[ US /ˌəndəˈvaɪdɪd/ ]
[ UK /ʌndɪvˈa‍ɪdɪd/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. not divided among or brought to bear on more than one object or objective
    undivided affection
    judging a contest with a single eye
    gained their exclusive attention
    a single devotion to duty
  2. not parted by conflict of opinion
    presented an undivided front
  3. not separated into parts or shares; constituting an undivided unit
    a full share
    an undivided interest in the property
  4. not shared by or among others
    undivided responsibility
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How To Use undivided In A Sentence

  • She was literally demanding your complete, undivided attention.
  • Zeno could henceforth exercise undivided imperial authority, and Odovacar kindly offered to administer Italy in Zeno's name, complete with Zeno's image on the coins. Birdoswald Roman Fort: dating the post-Roman use of the site
  • While the protoplasm in the animal section of the ovum continues briskly to divide, multiplying the nuclei, the deutoplasm in the vegetal section remains more or less undivided; it is merely consumed as food by the forming cells. The Evolution of Man — Volume 1
  • Barbed and Unbarbed, and feet into Manycleft, and Twocleft, like those of animals with bifid hoofs, and Uncleft or Undivided, like those of animals with solid hoofs. On the Parts of Animals
  • Give us, pray, the benefit of your undivided attention.
  • The placoderms and chondrichthyans both show at least some capsular protuberance of the braincase, but the braincase is a single, undivided mass, whether or not ossified.
  • As a result, windows with broad, undivided panes of glass became both practical and affordable - and very popular.
  • presented an undivided front
  • But opportunities were also missed by this famous soldier who had the world's undivided attention. The Sun
  • It is always to be remembered, that Saint John's Church thus consecrated and set apart to the worship of Almighty God, is by the act of consecration thus performed, separated from all worldly and unhallowed uses, and to be considered sacred to the service of the _Holy and undivided Trinity_. The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 5, No. 1, January, 1852
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