would vs could vs will

would could will

Definitions

  • 1) See 2d weld.
  • 2) As a modal , the subjunctive of will.
  • 3) As a past-tense form of will.
  • 4) Commonly used as an auxiliary verb, either in the past tense or in the conditional or optative present. See 2d & 3d will.
  • 5) Used to express a wish.
  • 6) Used to express desire or intent.
  • 7) Used to indicate uncertainty.
  • 8) Used to express presumption or expectation.
  • 9) Used in the main clause of a conditional statement to express a possibility or likelihood.
  • 10) Used to express repeated or habitual action in the past.
  • 11) Used to make a polite request.
  • 12) Used after a statement of desire, request, or advice.

Definitions

  • 1) Preterit of can.
  • 2) Used to show the possibility that something might happen.
  • 3) Used to politely ask for permission to do something.
  • 4) Used to suggest something.
  • 5) Simple past of can.
  • 6) Used to politely ask for someone else to do something.
  • 7) Was, should be, or would be, able, capable, or susceptible. Used as an auxiliary, in the past tense or in the conditional present.
  • 8) Used to indicate ability or permission in the past.
  • 9) Used to indicate tentativeness or politeness.
  • 10) Used with hypothetical or conditional force.

Definitions

  • 1) A desire, purpose, or determination, especially of one in authority.
  • 2) A legally executed document containing this declaration.
  • 3) Diligent purposefulness; determination.
  • 4) A legal declaration of how a person wishes his or her possessions to be disposed of after death.
  • 5) Bearing or attitude toward others; disposition.
  • 6) Free discretion; inclination or pleasure.
  • 7) Deliberate intention or wish.
  • 8) The mental faculty by which one deliberately chooses or decides upon a course of action.
  • 9) Self-control; self-discipline.
  • 10) An abbreviation of the personal name William.
  • 11) Towish;desire.
  • 12) To yearn for; desire.
  • 13) To decide on or intend.
  • 14) To grant in a legal will; bequeath.
  • 15) To exercise the will.
  • 16) To induce or try to induce by sheer force of will.
  • 17) To order to direct in a legal will.
  • 18) To decree, dictate, or order.
  • 19) To make a choice; choose.
  • 20) (at will) Just as or when one wishes.
  • 21) To wish; desire.
  • 22) Used to indicate willingness.
  • 23) Used to indicate probability or expectation.
  • 24) Used to indicate simple futurity.
  • 25) Used to indicate likelihood or certainty.
  • 26) Used to indicate intention.
  • 27) Used to indicate capacity or ability.
  • 28) Used to indicate requirement or command.
  • 29) Used to indicate customary or habitual action.

