exempt vs except

exempt except

Definitions

  • 1) One who has been released from something.
  • 2) One who is exempted from an obligation, duty, or liability.
  • 3) One exempted or freed from duty; one not subject.
  • 4) engraving One of four officers of the Yeomen of the Royal Guard, having the rank of corporal; an Exon.
  • 5) One who is exempted or freed from duty; one dispensed from or not subject to service, especially military or other obligatory public service.
  • 6) In England, one of four officers of the yeomen of the royal guard, styled corporals in their commission; an exon.
  • 7) Free from a duty or obligation.
  • 8) of an employee Not entitled to overtime pay when working overtime.
  • 9) Not subject to certain federal workplace laws or protections, especially those requiring overtime compensation.
  • 10) Freed from an obligation, duty, or liability to which others are subject; excused.
  • 11) Obsolete Set apart; isolated.
  • 12) obsolete Extraordinary; exceptional.
  • 13) Free, or released, from some liability to which others are subject; excepted from the operation or burden of some law; released; free; clear; privileged; -- (with from): not subject to; not liable to
  • 14) obsolete Cut off; set apart.
  • 15) (of persons) freed from or not subject to an obligation or liability (as e.g. taxes) to which others or other things are subject
  • 16) transitive To grant (someone) freedom or immunity from.
  • 17) Standing apart; separated; select.
  • 18) To free or permit to be free (from some undesirable requirement or condition); grant immunity (to); release; dispense: as, no man is exempted from pain and suffering.
  • 19) Removed; remote.
  • 20) Exempted; having exemption; free or clear, as from subjection or liability to something disagreeable, onerous, or dangerous; dispensed: as, to be exempt from military duty; exempt from the jurisdiction of a court.
  • 21) Removed;remote.
  • 22) Obsolete To set apart; isolate.
  • 23) To free from an obligation, duty, or liability to which others are subject.
  • 24) obsolete To remove; to set apart.
  • 25) To release or deliver from some liability which others are subject to; to except or excuse from he operation of a law; to grant immunity to; to free from obligation; to release

Definitions

  • 1) intransitive To take exception, to object (to or against).
  • 2) transitive To exclude; to specify as being an exception.
  • 3) take exception to
  • 4) To take or leave out of consideration; exclude from a statement or category, as one or more of a number, or some particular or detail; omit or withhold: as, to except a few from a general condemnation.
  • 5) To object; take exception: now usually followed by to, but formerly sometimes by against: as, to except to a witness or to his testimony.
  • 6) Excepting; if it be not that; unless.
  • 7) Being excepted or left out; with the exception of; excepting: usually equivalent to but, but more emphatic.
  • 8) To object.
  • 9) To leave out; exclude.
  • 10) To take exception; to object; -- usually followed by to, sometimes by against.
  • 11) obsolete To object to; to protest against.
  • 12) To take or leave out (anything) from a number or a whole as not belonging to it; to exclude; to omit.
  • 13) archaic Unless; used to introduce a hypothetical case in which an exception may exist.
  • 14) With the exception (that); used to introduce a clause, phrase or adverb forming an exception or qualification to something previously stated.
  • 15) Archaic Unless.
  • 16) If it were not for the fact that; only. Often used with that:
  • 17) Otherwise than.
  • 18) Unless; if it be not so that.
  • 19) With the exception of; but.
  • 20) With the exclusion of; other than; but.
  • 21) With exclusion of; leaving or left out; excepting.
  • 22) (except for) Were it not for.

