accent vs ascent vs assent

accent ascent assent

Definitions

  • 1) A mark used as a superscript to indicate the first derivative of a variable.
  • 2) Something that accentuates or contrasts something else, as a touch of color that makes the features of an image stand out.
  • 3) One determined by the phonetic habits of the speaker's native language carried over to his or her use of another language.
  • 4) A characteristic pronunciation, especially.
  • 5) A mark used as a superscript to distinguish among variables represented by the same symbol.
  • 6) A mark representing this.
  • 7) Rhythmically significant stress in a line of verse.
  • 8) One determined by the regional or social background of the speaker.
  • 9) A mark or symbol used in the printing and writing of certain languages to indicate the vocal quality to be given to a particular letter.
  • 10) Emphasis or prominence given to a note or chord, as by an increase in volume or extended duration.
  • 11) A mark or symbol used in printing and writing to indicate the stressed syllables of a spoken word.
  • 12) The relative prominence of a particular syllable of a word by greater intensity or by variation or modulation of pitch or tone.
  • 13) Vocal prominence or emphasis given to a particular syllable, word, or phrase.
  • 14) A mark or one of several marks used as a superscript to indicate a unit, such as feet (′) and inches (″) in linear measurement.
  • 15) Particular importance or interest; emphasis: synonym: emphasis.
  • 16) A distinctive feature or quality, such as a feature that accentuates, contrasts with, or complements a decorative style.
  • 17) Modulation of the voice in speaking; manner of speaking or pro cing; peculiar or characteristic modification of the voice; tone
  • 18) (Pros.) Stress laid on certain syllables of a verse.
  • 19) A word; a significant tone.
  • 20) Modulation of the voice in speaking; manner of speaking or procing; peculiar or characteristic modification of the voice; tone
  • 21) A mark or character used in writing, and serving to regulate the pronunciation; esp.: (a) a mark to indicate the nature and place of the spoken accent; (b) a mark to indicate the quality of sound of the vowel marked.
  • 22) A regularly recurring stress upon the tone to mark the beginning, and, more feebly, the third part of the measure.
  • 23) A superior force of voice or of articulative effort upon some particular syllable of a word or a phrase, distinguishing it from the others.
  • 24) Manner of utterance; peculiarity of pronunciation, emphasis, or expression.
  • 25) A special effort of utterance by which, in a word of two or more syllables, one syllable is made more prominent than the rest.
  • 26) A character, usually (′ ), used to mark such an accented syllable.
  • 27) A mark placed after the letter representing a note to indicate the octave in which it is found.
  • 28) In decorative, art, an added relieving or contrastive touch or tint: as, deep blue or crimson, with accents of gold.
  • 29) In mathematics and mech.: In all literal notation, a mark like an acute accent placed after a letter in order that it may, without confusion, be used to represent different quantities.
  • 30) In printing, an accented or marked letter; a type bearing an accentual or diacritical mark.
  • 31) In geometry and trigonometry, a mark at the right hand of a number indicating minutes of a degree, two such marks indicating seconds: as, 20° 10′ 30″ = 20 degrees, 10 minutes, 30 seconds. In mensuration and engineering, a mark at the right hand of a number used to denote feet, inches, and lines; thus, 3′ 6″ 7‴ = 3 feet, 6 inches, 7 lines. In plans and drawings, a mark similarly used after repeated letters or figures, to indicate related or corresponding parts, and read as in algebra. See above, .
  • 32) Words, or tones and modulations of the voice, expressive of some emotion or passion: as, the accents of prayer; the accent of reproof.
  • 33) A mark or character used in writing to direct the stress of the voice in pronunciation, or to mark a particular tone, length of vowel-sound, or the like.
  • 34) A character, usually (″), used to mark such an accent. The term often includes minor accents of the third (tertiary) or weaker grades, as in in″′ con″ tro-ver'ti-ble, hy″percat″′ a-lec'tic, in″″com″ pre-hen″′ si-bil'i-ty, etc.
  • 35) plural Words, language, or expressions in general.
  • 36) The special stress or emphasis laid on a particular word in a sentence: as, for example, on ‘us’ in the line, “Better for us, perhaps, it might appear”
  • 37) In eccles. chanting, one of the seven forms of modulation used in parts sung by the officiating priest or his assistants, viz., the immutable, medium, grave, acute, moderate, interrogative, final. In music: A stress or emphasis given to certain notes or parts of bars in a composition.
  • 38) To give expression to; utter.
  • 39) To mark with a written accent or accents: as, to accent a word in order to indicate its pronunciation.
  • 40) To emphasize; dwell upon; accentuate (which see).
  • 41) To express the accent of; pronounce or utter with a particular stress or modulation of the voice: as, to accent a word properly.
  • 42) To stress or emphasize the pronunciation of.
  • 43) To focus attention on; accentuate.
  • 44) To mark with a printed accent.
  • 45) To express the accent of (either by the voice or by a mark); to utter or to mark with accent.
  • 46) To mark emphatically; to emphasize.

Definitions

  • 1) An increase, for example in popularity or hierarchy
  • 2) typography The ascender height in a typeface.
  • 3) The act of ascending. A motion upwards.
  • 4) The act or process of rising or going upward.
  • 5) An advancement, especially in social status.
  • 6) A going back in time or upward in genealogical succession.
  • 7) the act of changing location in an upward direction
  • 8) A proceeding upward or backward in time or in logical order of succession.
  • 9) Hence A rising from a lower to a higher state, degree, or grade; advancement.
  • 10) The act of rising or ascending; upward movement: as, the ascent of vapors, or of a balloon.
  • 11) The act of climbing or traveling up; the act of advancing from a lower to a higher position; a going up, as up a mountain, river, stairway, etc.
  • 12) The angle made by an ascending line or surface with the horizontal line or plane: as, the road has an ascent of five degrees.
  • 13) An eminence; a hill or high place.
  • 14) The way by which one ascends; the means of ascending; acclivity; upward slope.
  • 15) The degree of elevation of an object, or the angle it makes with a horizontal line; inclination; rising grade.
  • 16) The act of rising; motion upward; rise; a mounting upward
  • 17) An eminence, hill, or high place.
  • 18) The way or means by which one ascends.

Definitions

  • 1) agreement, act of agreeing
  • 2) Agreement; concurrence.
  • 3) Acquiescence; consent.
  • 4) The act of assenting; the act of the mind in admitting or agreeing to anything; concurrence with approval; consent; agreement; acquiescence.
  • 5) in England, the assent of the sovereign to a bill which has passed both houses of Parliament, after which it becomes law.
  • 6) agreement with a statement or proposal to do something
  • 7) Consent; concurrence; acquiescence; agreement to a proposal: as, the bill before the house has the assent of a great majority of the members.
  • 8) Accord; agreement; approval.
  • 9) Opinion.
  • 10) The act of the mind in admitting or agreeing to the truth of a proposition proposed for acceptance.
  • 11) To agree to, give approval to.
  • 12) to agree or express agreement
  • 13) To admit a proposition as true; express an agreement of the mind to what is alleged or proposed; concur; acquiesce: with to before an object.
  • 14) To agree to; approve; determine.
  • 15) Synonyms To agree, subscribe.
  • 16) To express agreement or acceptance, as of a proposal.
  • 17) To admit a thing as true; to express one's agreement, acquiescence, concurrence, or concession.

Examples

  • 1) One had blue eyes and blond hair and spoke with a northern accent.
  • 2) Liverpool was right, but too distinctive an accent and place.
  • 3) He asked me with a strong French accent where my ring was.
  • 4) And all because they couldn't find a woman of colour with a regional accent in time.
  • 5) That is the language, the accent, people who live on the internet have forged.
  • 6) He speaks with a strong South African accent.
  • 7) Born in Kent and talks with an American accent!
  • 8) I do a great Paisley Scottish accent.
  • 9) But it was unusual to hear the script delivered in a northern accent for once.
  • 10) This patronising voice with a whine and an awful regional accent was talking.
  • 11) Uses voice recognition to train you on accents and pronunciation.
  • 12) Perhaps that accent goes some way to explaining it.
  • 13) Each song reflects its different writer in distinctive accents.
  • 14) Where does this accent failure come from?
  • 15) She switches effortlessly between regional accents to suit the person in front of her.
  • 16) All had northern accents and almost all said their accent had been mentioned by mentors at their schools.
  • 17) You can see that today from the number of different languages and accents you can hear in the crowd.
  • 18) She will presumably be able to tell him why some accents and some languages just sound nicer than others.
  • 19) Why does it have to be a Scottish accent?
  • 20) The exhibition will also show how Victorians were acutely aware of how accents betrayed their class status.
  • 21) The guy in shorts with a really strong Aussie accent may have a billion dollars.
  • 22) Her American accent was all over the place.
  • 23) I hung on his heavily accented speeches.
  • 24) The flat Black Country accent is peerless for delivering these kind of pronouncements.
  • 25) And to keep quiet when he's visiting, so no one hears the accent.
  • 26) It was all delivered in a broad West Country accent.
  • 27) I tend to think of the term accent as used sometimes as a non-technical word for dialect, or as something used to talk about the speech of those speaking in a second or third or what have you language.
  • 28) Look at people like Henry Kissinger whose command of English far exceeds that of a majority of Americans, yet his accent is atrocious and he has never been able to improve upon it.
  • 29) ‘The whole country was a mixture of different languages and accents back then, especially in the rural areas.’
  • 30) ‘And is there anywhere in the world with a greater diversity of accents than London?’
  • 31) ‘And a beautiful thing, for me, was that most spoke with foreign accents and in foreign languages.’
  • 32) ‘Mass-media broadcasters spoke in the accents of the upper classes.’
  • 33) ‘The annual meeting of China's legislature is a jamboree of regional accents and languages.’
  • 34) ‘Yet, although we share the same language, English accents still confuse the locals.’
  • 35) ‘With some exceptions, strong regional or Spanish accents are associated with working-class status.’
  • 36) ‘Type in whatever you want into the text box, and it'll read it out in an eerily realistic human voice. You can even pick male or female voices and a few different languages or accents.’
  • 37) ‘The conversation veered towards language and accents.’
  • 38) ‘As for the impact of popular culture, Kay says that the evidence isn't so much that TV levels out language, but that strong regional accents from all over Britain seem to be thriving.’
  • 39) ‘Primarily, however, I notice the sheer multiplicity of accents, languages and ethnic types jostling for space in those sweaty Tube carriages.’
  • 40) ‘‘Some people with working class or regional accents are not getting the chances they deserve and that is a waste,’ she says.’
  • 41) ‘It is believed he was British but the suspect spoke in a Patois accent, the accent of Caribbean street language.’
  • 42) ‘Fraudsters may have ‘upper class' accents and a Mayfair address but the lines are the same.’
  • 43) ‘When actors baulked at speaking lines in a foreign language - or their accents were execrable - native-speakers were brought in to play the parts.’
  • 44) ‘All TV announcers had unbelievable upper class accents.’
  • 45) ‘But the five Americans also manage highly creditable regional or class accents.’
  • 46) ‘The melange of languages and accents was as varied as the faces.’
  • 47) ‘After reading, judges check on their pronunciation, accent, posture and eye contact.’
  • 48) ‘I heard my dad struggle with the pronunciation, trying to add on an Italian accent along with the words and couldn't hold back a giggle.’
  • 49) ‘In all but parts of eastern Slovakia, the stress is on the first syllable of a word; longer words (three or more syllables) have secondary accents.’
  • 50) ‘Mania, they were told, is simply the Italian translation of the word obsession, and anyway it's pronounced with the accent on the second syllable.’
  • 51) ‘In Samoan words all syllables are given equal timing with a slight accent placed on the penultimate syllable.’
  • 52) ‘TO-mah-to, they called them in Calcutta, with the accent on the first syllable, making no distinction between singular or plural.’
  • 53) ‘Also, the accent should be on the second syllable: a-SAH-a-na.’
  • 54) ‘Furthermore, the narrator speaks with the words, accents, and intonations of Golyadkin himself.’
  • 55) ‘Falimako is pronounced FA-li-ma-ko with the accent on the FA.’
  • 56) ‘These aren't imported words with genuine umlauts, but retrospective accents denoting a junked hyphen as in microorganisms or coordinated.’
  • 57) ‘And when the British crossed the Atlantic and the accent shifted from a to e, all the vowels shifted along one position, e i o u a.’
  • 58) ‘The accents and other diacritical marks we now use to write ancient Greek are comparatively late inventions.’
  • 59) ‘FYI - I had to leave out some of the accent marks on some of the Spanish words.’
  • 60) ‘It's a neat trick to have a way to spell words containing both nasalization and crucially important tone without any accents or funny letters.’
  • 61) ‘Modern Greek also retains from the ancient language a system of three pitch accents (acute, circumflex, grave).’
  • 62) ‘Elegant accent marks can make any typical product name sound like a shimmering diamond mined from the fertile bowls of the finest dragon filled cave.’
  • 63) ‘The Soviet Russia template has an interesting linguistic aspect: the paired contrastive accents that indicate role reversal.’
  • 64) ‘Little accents, little umlauts, tiny apostrophes like snowflakes sting her cheeks.’
  • 65) ‘Why do the normal keyboard letter combinations for eg French accents not work in comments boxes?’
  • 66) ‘The spelling is fundamentally phonetic and the stress falls on the next to last syllable unless indicted by an accent mark.’
  • 67) ‘After all, people who write in these languages on a computer want to use the correct accent marks.’
  • 68) ‘I don't think I grasped much of the concept of where to place accents in the Spanish language, but oh well.’
  • 69) ‘Rachmaninoff indicates that the tenor carries the melody by placing accents over each of its notes.’
  • 70) ‘Or consider the college piano student, carefully groomed to taper each Mozartean phrase just so, and deliver sharp accents in Bartok.’
  • 71) ‘Moravec takes the opening of the first in a way that connects with Bartók's piano dances, with shifting accents.’
  • 72) ‘The composer's intentions may be notated as dots, dashes, accents, and slurs.’
  • 73) ‘The weight came from accents and the interpretation's fire, not from thick orchestral playing or slow tempos.’
  • 74) ‘Sir John Barbirolli in rehearsal with the Hallé Orchestra, with subtly weighted accents on the first beat of each note group in the strings, is not to be ignored.’
  • 75) ‘The use of unpredictable accents also can add to the rhythmic complexity of a musical work.’
  • 76) ‘Tempos tend to be driving, and accents tend to be emphatic, strengthening the similarities between Schumann and Beethoven.’
  • 77) ‘The rich tone and strong accents of Gabriel Beavers's solo bassoon were striking.’
  • 78) ‘In the second to last bar of ‘Purgatorio’, Mahler wrote a chord B E-G plus an accent.’
  • 79) ‘The meter, complexity of rhythms created by dotted rhythms, triplets and irregular accents manifest the spirit of Korean peasant dance and music.’
  • 80) ‘Some of these have involved minutely detailed descriptions of snare drum accents and eight-to-the-bar boogie-woogie rhythms.’
  • 81) ‘There are sharp pizzicato accents everywhere, and once again, leave it to David Finckel to look like he is having the time of his life.’
  • 82) ‘Syncopated staccato accents gradually drop into place on top of an extended droning chord.’
  • 83) ‘Similarly the trumpet/xylophone guy did some well-placed accents throughout, weaving his notes into the fabric of the music.’
  • 84) ‘He might land his hardest accent in the middle of a triplet of notes, or rustle the snare and tom-tom drums with his sticks the way others brush the ride and high-hat cymbals.’
  • 85) ‘The displacement of the normal musical accent from a strong beat to a weak one.’
  • 86) ‘By contrast, the three-beat group is subdivided as a hemiola with accents falling on beat 1 and the second half of beat 2.’
  • 87) ‘As in the accented baseline condition, the two kinds of accents emphasized the same tones.’
  • 88) ‘Riemann published editions of standard keyboard works in which agogic accents were marked with the sign ^.’
  • 89) ‘Though there are sections on Welsh and Greek, the accent is on French, German, Spanish and Italian, each of which has a 24-lesson course attached.’
  • 90) ‘The accent is on natural materials - wood and stone.’
  • 91) ‘The accent is on making learning an enjoyable experience. ‘Look, understand, absorb and learn’ is the new mantra.’
  • 92) ‘Instead, the accent is on improving business attitudes, leaving consumers with the impression that once again profit is being put before safety.’
  • 93) ‘For the moment, though, the accent is on celebration.’
  • 94) ‘The toys appear to be high-quality, and the accent is on educational products.’
  • 95) ‘The accent is on winning and making money, not developing New Zealand talent.’
  • 96) ‘The accent is on creating a simulated environment for the customer to feel at home.’
  • 97) ‘The accent was on humour and song, and a patriotic theme was introduced for Coronation year.’
  • 98) ‘The accent is on comfort rather than sportiness and its no coincidence that it looks like an S-Class that shrunk in the wash.’
  • 99) ‘Computer dealers are finding that even machines that were considered ‘high end’ are being snapped up for use at home with the accent on value for money.’
  • 100) ‘Moreover, they put the accent on the spiritual values connected with youth, rather than on age.’
  • 101) ‘This idea was imposed by Western nations' heavy accent on democracy as the almighty and foremost value.’
  • 102) ‘The accent of the speech however, fell on the steps being taken by the government to reverse these social ills.’
  • 103) ‘The accent therefore had to fall on external action by the state, but of itself this did not require immediate and exact foreign policy choices.’
  • 104) ‘The main accent falls on the significance of Christ's action, and the explication of sin through the figure of Adam serves to clarify this significance.’
  • 105) ‘Again, this was simple food with the accent upon quality ingredients and a desire to avoid over-elaboration.’
  • 106) ‘Last week I lamented the lack of tries in our now defence-dominated game, what with the accent on specialist prevention coaching.’
  • 107) ‘There was a mismatch between theory and understanding, when the accent should have been on continuous learning.’
  • 108) ‘Small schools have sprung up all over the country, laying accent on the quality of the relationship between teacher and student.’
  • 109) ‘If you're using chives as a visual accent, just sprinkle a few over whatever you're accenting.’
  • 110) ‘After a tour of five hotels in Lakes towns from Keswick to Coniston his recommendation is to inject a regional accent into the decor to get more guests to the check-in desks.’
  • 111) ‘Bright red is a bold accent in clusters of anemones and candy canes.’
  • 112) ‘She refused to meet his gaze, eyes resting instead on the gold accent of his navy blue coat, or the thick leather belt still decorating his broad chest.’
  • 113) ‘It is all about layering the textures and then maybe adding an accent colour to spice it up a bit.’
  • 114) ‘A key ingredient in almost every successful colour scheme is the inclusion of just two main colours and an accent colour, so be disciplined in your choices.’
  • 115) ‘Ottomans can carry an accent colour, or add texture and thereby lift the look of a room.’
  • 116) ‘In the typical mix of femininity and sporty styling, such accents emphasize a modern femininity.’
  • 117) ‘A few plum accents can bring in a note of elegance to any room; try a throw pillow or two, or a plum lampshade with a fringe?’
  • 118) ‘His pale features were accented by his ebony hair.’
  • 119) ‘Dark hair and even darker eyes accented his pale features and an amused smile touched his thin lips.’
  • 120) ‘He had a certain smug look as the setting sun accented his facial features and bathed the luxurious office in shades of red and gold light.’
  • 121) ‘You can accent a room's feature - such as a pipe or post - by painting it a different color from the rest of the room or de-emphasize it by painting it the same color.’
  • 122) ‘She shrugged off her wet robe and pulled on a new one that seemed to accent her dark features even more.’
  • 123) ‘She was dressed in a red gown, with a tight bodice that accented her womanly features.’
  • 124) ‘In consequence they strove to accent the competitive element and eliminate any attempt at showboating at every opportunity.’
  • 125) ‘His angular features were accented by a short bristly goatee, and a single black curl fell on his forehead.’
  • 126) ‘In both cases, cobalt blue was used to accent certain elements including the bells, the man's shoes, shirt, and hat, and the cantons of the flags.’
  • 127) ‘She had Egyptian features, which were accented by the mascara she was wearing and her honey-colored eyes.’
  • 128) ‘Brown curls that framed his fragile features and accented his crystalline red-hazel eyes.’
  • 129) ‘Following lunch the shimmering afternoon sun warmed the shoulders, and accented the floral colours of the pleasure garden and the verdant fruitfulness of the walled organic garden.’
  • 130) ‘So my thought was to replace the flower over-abundance with a solid blue color to accent the nice yellow, by whatever means was the easiest and best way to accomplish this task.’
  • 131) ‘The different vibrant and funky colours and ‘intelligent’ lighting perfectly accent the curtain wall and a high ceiling.’
  • 132) ‘We all look to you to accent the positives and help us to eradicate the more negative events, and mostly you do achieve this.’
  • 133) ‘Victoria blushed, causing Eagan to smile for a moment; she looked as cute as always, a blush so easily brought to her cheeks accenting her color.’
  • 134) ‘It seemed to be just Helen's size, and the color perfectly accented her light brown hair.’
  • 135) ‘Make art the focal point of your living room by accenting it with halogen spotlights.’
  • 136) ‘A tent sized mu-mu - hot orange and pink, accenting the contours of her big, round belly.’
  • 137) ‘The mystique surrounding Cirque du Soleil is accented by the wonderment the show evokes from the audience.’
  • 138) ‘Double-time blast beats are accented by equally furious ‘breakdowns’ and searing vocals, but it's all done without coming across like it was as butchered as their song subjects.’
  • 139) ‘Their drummer seemed to be half asleep because he missed a dozen beats key beats that were supposed to accent the vocals.’
  • 140) ‘The strings are used only to accent the melody, and any misgivings are quickly redeemed by yet another amazing guitar solo.’
  • 141) ‘‘Tsuginepu to ittemita’ is a good example of this, a tone poem for a female voice and tabla, the tabla accenting every syllable, accompanied by a gently chiming Japanese melody.’
  • 142) ‘Axis and Alignment is a jazz tapestry accented by intricate minimalist patterns and incredibly fluid changes, a perpetually shifting sonic picture of gentle enlightenment.’
  • 143) ‘Ungerleider's sparse guitar style was accented with long bass solos.’

Examples

  • 1) Theirs has been no rapid ascent to stardom.
  • 2) The pair had skied to the final rock ridge and were roped together for the final ascent.
  • 3) Other triggers include making a rapid ascent to high altitude and performing hard physical exertion while there.
  • 4) His progress has not always followed a linear trajectory, with injuries and inconsistency slowing his ascent.
  • 5) It's more of an ascent than a descent.
  • 6) On the contrary, his dive computer recorded a very gradual ascent.
  • 7) It was a steep, hazardous ascent.
  • 8) What you can't dispute is the rapid ascent of the band.
  • 9) His heart pounded in his ears and he knew his breath came more quickly than could be accounted for by his rapid ascent.
  • 10) After such a rapid ascent, investors are understandably worrying about what comes next.
  • 11) It was almost sunset now, and the next morning we would begin our ascent up the mountain.
  • 12) A long ascent of the steep hill is rewarded by a rest bench overlooking an idyllic scene.
  • 13) The ascent of the world 's favourite precious metal has been one of the wonders of the past decade.
  • 14) Then there was a sudden steep ascent and I had a moment of breathlessness and feeling sick.
  • 15) A steep ascent, it is said to command fabulous views over the lake of the same name.
  • 16) They still had to climb a steep ascent that lay behind Peter's hut.
  • 17) Difficulty rating The steep ascent and rocky ground means that you will need to be sure-footed.
  • 18) In 2004 their study concluded that the risk of such damage could be increased by anything that disrupted the slow ascent of the mammals to the surface.
  • 19) The strongest will be the first to make the hazardous ascent to freedom, in case the capsule hits problems, then the weakest.
  • 20) I clawed back a little of the time on the frozen ascent and descent over the Alpine pass to Gstaad.
  • 21) Bronowski summarizes a key factor in what he calls the ascent of Man, and one thing to keep in mind here is that he's not talking about some amazing engineering triumph or complex scientific discovery - he's standing before a piece of abstract sculpture.
  • 22) Energetic and affable, Deacon helped steer Georgetown's ascent from a provincial to national university, building a cross-country network of alumni and recruitment to mirror those of the Ivy League schools.
  • 23) The ear-popping ascent from the floor of Silicon Valley winds under moss-covered trees, eventually becoming decidedly too small for two cars to pass.
  • 24) The ascent is precipitous, but the path is cut into continual and short windings, which enable you to surmount the perpendicularity of the mountain.
  • 25) The 5. 5-mile ascent from the valley up to Verbier was the first time that the Tour has visited the ski resort.
  • 26) I think the point has been well made that his ascent is exploration only in a personal sense, so there are few lessons about exploration that pertain to nationally funded space exploration.
  • 27) And here are the steps of its ascent from the mud to man: simple reflex action, compound reflex action, memory, habit, rudimentary reason, and abstract reason.
  • 28) Two hours later, from another thicket, Koolau watched a body of police trying to make the ascent from the opposite side of the valley.
  • 29) The ascent is a birdwatcher's delight, too, with chances to see as many as 60 different bird species in a single day!
  • 30) ‘It was he who first taught me that the ascent of mountains was an act of mystery, a way in to the greatest perplexities of human place in the land.’
