story vs storey

story storey

Definitions

  • 1) A lie.
  • 2) US, colloquial, usually pluralized A soap opera.
  • 3) A floor or level of a building; a storey.
  • 4) A sequence of real or fictional causal events; or, an account of such a sequence.
  • 5) obsolete History.
  • 6) A sequence of events, or a situation, such as might be related in an account.
  • 7) A set of rooms on the same floor or level; a floor, or the space between two floors. Also, a horizontal division of a building's exterior considered architecturally, which need not correspond exactly with the stories within.
  • 8) (Arch.) a vertical post used to support a floor or superincumbent wall.
  • 9) The relation of an incident or minor event; a short narrative; a tale; especially, a fictitious narrative less elaborate than a novel; a short romance.
  • 10) colloq. A euphemism or child's word for “a lie;” a fib.
  • 11) A narration or recital of that which has occurred; a description of past events; a history; a statement; a record.
  • 12) a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale
  • 13) a record or narrative description of past events
  • 14) a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events
  • 15) A building; an edifice.
  • 16) A report; an account; a statement; anything told: often used slightingly: as, according to his story, he did wonders.
  • 17) A stage or floor of a building; hence, a subdivision of the height of a house; a set of rooms on the same level or floor.
  • 18) A scene from history, legend, or romance, depicted by means of painting, sculpture, needlework, or other art of design.
  • 19) An account of an event or incident; a relation; a recital: as, stories of bravery.
  • 20) An anecdote: as, a speech abounding in good stories.
  • 21) The plot or intrigue of a novel or drama: as, many persons read a novel, or are interested in a play, only for the story.
  • 22) In lit., a narrative, either true or fictitious, in prose or verse; a tale, written in a more or less imaginative style, of that which has happened or is supposed to have happened; specifically, a fictitious tale, shorter and less elaborate than a novel; a short romance; a folk-tale.
  • 23) The facts or events in a given case considered in their sequence, whether related or not; the experience or career of an individual: as, the story of a foundling; his is a sad story.
  • 24) Memoir, life, biography.
  • 25) Synonyms Relation, Narration, etc. (see account); record, chronicle, annals.
  • 26) A connected account or narration, oral or written, of events of the past; history.
  • 27) Tale, fiction, fable, tradition, legend.
  • 28) A falsehood; a lie; a fib.
  • 29) Anecdote, Story. See anecdote.
  • 30) To tell as a story; to relate or narrate about.
  • 31) Torelate;narrate.
  • 32) To tell in historical relation; to make the subject of a story; to narrate or describe in story.

Definitions

  • 1) A floor or level of a building or ship.
  • 2) See story.

