dear vs deer

dear deer

Definitions

  • 1) A beloved person
  • 2) A very kind, loving person.
  • 3) An endearing, lovable, or kind person.
  • 4) A person who is greatly loved. Often used as a form of address.
  • 5) A dear one; lover; sweetheart.
  • 6) An obsolete spelling of deer.
  • 7) A darling: a word denoting tender affection or endearment, most commonly used in direct address: as, my dear.
  • 8) High in price; expensive.
  • 9) An ironic way to start (often after my) addressing an inferior.
  • 10) obsolete noble
  • 11) A formal way to start (possibly after my) addressing somebody at the beginning of a letter, memo etc.
  • 12) A formal way to start (often after my) addressing somebody one likes or regards kindly.
  • 13) Loved; lovable.
  • 14) Precious to or greatly valued by someone.
  • 15) obsolete noble
  • 16) Loving, affectionate, heartfelt
  • 17) Earnest; ardent.
  • 18) Greatly valued; precious.
  • 19) High-priced; expensive.
  • 20) Highly esteemed or regarded. Used in direct address, especially in salutations.
  • 21) Loved and cherished.
  • 22) Heartfelt.
  • 23) Obsolete Noble; worthy.
  • 24) Charging high prices.
  • 25) Severe; grievous; sore.
  • 26) Obsolete Noble; worthy.
  • 27) Of disagreeable things and antipathies.
  • 28) Hence, close to the heart; heartfelt; present in mind; engaging the attention.
  • 29) Marked by scarcity or dearth, and exorbitance of price.
  • 30) Highly valued; greatly beloved; cherished; precious.
  • 31) Bearing a high price; high-priced; costly; expensive.
  • 32) Of agreeable things and interests.
  • 33) With fondness; affectionately.
  • 34) At a high cost.
  • 35) Dearly; at a high price.
  • 36) [Obsolete or archaic in senses , and 8.]
  • 37) An exclamation indicating surprise, pity, or other emotion: used absolutely or in connection with oh or me: as, oh dear ! I am so tired; dear me ! where have you been?
  • 38) Dangerous;deadly.
  • 39) Coming from the heart; heartfelt; earnest; passionate.
  • 40) To make dear; endear.
  • 41) Costly; high in price; expensive, either absolutely, or as compared with the cost of other similar things, or of the same thing at other times or places: opposed to cheap.
  • 42) Intense; deep; keen; being of a high degree.
  • 43) Held in tender affection or esteem; loved; beloved: as, a dear child; a dear friend
  • 44) Dangerous; deadly.
  • 45) Tomakedear;endear.
  • 46) Characterized by high prices in consequence of scarcity or dearth: as, a dear season.
  • 47) Charging high prices: as, a dear tailor.
  • 48) Dearly; very tenderly.
  • 49) Dearly;verytenderly.
  • 50) Precious; of great value; highly esteemed or valued.
  • 51) At a dear rate; at a high price.
  • 52) obsolete To endear.
  • 53) obsolete To endear.
  • 54) Used as a polite exclamation, chiefly of surprise or distress.

Definitions

  • 1) archaic (Esp. in phrase small deer) Any animal, especially a mammal.
  • 2) The meat of such an animal
  • 3) zoology a ruminant mammal with antlers and hooves of the family Cervidae or one of several similar animals from related families of the order Artiodactyla
  • 4) archaic (Esp. in phrase small deer) Any animal, especially a mammal.
  • 5) obsolete A beast, usually a quadruped as opposed to birds, fish, etc.
  • 6) obsolete A beast, usually a quadruped as opposed to birds, fish, etc.
  • 7) zoology a ruminant mammal with antlers and hooves of the family Cervidae or one of several similar animals from related families of the order Artiodactyla
  • 8) Any of various hoofed ruminant mammals of the family Cervidae, characteristically having deciduous antlers borne chiefly by the males. The deer family includes the white-tailed deer, elk, moose, and caribou.
  • 9) obsolete Any animal; especially, a wild animal.
  • 10) (Zoöl.) the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus, formerly Hesperomys leucopus) of America.
  • 11) (Zoöl.) A ruminant of the genus Cervus, of many species, and of related genera of the family Cervidæ. The males, and in some species the females, have solid antlers, often much branched, which are shed annually. Their flesh, for which they are hunted, is called venison.
  • 12) (Zoöl.) A ruminant of the genus Cervus, of many species, and of related genera of the family Cervidæ. The males, and in some species the females, have solid antlers, often much branched, which are shed annually. Their flesh, for which they are hunted, is called venison.
  • 13) (Zoöl.) the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus, formerly Hesperomys leucopus) of America.
  • 14) obsolete Any animal; especially, a wild animal.
  • 15) petty game, not worth pursuing; -- used metaphorically. (See citation from Shakespeare under the first definition, above.)
  • 16) distinguished from Bovidae by the male's having solid deciduous antlers
  • 17) Any wild quadruped.
  • 18) The general name of the solid-horned ruminants of the family Ccrvidœ, and especially of the genus Cervus. See these words.
  • 19) A term loosely applied to the chevrotains, of the family Tragulidæ (which see), from their resemblance to musk-deer.

Examples

  • 1) This failure to understand the business cost the company dear.
  • 2) We had to hold on for dear life.
  • 3) It made me think about what we hold dear.
  • 4) We welcome those who are prepared to make a stand to defend all they hold dear regardless of the cost.
  • 5) But the mortgagebacked securities scandal has also cost the banks dear because of the huge fines they have faced as a result.
  • 6) These five days have cost Arsenal dear.
  • 7) And that momentary fantasy costs you dear because as you land, you twist your knee.
  • 8) Leicester looked second best all afternoon and their lack of discipline, with three yellow cards, also cost them dear.
  • 9) She said:'I have no doubt that the loss of her close and very dear friend in very tragic circumstances would have had a profound effect.
  • 10) Across from the flat was a dear little shop.
  • 11) The dear fellow wanted to see if the missing piece were at the scene of the struggle.
  • 12) Failure to capitalise on branding opportunities can cost firms dear.
  • 13) Everything is so much dearer in a town.
  • 14) Mercury promises success when you write about a topic you hold dear.
  • 15) You introduce them to the new godparents as you would introduce any other dear friends.
  • 16) This is a subject dear to my heart.
  • 17) But poor running between the wickets and rash shot selection cost them dear.
  • 18) Car insurance could also cost motorists dear if they buy it through their bank rather than shopping around.
  • 19) Our unique role also becomes dear when leaders surface to carry out a particular ministry and when resources become available.
  • 20) She was a dear little thing.
  • 21) It is so dreadful to think of our dear Arthur in prison!
  • 22) How have my dear old Scotland not won a game?
  • 23) My dear fellow, is that you?
  • 24) It got me thinking about other brands dear to my heart that improve my physical, mental and emotional wellbeing.
  • 25) Despite what the executives say, the credit crunch has reduced bank liquidity to a trickle and money itself is dearer.
  • 26) Do come back dear soon.
  • 27) Will send money soon, dear.
  • 28) Maybe I should get that hypnotist back dear!
  • 29) Oh dear - this just won't do.
  • 30) Oh dear, it's geography fail time again.
  • 31) My daughter followed him upstairs as she heard him saying 'Oh dear' and shut the door behind him.
  • 32) My 'oh dear' was involuntary.
  • 33) "And now, dear, _dear_ Mademoiselle de Charrebourg, I come into your presence, to learn how it fares with you."
  • 34) "_May you never regret it, my dear, my dear_," said the lover on the stage.
  • 35) "Oh, I entreat you -- I implore you, my dear, _dear_ --"
  • 36) The man cried out: "Mother dear -- _Mother dear_!"
  • 37) "Yes," replied Dexie, "they are rather dear, _dear shad_," and she looked intently at her plate, well knowing how Plaisted was glaring at her.
  • 38) Amelia addressed him now, with an effect of angry mockery, as “my dear old Frank Bronson”; but that (without the mockery) was how the Amberson family almost always spoke of him: “dear old Frank Bronson.
  • 39) "My dear, _dear_ friends!" he said, and stretched out both hands towards the company, as if to clasp them all to his heart.
  • 40) She often called Nels "my dear" with a peculiar inflection on the _dear_ and an upward lilt of tone.
  • 41) That was the line, the very sharp and impassable line she drew between her "dear, _dear_ Ellen", her "dearest Nel", and her sisters, Anne and Emily.
  • 42) She had hurt his feelings by saying she wished she didn't have to live with him, and she had insulted his dear, dear, _dear_ picture!
  • 43) ‘She joined a whole secret league of the hunters after being separated from a friend very dear to her.’
  • 44) ‘She went quietly about her daily life and was held in fond regard by her dear friends.’
  • 45) ‘Let the honor of your friend be as dear to you as your own (Ethics of the Fathers 2: 15).’
  • 46) ‘Early this morning, that bar, which was very dear to me, my family and my friends, burned to the ground.’
  • 47) ‘It took me a long time to learn the value of friends and I now have many who are very dear to me.’
  • 48) ‘Yet there are surely more things close and dear to the human heart than are dreamed of in Carver's fiction.’
  • 49) ‘I admittedly was pretty uneducated about this disease but it has piqued my interest in the last few months as these clients are close relatives of someone very dear to me.’
  • 50) ‘And there was charity attached to it, something that was dear to his heart.’
  • 51) ‘She'd hate to leave her friends… they were so dear to her.’
  • 52) ‘They like to hold on tightly to what they value as near and dear to them.’
  • 53) ‘Likewise, we want our lives to reflect those values and goals which are dear to us, and it is a source of pleasure to us when this is so.’
  • 54) ‘She is talented and very dear to me, but our concepts of music are totally different.’
  • 55) ‘The land where the plane had landed, everything belonging to it was intensely dear to me, ‘he wrote.’’
  • 56) ‘I gave everything of myself in support of the beliefs I held so dear.’
  • 57) ‘"Some dear friends from a Verdi opera were kind enough to donate these.’
  • 58) ‘Naomi… my dear youngest sister… farewell for now, " he murmured.’
  • 59) ‘I was nervous, certainly; afraid I might lose something dear to me.’
  • 60) ‘Francesca supposed she was lucky to have avoided losing anyone dear to her.’
  • 61) ‘A country especially dear to me, as my wife's homeland.’
  • 62) ‘What a shame dear ol ' TinTin couldn't make it this time!’
  • 63) ‘An excellent idea, dear fellow, to not have a television.’
  • 64) ‘Charles, my dear fellow, you've no idea how wonderful that made me feel.’
  • 65) ‘I congratulate you, my dear fellow, I really do.’
  • 66) ‘Please dear reader, read the last paragraph once more.’
  • 67) ‘"No… No please dear god… " she cried.’
  • 68) ‘Please dear God let Pakistan win some medals this time.’
  • 69) ‘There engraved on the trunk was this… "Here, dear friend, I stand."’
  • 70) ‘Thank you for staying here dear sirs, hope you had a nice time, please do visit us again.’
  • 71) ‘"Gee, nice to see you too dear brother, " Benji said grinning.’
  • 72) ‘Today, dear reader, I have two words for you: night sweats.’
  • 73) ‘My apologies, dear sir, and thank you for revealing truth to me!’
  • 74) ‘"Are you suggesting, dear sir, that we spoke to a ghost?’
  • 75) ‘But disappear not in my ocean of thoughts, for I will always love you dear Unc.’
  • 76) ‘"Dinner is ready sister dear, " Mikael announces, poking his head around the door.’
  • 77) ‘dear reader, to all of these questions I can provide no answers.’
  • 78) ‘Never fear dear reader, I am alive and well.’
  • 79) ‘"It is so good to see you, as well, brother dear.’
  • 80) ‘"So brother dear… " I started, propping myself on my pillow.’
  • 81) ‘No, dear friend… such things happen, and they happen right here in Mumbai.’
  • 82) ‘"Well, for one thing, mother dear, I'm not a dog.’
  • 83) ‘dear Friend: First, I want to tip my hat to you.’
  • 84) ‘"dear friends world over, Nepal is closed for the time being.’
  • 85) ‘dear BI Career Consultants: How can we measure the true impact of technology on learning and student success?’
  • 86) ‘If the letter began ‘dear Sir’ or ‘dear Madam’, you should sign off ‘Yours faithfully’.’
  • 87) ‘The letter opened, "dear Mother and Dad," and described the recent activity of the 7th Marines.’
