compact vs contract

compact contract

Definitions

  • 1) An agreement or contract.
  • 2) A small, slim folding case, often featuring a mirror, powder and a powderpuff; that fits into a woman's purse or handbag, or that slips into ones pocket.
  • 3) A broadsheet newspaper published in the size of a tabloid but keeping its non-sensational style.
  • 4) An agreement between parties; a covenant or contract.
  • 5) a small and economical car
  • 6) Structure; frame.
  • 7) An agreement; a contract between parties; in general, any covenant or contract between individuals, members of a community, or nations.
  • 8) topology Such that every exhaustion of it by (overlapping) open balls has the property that some finitely many of those balls will also cover it.
  • 9) Closely packed, i.e. packing much in a small space.
  • 10) mathematics Closed and bounded.
  • 11) topology, of a set Such that every open cover of the given set has a finite subcover.
  • 12) Having all necessary features fitting neatly into a small space.
  • 13) closely and firmly united or packed together
  • 14) transitive To make more dense; to compress.
  • 15) have the property of being packable or of compacting easily
  • 16) To unite or connect firmly, as in a system; join the parts of tightly; bring into close junction, as the sheets of a book or other loose materials, by heating, pressure, or the like.
  • 17) In entomology, specifically, compacted or pressed close, as a jointed organ, or any part of it, when the joints are very closely united, forming a continuous mass: as, a compact antennal club; compact palpi.
  • 18) United in a compact; leagued; confederated.
  • 19) Synonyms Firm, condensed.
  • 20) To make a contract or enter into an agreement.
  • 21) Connected or expressed with closeness or brevity, as ideas; hence, of literary style, pithy; terse; not diffuse; not verbose: as, a compact discourse.
  • 22) Terse, sententious, succinct concise.
  • 23) To thrust, drive, pack, or press closely together; join firmly; consolidate, as the parts which compose a body; condense.
  • 24) Closely and firmly united, as the parts or particles of solid bodies; having the parts or particles pressed or packed together; solid; dense: as, a compact mass of people.
  • 25) Compacted; joined; held together.
  • 26) Composed; consisting; made.
  • 27) In petrography, dense without pores: also applied to extremely fine-grained textures in which the individual crystals or grains cannot be seen by the unaided eye: equivalent to aphanitic, cryptocrystalline, and cryptoclastic.
  • 28) To make firm or stable; establish firmly; confirm; solidify.
  • 29) To thrust, drive, or press closely together; to join firmly; to consolidate; to make close; -- as the parts which compose a body.
  • 30) To unite or connect firmly, as in a system.
  • 31) obsolete Joined or held together; leagued; confederated.
  • 32) Closely or firmly united, as the particles of solid bodies; firm; close; solid; dense.
  • 33) Poetic Composed or made; -- with of.
  • 34) Brief; close; pithy; not diffuse; not verbose.

Definitions

  • 1) Marriage as a formal agreement; betrothal.
  • 2) The number of tricks thus bid.
  • 3) The last and highest bid of a suit in one hand in bridge.
  • 4) An agreement between two or more parties, especially one that is written and enforceable by law.
  • 5) A paid assignment to murder someone.
  • 6) The writing or document containing such an agreement.
  • 7) The branch of law dealing with formal agreements between parties.
  • 8) Contract bridge.
  • 9) The act of formally betrothing a man and woman.
  • 10) (Law) The agreement of two or more persons, upon a sufficient consideration or cause, to do, or to abstain from doing, some act; an agreement in which a party undertakes to do, or not to do, a particular thing; a formal bargain; a compact; an interchange of legal rights.
  • 11) A formal writing which contains the agreement of parties, with the terms and conditions, and which serves as a proof of the obligation.
  • 12) An agreement between two or more parties for the doing or the not doing of some definite thing. Parsons, Contracts, I. 6. See def. 5.
  • 13) Specifically Betrothal.
  • 14) Specifically, in law, an interchange of legal rights by agreement.
  • 15) A written contract specifying in detail what is to be done, as a building-contract with specifications.
  • 16) A contracted word; a contraction.
  • 17) A drawing together; mutual attraction; attractive force.
  • 18) The writing which contains the agreement of parties, with the terms and conditions, and which serves as evidence of the obligation.
  • 19) obsolete Contracted; affianced; betrothed.
  • 20) Contracted.
  • 21) Condensed; brief.
  • 22) To acquire, as by habit, use, or contagion; gain by accretion or variation; bring on; incur: as, to contract vicious habits by indulgence; to contract debt by extravagance; to contract disease.
  • 23) Tobetroth;affiance.
  • 24) To bind one's self by promise of marriage.
  • 25) To be drawn together; be reduced in compass; become smaller, shorter, or narrower; shrink.
  • 26) To draw together or closer; draw into a smaller compass, either by compression or by the omission of parts; shorten; abridge; condense; narrow; lessen: as, to contract a space or an inclosure; to contract the period of life; to contract a word or an essay.
  • 27) To draw the parts of together; wrinkle; pucker.
  • 28) Condensed;brief.
  • 29) Contracted; affianced; betrothed.
  • 30) In grammar, to shorten by combination of concurrent vowels into one long vowel or a diphthong.
  • 31) Concrete.
  • 32) Synonyms Diminish, Dwindle, etc. See decrease.
  • 33) To betroth; affiance.
  • 34) To make a bargain; enter into an agreement or engagement; covenant: as, to contract for a load of flour; to contract to carry the mail.
  • 35) To make, settle, or establish by contract or agreement.
  • 36) To reduce in size by drawing together; shrink.
  • 37) Grammar To shorten (a word or words) by omitting or combining some of the letters or sounds, as do not to don't.
  • 38) To become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together.
  • 39) To enter into or make an agreement.
  • 40) To acquire or incur.
  • 41) To enter into by contract; establish or settle by formal agreement.
  • 42) To pull together; wrinkle.
  • 43) To be drawn together so as to be diminished in size or extent; to shrink; to be reduced in compass or in duration.
  • 44) To make an agreement; to covenant; to agree; to bargain.
  • 45) To draw together so as to wrinkle; to knit.
  • 46) To draw together or nearer; to reduce to a less compass; to shorten, narrow, or lessen.
  • 47) To betroth; to affiance.
  • 48) To enter into, with mutual obligations; to make a bargain or covenant for.
  • 49) To bring on; to incur; to acquire.

Examples

  • 1) The record album has been replaced by the compact disc.
  • 2) We must keep our feet on the ground and stay solid and compact as a team.
  • 3) Do not compact the soil too much.
  • 4) The crème blush comes in a handy compact with mirror.
  • 5) This is a compact car that gets you noticed.
  • 6) The cheapest way to save electricity is to swap your incandescent bulbs for compact fluorescent ones.
  • 7) The compact disc is suffering a lingering death.
  • 8) It comes in a gorgeous gold and mirrored compact.
  • 9) Thanks to our good friend the compact disc.
  • 10) Anything that comes in a solid compact has a heavier consistency and will block sweat from leaving the skin.
  • 11) She also loves her compact flat.
  • 12) We are very solid and compact.
  • 13) You can't do this memory justice on a compact camera.
  • 14) They small and compact, but if you swing them about enough you will quickly tone up.
  • 15) This way, you will not have to walk on the soil and compact it.
  • 16) If your garden is small, choose compact varieties.
  • 17) Countries will have to use energy-efficient compact fluorescent lamps instead.
  • 18) The easiest way to do this is to use a compact container that you can keep on a windowsill or tucked against a wall.
  • 19) THIS is a compact security camera you can position and connect to your home broadband network.
  • 20) Take a blusher or bronzer with a small mirror inside so you don't have to worry about packing a compact.
  • 21) They also glance at other people's sunglasses to see how they look and use compact mirrors up to ten times daily.
  • 22) Two: think of make-up and you either imagine a lipstick or a powder compact.
  • 23) But if it gets heavy use you will flatten and compact the soil in a ring around the tree, which is not good for it.
  • 24) The flats are compact but, unlike shared ownership or equity schemes, you buy the whole flat outright with just one loan.
  • 25) The nominally, but not practically, five-seat Juke is built on the Versa platform and gives new meaning to the word compact when related to CUVs.
  • 26) Kaleidescape has announced a new multi-zone entertainment server in what it calls a compact and affordable package.
  • 27) There are, of course, all sorts of technical constitutional questions about the ability of one Congress to bind another -- I think that the "compact" is probably not binding -- but we're ultimately talking about the proper relationship between the US and what remains the world's largest colony (i.e., a territory held by a national polity that does not give the territory any participation rights in the national polity itself).
  • 28) SUVs in "compact" spots, squeezing me between like a dinghy sneaking between cruiseliners.
  • 29) So to say that a single sentence in the 14th amendment operates as some sort of compressed zip file that clearly and lucidly by its terms overrides whatever in the Constitution appears to run afoul of more modern ideas of the political compact is ludicrous.
  • 30) On an otherwise peaceful day, the three come across a mysterious Kirumin compact in an attic.
  • 31) I'm sure the city can make it fit, they specialize in compact urban development.
  • 32) Mercury helps produce light in compact fluorescent bulbs and that's been a concern to some consumers worried about the element's toxicity.
  • 33) ‘Rugosa roses make up a dense, compact hedge at the end of the garden without distracting from the sea view.’
  • 34) ‘We snuggled together around the fire we had built, all together in a compact ball around the small flames.’
  • 35) ‘Therefore, the shell wall is not compact or dense and is, in fact, poorly defined.’
  • 36) ‘He said that pasta's dense, compact nature means that it is digested more slowly than other starches.’
  • 37) ‘Because it is only 1 micro m wide, we can make a much denser, more compact, device.’
  • 38) ‘Below this mass, these dense, compact objects are supported against further gravitational collapse by fermion-degeneracy pressure.’
  • 39) ‘This theme is carried through to the interior with a lower seating position, aluminium trim elements, a higher centre console and a compact instrument cluster.’
  • 40) ‘Near the port area is compact Ladadika, a cluster of squares and streets which formerly comprised olive oil warehouses and markets.’
  • 41) ‘These cones normally migrate together in a compact mass.’
  • 42) ‘Furthermore, in cultivated soils, dense compact subsoils frequently underlie the loosened topsoil.’
  • 43) ‘It is true that the Paris region area is denser and more compact than are common world cities (such as London).’
  • 44) ‘Its texture ranges from dense porcelain-like to a compact granular material composed of minute crystals.’
  • 45) ‘The centroid linkage method was utilized because of the way it can maximize compact clusters composed of similar cases.’
  • 46) ‘Its tiny, bell-shaped, cobalt-blue flowers, each with a very delicate white border, form a compact cluster.’
  • 47) ‘When the weather is cold, they cluster into compact balls and shiver, warming the hive.’
  • 48) ‘The protein units appear to be packed in a compact hexagonal way and from the position and distribution of the spots it is possible to derive some structural parameters.’
  • 49) ‘Then it's sent to a bale press, which compresses loose cotton into compact, dense bales.’
  • 50) ‘To protect the environment, all the villagers built their houses in a compact area.’
  • 51) ‘In this heightened world, everything needs to be compact and tight.’
  • 52) ‘The towns that were affected were mostly small communities of brick houses, a compact commercial area, a church or two, a school, and maybe a health clinic or a hospital.’
  • 53) ‘It had to be compact enough to fit in the tight shelf space reserved for impulse buys at the supermarket.’
  • 54) ‘Be assured, this latest XJ is compact enough to fit into a normal-size garage, and can easily cope with the tight spaces of multi-storey car parks.’
  • 55) ‘The device would fit all sizes of pram or buggy, including three-wheelers, and was compact enough to fit into the overhead lockers on aeroplanes.’
  • 56) ‘For travelling it is carried split in a padded carry case, which is compact enough to fit even a small overnight travel bag.’
  • 57) ‘It's also compact enough to tuck neatly into an entertainment center or tabletop without being too obtrusive.’
  • 58) ‘When it rained or snowed, the little carbine was compact enough to fit under your slicker and to tuck up under your arm.’
  • 59) ‘Excellent marksmanship is one of the key skills required of the marshals, who work in very compact spaces often tens of thousands of feet in the air.’
  • 60) ‘Not for the extra features, or the compact size, but for the simple fact that they look killer on a computer screen.’
  • 61) ‘The human brain keeps experience and memory and everything else that makes its owner who they are, in a nice compact space.’
  • 62) ‘Samantha and Todd share a compact space that provides a chair and computer station for each of them at a gracefully curved, solid cherry desk.’
  • 63) ‘The compact machine has many features that can benefit packagers of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and small device parts.’
