distinct vs distinctive

distinct distinctive

Definitions

  • 1) Different from one another (with the preferable adposition being "from")
  • 2) Noticeably different.
  • 3) Very clear.
  • 4) Clearly defined; unquestionable.
  • 5) Easily perceived by the senses.
  • 6) Readily distinguishable from all others; discrete.
  • 7) Not identical; different; individual.
  • 8) obsolete Marked; variegated.
  • 9) obsolete Distinguished; having the difference marked; separated by a visible sign; marked out; specified.
  • 10) Separate in place; not conjunct; not united by growth or otherwise; -- with from.
  • 11) So separated as not to be confounded with any other thing; not liable to be misunderstood; not confused; well-defined; clear.
  • 12) obsolete Distinguished; having the difference marked; separated by a visible sign; marked out; specified.
  • 13) obsolete Marked; variegated.
  • 14) constituting a separate entity or part
  • 15) easy to perceive; especially clearly outlined
  • 16) (often followed by `from') not alike; different in nature or quality
  • 17) recognizable; marked
  • 18) clearly or sharply defined to the mind
  • 19) Distinguishing clearly; capable of receiving or characterized by definite impressions; not confused or obscure: as, distinct vision; distinct perception of right and wrong.
  • 20) Clearly distinguishable by the mind; unmistakable; indubitable; positive: as, a distinct assertion, promise, or falsehood.
  • 21) Very plain and intelligible in thought or expression.
  • 22) Decorated; adorned.
  • 23) Distinguished; not identical; not the same; separate; specifically, marked off; discretely different from another or others, or from one another.
  • 24) To make distinct; distinguish.
  • 25) Clearly distinguishable by sense; that may be plainly perceived; well defined; not blurred or indeterminate: as, a distinct view of an object; distinct articulation; to make a distinct mark or impression.
  • 26) Synonyms Separate, etc. See different.
  • 27) Decorated;adorned.
  • 28) 2 and Well marked, plain, obvious, unmistakable. See distinctly.
  • 29) obsolete To distinguish.
  • 30) obsolete To distinguish.

Definitions

  • 1) A distinctive mark; specifically, in Hebrew grammar, a distinctive accent. There are 26 of these — 18 disjunctive and 8 conjunctive.
  • 2) that is characteristic or typical of something
  • 3) that serves to distinguish between things
  • 4) Distinguished or attractive.
  • 5) Linguistics Phonemically relevant and capable of conveying a difference in meaning, as nasalization in the initial sound of mat versus bat.
  • 6) Serving to identify; distinguishing or characteristic.
  • 7) Linguistics Phonemically relevant and capable of conveying a difference in meaning, as nasalization in the initial sound of mat versus bat.
  • 8) Marking or expressing distinction or difference; distinguishing; characteristic; peculiar.
  • 9) obsolete Having the power to distinguish and discern; discriminating.
  • 10) obsolete Having the power to distinguish and discern; discriminating.
  • 11) of a feature that helps to distinguish a person or thing
  • 12) capable of being classified
  • 13) Marking distinction, difference, or peculiarity; distinguishing from something diverse; characteristic: as, distinctive names or titles; the distinctive characteristics of a species.
  • 14) Having the power to distinguish and discern; discerning.