  • 88) ‘It was quite a pleasant excursion for the dear little thing.’
  • 89) ‘It would seem that Sammy's dear little darling sister has struck again.’
  • 90) ‘But Jimmy Grimble smells like a sweet and innocuous film from the get-go, thus we know someone's going to get their comeuppance, and it isn't dear little Jimmy.’
  • 91) ‘But eventually, even a Labrador's jaw will tire, at which point the dear little animal will inevitably leave the thing where it can most conveniently be fallen over by someone carrying a full mug of hot liquid.’
  • 92) ‘In the course of the last half hour the sheep have been efficiently caught by Dr Biswell, and I have fired a nasty looking white gloop down their dear little throats with a syringe.’
  • 93) ‘They both smiled at him a good deal, and one of them referred to me as ‘your dear little girl.’’
  • 94) ‘Or perhaps she felt that I am a simpleton who would welcome such kittens in his inbox, and that when I saw its dear little ears I would be happy.’
  • 95) ‘It's still a dumb haircut even on his dear little genius head.’
  • 96) ‘Inevitably, she decided that a newly painted windowsill would be the better for dear little paw-prints and was duly shouted at.’
  • 97) ‘I'm staying at a dear little guesthouse a bit of a way out for a couple of days and perhaps we could meet at one of the fringe meetings Boris will be addressing?’
  • 98) ‘Here I might be in trouble with the law again, for my dear little Jack Russell terrier Polly has had her tail docked.’
  • 99) ‘That was the year James was born, and we bought our first new car, a dear little red Mini.’
  • 100) ‘You wouldn't believe how much I spend each week on assorted nuts and seeds to feed the dear little birds, not forgetting the cost of bird boxes and bird tables, some of which these days have proper tiled roofs and are as big as a house.’
  • 101) ‘We delivered our little dog into the tender care of the vet, and we needed to know that, whatever the outcome for our dear little dog Sally, we had the provisions set out in the Veterinarians Bill.’
  • 102) ‘I've seen it happen more than once to some very dear, sweet people, and it's really heartbreaking to watch.’
  • 103) ‘It wasn't that Uncle Henry's house wasn't pretty, but I did miss my dear little swing.’
  • 104) ‘I have some advice for members out of this dear little book, which is called The Little Book of Calm.’
  • 105) ‘What happened to the dear little boy who used to play with you in the street?’
  • 106) ‘One of them gave me the most poisonous looks, but later she came to me and said ‘what a dear little child.’’
  • 107) ‘How could Garfield be so cruel to that dear little mouse?’
  • 108) ‘I don't use the blank rune any longer, but before the Age of the Internet when information was dear and costly, I used it and didn't have a problem with it.’
  • 109) ‘A Philadelphia customer admired the company's cut glass but hesitated to buy any because it was ‘most extravagantly dear.’’
  • 110) ‘She was forced to pay the £4 taxi fare from her benefits, which soon became too dear.’
  • 111) ‘They say these payments make it too dear to shoot films in the republic.’
  • 112) ‘Customers think organic food is too dear.’
  • 113) ‘But Americans had to pay a dear price for that questionable privilege.’
  • 114) ‘Premiums are dear, typically in the range of $1 million per $25 million coverage.’
  • 115) ‘He had extraordinary luck; he met a dealer with just what he needed, although he paid a dear price for them.’
  • 116) ‘His wife dying, his children scattered, he has paid a dear price for his act of defiance.’
  • 117) ‘We are ready to pay a very dear price for this peace.’
  • 118) ‘The passenger was not happy with the Metrolink service, and said ticket prices were very dear.’
  • 119) ‘The end result will lead to sharp cuts in pensions, endowments and other investment returns for its members, who will now have to pay a dear price for a series of catastrophic management blunders.’
  • 120) ‘Tax payers are getting tired of always having to pay the dear price for the conduct of irresponsible and insensitive members of the public.’
  • 121) ‘On hearing our lament for a country gone frankly insane, she simply suggested, ‘Well, dears, why don't you move here?’
  • 122) ‘Never let it be said that I don't have high expectations of you, my dears.’
  • 123) ‘Make sure you don't spoil your dinner, dears.’
  • 124) ‘‘Well, be careful where you go, my dears,’ she warned.’
  • 125) ‘"He'll be fine, don't worry dear, " Trudy confirmed.’
  • 126) ‘"Now dear, it is quite alright to cry in situations like these.’
  • 127) ‘"I hope you know how much we love you dear, " she said as she hugged her daughter.’
  • 128) ‘Well dear are you sure you'll be okay if I send you alone?’
  • 129) ‘"Sorry, dear, " smiled Izumi, contradicting her husband.’
  • 130) ‘"Ok dear, I'll leave you here with Cassandra while I go finish some preparations.’
  • 131) ‘"Good morning dear, " they both said as the three exchanged kisses.’
  • 132) ‘After a moment had passed she smiled and said, " Of course, dear!"’
  • 133) ‘It was fine, dear, but please do be polite to your sister and let her finish.’
  • 134) ‘So he says to the first, ‘How much do you love me, my dear?’’
  • 135) ‘I thought you'd want what I want - sorry, my dear.’
  • 136) ‘I'll do anything, for you, dear, anything, 'cause you mean everything to me.’
  • 137) ‘‘You're awfully late, dear,’ Prince Alfonso was heard to mutter in English.’
  • 138) ‘I restated my plight and asked: who might you be, my dear?’
  • 139) ‘Then, she looked at my friend and said, ‘But you need a bigger pair, my dear.’’
  • 140) ‘A young nurse put me to bed and said: ‘Would you like a nice cuppa tea, dear?’’
  • 141) ‘But Sara didn't know how she could cheer the little dear's father.’
  • 142) ‘Sanjuro, I am sure you are much more mature than my own son, so could you be a good sweet dear and pass me that bundt cake pan?’
  • 143) ‘The poor old dear was probably out of her mind with worry by now.’
  • 144) ‘And people look as if the poor old dear has said something obscene.’
  • 145) ‘Yes unfortunately she died sometime in the night, poor old dear.’
  • 146) ‘Oh, he is such a dear.’
  • 147) ‘Motoring organisations have been worried by new legislation, which is awaiting its second reading in the European Parliament, that could cost motorists dear.’
  • 148) ‘Fraud Squad officers from North Yorkshire police say they have encountered reports of several ‘scams’ which have cost local people dear.’
  • 149) ‘But the combination of political spin and media hype cost investors dear.’
  • 150) ‘Then came the long years of the cold war which saw the Soviet Union continue to blindly follow communism even though that pursuit cost it and its people dear.’
  • 151) ‘The continuing dispute has, however, still cost the company dear.’
  • 152) ‘An immature and petulant display by the centre-back cost his side dear as the game progressed.’
  • 153) ‘Buy cheap and sell dear, and that goes for people and the results of their labour.’
  • 154) ‘Common sense (which is a surprisingly rare commodity) tells us we should buy cheap and sell dear.’
  • 155) ‘If nothing else, Sircam and Nimda have established one thing: when it comes to viruses, ignorant staff can cost your company dear.’
  • 156) ‘The decline in service standards - which unions blame on a shortage of trained staff - are likely to cost the company dear.’
  • 157) ‘Yet this costs the bank dear, because it carefully screens out companies which would like a Co-op account but which breach its guidelines.’
  • 158) ‘If a merchant is one who buys cheap and sells dear, Kirch broke that golden rule by buying dear with money he didn't have.’
  • 159) ‘A few miles further on they will drive calmly past the carnage they have caused, and remark primly to each other ‘Oh dear!’’
  • 160) ‘If you're a card-holder then you might be thinking ‘Oh dear!’’
  • 161) ‘Yes - the number had been disconnected - oh dear!’
  • 162) ‘They described Jackson as ‘a bespectacled Australian’ - oh dear!’
  • 163) ‘Then they went and ruined it all by upgrading to a new site - oh dear!’
  • 164) ‘She started painting when she was told she was box office poison, and she thought, Oh, dear, it's going to be a long, sad period of life, and I've got to do something or I'll go crazy.’
  • 165) ‘And she said, oh, dear, to think I am to blame for that.’
  • 166) ‘I've had conversations with Kofi in the run-up to war, thinking oh, dear, there will be a transcript of this and people will hear what I'm saying.’