  • 64) ‘Previous models have combined loads of features and award-winning compact designs - albeit at a hefty cost.’
  • 65) ‘He found the parking garage and drove nonchalantly to the fourth floor, where he found a compact space between two larger vehicles.’
  • 66) ‘These two-dimensional examples give us an idea of how to build the more difficult three-dimensional, topologically compact spaces.’
  • 67) ‘A compact version of a space ship floated right outside the doorway.’
  • 68) ‘There were around 80 teenagers in around their mid-to-late teens, all dancing on a wooden floor in a compact space.’
  • 69) ‘In a compact space, a narrow painted wardrobe or corner table and chairs can serve as a unique area of interest within the space.’
  • 70) ‘Dark colors are dramatic but will make a compact space seem smaller.’
  • 71) ‘The gear-driven design also makes the unit more compact than other similar components.’
  • 72) ‘They provide the right set of features in a compact form for the right price.’
  • 73) ‘The compact cat made one short, inconceivably fast motion, and the overbearing ferret jerked backward then collapsed to the pavement in a limp heap.’
  • 74) ‘The modern bouvier de Flandres is a powerful but compact dog.’
  • 75) ‘Overall the sheltie is a compact dog with a moderately long head, the tiniest of ears and an expression of wisdom and kindness.’
  • 76) ‘Her husband, Willy, a compact man with a Marine crew cut and Popeye forearms, is her catcher.’
  • 77) ‘He was compact, stylish and just too good to be true.’
  • 78) ‘We were standing outside the Monitor's office in the harsh afternoon sun and now Short, a compact woman with a ruddy complexion, took a drag on her cigarette.’
  • 79) ‘Stücke, a compact man with a friendly smile, says he averages 68 miles a day, lugging 80-plus pounds of gear.’
  • 80) ‘He is sitting on a settee in his hotel suite in One Devonshire Gardens, a plump and compact figure in a black pinstripe shirt and black trousers.’
  • 81) ‘Despite being a compact figure, he looks as if he could handle himself in a Klingon bar brawl.’
  • 82) ‘He was compact, mostly black, and quite dapper.’
  • 83) ‘A dapper, compact chap, the very British man has been in Thailand for many years as a financial advisor, but this was very different from his early career path.’
  • 84) ‘He's compact and sturdy yet runs like a sprinter.’
  • 85) ‘He is compact, powerful and has played extensively in short-yardage situations.’
  • 86) ‘He was very compact and was the shortest guy at 5 feet 6 inches.’
  • 87) ‘She was compact, but her tan and the way she was easily carrying a shopping basket loaded with herbs and stones suggested she was athletic, always a plus.’
  • 88) ‘He sees Strang, a compact man with deep-set eyes and a broad forehead, scratching his thick brown beard and leaning against a door jamb.’
  • 89) ‘His father Lou, an accountant, is a short, compact man with an intense, handsome face who suddenly and permanently leaves home.’
  • 90) ‘His counterpart was a short, compact man, obviously in the type of shape and trim that came from self-indulgent working out.’
  • 91) ‘Her green eyes take in every inch of the young man's frame, from his dark gold hair to his gray eyes to his muscular, compact figure.’
  • 92) ‘He's compact, with salt-and-pepper hair and mustache and an open-collar gray shirt.’
  • 93) ‘His writing is compact, there is description and dialogue here, but nothing extraneous to the plot, or plots, of which there are many.’
  • 94) ‘Those who wish to read an overview of cancer of the lung will find this concise and compact book very useful.’
  • 95) ‘Soon, we have witnessed a compact summary of the scientist's obsessive quest to develop a genetically modified human being.’
  • 96) ‘Now, let's turn to the split rumours, which he has provided a compact summary of.’
  • 97) ‘The utility of compact expression is short-lived.’
  • 98) ‘A compact summary of his ideas is difficult to pull off.’
  • 99) ‘Chapter 2 has a this-happened, then that-happened quality that defies a simple and compact summary.’
  • 100) ‘This is a compact, intelligent, plainly written and well organised account of the elements of the craft of writing fiction.’
  • 101) ‘Overall this book is a wealth of information in a compact, easily understandable form.’
  • 102) ‘Poetry is a dense and compact literary medium and its impact in rousing the soul needs no emphasis.’
  • 103) ‘As a result, this complete yet compact book is crowded.’
  • 104) ‘Canada is a compact of some very different people who have all managed to remain united through their common loyalty to the Crown of Canada.’
  • 105) ‘The more dense and compacted the snow is the easier it will be to perform slides.’
  • 106) ‘I was forced to compact a six-shelf collection of boxes for my impending move and my collection would take up a lot less weight and room if this was implemented sooner.’
  • 107) ‘Gasoline or diesel engines drive an eccentric weight at a high speed to develop compaction force and vibrations that compact granular soils.’
  • 108) ‘The long DNA chain is naturally compacted in a dense form in most biological systems.’
  • 109) ‘These act as a giant poultice, drawing toxins out from the skin, compressing and compacting the soft tissue.’
  • 110) ‘I've been using Zip compression to compact files for storage and transmission for longer than that.’
  • 111) ‘The problem is that walking on earth compacts it, causing a need for deep double digging in spring to get the air back in the soil.’
  • 112) ‘It's the story of Hanta, an old man who has worked for decades compacting waste paper, books especially, in his press, selecting a couple to take home with him and read.’
  • 113) ‘It's also good to use early in the spring instead of heavier equipment which compacts wet spring soil.’
  • 114) ‘By increasing the tire effective width, about twice the soil volume is compacted compared to single tires.’
  • 115) ‘Wallowing also lays the soil bare and compacts it.’
  • 116) ‘When the mulch is compacted too tight, this air flow cannot take place, and as the mulch continues to decompose it becomes extremely hot as the organic matter ferments.’
  • 117) ‘Both materials are quite similar to each other and the main difference is that material IC was compacted in thicker layers.’
  • 118) ‘We placed the stone at 10 inches thick, then compacted it to 8.5 inches, then cut it with the grader.’
  • 119) ‘When using the combat roll, your downward energy is compacted and the tight roll causes a slight flowing impact.’
  • 120) ‘Some evidence indicates that the traction exerted during cell locomotion can concomitantly compact the surrounding network.’
  • 121) ‘Some areas, like the vegetable plot, have been well cultivated in the past and have a deep, well-textured soil, while other areas are more compacted with a clayey subsoil quite close to the surface.’
  • 122) ‘Several tons of paper, cardboard, untreated wood and plastic are compacted into more than 2,100 tons of pellets each year and burned alongside the coal.’
  • 123) ‘Everyone passed paper back to Timmy, and he compacted it into the most lethal paper wad ever conceived.’
  • 124) ‘Leaves are then compacted under train wheels to form a thick, greasy layer on the top of the running rails.’
  • 125) ‘Some of the most dominating physical features I've ever encountered, a glacier is a vast mass of ice formed from the accumulation of snow that compacts faster than it melts and sublimates.’
  • 126) ‘His throat burned for oxygen and he felt his ribs compressing, compacting, and ready to break.’
  • 127) ‘This process causes the snow to compact as it slowly diminishes creating a solid crust base and surface.’
  • 128) ‘It is formed from snow falling in the interior of the Antarctic which compacts into ice.’
  • 129) ‘Mulches used to protect plants over winter should be loose material such as straw, hay, or pine boughs that will help insulate the plants without compacting under the weight of snow and ice.’
  • 130) ‘Snow will often accumulate and can eventually compact to form glaciers and ice caps.’
  • 131) ‘She called me over to see the approximately 12 inches of cigarette butts compacted in the bottom.’
  • 132) ‘By the fourth night the mattress had compacted and was hard as rock.’
  • 133) ‘I think our center will compact to the density of a neutron star.’
  • 134) ‘As a video junkie, I don't advocate that often, but let's face it: the combination of subtitles and high speed martial arts isn't something that compacts easily onto a TV screen.’
  • 135) ‘The buildings were so poor they had collapsed into dust and rubble which compacts down, making it very difficult for people to survive.’
  • 136) ‘And if you work it or walk on it when it's wet, it compacts easily.’
  • 137) ‘He had been on the second floor of a seven-storey building that compacted into a pile of rubble.’
  • 138) ‘This sprawling site bears the marks of geological metamorphosis, when sediments have compacted into layers of shale and now preserve the delicate details of these organisms as fossils.’
  • 139) ‘Carried to its extreme, this hypothesis suggests that at one time all the matter of the universe was compacted together.’
  • 140) ‘If the anti-universe was compacted together, how can we be on the surface of anything?’
  • 141) ‘In the way that des Esseintes imagines literature as being compacted into a single chiseled phrase, Huysmans sees the mother as being condensed into the perfection of a prayer that invokes and replaces her.’
  • 142) ‘Listening to this astonishing 6-track set is like listening to the entire history of music compacted into short sweet segments.’
  • 143) ‘Great music for lazy drives and porch sunsets, like a summer evening compacted into handy CD form.’
  • 144) ‘Looking once more in her compact's mirror, she got out of the limo and ran up to hug him.’
  • 145) ‘There were lipstick holders, compacts and mirrors discreetly designed to go inside.’
  • 146) ‘Veréd Cosmetiqué's bronzing powder is encased in a beautiful silver compact with a mirror and separate compartment for the brush applicator.’
  • 147) ‘The chic leather compact also has a mirror, lip brush and dual-ended eye brush.’
  • 148) ‘Kaitlin takes out a compact from her black satin purse and starts applying some face powder.’
  • 149) ‘The compact is a olive green cosmetic-like container with an acrylic mirror to assist in self application.’
  • 150) ‘Her stomach fell as the box went up while the girl pulled out a compact from her $700 flare jeans and started to check her perfect unblemished reflection.’
  • 151) ‘Vintage bowling bags have been reinvented as women's accessories, from compacts to purses.’
  • 152) ‘In addition, colors look ‘truer’ in the compacts, without a real difference on the skin, which is common, she said.’
  • 153) ‘You with the make-up bag on your lap, compact in one hand and sponge-brush in the other.’
  • 154) ‘Sandra answered, clipping her compact shut and turning to engross herself in the conversation with Isabelle.’
  • 155) ‘Philippa pulls a cigarette from a silver compact and taps it against the cover.’
  • 156) ‘To ensure the shades go together, purchase a compact with two coordinating shades.’
  • 157) ‘At the bottom of nearly all my handbags and suitcases can be found a random array of black eyeliners, lip glosses and discarded powder compacts.’
  • 158) ‘Finally, I remembered my coat and the extra makeup I'd brought - including a powder compact.’
  • 159) ‘I almost regretted agreeing to let her help me get ready for the party when I saw the array of brushes, compacts, bottles, and tubes littering the top of her sink.’
  • 160) ‘After touching up her lip-gloss, Sally closed her compact.’
  • 161) ‘The woman standing next to me applied makeup from a compact, oblivious to our impending doom.’
  • 162) ‘If you have a good printer or photo studio, you will hardly be able to tell them from work by a conventional compact.’
  • 163) ‘Trumpf will display the VectorMark compact, a valuable tool for various industrial and commercial marking tasks.’
  • 164) ‘Used as a family snapshot camera it's on a par with early colour compacts, using cheap colour film and cheap laboratory processing.’
  • 165) ‘But you can't ignore them: sport compacts, rice rockets, whatever you want to call them, they're today's hot rodders.’
  • 166) ‘The baby-size pocket guns, the compacts, the full size, and the long target models, all fit the same holster.’
  • 167) ‘They are available in eight-round capacity for full size guns and seven-round for compacts.’
  • 168) ‘Most titanium metal powders currently available in commercial quantities do not have sufficient purity to produce ductile metal compacts.’
  • 169) ‘All the Liberal Party candidates refused to sign the compact.’
  • 170) ‘In fact, a ‘one license limit’ is a condition of participation among states that are parties to the compact.’
  • 171) ‘An interstate compact is an agreement between two or more states that allows this practice model.’
  • 172) ‘By Tuesday - the day for touring that hole in the ground - both compacts had settled for neatness rather than impact and left it to their big brothers to do the newsstand business.’
  • 173) ‘It was that very success that encouraged the community of nations to try its collective hand at drafting a similar compact to deal with global warming.’
  • 174) ‘The Constitution and federal law require that the state and tribes sign detailed compacts to spell out exactly how the casinos will be run.’
  • 175) ‘But at the heart of this collection of treaties, compacts, laws and court decisions are two sets of documents.’
  • 176) ‘The compact under multiculturalism is that each community within a society must have the freedom to sustain its own identity, traditions and culture.’
  • 177) ‘It's a compact between citizens and between generations.’
  • 178) ‘It was rather a ‘federal’ approach, a compact between indigenous lords and their nominal superiors.’
  • 179) ‘They are not concerned, and claim not to notice, the egregious breach of the compact between society and the media.’

Examples

  • 1) Later Lazard found out there was a petrol contract attached to the deal.
  • 2) Then, four years ago, Derek was offered a five-year contract in Mexico with a company house thrown in.
  • 3) No contract entered into under those circumstances would ever stand scrutiny in court.
  • 4) I found out the mayor's being investigated in the gambling contract, which is why we're getting this heat.
  • 5) ‘Within 28 days of signing your contract of employment you should have received a copy of the disciplinary procedure.’
  • 6) ‘Every employee must be given a contract of employment.’
  • 7) ‘When an agreement is reached with the owner, a private contract is written and signed.’
  • 8) ‘Their employment contracts will not be changed.’
  • 9) ‘Make certain that your severance package is clearly spelled out in your employment contract.’
  • 10) ‘You must comply with the Statute of Frauds, which means that the contract must be in writing and that the burden of proof will be on you to assert your claim.’
  • 11) ‘It is not surprising then that landlord domination of the land rental market has resulted in stringent tenancy contracts.’
  • 12) ‘In your case, it would be a waste of time to sue because a contract for the sale of land has to be in writing to be valid.’
  • 13) ‘The panel will also strive to bring the contents of contracts concerning the sale of Japanese technology and equipment to the Chinese side in line with global standards.’
  • 14) ‘They began going to retailers to renegotiate their contracts.’
  • 15) ‘The result for tenants and landlords would be increasingly complicated tenancy contracts which would be designed in favour of the landlord.’
  • 16) ‘Trade talks on Thursday saw 82 Irish companies sign contracts worth €40 million over the next three years.’
  • 17) ‘We retained a district sales manager with total accountability for driving sales, not negotiating contracts.’
  • 18) ‘Property is freehold and all contracts are written in English.’
  • 19) ‘There has never been a better time to renegotiate a maintenance contract.’
  • 20) ‘Was there a construction contract between the parties?’
  • 21) ‘New firms might also be awarded contracts at the end of the review.’
  • 22) ‘Seventy-four percent of that company's contracts over the last six years were won without competition.’
  • 23) ‘Although existing contracts will be allowed to run their course, they will be replaced by new contracts or in-house arrangements that put all employees on an equal footing.’
  • 24) ‘Food processors enter into formal contracts with individual farmers to meet their supply needs.’
  • 25) ‘Most of these cases would today be regarded as falling under the law of contract, not tort.’
  • 26) ‘The validity of the contracts and of the acts done was governed entirely by the law of contract, not by the statutes.’
  • 27) ‘That relationship is governed by the ordinary rules of the law of contract.’
  • 28) ‘The English law of contract is not subject to any such abject paternalism.’
  • 29) ‘Omitting to do so may lead to civil liability in contract, tort, equity, or restitution.’
  • 30) ‘When he can't succeed in killing himself, he hires a contract killer to carry out the job for him.’
  • 31) ‘For example, a serial killer and a contract killer both kill lots of people, but the crimes are essentially different.’
  • 32) ‘Then a solution presents itself: why not hire a contract killer?’
  • 33) ‘When his boss becomes suspicious, the three decide to hire a contract killer, played by Adam Faith.’
  • 34) ‘It was to have been a straight-forward contract killing arranged by an adulterous couple to rid them of the man's wife.’
  • 35) ‘The Hit Man's first step onto the slippery slope had been taking a contract to kill a gangster.’
  • 36) ‘He could claim that while creating and producing hit game shows, he was also a contract assassin for the CIA.’
  • 37) ‘The murder of a father-of-two, who was shot dead outside his Virginia Water home, could have been the victim of a contract killing, according to police.’
  • 38) ‘There had been speculation that the couple, or a relative, had been on a witness protection scheme and that the shooting was a contract killing.’
  • 39) ‘Vincent is a ruthless contract killer and has to kill five people in a single night.’
  • 40) ‘Police have not ruled out robbery as a motive for the murder, but suspect it could have been a revenge murder or a contract killing disguised as a robbery.’
  • 41) ‘The third tale speaks of El Chivo, a bitter ex-guerrilla-turned-hit man, who is given a contract to kill a wealthy businessman.’
  • 42) ‘Smith is accused by the Crown of being a contract killer, responsible for four other planned murders over the past 34 years.’
  • 43) ‘During the meeting, Hodson claimed he was offered a contract to kill an alleged amphetamine trafficker.’
  • 44) ‘He had been offered $50,000 to carry out the hit, and was jailed for life for the contract killing.’
  • 45) ‘The film, a story of a contract killer fighting his conscience more often than his bullet-laden opponents, makes some brave new noises.’
  • 46) ‘Let us not forget that we are dealing with the alleged contract murder of a young naturopathic doctor, a crime that shocked the nation.’
  • 47) ‘A British woman who tried to arrange the contract killing of her husband was jailed for five years on Wednesday.’
  • 48) ‘A jury could reject entirely your client's statements and say all of the evidence is consistent with his being involved in the contract killing.’
  • 49) ‘Whether it was a random killing, a settling of old accounts or a political contract killing remains unclear.’
  • 50) ‘There are so many people with contracts out on his life he has to look over his shoulder all the time.’
  • 51) ‘The team that won the auction but did not make enough tricks to make the contract gets the score of the lower scoring team.’
  • 52) ‘When bidding a contract with a minor suit as trumps, the suit is not mentioned.’
  • 53) ‘After a contract on the bid is made, the declarer decides whether to set the rank for that hand high or low.’
  • 54) ‘If the contract is set, he doesn't make the bid, then his opponent scores a mark.’
  • 55) ‘Beginning with the player to dealer's left, each player may pass or bid a contract.’
  • 56) ‘They both meet each other and make a contract to marry.’
  • 57) ‘A contract of marriage may be made through agents acting ad hoc on behalf of the bride and bridegroom themselves, or of their guardians.’
  • 58) ‘After this outburst, the Emperor applied to be released from his contract to wed the Princess Mary, who was still an infant.’
  • 59) ‘It was only 3 years later, September 29, 1662, that Catherine and Jean Durand signed a contract to be married.’
  • 60) ‘The contract of betrothal is made at the village temple and the caste-fellows sprinkle turmeric and water over the parties.’
