acclimation vs acclamation

acclimation acclamation

Definitions

  • 1) biology The adaptation of an organism to its natural climatic environment.
  • 2) biology The adaptation of an organism to its natural climatic environment.
  • 3) The process of becoming, or the state of being, acclimated, or habituated to a new climate; acclimatization.
  • 4) Acclimatization.
  • 5) The process of acclimating or of becoming acclimated.
  • 6) The process of becoming, or the state of being, acclimated, or habituated to a new climate; acclimatization.
  • 7) adaptation to a new climate (a new temperature or altitude or environment)
  • 8) The process of acclimating, or the state of being acclimated; acclimatization.

Definitions

  • 1) politics An oral vote taken without formal ballot and with much fanfare; typically an overwhelmingly affirmative vote.
  • 2) art A representation, in sculpture or on medals, of people expressing joy.
  • 3) A shout of approbation, favor, or assent; eager expression of approval; loud applause.
  • 4) art A representation, in sculpture or on medals, of people expressing joy.
  • 5) Canada, politics Without opposition in an election.
  • 6) politics An oral vote taken without formal ballot and with much fanfare; typically an overwhelmingly affirmative vote.
  • 7) The process of electing a person to a post in the absence of other nominees.
  • 8) Canada, politics Without opposition in an election.
  • 9) A shout or salute of enthusiastic approval.
  • 10) An oral vote, especially an enthusiastic vote of approval taken without formal ballot.
  • 11) (R. C. Ch.) In parliamentary usage, the act or method of voting orally and by groups rather than by ballot, esp. in elections
  • 12) are those on which laudatory acclamations are recorded.
  • 13) (Antiq.) A representation, in sculpture or on medals, of people expressing joy.
  • 14) A shout of approbation, favor, or assent; eager expression of approval; loud applause.
  • 15) (R. C. Ch.) In parliamentary usage, the act or method of voting orally and by groups rather than by ballot, esp. in elections
  • 16) (Antiq.) A representation, in sculpture or on medals, of people expressing joy.
  • 17) enthusiastic approval
  • 18) A shout or other demonstration of applause, indicating joy, hearty assent, approbation, or good will.
  • 19) Something expressing praise or joy.
  • 20) In deliberative assemblies, the spontaneous approval or adoption of a resolution or measure by a unanimous viva voce vote, in distinction from a formal division or ballot.

Examples

  • 1) He was out here to acclimate himself to the cold, and the mealy scent of the everlasting ice was strong.
  • 2) Club officials continue to resist putting him in the bullpen even as a short-term acclimation to the big leagues.
  • 3) "The first couple days will be what we call acclimation days where it’s getting players into the process of getting ready to play in the season.
  • 4) He was lifted in the sixth inning after getting four at-bats, almost exactly the kind of acclimation Maddon hoped to get for Baldelli.
  • 5) Obama is engendering the kind of acclimation reserved for few in American political life.
  • 6) That Germans are fustrated with foreigners not interested in learning their language causes nation-wide panic attacks and the development of 'acclimation' programs.
  • 7) We might also ask how this prediction by Goodchild might affect the overall "acclimation" or preparedness of people about the possibility of ET visitation to Earth, whether anything unusual happens today or not.
  • 8) Then Raymond Shaw shoots Ike at the convention and, after everything is sorted out, Kolhammer is nominated by acclimation on a promise to root out the Red Menace.
  • 9) And while the MagicMouse can be picked up and grokked nearly instantaneously (though it sucks that right-click is disabled by default), the OpenOfficeMouse requires about two days of acclimation according to the FAQ.
  • 10) A house of Congress can vote to pass a bill by acclimation IF there are no objections.
  • 11) ‘he spent most of his rookie season documenting his acclimation to life in the NFL’
  • 12) ‘plants' acclimation to changes in temperature’
  • 13) ‘there is going to be an acclimation period for anyone who is new’

