special vs general vs ordinary

special

Definitions

adjective

  1. surpassing what is common or usual or expected
  2. first and most important
  3. for a special service or occasion
  4. added to a regular schedule
  5. having a specific function or scope
and more 2 ...

noun

  1. a television production that features a particular person or work or topic
  2. a special offering (usually temporary and at a reduced price) that is featured in advertising
  3. a dish or meal given prominence in e.g. a restaurant

Examples

When the new foods that came from the Americas - peppers, summer squash and especially tomatoes - took hold in the region, a number of closely related dishes were born, including what we call ratatouille - and a man from La Mancha calls pisto, an Ikarian Greek calls soufiko and a Turk calls turlu.

These observations will provide a valuable supplement to the simultaneous records of other expeditions, especially the British in McMurdo Sound and the German in Weddell Sea, above all as regards the hypsometer observations (for the determination of altitude) on sledge journeys.

He specialized in moonlit and winter scenes, usually including a sheet of water and sometimes also involving the light of a fire, and he also painted sunsets and views at dawn or twilight.

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general

Definitions

adjective

  1. not specialized or limited to one class of things
  2. applying to all or most members of a category or group
  3. affecting the entire body
  4. somewhat indefinite
  5. of worldwide scope or applicability
and more 1 ...

verb

  1. command as a general

noun

  1. a fact about the whole (as opposed to particular)
  2. a general officer of the highest rank
  3. the head of a religious order or congregation

Examples

In my view his confrontational, gladiatorial style has been a major contributor to the widespread disdain of the British public for politicians generally.

They are trying to rush through the draft resolution before the general election.

Burke's execution was witnessed by the novelist Sir Walter Scott, who sympathized with the general opinion that both men's wives had served as accomplices, and that the anatomists had been accessories to the murders.

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