  • 61) ‘In the case of the Sun or some similar large object, as it contracts there is a decrease in its gravitational energy because the composite matter is moving closer to the middle, and that energy has to go somewhere.’
  • 62) ‘The deer's range later contracted to the Ural Mountains, in modern-day Russia, which separate Europe from Asia.’
  • 63) ‘On cooling it contracts to a smaller dimension, thus reducing the area of contact and allowing oxide to form at the interface.’
  • 64) ‘Similarly, cooled rock contracts, experiences an increase in density, and tends to sink.’
  • 65) ‘Then, while still contracting, the star cools through yellow and red-hot, and the protyle condenses into progressively heavier elements.’
  • 66) ‘As the lava solidified and cooled, it contracted, but the surface layers, exposed to the air, cooled faster than the deeper layers.’
  • 67) ‘That is because all objects expand when they are heated and contract when they are cooled.’
  • 68) ‘This causes the skin's natural collagen to contract, usually reducing wrinkles over the following months.’
  • 69) ‘When they contract they reduce the internal diameter of the vessels in the arterial network.’
  • 70) ‘I feel a tear trickle softly down my cheek, and my throat contracts to half its normal size.’
  • 71) ‘These stars change in actual size by about 10 per cent, expanding and contracting over a period of several days.’
  • 72) ‘Spain is increasing the size of its fishing fleet while ours is contracting.’
  • 73) ‘Most liquids contract as they cool.’
  • 74) ‘As the air cools, it contracts and loses some of its capacity, so the moisture is given off to cooler surrounding surfaces.’
  • 75) ‘l Output in Japan, the world's second-biggest economy, contracted sharply in the second quarter of the year.’
  • 76) ‘Revised figures have shown that the Japanese economy contracted by 0.6 percent in the September quarter.’
  • 77) ‘Since the recession began in March 2001, the labor force has contracted by 1.2 percent.’
  • 78) ‘While most Asian economies contracted in the third quarter, Korea grew by 1.8 %.’
  • 79) ‘The economy unexpectedly expanded in the final three months of last year after contracting in the third quarter.’
  • 80) ‘The polar ice caps are contracting at a rate of 9 percent each decade.’
  • 81) ‘Because wood absorbs moisture, it will expand and contract with changes in the weather and humidity.’
  • 82) ‘Solid pieces used for the table top will expand and contract with changes in humidity.’
  • 83) ‘This stimulation causes electrical activity in the muscle, which in turn causes the muscle to contract or tighten.’
  • 84) ‘It increases the heart rate, makes muscles contract more forcefully and enhances the general state of alertness.’
  • 85) ‘For example, as an individual lands from a jump, the quadriceps muscle contracts, protecting the knee.’
  • 86) ‘Electrical stimulation causes the heart muscles to contract or pump.’
  • 87) ‘When people laugh, their muscles contract, their pulse rates rise and their breathing is faster.’
  • 88) ‘To see closer objects, this muscle contracts to thicken the lens.’
  • 89) ‘As your muscles contract during exercise, they use sugar for energy.’
  • 90) ‘Each time the calf and thigh muscles contract when walking, veins deep inside the leg are squeezed.’
  • 91) ‘The heart works as a pump, with its muscular walls contracting to force the movement of blood.’
  • 92) ‘The treated muscles can't contract so new wrinkles won't form either.’
  • 93) ‘The more slowly muscles contract, the more force they are able to deliver, which is why heavy weights can only be lifted slowly.’
  • 94) ‘Mucus production increases and the muscles surrounding the airways contract, narrowing the space through which air can flow.’
  • 95) ‘Breath-holding helps create a firm base upon which the muscles can effectively contract.’
  • 96) ‘When your heart contracts, it ejects blood from the pumping chambers (ventricles).’
  • 97) ‘When these muscles contract, they don't directly push the head forward.’
  • 98) ‘Raise your hips only as high as you can while still forcefully contracting your abs for a second or two.’
  • 99) ‘He then contracted his abs to raise his legs until they were perpendicular.’
  • 100) ‘Between meals, a mammal's intestinal muscles normally contract rhythmically to sweep out bacteria and waste.’
  • 101) ‘You are not lifting weights; you are stretching and then contracting your muscles as hard as possible.’
  • 102) ‘Spasms shook every inch of my skin, and my muscles contracted painfully.’
  • 103) ‘I haven't checked the audio to see whether ‘is’ was contracted or not in those examples.’
  • 104) ‘Incidentally, Hocus Pocus was itself contracted during the eighteenth century into the word ‘Hoax.’’
  • 105) ‘The various sources consulted differ in its further evolution; some say the word was contracted further to aan't, others say an't (pronounced ahnt).’
  • 106) ‘This is someone who is so expert on the subject of sex that the two words become contracted into one - sexpert.’
  • 107) ‘Now with open access, the mining companies wish to handle the traffics themselves, or contract with third parties.’
  • 108) ‘Vendors contract with one of nine independent laboratory-testing facilities.’
  • 109) ‘He told how they contract with area farmers to guarantee a steady supply.’
  • 110) ‘Many have found it easier and less risky to contract with a vendor that already handles such issues.’
  • 111) ‘The goal was to contract with one vendor that could provide a consistent solution in all markets.’
  • 112) ‘The defendant has not returned the software and intends to use it until it can contract with a new vendor.’
  • 113) ‘Biotech companies also contract with individual farmers to grow pharma crops.’
  • 114) ‘We then moved to the situation where governments now contract with non-profit organisations to deliver a specified service.’
  • 115) ‘We contract with utilities to supply water, gas, or electricity at specified service levels for specified costs.’
  • 116) ‘They also contract with local women to supply cakes and with local artisans to make Val Day mementos such as carved wall hangings.’
  • 117) ‘Local governments can also contract with private businesses for other services, like trash collection.’
  • 118) ‘Once expired, the lessee could begin to contract with new suppliers.’
  • 119) ‘Clients contract with one of the member firms, whose services are supplemented by the resources of the others.’
  • 120) ‘If you need help, you can get it from just about any of the tradespeople you contract with to deal with other parts of the project.’
  • 121) ‘Building owners want to contract with service providers that will be around to honor their commitments.’
  • 122) ‘Under the deed, signatories will refuse to contract with breaching suppliers until the problems are fixed.’
  • 123) ‘We have tried to contract with them several times for specific jobs.’
  • 124) ‘The unions don't contract with the government, therefore they don't have to comply with it.’
  • 125) ‘Some large wineries, for example, contract with hundreds of grape growers.’
  • 126) ‘In others, employers contract privately to provide the benefits.’
  • 127) ‘The new changes serve to increase flexibility and pastoral support for students contracted into the scheme.’
  • 128) ‘They gave us tax relief on the money going in, and they took my National Insurance Contributions, while encouraging pension schemes to contract out of Serps.’
  • 129) ‘About six million people were encouraged to contract out of the state scheme by the carrot of generous contracting out rebates.’
  • 130) ‘It would be possible to contract out into approved occupational schemes.’
  • 131) ‘If you're not in a company scheme but have contracted out in the past, you should receive annual statements from the pension or insurance company that invests your NIC rebates.’
  • 132) ‘Since April 1978 it has been possible for you to contract out of Serps via a final salary scheme, and since April 1988 via a company money purchase scheme.’
  • 133) ‘In the meantime, the clear advice to everyone is that the current level of rebates is too low to justify contracting out on financial grounds.’
  • 134) ‘Independence does not mean contracting out of all relationships with others.’
  • 135) ‘It also discourages people from saving and contracting out adds further to the complex tangle.’
  • 136) ‘About 15m people have contracted out, most of them in the 1980s and 1990s.’
  • 137) ‘I mean, it's just not on, it's not the real world, and when you contract for something you expect to pay that price, and you expect to get it on time.’
  • 138) ‘That is, you could contract for how many calls you would receive, and what kind of calls.’
  • 139) ‘In October 1986 the government introduced the Goods and Services Tax charged on almost everything you buy or contract for.’
  • 140) ‘Is it possible to contract for profit with poor people without being labeled an exploiter?’
  • 141) ‘Physicians do not know how to contract for these technologies.’
  • 142) ‘The committee has also made explicit provision for Transpower to contract for generation and to manage grid reliability.’
  • 143) ‘It does not receive the funding or the authority to contract for research at civilian universities that it needs.’
  • 144) ‘More than one-half expect to contract for more services in the coming years.’
  • 145) ‘Under such a system, film-makers form their own group to contract for a film production.’
  • 146) ‘Planning permission has already been obtained for the terminal and British Gas intends to contract for the use of 2.2 million tonnes a year of capacity.’
  • 147) ‘They should also track their hotspot usage so that the company will know what to contract for when the market matures further.’
  • 148) ‘Many large online travel agencies also may contract for a block of rooms at a special rate.’
  • 149) ‘If you contract for a simple change from a big vendor, you can be in for spending a lot of money.’
  • 150) ‘The factory should be self contained and contract for, order and pay for all materials obtained locally.’
  • 151) ‘It is always open to minority shareholders to contract for such representation.’
  • 152) ‘These policies should also stipulate that you own all rights to the software that you contract for development.’
  • 153) ‘The company wants to contract for as much technological capability as it can.’
  • 154) ‘Probably the most important part of this bill is the provision for the Electricity Commission to contract for reserve electricity.’
  • 155) ‘Sanctions on a country could affect its ability to contract for concessional lending.’
  • 156) ‘It must be possible for parties effectively to contract for the release of all and any claims, whether based on known facts or unknown facts.’
  • 157) ‘If a local authority contracts a builder to construct a certain amount of houses they must pay the full cost not just a deposit.’
  • 158) ‘Channel Seven contracted an outside lawyer to work up a draft agreement and has refused to negotiate on anything falling outside its scope.’
  • 159) ‘He complained about the wild dogs and the National Parks & Wildlife Service contracted a local man to trap and shoot the dogs.’
  • 160) ‘I forget what they called the deal, but he was contracted to produce something like 10 fairly low-budget features for MGM.’
  • 161) ‘Drivers are contracted to work Monday to Saturday.’
  • 162) ‘He was contracted to produce films of a certain length and that week, he handed in one that was more than double the agreed-upon running time.’
  • 163) ‘In 1985 he was contracted to film crocodiles and dolphins in China, the beginning of an amazing career spanning nearly 20 years.’
  • 164) ‘He is officially contracted to work for the company for another 12 months - although few observers expect him to serve out the full year.’
  • 165) ‘He wanted something like that and contracted me to build it.’
  • 166) ‘Camp Henry contracted a wildlife biologist to study the property and create a land stewardship plan.’
  • 167) ‘I contracted him in November to remove my windows and replace them with French-styled steel windows.’
  • 168) ‘She was contracted to work 24 hours a week on a permanent basis.’
  • 169) ‘The builders were contracted by Westlea Housing Association to build five houses on land behind Ashe Crescent.’
  • 170) ‘She was contracted to work in a garment factory in the United Arab Emirates.’
  • 171) ‘I am contracted to be here for a year - who knows what will happen after that?’
  • 172) ‘If the amount of cargo is greater than the hauling capacity of available military trucks, civilian trucks are contracted to complete the mission.’
  • 173) ‘The council later contracted another firm to complete the work, but at a cost of some €20m.’
  • 174) ‘Fourthly, for the medium term, a non-governmental organisation has been contracted to provide six intensive support rehabilitation beds.’
  • 175) ‘In Swindon, there is a strong network provided by Trio Childcare, which is contracted by the council to advise and support childminders and parents.’
  • 176) ‘In 1999 the Council contracted Bedminster to provide an alternative waste system.’
  • 177) ‘At my workplace, food and housekeeping services have been contracted out to subsidiaries of Compass Group, a British multinational corporation.’
  • 178) ‘Other courses have been contracted out to private suppliers.’
  • 179) ‘The university proposed that current staff positions could be contracted out with four months' notice, a proposal which made the staff feel threatened.’
  • 180) ‘But there is a greater possibility that areas of the service such as prisoner escorts could be contracted out.’
  • 181) ‘Further, the government system requires that projects are contracted out by private enterprises by a bidding process.’
  • 182) ‘A bureau spokesman said the number of students attending evening adult education courses was declining before the services were contracted out.’
  • 183) ‘But in future the work will be contracted out to shoe repair giant Timpsons, which has its own repair factories in Manchester and Luton.’
  • 184) ‘This element of the project will be contracted out to an independent company who will carry out the fieldwork.’
  • 185) ‘An automated watering system was introduced around five years ago and the project was contracted out.’
  • 186) ‘The Corps of Engineers and Project contracting Office program contracts the work out to local laborers, with the Corps of Engineers Gulf Region District overseeing the construction.’
  • 187) ‘This may ultimately lead to farmers doing the job themselves rather than contracting it out.’
  • 188) ‘Lancashire County Council funds road gritting by contracting it out to district councils.’
  • 189) ‘I thought the whole point was to contract these services out so the bidders would compete for the contracts using their own existing capital and thus keep the price down for the government, ultimately saving the taxpayers a bit of money.’
  • 190) ‘Whether you're planning to tackle needed facility repairs in house or whether you're going to contract the work out, the first few steps may well determine the success of the final product.’
  • 191) ‘You should budget for this part of the project to ensure that if you decide to contract the work out, the contractor makes provisions to handle the material in the manner that you planned.’
  • 192) ‘Some institutions contract the work out to casual labour with little continuity and stability for the student.’
  • 193) ‘However, the police have chosen to contract the work out to the private sector rather than set up their own civilian-run scheme.’
  • 194) ‘Leaders must ensure that appropriate organizational expertise is retained as processes and programs are contracted out.’
  • 195) ‘They are employed by someone else and their services are contracted out.’
  • 196) ‘The government contracted out the accommodation of delegates to a private company, Turners.’
  • 197) ‘The infatuated prince subsequently caused an international incident by contracting a bigamous marriage with her.’
  • 198) ‘In the countryside, on the contrary, more hands were needed to work the fields in grain-growing regions, and males contracted marriages at younger ages to increase the rural labour supply.’
  • 199) ‘The queen's cousin, Prince Michael of Kent, married in a civil ceremony in Vienna, but no member of the royal family has ever contracted a civil marriage in Britain.’
  • 200) ‘Louisbourg women usually contracted their first marriages at less than 20, a couple of years earlier than eighteenth-century Canadian women.’
  • 201) ‘Under English law, the minimum age for contracting a valid marriage is 16 for both men and women.’
  • 202) ‘How could Heidi have been aware that she was contracting marriage - the requirement for valid consent - if she thought that she was merely contracting an engagement?’
  • 203) ‘However, the ease with which a women can contract sexual liaisons does not directly translate into a socially sanctioned pregnancy and birth.’
  • 204) ‘To contract a friendship, I'll have to have an idea what I think is important in a friendship.’
  • 205) ‘If you think you've contracted an infectious disease, contact your doctor.’
  • 206) ‘Two other patients are critically ill after contracting the disease through infected organs from the donor.’
  • 207) ‘His early education was restricted by severe asthma and he contracted tuberculosis when he started medical school.’
  • 208) ‘Elderly people are at particular risk of serious illness if they contract influenza.’
  • 209) ‘The virus is spread by infected blood, and numerous ways to contract the disease have been identified.’
  • 210) ‘Ninety per cent of travellers who contract malaria do not become ill until after they return home.’
  • 211) ‘Most of the human victims of bird flu appear to have contracted the disease through close contact with chickens.’
  • 212) ‘At age 4, she contracted double pneumonia and scarlet fever simultaneously and almost died.’
  • 213) ‘Rarely, an infant can contract the infection during delivery and develop a fever after birth.’
  • 214) ‘Another danger is contracting an illness while on the road.’
  • 215) ‘More than 100 haemophiliacs contracted HIV and more than 260 contracted hepatitis C from contaminated blood products.’
  • 216) ‘In each case, when later exposed to full blown tuberculosis, the mice all contracted the disease.’
  • 217) ‘Humans can also contract the disease, by breathing in the infection, and then pass it on by kissing.’
  • 218) ‘He had been admitted to hospital after suffering a stroke on January 2 before then contracting pneumonia.’
  • 219) ‘By then, over 30,000 people had already contracted AIDS, and it was too late to stop the epidemic.’
  • 220) ‘Health chiefs say the number of people contracting the virus since then has remained low.’
  • 221) ‘A baby is in intensive care and has somehow contracted meningitis while there.’
  • 222) ‘Reduce your chances of contracting the flu bug by getting a yearly flu vaccine from your doctor's office or local clinic.’
  • 223) ‘The leaflets offer advice and tips on safe farm practices so that farmers can reduce the chances of they and their families contracting these germs.’
  • 224) ‘About 10,000 Irish patients contract the superbug each year.’
  • 225) ‘As stated earlier, much of the debt was contracted by undemocratic governments and oppressive regimes.’
  • 226) ‘He says that he contracted the debt on behalf of the ruling party.’
  • 227) ‘How unjust to do so by pillaging the church, an institution that was neither responsible for contracting the debt nor had benefited from the deficit expenditures.’
  • 228) ‘And why should we, struggling American citizens of today, be bound by debts created by a past ruling elite who contracted these debts at our expense?’
  • 229) ‘As for the gild's financial influence, some jurats were indeed occasionally debtors of the gild, but their debts were contracted as gildsmen not as jurats.’
  • 230) ‘Only one in five elite Marylanders contracted debts during their lifetimes that forced the selling of land or slaves.’
  • 231) ‘Currently the minister of Finance and National Planning has the mandate to contract debts for the nation whenever need arises.’
  • 232) ‘When you contract a debt for a fixed period, write it down.’
  • 233) ‘So-called entrepreneurs do the buying and selling, pay the workers, contract debts and pay interest.’
  • 234) ‘Congress could not even pay the interest on its domestic debt and was financing its foreign debts only by contracting additional loans.’
  • 235) ‘Meanwhile, a debt had been contracted and four years later the papacy sent Pippin the bill.’
  • 236) ‘Public debt - loans contracted by governments to pay their armies, borrowing by cities and rural communities to pay their taxes - had risen alarmingly.’
  • 237) ‘One result of this is that the proportion of debt that is contracted on a short term basis rises.’
  • 238) ‘And on the other hand, they don't protect our identities, so we can end up liable for debts we didn't contract.’
  • 239) ‘The debt which America has contracted, compared with the cause she has gained, and the advantages to flow from it, ought scarcely to be mentioned.’
  • 240) ‘Now, he of course had to do something about the debts he'd contracted.’
  • 241) ‘It was held by many to undermine one of the elementary principles of economic life - that every person is bound to pay debts contracted insofar as this is possible.’
  • 242) ‘Many debts contracted then were still being serviced three generations later, and were only liquidated by the Revolution.’
  • 243) ‘The debt contracted to fund the war had been paid for in just over 19 years.’
  • 244) ‘A husband shall answer in court in pleas concerning debts contracted by his wife before and after their marriage.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy