[ US /əbˈhɔɹəns/ ]
[ UK /ɐbhˈɒɹəns/ ]
NOUN
  1. hate coupled with disgust
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How To Use abhorrence In A Sentence

  • His extreme abhorrence of heresy makes him immediately fall upon that of the Docætæ, against which he arms the faithful, by clearly demonstrating that Christ was truly made man, died, and rose again: in which his terms admirably express his most humble and affectionate devotion to our divine Redeemer, under these great mysteries of love. The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints January, February, March
  • Interestingly, a counter-taboo has emerged as, for the US liberal, it has become inextricable from the abhorrence through which that conservative misogyny is itself judged as morally obscene. On Profanity: 3
  • And what's the deal with management consultants and their abhorrence of footnotes?
  • He leaves office with near-record-high approval ratings despite widespread abhorrence at his personal behavior, pollsters say.
  • Meanwhile, the right-wing demonstrates its abhorrence of defamatory character assassination and smear jobs here.
  • His abhorrence of racism led him to write The Algiers Motel Incident.
  • Yet I entertained such an abhorrence of the savage wretches that I have been speaking of, and of the wretched, inhuman custom of their devouring and eating one another up, that I continued pensive and sad, and kept close within my own circle for almost two years after this: when I say my own circle, I mean by it my three plantations - viz. my castle, my country seat (which I called my bower), and my enclosure in the woods: nor did I look after this for any other use than an enclosure for my goats; for the aversion which nature gave me to these hellish wretches was such, that I was as fearful of seeing them as of seeing the devil himself. Robinson Crusoe
  • Despite ever-growing public abhorrence of this most antisocial crime, numbers of drivers caught over the limit are rising.
  • I held the tan-yard in abhorrence – to enter it made me ill for days; sometimes for months and months I never went near it. John Halifax, Gentleman
  • It appears that a deep-seated abhorrence of that tacky Jezebel Jan Crouch is utterly cross-cultural, which is making lining up backing a snap from Geneva to Abu Dhabi. What Would Betty Do?
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