  • 31) ‘The fact that the route over the mountain began with the ascent of the steepest face, and that this was the route of frequent steeplechases, was not coincidental.’
  • 32) ‘For people in the prime of their youth - and with perfect sight - the ascent of the mountain can be a demanding and dangerous business.’
  • 33) ‘The scenery in all directions is particularly spectacular - it is often the case that the ascent of a smaller hill gives the best views of its larger neighbours.’
  • 34) ‘It took two days and a night, and involved the ascent of two mountains and an evening descent upon a rotten glacier.’
  • 35) ‘But his latest trip had been the experience of a lifetime, he said, with highs and lows to match any Himalayan mountain ascent.’
  • 36) ‘One Scot ran past me on my ascent of the highest mountain in Britain.’
  • 37) ‘The long and easy ascent of the hill is rewarded by extensive views in all directions from the summit.’
  • 38) ‘It involves negotiating mountainous routes through snow and the ice of glaciers as well as the ascent of rock routes in a glaciated environment.’
  • 39) ‘Three of North America's best climbers spent two days making the first ascent of this same route 20 years previously.’
  • 40) ‘Despite that, the most straightforward route of ascent is on this side of the hill.’
  • 41) ‘Its ascent makes a good introduction to the hill walking game and provides a fairly stiff afternoon's walk with the reward of extensive views from the summit on a good day.’
  • 42) ‘They had left the hamlet and circled to the far side of the hill before beginning their ascent, threading their way through rocks and scrub to the wood straddling the crest.’
  • 43) ‘She couldn't help giggling as they began their ascent up a huge hill.’
  • 44) ‘Elizabeth, in her riding habit, is about to begin her ascent up the mountain.’
  • 45) ‘We'll end our journey in triumph with the ascent of Ben Nevis, Scotland's highest mountain.’
  • 46) ‘It also includes an overnight ascent of Mount Sinai to watch the sunrise over the mountains, a breathtaking experience well worth the three-hour walk up.’
  • 47) ‘You should therefore avoid a quick ascent and take time to acclimatise to the mountains' oxygen challenged air.’
  • 48) ‘Bear right through the gate off the main path and begin the steep, steep ascent directly to the summit.’
  • 49) ‘Staying in climbing huts along the route, her group of 52 walkers began the ascent through terrain which ranged from desert to Arctic-like conditions.’
  • 50) ‘Luckily when you are on the ascent the path cleverly twists and turns over the one-step streams to make the going reasonable, avoiding the worst.’
  • 51) ‘Keep going, however, and an ascent up sloping bedrock will be found at the end on the right.’
  • 52) ‘This was a long, challenging day with groups climbing either Number 4 Gully or Ledge Route rather than the easier ascent by the tourist path.’
  • 53) ‘It's a six-hour undertaking with a 700m ascent along paths hewed into near-vertical mountainside.’
  • 54) ‘Small, pale brown leaves covered the ground, and the tortured mesquite trunks twisted and cracked on their upward ascent.’
  • 55) ‘We got to the first landing, the ascent upwards being a series of long curves and short straights, when I heard Rafferty's voice calling on us to wait up.’
  • 56) ‘Now the 27 year old from Pamplona is hitting the steepest part of the ascent, and gritting his teeth as the road ramps up.’
  • 57) ‘After the first hour or so of gentle ascent through a lava flow the climb steepens.’
  • 58) ‘In another sixty or seventy yards the tunnel would begin a final ascent to its exit on the western side of the arroyo where Axler's men would be waiting with their transport.’
  • 59) ‘The stress of the situation must have driven her to push hard in the race, as she rode strongly and powered up the final ascent to win the race.’
  • 60) ‘In July 1925 Friedmann made a record-breaking ascent in a balloon to 7400 metres to make meteorological and medical observations.’
  • 61) ‘Wind measurements were performed every 4 h by tracking the ascent of a pilot balloon by radar.’
  • 62) ‘As the balloon continued its ascent, propelled by the heat from the flames, gas tanks inside the balloon ignited and caused an explosion.’
  • 63) ‘As the balloon began its historic ascent, someone nearby questioned the usefulness of this new invention.’
  • 64) ‘A gutsy group of Ukrainians has made the world's first underground balloon ascent in a disused coal mine in Doneck.’
  • 65) ‘At the end of its ascent, the balloon bursts from the lack of air pressure in near space.’
  • 66) ‘Flames licked out of the exhaust as the plane lifted off the runway and began the ascent, and as the noise faded into the distance it seemed to get even more intense.’
  • 67) ‘In the time remaining, and amid much giggling, we inflated our balloons, ready for the ascent.’
  • 68) ‘Ariane 44L carries four large liquid strap-on boosters to augment the launcher's thrust at liftoff and during the initial ascent.’
  • 69) ‘As flight director, Mr Noble, who attended Burnley Grammar School and took up ballooning in 1974, was to mastermind the ascent and ensure the pilots return safely to earth.’
  • 70) ‘Gaston, our pilot, checks two gauges - the variometer measures the balloon's rate of ascent or descent.’
  • 71) ‘May 20, 1910, was one of a series of days on which weather observations were collected from coordinated balloon ascents all over Europe.’
  • 72) ‘Data produced by these balloon ascents result in data that is applied to the guns, improving accuracy of fire.’
  • 73) ‘For example, after the shuttle has entered orbit, the cargo bay doors open to help release much of the pent-up heat created during liftoff and ascent.’
  • 74) ‘Both heart rate and wingbeat frequency were significantly higher during ascent than later in the flight.’
  • 75) ‘An hour or two before launch the guidance software that controls the vehicle's ascent is loaded.’
  • 76) ‘It ascended slowly and without sound, maintaining constant ascent and flight path towards the center of Manhattan.’
  • 77) ‘No need for rockets, ramjets, or other propulsive technologies, and the ascent to orbit can be made in a far more benign, safe environment than within a rocket.’
  • 78) ‘The rapid ascent to high altitudes strained the silk beyond the tolerance limit.’
  • 79) ‘Whether or not he gets back in one piece depends very much on a successful take-off and ascent to a relatively calm cruising altitude of up to 45,000 ft.’
  • 80) ‘There has, however, been an unexpected twist to the tale that may serve as a warning for other successful entrepreneurs dreaming of a swift ascent to celebrity land through the magic door of television.’
  • 81) ‘Her ascent to the presidentship of the Kerala Electricity Board Employees Confederation had attracted attention not least because of the controversy it led to.’
  • 82) ‘His ascent to his current post would be because Secretary Rice has confidence is his ability and character, not because he is a stalking horse for the Democrats.’
  • 83) ‘The modern phase of Mysore began from 1800 with the ascent to the throne of Krishnaraja Wodeyar III.’
  • 84) ‘The captain's story is conspicuously smooth, a vertical ascent to stardom.’
  • 85) ‘He is black, and some people were quick to credit his ascent to affirmative action and his editors' desire for a more diverse reporting staff.’
  • 86) ‘Gone too is the sad figure of the politician who for some years has been making the arduous ascent to political mediocrity only to find that he/she has lost on the fifth, sixth or umpteenth time.’
  • 87) ‘With the advent of the electronic media, these popular forms gained new outlets and, in the case of jazz and film, began a rapid ascent to the level of genuine art.’
  • 88) ‘It signifies the ascent to power of a new kind of American, one profoundly at odds with that older type who aspired to modesty and self-restraint.’
  • 89) ‘We'll see if, like his brother, Stephen can feast on Indy League pitching before making a rapid ascent to the bigs.’
  • 90) ‘And fortunately, it is a story that grows ever less likely to be repeated with the ascent to the bench of increasing numbers of females.’
  • 91) ‘Though Arthur was initially shocked by his ascent to the presidency, he rose to the occasion.’
  • 92) ‘His progressive thinking is what has led to his quick ascent to the top of the world-renowned development studio.’
  • 93) ‘Bruno restored the balance from teetering totally towards the canvas by his ascent to a brief reign as holder of a version of the world title.’
  • 94) ‘The broad story of Capote's ascent to literary greatness and descent into decades of writer's block in that time is well known.’
  • 95) ‘Mary's ascent to the throne was clouded with the actions of the Duke of Northumberland and Lady Jane Grey.’
  • 96) ‘But their ascent to this status depended largely on the processes of industrialisation, urbanisation and commodification.’
  • 97) ‘Most people consider acne to be a consequence of being a teenager, as though it were a rite of passage marking the ascent into adulthood.’
  • 98) ‘It is little wonder, therefore, to find that there are still ‘pinch me’ moments for the rising star, given her remarkable ascent into the limelight.’

Examples

  • 1) But whether it will receive assent before the upcoming general election remains to be seen.
  • 2) The bill is still awaiting royal assent.
  • 3) So the assent theory must be wrong.
  • 4) There was a murmur of assent from all the career women present.
  • 5) It is expected to receive royal assent by the year-end.
  • 6) It has received royal assent, but cannot come into force until enabling regulations have been passed.
  • 7) Perhaps that's why she has refused to give her assent to a film.
  • 8) And yet all are confined to small pockets of devotion and none is able to command the assent of the nations of the world.
  • 9) With just a few months before the bill receives royal assent, lobbying from all sides is in overdrive.
  • 10) The script's message about the importance of scientific inquiry and common decency will be enough to command assent from audiences across the spectrum.
  • 11) The Bill received Royal assent the following year.
  • 12) It was barely a year since the Bubble Act had received its royal assent.
  • 13) We give intellectual assent to it, but if we really experience his presence, then renewal will happen.
  • 14) Yet it has been clear almost since the 2010 act received royal assent that the 2020 target would not be met.
  • 15) Because royal assent for the changes was only delivered in March some companies haven't got round to doing it yet.
  • 16) ‘Both ambassadors nodded assent, as did the Council President as he looked around the room.’
  • 17) ‘Imagine your private thrill when everyone in the congregation nodded assent.’
  • 18) ‘I nodded assent, and promptly closed my eyes and began to daydream.’
  • 19) ‘Everyone nodded and murmured their assent, and then began to shout out suggestions.’
  • 20) ‘The others nodded their assent and went back to their respective homes.’
  • 21) ‘The most honourable manner of signifying their assent, is to express their applause by the sound of their arms.’
  • 22) ‘This doubt spreads to the narrator's reliance on the narratee's assent and approval.’