Examples

  • 1) By acclamation we agreed I'd work out a rough idea of how we're going to comprehensively review each case.
  • 2) One indication of this change is the disappearance of an acclamation from the Church's official prayers and chants.
  • 3) As to a dear friend Mother Church bids farewell to her beloved Alleluia on the Saturday before Septuagesima Sunday, when at the end of Vespers the acclamation is sung twice after the Benedicamus Domino and the choir responds with its twofold repetition following the Deo gratias.
  • 4) Upon the other meanings which have been attached to the word acclamation some of them rather strained it does not seem necessary to speak at length.
  • 5) It is not as if his acclamation was a surprise to anyone in the Party.
  • 6) Do you believe they were ever imposed upon by those votes and resolutions, made by what is called acclamation, for their union, of which corruption paid one part, [9] and fear forced the remainder?
  • 7) Labour's rules allow the cabinet to install a single candidate by acclamation, which is surely the only serious option this close to an election: two or three months of a messy leadership contest so close to national polling day would amount to collective suicide.
  • 8) According to Spinelli's original script Europeans should have greeted the constitution with "acclamation".
  • 9) ‘During the introductions I mentioned that information science is integral to each of the sciences represented and received loud acclamation.’
  • 10) ‘Similarly cheers and acclamation punctuated the famous speech of the young senator on man's rights and dignity.’
  • 11) ‘However, the greatest acclamation was reserved for the audience who to a person applauded and cheered at the conclusion of the play.’
  • 12) ‘You might imagine, therefore, that the appearance of Ulysses would have been greeted with cries of joy and acclamation from the literary intelligentsia.’
  • 13) ‘The acclamation had been nearly unanimous: shouts of the imperial troops at Rome, seconded wholeheartedly by the Senate, the rabble, the clergy.’
  • 14) ‘The acclamation that followed his death from colon cancer early this year strangely mirrored his ghostly omnipresence during life. He was a missing link: an authentic songster who voiced folk-made music.’
  • 15) ‘His elegant and refined style of conducting has won Ozawa acclamation even from European and North American audiences who have previously shown great suspicion towards Asian musicians performing Western classical pieces.’
  • 16) ‘He gave unlucky Derby second Silver Patriarch a typically-robust ride to take the St Leger of 1997, and the crowd's roar of acclamation that day showed just how much they wanted Eddery to crown his career in fairytale style.’
  • 17) ‘But I've done 140 gigs this year and here I am, able to tootle around the world to incredible acclamation, and I think that's amazing, and I love it, after 27 years of it!’
  • 18) ‘Tang's excellent depictions of the 160 odd characters in the ‘Peony Pavilion’ has earned him centuries of acclamation from generations of dramatists.’
  • 19) ‘While the artists might modestly resist such acclamation, what has transpired here certainly displays a high degree of artistic experimentation and talent.’
  • 20) ‘Two years after this came universal acclamation: Golding received the 1983 Nobel Prize for Literature, the last British writer in the twentieth century to do so.’
  • 21) ‘Now the Trust is preparing its own long-term bid for the survival of its beloved club, a plan which drew considerable acclamation when it was made public during the interval of the Swansea game.’
  • 22) ‘No proclamation or ceremony was needed, no public acclamation or even acceptance; behind their backs, the people had got a new sovereign.’
  • 23) ‘Three-one at half-time and the crowd rose in acclamation.’
  • 24) ‘In more rarified circles, Chinese and Indian artists are winning acclamation at the highest levels.’
  • 25) ‘This was received with acclamation, and the proclamation was made from the Hotel de Ville.’
  • 26) ‘Four minutes later, Morgan struck down the other end and all that was left was the thunderous acclamation of the team.’
  • 27) ‘Parliament and public greeted this imperial retreat with a fanfare of acclamation.’
  • 28) ‘Described in the press and at trade organizations' meetings as a ‘great force,’ women retail workers received widespread acclamation for their achievements.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy