oosphere

NOUN
  1. a gamete; used especially of lower plants
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How To Use oosphere In A Sentence

  • They were the most intelligent animals of their time, but they never developed the use of tools or a memetic noosphere.
  • By its very nature the noosphere is a whole system predicated by the holistic perception and philosophy which further states that evolution moves in the direction of greater, all-encompassing whole systems which of necessity embrace an increasingly greater consciousness as well. Thinking About the Noosphere
  • The appearance of man in evolutionary history marks the emergence of self-consciousness and has added to the earth, superimposed as it were upon the biosphere, a new dimension, the noosphere, or domain of thought.
  • I completely agree with you, John, that the idea of the noosphere is fascinating. REVIEW: The Commons by Matthew Hughes
  • The sexual generation is a small green thalloid structure called a prothallium, which bears antheridia and archegonia, each archegonium having a neck-canal and oosphere, which is fertilized just as in the moss. Scientific American Supplement, No. 531, March 6, 1886
  • The sexual generation is a small green thalloid structure called a prothallium, which bears antheridia and archegonia, each archegonium having a neck-canal and oosphere, which is fertilized just as in the moss. Scientific American Supplement, No. 531, March 6, 1886
  • He foresaw some immense consequences, mostly of the positive kind, that the appearance and development of the noosphere entailed for mankind.
  • The noosphere is a way of helping us deal with this "phase transition" of consciousness that may well be akin to the phase transition between liquid water and water vapor - a change in degree that effects a change in kind. Jason Silva: Darwin's Pharmacy: Sex, Plants and the Evolution of the Noosphere
  • The pollen cells are formed from mother cells by a process of cell division and subsequent setting free of the daughter cells or pollen cells by rejuvenescence, which is distinctly comparable with that of the formation of the microspores of Lycopodiace√¶, etc. The subsequent behavior of the pollen cell, its division and its fertilization of the germinal vesicle or oosphere, leave no doubt as to its analogy with the microspore of vascular cryptogams. Scientific American Supplement, No. 531, March 6, 1886
  • Those which are of two kinds are, first, a generally aggressive and motile fertilizing or so-called "male cell," called in its typical form an _antherozoid_; and, second, a passive and motionless receptive or so-called "female cell," called an _oosphere_. Scientific American Supplement, No. 531, March 6, 1886
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