  • 23) ‘When it is a case of majority assent or approval, issues arise as to the effect on the minority.’
  • 24) ‘For example, the voice actors issue pre-recorded phone calls and their conversations are such that all you can do is nod or assent.’
  • 25) ‘I nodded in assent, and slowly moved forward to embrace my coach, mentor, and friend in a gesture of thanks.’
  • 26) ‘Her eyes held him steady and he breathed deeply before nodding in assent.’
  • 27) ‘He stared at me for a moment, as if searching for the proper response, and then finally nodded in assent.’
  • 28) ‘She is the sort of person who, if you called her an unregenerate hippie, might proudly nod assent.’
  • 29) ‘It is a deviation from the party line, but a murmur of assent goes up.’
  • 30) ‘There were murmurs of assent before the messenger replied.’
  • 31) ‘A few murmurs of assent ran down the table's length at that remark.’
  • 32) ‘Parental consent and child assent was received from all dyads.’
  • 33) ‘These ordinances were read out before the community at a further churchyard meeting in September and received community assent.’
  • 34) ‘They indicate those objects toward which and those areas within which every human being is entitled to act without securing further permission or assent.’
  • 35) ‘The thesis received respectful attention, but it did not win assent or committed followers.’
  • 36) ‘He has power to veto bills by withholding his assent.’
  • 37) ‘If the president withholds his assent, the bill will be killed.’
  • 38) ‘In such cases, it has the power either to assent or to withhold assent.’
  • 39) ‘Upper houses have only one hold over governments, their ability to withhold assent from government legislation.’
  • 40) ‘They give ample assurance that it would be unreasonable to withhold assent.’
  • 41) ‘Peers had attempted to extend disability rights to sufferers of depression, but backed down from a confrontation and allowed the bill to gain assent.’
  • 42) ‘Allowing time for completion of the negotiations, then assent and ratification, the first accessions are expected around 2004.’
  • 43) ‘But we say the Chief Justice was right to draw distinction between prospective assent and ratification.’
  • 44) ‘‘The present Act never received assent, but this has never been properly challenged,’ she said.’
  • 45) ‘At the moment, the treaty assumes each state will go through with its own ratification procedure either by referendum or by assent through individual parliaments.’
  • 46) ‘Later, there is a formal ceremony in Rome but his authority as Pope is present from the moment of assent.’
  • 47) ‘His professed attitude of withholding assent was adopted to avoid error and rashness of judgement.’
  • 48) ‘Because subjects who give assent have diminished capacity, permission from their proxies also should be obtained.’
  • 49) ‘It now awaits ratification and the assent by the Chancellor, as the move requires a change in the University statute.’
  • 50) ‘Since passage of a bill into law required the assent of all three institutions, compromise was essential.’
  • 51) ‘This provision requires the Council to act unanimously after receiving the opinion of the Commission and the assent of the Parliament.’
  • 52) ‘But they clung to their plan and carried on without constitutional approval and parliamentary assent.’
  • 53) ‘The others nodded in mute agreement, assenting to the terms set down by the car's owner.’
  • 54) ‘We then asked all children of consenting parents to assent to study participation.’
  • 55) ‘By convention, the monarch will not refuse her assent to a Bill passed by Parliament and she will act on the advice of her ministers.’
  • 56) ‘The Senate, on a voice vote Monday, gave its assent to the legislation three days after the House blessed it by 298-121.’
  • 57) ‘The patient may then readily assent to other requirements we both agree on.’
  • 58) ‘The theological debates of the time come alive through his bourgeois, sporting, nonintellectual hero who nonetheless is dogged in trying to find out what precisely he would be assenting to in becoming an Anglican clergyman.’
  • 59) ‘The pope cannot remit any guilt, except by declaring that it has been remitted by God and by assenting to God's remission.’
  • 60) ‘Certainly he appears to be fulfilling all the legal functions of the role adequately, such as assenting to laws and setting session times for Parliament.’
  • 61) ‘The formality of being made to click assent is significant, even if one is assenting to standard form contracts.’
  • 62) ‘I assented to them all: not one of them created the slightest intellectual difficulty, save the major premise of God's existence.’
  • 63) ‘For such an effort to have been mounted so quickly, and for the Russians to have assented to outside help so speedily, speaks volumes for all concerned.’
  • 64) ‘‘They're still our heroes,’ said one, the nods and sound-bites from those around him signalling assent to his view.’
  • 65) ‘They might even assent to the idea that more and more women want marriage and children, not the bogus liberation that the sexual revolution purveyed.’
  • 66) ‘The Executive undertakes to produce a coherent programme of government which the parliament is duty bound to scrutinise, debate and give assent to.’
  • 67) ‘Yet a vague assent to a vague assertion only yields twice as much vagueness.’
  • 68) ‘To assent to obvious lies is to co-operate with evil, and in some small way to become evil oneself.’
  • 69) ‘Should Parliament assent to the amendments, this requirement will fall away.’
  • 70) ‘Factual assent to an armed assault is one matter; ideological commitment to it another.’
  • 71) ‘They declared themselves incapable of assenting to any changes touching the Church without the authorization of the Assembly of the Clergy.’
  • 72) ‘His acceptance of them as hypotheses does not require assenting to them.’
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