displeasing

[ UK /dɪsplˈiːzɪŋ/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. causing displeasure or lacking pleasing qualities
    displeasing news
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How To Use displeasing In A Sentence

  • he made displeasingly cutting remarks about his friends
  • Waverley -- my young and esteemed friend, Mr. Falconer of Balmawhapple, has craved of my age and experience, as of one not wholly unskilled in the dependencies and punctilios of the duello or monomachia, to be his interlocutor in expressing to you the regret with which he calls to remembrance certain passages of our symposion last night, which could not but be highly displeasing to you, as serving for the time under this present existing government. Waverley
  • Neither can the joys of our poor bodies be smooth and equal; but on the contrary they must be coarse and harsh, and immixed with much that is displeasing and inflamed. Essays and Miscellanies
  • At once I understood and was certain, that this was the sect of the caitiffs displeasing unto God, and unto his enemies.
  • I would not like to be the man that spoke a word displeasing to ye with those eyes of yours. Kirsteen: The Story of a Scotch Family Seventy Years Ago
  • And in destroying them they attempted to honour God by something displeasing to Him; and to use the language of men, God was angry with all destroyers of the works of great mastership, which is only attained by much toil, labour, and expenditure of time, and is bestowed by God alone. Albert Durer
  • On they went towards the great Church, Andreaes unsavourie perfume much displeasing them, whereupon the one said to his fellow: Can we devise no ease for this foule and noysome inconveniences? the very smell of him will be a meanes to betray us. The Decameron
  • Had he been displeasing in her eyes, she would, one may rely upon it, have anteceded the behaviour in similar case of her descendant of to-day -- that is to say, have expressed resentment in no uncertain terms. Tommy and Co.
  • Waverley, -- my young and esteemed friend, Mr. Falconer of Balmawhapple, has craved of my age and experience, as of one not wholly unskilled in the dependencies and punctilios of the duello or monomachia, to be his interlocutor in expressing to you the regret with which he calls to remembrance certain passages of our symposion last night, which could not but be highly displeasing to you, as serving for the time under this present existing government. Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since
  • displeasing news
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