Examples

  • 1) Yet officials monitoring the sanctions told a different story.
  • 2) This is by now an old story.
  • 3) Being less romantic and more realistic may turn your love life into a success story.
  • 4) There has been interest in both directions but whether it comes to anything is another story.
  • 5) The whole story might be a parable designed to give ministers the courage of social democratic convictions.
  • 6) They gave this account of their story.
  • 7) To cut a long story short this did not happen.
  • 8) Writing a story is something like making up a joke.
  • 9) What effected the transformation is another story.
  • 10) You may remember the story in the news.
  • 11) This is the story of a true bohemian.
  • 12) There are signs that people see this as a different story.
  • 13) This is an old story with a new twist.
  • 14) Pure export and import figures no longer tell the whole story.
  • 15) The story was decided long before the story had ended.
  • 16) This is a story about table tennis.
  • 17) Your love life will turn into a success story now that your mind and heart give you the same message.
  • 18) See the full story at timesonline.
  • 19) Either way, the full story of this apparent scandal must come out.
  • 20) If the short story is well suited to disregarded minorities, it is also tuned to the disappointed mainstream.
  • 21) It ends poignantly but perfectly, like a well-crafted short story.
  • 22) The cold truth of crisis management is that \ "telling your side of the story\" only works when you have a story to tell.
  • 23) It made me realise what sort of short story I enjoy: a story with a lot of worldbuilding where information needed to understand 'what's going on' comes out in the course of the plot; a story which has 'real' characters with 'real' issues other than to solve what the heck is going on *in just this story*.
  • 24) You will also find St. Godric of Finchale in the calendar of saints, and they are one and the same, the story of his very long life come down to us as he told it in his old age to Reginald of Durham -- although _this _story is not in there.
  • 25) When a story is rewritten to give a new interest to old facts it is called a _rewrite story_; when it is rewritten to include new facts or developments, it is called a _follow-up_,
  • 26) A _feature story_ is either a story that is thus played up or a story that is written for some other reason than news value, such as human interest.
  • 27) _Golden arm_ (story) Clemens _How to tell a story_
  • 28) But just as soon as any part of the story becomes more interesting than the fact that there was a fire, the story is no longer featureless -- it is a fire story with a feature, or, for the purposes of our study, _a feature fire story_.
  • 29) If you will bear in mind that a playlet is only as good as its plot, that a plot is a _story_ and that you must give to your story, as has been said, "A completeness -- a kind of universal dovetailedness, a sort of general oneness," you will have little difficulty in observing the one playlet rule that should never be broken -- Unity of action.
  • 30) A third student told the third part, beginning with _the next morning_ and ending with the close of the story, _Now this is a true story_.
  • 31) ‘There are romance stories, historical stories and adventures.’
  • 32) ‘I write adventure stories, thrillers, so most of my heroes spend their time running after the bad guys.’
  • 33) ‘His most recent work shows that a novel of philosophical analysis can be a real story.’
  • 34) ‘The trusty Dr Watson narrates the stories of his adventures with the sleuth of Baker Street.’
  • 35) ‘Henry James is not a name that springs to mind when we think of adventure stories, prose epics or historical fiction.’
  • 36) ‘As the story unfolds, the real character of Harry comes out into full view.’
  • 37) ‘It can't decide whether it is a detective story, a love story or a historical epic.’
  • 38) ‘Many SF and fantasy adventure stories are now written by female authors.’
  • 39) ‘Charlotte loved stories of romance and adventure, there had been so little romance or adventure in her life.’
  • 40) ‘I loved reading and filled my free time with Bible stories and adventure novels for young boys.’
  • 41) ‘These days children do not have grandparents telling them folklore and stories from epics.’
  • 42) ‘None of the stories were real, but one story in particular had an effect on Joanna.’
  • 43) ‘It is a story packed with plotting, political intrigue and bloody warfare.’
  • 44) ‘I cry every time I read a sad love story.’
  • 45) ‘The first film is a serious, atmospheric ghost story.’
  • 46) ‘story telling and shadows have been around since the time of the cave people, when their fires flickered as they told stories in to the night.’
  • 47) ‘She didn't just dutifully put pen to paper, she told stories, painted pictures and opened a window into the frustrations and rare joys of her own life.’
  • 48) ‘We sat around the table and told stories until late into the night.’
  • 49) ‘That's why people like to be told stories, so they can forget about their own lives and enter another world.’
  • 50) ‘Both are finely observed and elegantly told stories of childhood and family life.’
  • 51) ‘As the plot unfolds, the story begins to collapse under the weight of its unanswered questions.’
  • 52) ‘Shock revelations follow as the story unravels, the plot thickens and the audience grows more intrigued.’
