dioxin

[ US /ˌdaɪˈɑksɪn/ ]
[ UK /da‍ɪˈɒksɪn/ ]
NOUN
  1. any of several toxic or carcinogenic hydrocarbons that occur as impurities in herbicides
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How To Use dioxin In A Sentence

  • Dioxins, and furans, are chemical compounds generated as by-products of most forms of combustion, particularly of plastics and rubber.
  • The Jiading factory will be able to burn at 850 degrees centigrade, hot enough to destroy dioxin, a poisonous chemical compound found in some waste, said the engineer on that project.
  • Some examples of POPS are polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, and pesticides like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), chlordane, and dieldrin. Baby Bites
  • The chlorine used to bleach the paper fibers is bad enough, but the manufacturing process is also known to release dioxin, a probable carcinogen, as well as tributylin (TBT), a biocide used in paper mills that is highly toxic to wildlife. Sloan Barnett: Pooping the Progressive Way
  • Exposure to dangerous chemicals called dioxins can cause a rare form of acne called chloracne.
  • Decades after the wartime defoliant Agent Orange was sprayed over the country, dioxin continues to contaminate people through the food chain in present-day Vietnam, according to a study released yesterday.
  • Exposure to dangerous chemicals called dioxins can cause a rare form of acne called chloracne.
  • The by-product of this process, dioxin, is thought to be linked to cervical cancer and also has harmful effects on the environment.
  • ~ Dioxin pollution leads to more baby girls -study -- "More girls than boys are born in some Canadian communities because airborne pollutants called dioxins can alter normal sex ratios, even if the source of the pollution is many kilometers away, researchers say. Speedlinking 10/18/07
  • In the United States, trash incinerators are both a leading source of greenhouse gases and a leading source of dioxin, which is inevitably formed in the incinerators 'stacks as molecules of chlorine and carbon in the fly ash join together in a deadly union. Sandra Steingraber: The Hope Inside Canada's Garbage Cans
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