Examples

  • 1) Wild boar and deer could eat his livelihood.
  • 2) We passed salmon rivers, grouse, wild deer and a eagle that took a shine to drone.
  • 3) Wild red deer have been hunted for both sport and food here for centuries.
  • 4) Look out for deer and wild boar.
  • 5) Look through the curved window and you can see deer roaming wild.
  • 6) Its two bedrooms sleep up to four people and there are wild deer in the surrounding countryside.
  • 7) It is as wild as a deer.
  • 8) Another reason for the increase is the growing number of wild deer.
  • 9) There were deer and elk in the forest, too.
  • 10) In the wild she would live in northern China and learn to hunt deer and wild boar.
  • 11) Suddenly a large buck deer leapt across the road in front of the car and I slammed on the brakes.
  • 12) Red deer are our largest land mammals, so it's quite a sight!
  • 13) There are 12,500 trees making up new woodland, in which roe deer can be spotted.
  • 14) Red squirrel, badger, mink and roe deer live in the reserve.
  • 15) The auctioneer's podium faced a wall hung with six sets of mounted antlers each side of a large red deer's head.
  • 16) In large numbers deer destroy land, forestry and natural habitats, and need to be culled to keep control of the numbers.
  • 17) There are a few other kinds of deer in America, but the funniest of them is called the _mule deer_, which lives along the Rocky Mountains.
  • 18) But in one thing the tiger is better off than the deer: _the tiger can see farther than the deer_.
  • 19) II. i.100 (161,5) [too unruly deer] The ambiguity of _deer_ and _dear_ is borrowed, poor as it is, by Waller, in his poem on the _Ladies
  • 20) III. i.91 (443,8) It was my deer] The play upon _deer_ and _dear_ has been used by Waller, who calls a lady's girdle, _The pale that held my lovely_ deer.
  • 21) What a buck some people have all the luck but i rather be lucky than good any day i just cant get over how big this deer is and all the points coming out every where congrads on a magnificent buck i dont think you can ever beat that in your life time if you do iam coming to ill. and hunting beside you.
  • 22) Sitting in a tree and waiting on a deer is one thing, being able to track and sneak up on a deer is another.
  • 23) Before season starts i just go to where the deer are and make a blind and I have killed all of my deer from a blind.
  • 24) ‘The land around the ranch is a protected wintering area for elk, deer and bighorn sheep.’
  • 25) ‘Looping back around, I got a closer look at the ears and realised that it was probably a muntjac deer.’
  • 26) ‘Police said it was standard advice to cover the head of an injured deer or other animal to help reduce its stress.’
  • 27) ‘Environmentalists argue that Pooley is of exceptional value to deer and wolves.’
  • 28) ‘The deer, sheep and feral goats obviously appreciated the route through the forest too.’
  • 29) ‘It should be said that the carted deer run for a much shorter distance than the deer on Exmoor.’
  • 30) ‘Now there is no way they could do that to a healthy deer so I removed the hounds and the deer ran off.’
  • 31) ‘There is no relationship between the numbers of foxes, deer or hares as far as we can see and levels of damage.’
  • 32) ‘It had not horns in the sense of a deer or a cow but it had bony protuberances above the eyes.’
  • 33) ‘Why are some so poisonous to us, but not to the deer or squirrels who eat them?’
  • 34) ‘Today, his son was young and strong, so he would ask Jason to hunt deer or elk.’
  • 35) ‘Quickly and silently, his warriors parted and one large man carried in a deer over his shoulders.’
  • 36) ‘The herald glanced at me, a look that was as nervous and as fleeting as the deer in the gardens.’
  • 37) ‘They found a baby deer and rescued it, thinking they had found the source of the noise.’
  • 38) ‘Workers are now desperately searching for the female deer, who they believe is still at large.’
  • 39) ‘For the past two years, members have tried to scare the deer off, to no avail.’
  • 40) ‘After a few hours of this, and no luck with the deer, we return home drenched.’
  • 41) ‘It took Han a full hour to find the deer and when he finally located it, it was standing between two large trees.’
  • 42) ‘The deer are so tame they will come and take food from your hand and when we were there they took food from your pocket.’
  • 43) ‘Every young sapling that pokes its head above the heather is chewed to death by hungry deer.’
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