  • 53) ‘But I think we always return because we are hungry for the same story, the same plot.’
  • 54) ‘They both have entirely messy stories, rife with plot holes and improbabilities.’
  • 55) ‘One option we talked about was framing the story itself in flashback with a narrator.’
  • 56) ‘The evidence becomes incontrovertible, leading the story to its logical denouement.’
  • 57) ‘In its own way, the film works almost like a sequel to the comic, in that there are several new subplots and stories going on that weren't in the original.’
  • 58) ‘I am supposed to move the story along and provide comic relief or cynicism wherever I can.’
  • 59) ‘There are several coincidences in the story at present that hold it together flimsily.’
  • 60) ‘The audience see it through Elaine's eyes and gradually the story unfolds and the pieces start to fall into place.’
  • 61) ‘If you give people a compelling reason to come back every week for more pieces of a story, you will create rabid fans.’
  • 62) ‘The story that news papers would of course like to run is imminent collapse and absolute disaster.’
  • 63) ‘Obviously we will be bringing you many other big news stories in your favourite newspaper over the coming 12 months.’
  • 64) ‘We only hope they will at least provide more careful, balanced statements during live broadcasts or in newspaper stories.’
  • 65) ‘Like any young sports fan in America at that time, he read newspapers and magazine stories about his heroes.’
  • 66) ‘When he returned the local newspaper had a front-page story which made him cringe.’
  • 67) ‘Fiction sometimes presents a much more vivid perspective on events than we can ever glean from newspaper stories or television reports.’
  • 68) ‘We won't have to wait for front page stories in the newspaper about a bad product.’
  • 69) ‘This picture is taken from the local Spanish newspaper, where the traffic story is front page news.’
  • 70) ‘The policy shift has been the subject of numerous front-page news stories and op-eds.’
  • 71) ‘If you want to dig deeper, I reckon the way news media report drugs stories is but one example of a problem related to how they define news.’
  • 72) ‘Every report in an Irish newspaper initially reported similar stories, he said.’
  • 73) ‘Two recent front page stories in this newspaper represent the poles of opinion on crime and punishment.’
  • 74) ‘He has written more than 2,000 news and feature stories for print and broadcast media.’
  • 75) ‘He himself didn't find out about his dad's heroism until years later, when he read the story in a newspaper article.’
  • 76) ‘As well as highlighting these positive stories, regional newspapers also generate good news by campaigning for local causes.’
  • 77) ‘Almost all lead stories in both major newspapers and network television news are about men's sports.’
  • 78) ‘That evening's television news and the next day's newspapers were full of stories about the lottery winner who had taken the cash.’
  • 79) ‘In newspapers across America, the story was presented as a humorous tale of incredible stupidity.’
  • 80) ‘I was disappointed, however, by the sensationalist way the story was presented.’
  • 81) ‘One can read multiple news stories from different sources on the same subject.’
  • 82) ‘For centuries, if not longer, there have been rumours and stories about a giant bird living in the remote areas of Australia.’
  • 83) ‘In his letters, he gossips, tells wicked stories and speaks the unguarded truth.’
  • 84) ‘He fed his in-crowd with stories, gossip, tips and steers.’
  • 85) ‘There are stories and rumours of people who have already gone.’
  • 86) ‘Rumours and stories about the site's future use have done the rounds for the past few years.’
  • 87) ‘Post quiz we headed off to the bar to catch up on gossip, swap stories and generally bond a bit.’
  • 88) ‘Along the way there were stories and rumours that the two did not get on but Serena is adamant that the duo are not involved in a bitter feud.’
  • 89) ‘All you've heard are stories pieced together, some blown out of all proportion over time.’
  • 90) ‘You haven't seen each other in a while, you've got time to kill and you talk about how it's going, share gossip and stories from your club.’
  • 91) ‘There the matter ended and six months passed without any further published stories or rumours.’
  • 92) ‘I could tell you a lot of stories about some of my pupil's mammies and daddies and what they got up to over the years, but I'm not going to.’
  • 93) ‘While on Pictou Island, I heard stories about a lot of wasteful helicoptering by government.’
  • 94) ‘Outside the official investigation, a different story began to circulate.’
  • 95) ‘Like me, it is a bit wrinkled and frayed at the edges but it recalls a moment of history in the life story of Britain's railway industry.’
  • 96) ‘His life story is one of the most extraordinary tales in the history of the game.’
  • 97) ‘A reformed heroin addict turned property developer is hoping to film part of his life story in Swindon.’
  • 98) ‘For example, the narrator uses her life story as an example of how any woman can leave an abusive relationship.’
  • 99) ‘I hope to develop a dramatic feature-length script about his life story as well.’
  • 100) ‘If you want to understand the man and everything about him, then all of that is part of his life story.’
  • 101) ‘Do you think one day they will turn my life story into a film?’
  • 102) ‘Characters do tend to drop by the wayside as in a life story, and it doesn't contain a novel's narrative.’
  • 103) ‘His Vietnam service apart, his life story was insufficiently inspirational to excite the electorate.’
  • 104) ‘What struck Jarecki while interviewing David were the gaps in his life story.’
  • 105) ‘They had been expecting him to make an announcement about his new film, which will centre on his life story.’
  • 106) ‘His life story gives his words authenticity, whether he is talking about social exclusion or global conflict.’
  • 107) ‘So we sat down next to some guy who, in very slurred speech, started to tell us his life story.’
  • 108) ‘Yesterday morning some stranger trapped me and gave me his life story for over an hour.’
  • 109) ‘He had just published a book of his life story, and it had become a best seller.’
  • 110) ‘Now, the fascinating story of the woman behind the pictures has begun to emerge.’
  • 111) ‘People were elected to speak with the escapees and communicate to the media their stories and personal circumstances.’
  • 112) ‘The story of long term care in the United States holds lessons for the United Kingdom.’
  • 113) ‘How he arrived at that view is the story of his life and work.’
  • 114) ‘Where they got the law from, and how they did it, is the whole story of the emergence of substantive common law.’
  • 115) ‘At best, it will make some detainees feel better by letting them tell their side of the story.’
  • 116) ‘Apart from issuing a few brief statements, the failed viceroy has yet to face the media to tell his side of the story.’
  • 117) ‘Analysts and investors are just not listening to our side of the story.’
  • 118) ‘Then Bruce decided to go about and tell everyone, so I will present my side of the story.’
  • 119) ‘The police chief's decision to tell his side of the story proved controversial from the start.’
  • 120) ‘All the women tell the same story of poverty and the need to provide for their families.’
  • 121) ‘Cassie was glad that she had finally told her side of the story but she knew that there was still more to come.’
  • 122) ‘Now in the interests of balance, something we're very keen on here, here's her side of the story.’
  • 123) ‘Most of them brushed me off, but a few of them actually stopped and listened to my side of the story.’
  • 124) ‘They do not always have access to the media, and are not necessarily able to tell their side of the story to the public.’
  • 125) ‘I want to hear your side of the story now, I want to know what you think about all this.’
  • 126) ‘Adela is put in the witness box and she is asked to recount her side of the story.’
  • 127) ‘Anyway, I have decided to take your side of the story into consideration.’
  • 128) ‘I didn't try and listen or believe your side of the story even when you tried to tell me.’
  • 129) ‘Up until today I have not had the opportunity once again to defend myself, to give my side of the story.’
  • 130) ‘Ask any tube driver from any line and they will tell the same story.’
  • 131) ‘When he decided to give us an interview, all other criminals wanted to give their side of the story.’
  • 132) ‘Bryan was going to tell her his side of the story whether she wanted to hear it or not.’
  • 133) ‘Moreover Sherwood had told O'Brien to tell the same story as that originally told by Sherwood.’
  • 134) ‘It's because of the Observer article that James was able to tell his own story to a local newspaper.’
  • 135) ‘If it had happened at night then the story might have been different.’
  • 136) ‘But it was a different story when an easier chance fell for him a minute later.’
  • 137) ‘It is a story that has worrying similarities with the experiences of farmers elsewhere.’
  • 138) ‘The other half of the story, its complementary half, is the story about information.’
  • 139) ‘When we turn to the artisans and the peasantry of France, a different story emerges.’
  • 140) ‘However, the company denied any money had been lost and, within days, a different story emerged.’
  • 141) ‘When a court official was dispatched by the judge to check the truth a different story emerged.’
  • 142) ‘It might have been a different story had they not spurned two gilt-edged chances in the first five minutes.’
  • 143) ‘But it could have been a different story had the home side taken advantage of the chances which fell their way.’
  • 144) ‘However, it is a different story altogether when conflict occurs in a real life situation.’
  • 145) ‘It might have been a different story if I had ventured to a bar in town by myself, but who knows.’
  • 146) ‘They kicked a lot of wides in the first half and if they had put them on the board it might have been a different story.’
  • 147) ‘Words and a picture don't always tell the whole story.’
  • 148) ‘The look on the faces of those young participants, even those who don't win, tells the whole story.’
  • 149) ‘He said that he met the warrant officer outside the police station and told him the whole story.’
  • 150) ‘When they win it's a different story altogether; they're everywhere, like a bad rash.’
  • 151) ‘The whole story is however just another Leftist lie.’
  • 152) ‘If you only look at what the media says about attacks and dog bites, then you're not getting the whole story.’
  • 153) ‘The Students' Council made two good decisions on Sunday, but that isn't the whole story.’
  • 154) ‘The front doors of almost every hospital department tell the same story.’

Examples

  • 1) These upper storeys are connected by a floating staircase.
  • 2) Two stories use different metaphors to make much the same point.
  • 3) Their social superiors have larger houses of two storeys.
  • 4) They have all the stories in one place instead of having to search lots of websites.
  • 5) No residential building can be more than five storeys high.
  • 6) This allowed the architects to squeeze three storeys below the maximum height allowed by planners.
  • 7) One of the above stories is not true.
  • 8) What stories he must have to tell.
  • 9) The upper storeys looked like anonymous rental apartments.
  • 10) These are two different stories twinned by similar gender issues.
  • 11) The house is five storeys high and has been extended to almost twice its original size.
  • 12) The rise and rise of debt has been one of the stories of our age.
  • 13) Nor are they usually built above two storeys high.
  • 14) We must remember biblical stories are not morality plays where good and evil are obvious.
  • 15) But against a tsunami there is little defence except good luck and the protection of upper storeys.
  • 16) She visited us at the house and shared stories and photographs with us.
  • 17) It has been one of the few success stories on the high street as shoppers trade down to value stores.
  • 18) Their stories are set anywhere, anytime.
  • 19) The street 50 storeys below was a busy one.
  • 20) I saw a building of nine storeys collapse right in front of me.
  • 21) At present, arcane building laws impose fierce restrictions on floor space and the number of storeys that a building can have.
  • 22) A refurbished four-bedroom townhouse set over five storeys with two roof terraces.
  • 23) It is not known whether he was wearing safety equipment or how many of the building 's four storeys he scaled before finding an open window.
  • 24) To the top of the eighth storey, which is the first addition, dating from the sixteenth century, now used as a belfry, the height is about 220 feet.
  • 25) The Dining Hall, with its lobby and organ-gallery, occupies the entire storey, which is 187 feet long, 51 feet wide, and 47 feet high; it is lit by nine large windows, filled with stained glass on the south side; and is, next to Westminster Hall, the noblest room in the metropolis.
  • 26) The obvious lesson to be gained from this episopde is to instantly report any confrontations to the police immediately too ensure that your "storey" is to be on record first.
  • 27) The furs coming in the back door of this four-storey, nineteenth century red brick warehouse, had once covered living, breathing animals, now deceased and subject to the Law of Entropy.
  • 28) As we will be in our 60's upon retirement we are considering a 3 bed single storey home within reasonable reach of good healthcare (say 1 hour), although currently our health is fine.
  • 29) Next to the Mansión de don Aurelio Ibarra (# 15) is don Aurelio's old, two-storey mercantile building, built at the end of the last century.
  • 30) I started construction and completed a 2 storey 3 Bedroom, 2 full bath, Lr, Dr/kit/laundry room, 2 roof top terraces home with an adjoining but separate mother-in law studio apartment and an enclosed parking space.
  • 31) The top stair landing in Mi Pullman, a beautiful three storey, art nouveau town house in Chapala, Mexico.
  • 32) ‘The apartments will be arranged in courtyards with the highest building rising to five storeys, including the penthouse level.’
  • 33) ‘A reinforced concrete structure, with doors and windows in steel, the building is eleven storeys, plus a roof terrace and basement.’
  • 34) ‘Towards the north end, the building rises to two storeys, and the roof of the colonnade forms an external gallery.’
  • 35) ‘Steel girders have been used in its construction, which could allow for building of a second storey or mezzanine.’
  • 36) ‘The building, four storeys high and designed to a taut geometry, is an abstract composition of concrete, stainless steel and glass.’
  • 37) ‘Think of a jet faster than the Concorde, or a building taller than 120 storeys.’
  • 38) ‘Both buildings are three storeys with retail use at ground floor level and the upper floors in use as offices and storage.’
  • 39) ‘Player, administration and spectator facilities are arranged on three levels underneath the grandstand, with changing areas on the lowest storey at pitch level.’
  • 40) ‘The whole building will be raised half a storey above the ground to comply with existing levels.’
  • 41) ‘The new facility, which provides accommodation for 102 children in a two and a half storey building, is on a small site on Glenmorris Street.’
  • 42) ‘Inside the glass box are a large open dining room and living room, both two stories high.’
  • 43) ‘The 10,000 sq. ft. building has three storeys over a basement and also includes a car park with access from Tobergal Lane.’
  • 44) ‘The original building was two storeys with the upper floor being removed in 1866.’
  • 45) ‘Less than one minute later, she was in Ms Kiss's office, on the second floor of the three storey building.’
  • 46) ‘She said work on the top floor of the three storey building began in January and is expected to be finished by the end of this month.’
  • 47) ‘Some went as high as five stories, the top floor usually containing servants' rooms.’
  • 48) ‘Its walls stand five-foot thick, the building is three storeys high with small castellated towers sticking out at the tops of each corner of the building.’
  • 49) ‘The apartment blocks will range in size up to a maximum of four storeys above courtyard level, and the first phase of units will be ready for occupation within a year.’
  • 50) ‘Arches in three planes provide long spans in the prayer hall and carry the upper three storeys of the mosque.’
  • 51) ‘The three storey building comprises a ground floor retail unit and residential accommodation overhead.’
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