Examples

  • 1) There's a distinct possibility there could be further offences.
  • 2) He thinks there are distinct advantages to investment trusts over open-ended funds, not least the lower fees platforms charge to invest in them.
  • 3) In doing so they found that, just as in forests on land, there were distinct choruses at different times of the day.
  • 4) You want to make each brand as different and distinct as possible.
  • 5) This gives them a distinct advantage over other sea duck.
  • 6) Our politicians continue to show a distinct lack of control.
  • 7) There are two quite distinct issues here.
  • 8) Without them it becomes a distinct possibility.
  • 9) But this was something quite distinct from loving him.
  • 10) Another distinct feature of the house is the patchwork motif.
  • 11) One area where failure is a distinct advantage is the civic.
  • 12) It was also coupled with a distinct lack of official policy with respect to crime victims.
  • 13) There are two distinct sides to this argument.
  • 14) It is a distinct possibility they will not be ready.
  • 15) Having the option that either or both of them may conceive can be a distinct advantage.
  • 16) Did anyone else notice the distinct lack of an umbilical cord?
  • 17) The area is split into two distinct sectors.
  • 18) So we have the opportunity to build new business models that are very different and distinct from what we have known.
  • 19) The battle was for a clear, distinct soundtrack.
  • 20) And it's still a distinct improvement on a microwave.
  • 21) It is very small, but there is something distinct about this place.
  • 22) But people are not chess pieces, distinct from one another.
  • 23) Plus there is a distinct possibility that 5. could be going down.
  • 24) But clearly distinct from big.
  • 25) This is a distinct improvement.
  • 26) It was very clear, very distinct, it was a single shot.
  • 27) ‘This should be recognized as distinct from suppressing emotion.’
  • 28) ‘Thus the nature of plants is quite distinct from the nature of rocks and sand.’
  • 29) ‘There are different types of arthritis that occur in children that are distinct from adult types.’
  • 30) ‘Each taxon used is morphologically distinct, although the rank of these taxa is in flux.’
  • 31) ‘He does not interpret these genres as distinct entities, however.’
  • 32) ‘Instead, species that differ in timing of gamete release tend to constitute genetically distinct clades.’
  • 33) ‘As sea levels rose and the northern Channel Islands separated, each fox population became genetically distinct.’
  • 34) ‘There are three functionally distinct types of such subsystems: transducers, input and output systems, and central systems.’
  • 35) ‘There are three quite distinct types of lavender.’
  • 36) ‘Is this not part of what makes them culturally distinct?’
  • 37) ‘But that is not what makes his work distinct from that of his peers.’
  • 38) ‘For instance, could language of presentation help bilinguals keep remembered events cognitively distinct?’
  • 39) ‘Whilst distinct in terms of research focus, the two projects were theoretically and methodologically similar.’
  • 40) ‘There are two separate and distinct conditions for the exercise of the discretion created by that provision.’
  • 41) ‘What marks them out as distinct also separates them from their neighbours.’
  • 42) ‘If so, it is a completely separate and distinct issue that has nothing to do with this one.’
  • 43) ‘Losing weight and learning Spanish are separate aims with distinct requirements.’
  • 44) ‘Grape berries exhibit a double sigmoid pattern of development, with two distinct phases of growth separated by a lag phase.’
  • 45) ‘But as he splits, she is separating into two quite distinct parts, slipping out of his control.’
  • 46) ‘It's not like you to belittle legitimate concerns from a distinct ethnocultural space.’
  • 47) ‘This remained physically and functionally distinct and probably remained a separate planning unit.’
  • 48) ‘These are two separate, proudly distinct States, and yet both part of what we are happy to call the Union of India.’
  • 49) ‘They inhabited not only separate districts, but distinct worlds.’
  • 50) ‘The result of this is a vast landscape of communities which exist quite separately in distinct ethnic and economic worlds.’
  • 51) ‘What they worry about most is that with two coaching teams, two separate and distinct teams will emerge on tour.’
  • 52) ‘It was also foolish to decide to show the games on three separate and distinct channels.’
  • 53) ‘A large center console separates the interior into distinct right and left sections.’
  • 54) ‘All of this caused a distinct line of separation between sky and sea to appear.’
  • 55) ‘Notice the full mass on each of these muscles and how each is rock solid with distinct separation.’
  • 56) ‘Both groups of companies operate separately and have totally separate and distinct auditors.’
  • 57) ‘The removal is capable of being a distinct operation separate from the winning and working of minerals.’
  • 58) ‘A similar but much less distinct unit separates the middle and upper coccolith limestones.’
  • 59) ‘The mantle and the core are thought to have entirely separate and distinct convective regimes.’
  • 60) ‘Two tables are distinct individuals because they occupy distinct portions of space, or of time, or of both.’
  • 61) ‘Along the cathedral's long dark side aisles, one encountered six distinct spaces.’
  • 62) ‘In philosophy, individuals are defined as entities that are distinct in space and time.’
  • 63) ‘With a grid in place, you roughly break down the garden into distinct spaces.’
  • 64) ‘We use the logical framework provided by this dendrogram to group the SC and MC in functionally distinct clusters.’
  • 65) ‘Hestor can make out Jody and Morgan, who remain distinct in the throng.’
  • 66) ‘What stands distinct from the rest is the turban.’
  • 67) ‘Burkhard prints his own work and the end result is somewhat grainy with a distinct sense of texture.’
  • 68) ‘We're both nonsmokers, and there was a very distinct smell of cigars about Henri Paul.’
  • 69) ‘We arrive at the sailing club, and there's a distinct smell around.’
  • 70) ‘You forget that blood has this special, distinct metallic smell to it.’
  • 71) ‘I have none of these means to produce scent, but it doesn't mean we are without distinct smell.’
  • 72) ‘The distinct smell of alcohol mixed with perfume made Sol's nostrils flare angrily.’
  • 73) ‘She could never get used to the distinct smell of the hospital and wondered if the nurses felt the same way.’
  • 74) ‘I could smell her distinct perfume, my lungs feeling renewed with a part of heaven.’
  • 75) ‘The boy smiled toothily, smelling the distinct aroma that is victory and raised his hand again to strike.’
  • 76) ‘My immediate concern was to get everyone out of the van because there was a distinct smell of smoke.’
  • 77) ‘His nostrils were filled abruptly with the distinct smell of smoke and burning food.’
  • 78) ‘And then he caught the distinct smell of a rabbit, and made for the gate, oblivious to the fact that the trail was old.’
  • 79) ‘I could smell him, the distinct scent of him that was a mix of cologne and hair wax and his soap.’
  • 80) ‘She pulled her blanket to her chin, wrinkling her nose at its distinct mildew smell, then yanking it down to her feet.’
  • 81) ‘He walked up to the front door and suddenly began to notice a distinct, ranking smell.’
  • 82) ‘The burned parts of the etumbu also have a sharp and distinct smell which attracts fish to the trap.’
  • 83) ‘Traces, not scents, but more like colors he could smell in his head, each distinct and unique.’
  • 84) ‘Their smells floated into his nostrils, each one distinct, unique, intoxicating.’
  • 85) ‘Despite snow on the ground, leafless trees and the distinct absence of birdsong one can sense a seasonal change.’
  • 86) ‘He became first a wavering outline which then solidified, then became more distinct.’
  • 87) ‘I get a distinct impression that the money is important here.’
  • 88) ‘The problem with using intent with respect to terrorism is the very distinct possibility of never determining anyone's intent.’
  • 89) ‘A very distinct advantage to having a press pass is getting in before the general public.’
  • 90) ‘The process has very distinct advantages over chill casting when quantities are sufficient to warrant this production.’
  • 91) ‘One distinct advantage that Streisand had was William Wyler as her director on the film.’
  • 92) ‘His clothes were wrinkled and I had the distinct impression he slept in them.’
  • 93) ‘Others give the distinct impression that they no longer fancy being associated with failure.’
  • 94) ‘Influenced by scare stories about an imminent invasion, over-reaction is a distinct possibility.’
  • 95) ‘I was also pleased by the distinct lack of annoyingly goofy, stupid characters.’
  • 96) ‘Attitudes like that show a distinct lack of maturity when it comes to nationhood.’
  • 97) ‘However, those who oppose such separate schooling demonstrate a distinct lack of understanding of this issue.’
  • 98) ‘But the car shows its age with a distinct lack of storage space and frustratingly fiddly stereo controls.’
  • 99) ‘It has now become a distinct possibility that all spaces in the assigned lots would be taken.’
  • 100) ‘It was a film where no room was left for the viewer to interpret their own meanings, in distinct contrast to the novel.’
  • 101) ‘The tense atmosphere outside is in distinct contrast with the excitement of the audience inside.’
  • 102) ‘I had the distinct sense that she was an authority we were trying to impress.’
  • 103) ‘I have heard nor seen no sign of such feeling, though I can sense distinct undercurrents of change in the public demeanor.’
  • 104) ‘In the past couple of years, there has been the distinct sense that the genre of Americana is reaching critical mass.’
  • 105) ‘As you are discovering, that's a distinct disadvantage on the mate market.’
  • 106) ‘Using the traditional means of extending religious influence leaves us at a distinct disadvantage.’

Examples

  • 1) As you turn the pages of this book you can almost hear his distinctive voice, chuckling over the anecdotes.
  • 2) There were only personal items for his holiday in the distinctive blue carrier.
  • 3) The closeness of these relationships was distinctive to one phase of the life cycle.
  • 4) The general opinion was that the most distinctive feature was the minimalist decor and aircraft hangar lighting.
  • 5) Each song reflects its different writer in distinctive accents.
  • 6) Your new love has a distinctive voice.
  • 7) The stone was very good quality and distinctive.
  • 8) Partners around the world sell the products in their distinctive blue glass packaging.
  • 9) But they could also be set apart by their highly distinctive style.
  • 10) Language is the distinctive feature of humans.
  • 11) Luck is linking you to a friend who has a very distinctive voice.
  • 12) Design and decoration in village houses retained their distinctive quality.
  • 13) Another distinctive feature of these gulls is the pure white edge to the front of their wings.
  • 14) Luck connects you to the woman with a distinctive voice.
  • 15) This controversial subject reminds me of the six blind men who independently touched one distinctive part of an elephant.
  • 16) But in fact Somewhere stands up as a distinctive and different work.
  • 17) Throughout, a strong ensemble cast adroitly tackles the distinctive performance styles demanded by this playwright.
  • 18) The distinctive quality of a sign is that the relationship between it and the meaning it is intended to convey is genetically fixed.
  • 19) But Seinfeld's treatment was always distinctive.
  • 20) The city is cut into two distinctive halves by the Nile, which is broad and beautiful here.
  • 21) There is a danger in all this, of course: sending too many distinctive messages to different groups of voters could lead to charges of inconsistency.
  • 22) He also appeared to have had surgery on his eyelids and had two distinctive moles, which had been highlighted on wanted posters, removed from his right cheek.
  • 23) ‘Indeed, one of the most distinctive features was the fresh, unsullied cuisine.’
  • 24) ‘She considered such " glades " the most distinctive feature of the Nashville Basin.’
  • 25) ‘The parables are one of the most distinctive features of the teaching of Jesus.’
  • 26) ‘She has her own very distinctive style and the audience have really taken to her.’
  • 27) ‘The Philharmonic Hall itself has a very distinctive style.’
  • 28) ‘The Saudis have in a very short while come up with their own highly distinctive style of management.’
  • 29) ‘They brew four different beers with very distinctive flavours.’
  • 30) ‘Levine is an independent figure, standing apart from groups and movements, and his work is highly distinctive.’
  • 31) ‘But none of them has made a record as distinctive as Boy in Da Corner.’
  • 32) ‘We celebrate them as distinctive characteristics that set newspaper work apart.’
  • 33) ‘The Pixies left behind them an impressive legacy; their highly distinctive sound was impossible to replicate.’
  • 34) ‘All the studied species have diagnostic alleles in addition to morphologically distinctive characters.’
  • 35) ‘Everything's in place here, but they could stand to find a more distinctive sound vocally.’
  • 36) ‘We all order the same dish, off a set menu, but in our individually distinctive voices.’
  • 37) ‘If you don't have something distinctive to say, don't bother!’
  • 38) ‘All of these contribute to the distinctive flavour and aroma of the resultant wines.’
  • 39) ‘The instrumentals are all extremely well executed, each with its own distinctive flavour.’
  • 40) ‘The setting is also a great way to introduce a lot of distinctive characters.’
  • 41) ‘Students must learn to work more spontaneously, trusting the distinctive character of watercolor.’
  • 42) ‘Some have distinctive markings on their heads and on their carapace, or upper shell.’
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