Examples

  • 1) It is already subsidising purchase of electric vehicles by up to 4,500 and they are exempt from road tax.
  • 2) Does this affect the exempt status of the property?
  • 3) The religious were exempt from military service.
  • 4) They are also exempt from council tax and can continue claiming most benefits.
  • 5) Wine investments are also exempt from capital gains tax.
  • 6) It would encourage scroungers not to work as the unemployed would be exempt from the charges.
  • 7) Get the tax now and exempt future payments.
  • 8) Those recovering from injury will also be exempt.
  • 9) And as electric vehicles they are all exempt from congestion charges.
  • 10) American troops serving there are exempted from tax.
  • 11) This model is also exempt from road tax.
  • 12) It will be exempt from stamp duty because the transfer is not being done in return for payment.
  • 13) Any property up to and including 250,000 will now be exempt from stamp duty.
  • 14) That is where there should be adjustments, not making the police exempt from the law.
  • 15) Officials said that choice would gradually expand into other areas, though emergency services would remain exempt.
  • 16) There was no rent review during the term and the two oil majors were exempted from any obligation to pay ships or goods dues.
  • 17) The schemes are exempt from stamp duty when you first buy and up to a maximum share purchase threshold of 80 per cent.
  • 18) In Shiloh, a town of 2,200 people, billboards advertise new homes, and foundations have been laid for about 10 new buildings that remain exempt from the 10-month construction freeze.
  • 19) The term exempt is, strictly speaking, not applied to an Abbot nullius, because his jurisdiction is entirely extraterritorial.
  • 20) There are a few other entitlement programs that are exempt from the spending freeze, notably Medicare and Medicaid, which will continue to grow unless some form of the health care reform legislation is passed to rein it in.
  • 21) How these folks stay tax exempt is beyond my understanding.
  • 22) But if I was Rep. Kennedy I would tell the Bishop, your tax exempt is over with.
  • 23) In fact, the extension of the cuts is exempt from the new "pay-go" rules that Obama signed into law recently.
  • 24) Yet the Pentagon budget — which is expected to exceed $700 billion when Obama unveils his budget on Feb. 1st — remains inexplicably exempt from the spending freeze.
  • 25) War widows and those on disability living allowance will be exempt from the cap.
  • 26) ‘The national department is to amend current exemption procedures and criteria later this year to ensure all those who cannot pay fees are duly exempt from doing so.’
  • 27) ‘Book stores, corner stores and TV shops are also exempt from the bylaw.’
  • 28) ‘As a middle-aged baby boomer, I am certainly not exempt from the wishes and dreams of the anti-aging movement.’
  • 29) ‘Surely, some say, these elites should not be entirely exempt from pressure to adopt more climate friendly lifestyles.’
  • 30) ‘They are not something mysteriously exempt from the conditions they study.’
  • 31) ‘Am I expected to pay the IRS on the profit from the sale or am I exempt from capital gains taxes?’
  • 32) ‘You can make other tax-free gifts, called potentially exempt transfers, and they will be free from IHT if you survive another seven years.’
  • 33) ‘This is commonly interpreted to mean that water was initially exempt, but in the final stages this exemption was withdrawn.’
  • 34) ‘Those that were not felt they were exempt due to non-profit status.’
  • 35) ‘But back to tax exempt status with attendant effect to disqualify or discredit MEMRI.’
  • 36) ‘A friend told me you can also make exempt gifts from income.’
  • 37) ‘Still others simply spend the money or save in exempt assets rather than pay outstanding bills.’
  • 38) ‘Technically the cathedral was bankrupt but the Church of England's exempt status meant this could not be declared.’
  • 39) ‘We'll get it back after our first appointment but it's still a lot of money for NHS exempt patients to have to find.’
  • 40) ‘Ten concessionary exempt permits will also be given to the Methodist Church on Hartley Street.’
  • 41) ‘Last week's Western Open offered up exempt spots for the Open just as this Scottish Open does.’
  • 42) ‘This may also affect Bermudians who wish to work for exempt companies in Bermuda.’
  • 43) ‘Inheritance tax is levied only on the estate, not on the recipients of any exempt gifts.’
  • 44) ‘Coaches like exempt events because they provide the opportunity to play high-level competition in neutral settings.’
  • 45) ‘The term therefore does not permit the clear distinction between taxable and exempt transactions to be blurred on the basis of considerations which are outside the system.’
  • 46) ‘Being a war hero is not a lifetime ‘get out of jail free’ card, exempting you from responsibility for what you do thereafter.’
  • 47) ‘Loving him does not mean excusing him or even exempting him from punishment (including the death penalty, if necessary).’
  • 48) ‘His age exempted him from conscription, but he had enlisted anyway.’
  • 49) ‘You can hardly name a language, not to mention a country whose writers are exempted from this trend.’
  • 50) ‘Newly revised guidelines exempting ELL students for only 1 year are not nearly enough.’
  • 51) ‘What do we mean when we talk about exempting employees of small businesses from the protection of Commonwealth unfair dismissal law?’
  • 52) ‘No matter how much they adore him, they can't set a precedent by exempting him from this duty.’
  • 53) ‘New Labour exempted agricultural workers from the minimum wage.’
  • 54) ‘His religious principles made him a pacifist so he was exempted from military service and remained at Cambridge.’
  • 55) ‘She relies on a clause in the contract which exempts her from liability for damage to any tools providing she was not negligent.’
  • 56) ‘However, those who cannot afford to pay this fee are exempted and treated free of cost.’
  • 57) ‘The plaintiff was injured in an accident in the car park, caused in part by the negligence of the defendants, who relied on conditions in the notices exempting them from liability.’
  • 58) ‘The Liberals have exempted the corporate sector from the demands of social responsibility.’
  • 59) ‘He also promised to immediately exempt minimum wage earners from tax and give them a rebate for this year.’
  • 60) ‘The law does not exempt service members from legal obligations that result from an act of wrongdoing.’
  • 61) ‘But he said Cepa did not exempt Hong Kong firms from complying with mainland business licensing requirements.’
  • 62) ‘The Nice Treaty does not exempt Ireland from joining a common European defence policy.’
  • 63) ‘Playing for the national team does not exempt young players from three years of national service.’
  • 64) ‘She does not exempt anthropologists from her analysis.’
  • 65) ‘The estate tax exempts surviving spouses, which means they can inherit an unlimited amount of assets without triggering taxes.’
  • 66) ‘Thus, journalists' duties vary along a spectrum from the nonexempt to the exempt.’
  • 67) ‘Hayden had been one of the exempt 50 going into the final event of the PBA season, the World Championship.’
  • 68) ‘The system of exemptions told draftees that their society did not value them, long before this was made patent on their return home when they were spat upon by the exempt.’

Examples

  • 1) I won't spoil the climax except to say he manages somehow.
  • 2) Which is true in most cases except this one.
  • 3) except possibly not in front of eight thousand people.
  • 4) They feared being stuck in geographical groupings where they would share little in common except neighborhood.
  • 5) Not much can be done about the past cases except to grant them leave to stay.
  • 6) She had not slept except for tiny little naps during all that time.
  • 7) Fighters on their own could do little damage except to other fighters.
  • 8) The company has done very little except deliver impressive results through the booming and busting of the technology cycle.
  • 9) except she says it wasn't like that at all.
  • 10) He who ignores thy least command, what should teach him except thy pardon?
  • 11) except in this case, the stalker was his dad.
  • 12) except in many cases it's not their neighbours.
  • 13) But the two really share little in common except a loathing of Cambridge.
  • 14) So we have no interests in common, there is little to discuss except what she wants for lunch.
  • 15) It will not single out anyone as a successor to a bishop or archbishop except in rare cases when the incumbent is obviously old or very ill.
  • 16) except in the case of conviction for a criminal offence, there is no mechanism for removing them except at the ballot box.
  • 17) There is no objective way of explaining this drama except to say that it was a huge moment of forgetfulness, a mental lapse.
  • 18) except to say that I got through the first eight steps intact.
  • 19) Well, possibly - except for two teeny details.
  • 20) It is not the sort of football that hurts anyone - except possibly Newcastle.
  • 21) except, possibly, the absence of the goalkeeper.
  • 22) We don't know them, except to say hello.
  • 23) As for the fish, what can you say except that it's as fresh as it is possible to be?
  • 24) Possibly, except that relying on TV to build a sport is a dangerous game.
  • 25) True it is, that one can scarcely call _that_ education which teaches woman everything except herself, -- _except_ the things that relate to her own peculiar womanly destiny, and, on plea of the holiness of ignorance, sends her without one word of just counsel into the temptations of life.
  • 26) Interestingly, in most states, the law except in Florida requires you to walk away from a fight if you can, *except* in your own home, where you can shoot someone and it’s considered self-defense.
  • 27) What we were too dumb to realize was that the guys in Def Leppard hated the term “heavy metal,” and any member of the band would have given his right arm to avoid the label except for Rick Alien, I suppose.
  • 28) Throughout the ordeal, no one said a word except for a single monk they encountered in the sanctuary.
  • 29) They were told to start and no one said a word except Victor, who continued to complain as they counted out their punishment.
  • 30) Who here would know her name except someone who knew Nate, too?
  • 31) ‘I looked around, but it was dark outside except for one street light at the corner a short way ahead of me.’
  • 32) ‘Everything is very quiet, except for the occasional floomfing sound of snow falling off pine trees and cedars.’
  • 33) ‘John and Norma Major filmed entirely in grey tone, except for the peas.’
  • 34) ‘The discotheque becomes a free space, to which adults have no access, except for a minute glance through the door.’
  • 35) ‘In particular, don't put writing on it except for brand names or logos.’
  • 36) ‘Nearly everyone knew who I was except for one guy who kept accusing me of coming dressed as someone from The Simpsons.’
  • 37) ‘Everyone seems to fall under the mercy of the council except for Van the man.’
  • 38) ‘I love a trip to the cinema except for the rather sticky residue on the floor.’
