  • 128) ‘The multiple shocks to body and mind sent his wounded psyche catapulting down the dark tunnel to oblivion in a dead faint.’
  • 129) ‘Adondra collapses in a dead faint as the power leaves her body, along with the blood from the deep gash on her shoulder.’
  • 130) ‘I would have started yelling and hooting with glee in his face, but I was in bed in a dead faint while he was thrown out.’
  • 131) ‘Pellew was the one to notice her fatigue and caught her in a dead faint.’
  • 132) ‘The first time he had drunk it he had been violently sick, then had fallen to the ground in a dead faint as the mildly poisonous root exploded through his system.’
  • 133) ‘He gave a loud, startling, heart-wrenching cry and fell backwards in a dead faint.’
  • 134) ‘They both fell to the ground in a dead faint, taking their chairs with them.’
  • 135) ‘Everyone in the crowd gasped and Miss Moss fell over in a dead faint with poor little Mr. Goodman to catch her stout figure.’
  • 136) ‘Others simply dropped to the ground in a dead faint, overwhelmed by Darkstorm's rage.’
  • 137) ‘All she could do was stumble over to her cot and drop in a dead faint.’

Examples

  • 1) One of them was ours," the driver told him, and added knowledgeably, `That will have been a feint.
  • 2) It had taken Damin quite some time to accept that the forays were genuine, not merely a feint to disguise a more effective attack.
  • 3) He snorted, lowered his head dangerously, made a feint charge at it; thundered to ano ther halt.
  • 4) Anyway, this is probably the closest to "classical" rag style that I've ever gotten, the D strain feint towards the Neapolitan notwithstanding.
  • 5) Turns out, "Choral" is a record label feint, a sonorous if deceptive introduction to the New York duo that was never intended to represent their oeuvre.
  • 6) Have the dumb Democrats, who think that just because the United States established war policies at the Nuremburg Trials, they must follow them; ever heard of the boxing technique called a feint punch or the legendary chess move called the "ghost knight gambit"?
  • 7) But there one name that make the left-wing go crazy and feint, which is a good signal:
  • 8) Of course, I answered him that I would make the "feint," regardless of public clamor at a distance, and I did make it most effectually; using all the old boats I could get about Milliken's Bend and the mouth of the Yazoo, but taking only ten small regiments, selected out of Blair's division, to make a show of force.
  • 9) Bethlehem saw a "feint" on the part of St. Paul in the disputed passage:
  • 10) This "feint," however, was only made in order to divert our attention, while Buller was concentrating his troops and guns on Spion Kop.
  • 11) ‘Both players attempt to control the space by confusing the opponent with feints and deceptive moves.’
  • 12) ‘If the attack is commenced when the opponent's blade is not in line, the attack may be completed either direct, or by one disengagement or by a cut-over, or else be preceded by successful feints which oblige the opponent to parry.’
  • 13) ‘The self-absorbed men take center stage via a series of furtive crouches, runs, hops, and boxing feints.’
  • 14) ‘Your opponent makes a feint to your six, then hits your eight with a simple lunge.’
  • 15) ‘I thought I gained my respect early and the guy saw that all those feints and tricks were not working.’
  • 16) ‘Account should be taken at the same time of enemy methods of feints and other stratagems.’
  • 17) ‘In a more narrow sense, the use of strategy may be seen in demonstrations and feints that surprise the enemy by hitting him where he is unprepared.’
  • 18) ‘Fix the enemy in place using skirmishes, artillery, feints, and demonstrations while probing his lines.’
  • 19) ‘The German High Command, viewing the Normandy attack as a feint, failed until too late to commit their armored reserves.’
  • 20) ‘A feint can force your enemy to tie down huge amounts of forces to protect against an attack that never comes.’
  • 21) ‘Fencing has developed over the centuries to become Europe's most refined martial art, and when one learns how to feint, lunge, parry and riposte it is possible to take this combative art to Olympic level.’
  • 22) ‘I shifted my grip on my weapon and parried as he feinted at me.’
  • 23) ‘He taught me how to feint and pull back and right-hand counter-punch.’
  • 24) ‘So we circled each other for some time feinting at one another.’
  • 25) ‘He took half a step backwards to stabilise himself, before feinting to the left and bringing his sword around to the right.’
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