Othello

[ US /əˈθɛɫoʊ/ ]
NOUN
  1. the hero of William Shakespeare's tragedy who would not trust his wife
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How To Use Othello In A Sentence

  • A herald announces feasting in honour of Othello's marriage.
  • The Duke oversees the case between Brabantio and Othello, whom he believes to have bewitched his daughter with magic.
  • Shakespeare's use of "seamy" in this passage of Othello is also a pun -- appearance seeming and reality is a major theme of the play. Languagehat.com: SEAMY
  • Pretty soon, Othello is convinced that even his wife, Desdemona, is making a fool of him. LEO: STAGE FRIGHT
  • He skilfully convinces Othello that his wife Desdemona has been adulterous with Cassio.
  • gave an impressive performance as Othello
  • In _Othello_, "if virtue lack no delighted beauty," i.e. "_want not the light of beauty_, your son-in-law shows far more fair than black. Notes and Queries, Number 43, August 24, 1850
  • In order to demonstrate progress on race relations, John Othello is made the first black commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police force.
  • Othello smothered Desdemona with a pillow
  • The difficulty Ducis felt about translating Othello in consequence of the importance given to such a vulgar thing as a handkerchief, and his attempt to soften its grossness by making the M.or reiterate 'Le bandeau! le bandeau!' may be taken as an example of the difference between la tragedie philosophique and the drama of real life; and the introduction for the first time of the word mouchoir at the Theatre Francais was an era in that romantic - realistic movement of which Hugo is the father and M. Zola the enfant terrible, just as the classicism of the earlier part of the century was emphasised by Talma's refusal to play Greek heroes any longer in a powdered periwig -- one of the many instances, by the way, of that desire for archaeological accuracy in dress which has distinguished the great actors of our age. Intentions
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