  • 39) ‘The pup is pure white except for her black-skin ears, which have yet to grow their covering.’
  • 40) ‘All benchmarks in the region fell for the week except for Hong Kong, Singapore and India.’
  • 41) ‘The media coverage is always sensationalized here in the US except for possibly Public Radio.’
  • 42) ‘So we're all men of our word really… except for Elizabeth, who is in fact, a woman.’
  • 43) ‘She just goes on talking, without a pause, except for the coffee, and my mind wanders again.’
  • 44) ‘The first was a head and shoulders shot of her apparently naked except for a white feather boa wrapped round her shoulders.’
  • 45) ‘It helps that it's getting warmer and sunnier and more springlike, well except for the snow storm on the weekend.’
  • 46) ‘We were compatible at every level, except for my ethnic and religious background.’
  • 47) ‘In 2000, Al Gore… did not win a single one of these states except New Mexico.’
  • 48) ‘Spain established complete control over all the Italian states except Venice.’
  • 49) ‘I have a similar problem, except that mine is all to do with people who are lost.’
  • 50) ‘Mr Greeno in his first statement said nothing about this except that the owner was not CCUK.’
  • 51) ‘It felt like I was in the torture scene from a science fiction movie, except that it didn't hurt.’
  • 52) ‘It has nothing to do with it except that it has a lot to do with his own credibility on various issues.’
  • 53) ‘It was said to have a similar appearance to the original homestead, except that it was built in brick.’
  • 54) ‘So far, no word is out on where the show will be shot exactly, except that it will be somewhere near Panama.’
  • 55) ‘It's an impressive record, except that it loses some of its gloss on closer examination.’
  • 56) ‘The second half was really a mirror of the first, except that the Wolfhill defence was more solid.’
  • 57) ‘She had been unable to say where she was except that it was wooded.’
  • 58) ‘The Medium Lobster is a higher being, except that it doesn't look that way to us.’
  • 59) ‘Pretty ordinary flat type food I think except that we hardly ever had vegetables.’
  • 60) ‘It was like being in busy shipping lanes, except that they were full of whales.’
  • 61) ‘And this for a game which had no special appeal except that it featured the old rivals.’
  • 62) ‘Similar techniques are also being used to produce chocolate which is normal in every way, except that it is chewy.’
  • 63) ‘The main design of all the houses was the same except that it varied in size.’
  • 64) ‘He understood them, except that there were some parts he was not able to finish.’
  • 65) ‘There was a light, cool breeze, which was pleasant enough except that it made the skin feel chilled and clammy.’
  • 66) ‘It's all like home, except that here food is made and served with scrupulous hygiene.’
  • 67) ‘Technically, it's very similar to the prosthesis I have now, except for one major difference.’
  • 68) ‘The public transport is pretty good, except for the buses at rush hour when it's rather nasty.’
  • 69) ‘Till today he never talks about my work except to offer bits of useful criticism.’
  • 70) ‘There are a few abbreviations, things like SMTP and HTTP and such, that are specifically excepted from this rule.’
  • 71) ‘Not a creature was to be seen in the room or at the door as I passed out - always excepting the man with the cough.’
  • 72) ‘Yorkshire women were to be excepted from any criticism he added, because they ‘always have dinner on the table when you get home’.’
  • 73) ‘That was Edmund Wilson's judgment in 1950, and in view of the half century since I see no reason, not excepting Wilson's own career, to alter it.’
  • 74) ‘They also retain their share of misery, however, and misery is most of what you find in the other cities, not excepting the state capital.’
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