Examples

  • 1) They would also like to get rid of their steep staircase.
  • 2) She has said that she would like to see annual binding votes on pay packages.
  • 3) Sometimes he would put down something he had already done simply for the pleasure of ticking it off.
  • 4) We knew something would go wrong.
  • 5) She would know something about that.
  • 6) And it would do something else.
  • 7) The income would flow back over 20 years and would be used to repay the loan.
  • 8) I can't think of a single reason why you wouldn't use an online agent.
  • 9) The government won an agreement that only funds contributed by the eurozone countries would be used.
  • 10) Figures like these would have sent the pound tumbling.
  • 11) Was it a surprise that something like this would occur during the course of the credit crunch?
  • 12) So which method would have been used?
  • 13) They would do something similar on crime policy.
  • 14) And they claimed explosive devices which cannot be detected by security scans would be used.
  • 15) Does that sound like something you would enjoy?
  • 16) Is there anything else you would like us to know that would help us be of service to you?
  • 17) The step up in trip was something we hoped would suit him and the feather weight also played its part.
  • 18) It looked like he would notch another treble against the Cherries here after his early brace.
  • 19) Yet only the most harsh would not concede something to the consistency with which they have clung to their cause for so long.
  • 20) We have about 10,000 to spend and would consider something up to three years old.
  • 21) If she wanted to do something, she would just wait until you let her do it.
  • 22) And the longer the suffering went on, the more likely it was that something would snap.
  • 23) I would rather use alternative medicine than anything else.
  • 24) I would really like to see him back.
  • 25) I would like to see it totally carbon fibre.
  • 26) For years thereafter this incident would be used by critics as a reminder of what could happen if public employees were given the right to strike.
  • 27) I think we both realized at last that before long the lights of our accustomed world would have faded behind us.
  • 28) What exactly that better world would look like must be settled by future generations, when the possibilities and new problems become clearer.
  • 29) The company said that the additional information would be used along with existing 3D seismic data to look at possible opportunities in the field.
  • 30) There was no way I would continue like that.
  • 31) ‘It was in October last year that the club first heard that changes would be made to the lecture theatre.’
  • 32) ‘Caroline never met her stepfather and her mother would never hear her voice again.’
  • 33) ‘Here his followers would gather in the mornings and afternoons for religious services.’
  • 34) ‘The gang would then force a window to get them, or, if the door was unlocked, simply walk in.’
  • 35) ‘Florence was shocked when she heard her name would appear in the medieval video.’
  • 36) ‘Within minutes, a small crowd would gather and most of them knew of the village.’
  • 37) ‘Thatch would have been gathered from reeds and rushes on the shore and used for the roof of the main castle.’
  • 38) ‘When last week I heard Morris would be in London for a few days I decided to collar her.’
  • 39) ‘Fears had been expressed that the historic building would be closed permanently.’
  • 40) ‘Settle parish churchyard was filling up rapidly and would have to close in two years.’
  • 41) ‘He left a large gap around the cupboard door hinges and three unit drawers would not close.’
  • 42) ‘We were always a close family, we would talk to each other, and we pretty much got along.’
  • 43) ‘Moorby said he would be keeping a close eye on player availability right up until Easter.’
  • 44) ‘He added that the bell would be first heard in public as part of the Keighley Day events.’
  • 45) ‘The first night I was in a room on my own with a window that would only open three or four inches.’
  • 46) ‘However, he confirmed that officers would keep a close eye on the cemetery in the future.’
  • 47) ‘The mayor said he would be keeping a close eye on the building to try and ensure the problem did not arise again.’
  • 48) ‘In July this year the bank said it would close the business having failed to find a buyer.’
  • 49) ‘A workman had fitted locks to some windows, but ran out of locks and said he would come back later.’
  • 50) ‘So she decided she would climb out of the window onto a low roof and get down to the yard that way.’
  • 51) ‘Had Frank Furedi been pondering how to handle the situation he would not have had to look far for advice.’
  • 52) ‘And he said if he was faced with the same situation he would again break the speed limit.’
  • 53) ‘Huntley said that should such a situation arise, he would report it to a senior member of staff.’
  • 54) ‘Mr Haslam said he could not comment on what would happen to the hotel if the application was turned down.’
  • 55) ‘If it wasn't a private firm, we would probably be hearing an awful lot more about it.’
  • 56) ‘It would be marvellous to hear his reactions on other fuss and bother while he's in the mood.’
  • 57) ‘If they had any musical knowledge they would be able to hear our voices are good.’
  • 58) ‘If you heard a noise in the dark of night, would you know where to find your torch or a candle?’
  • 59) ‘Anything that acts as a deterrent to anti-social behaviour would be used if we needed it.’
  • 60) ‘I'm starting to wonder if my writing is really as unclear as my comments would suggest.’
  • 61) ‘How tame this behaviour would seem if they were allowed to really have some fun!’
  • 62) ‘They would not stop if the police shouted at them because they simply would not hear.’
  • 63) ‘She would suffer if she was sent to prison and would have to close her business, leading to the loss of two jobs.’
  • 64) ‘If it closed, its customers would have absolutely no qualms about going elsewhere.’
  • 65) ‘Later that year Mr Craig put the club on the market and said it would close if a buyer was not found quickly.’
  • 66) ‘Players and staff were sacked, and for weeks it looked as though Dundee would close.’
  • 67) ‘If a child were to be killed outside a school, would we talk about closing the school?’
  • 68) ‘If she were to gossip, it would be with the closest of friends, not when there was a camera in her face.’
  • 69) ‘He quoted a friend who offered a woman a free pair of curtains if she would clean her dirty front window.’
  • 70) ‘It occurred to me that if this were a business it would most likely have closed long ago.’
  • 71) ‘Anyway, you can be sure that if I had to spend a week in an hotel, I wouldn't waste it by staying awake.’
  • 72) ‘If I were you I'd lock the door.’
  • 73) ‘This may reflect in a willingness to pay higher prices, although I wouldn't bet on it.’
  • 74) ‘You can go down that channel if you're mad enough, but I wouldn't do it if I were you.’
  • 75) ‘In fact, I wouldn't recommend taking the advice of a tied agent under any circumstances.’
  • 76) ‘I think it will pick up stuff other than country and western, but I wouldn't advise it!’
  • 77) ‘If at all possible I would urge a newcomer to pike fishing to ask an experienced angler if they could tag along for a session or two.’
  • 78) ‘If I were you I would get out of here I soon as I could.’
  • 79) ‘I would request he moves the aerial so that it does not encroach your property.’
  • 80) ‘Malcolm Morley, who has worked at the hotel for three years, would love to make Iona his home.’
  • 81) ‘We would be delighted to hear from any other people who could support us in some way.’
  • 82) ‘As someone who kept a daily diary all her life, she would have loved blogging.’
  • 83) ‘He said he would be glad to write me a recommendation.’
  • 84) ‘I think instead of arriving at Tortuga by sea, I'd rather arrive by air.’
  • 85) ‘Although this is not the outcome that we would have desired, at least it is now at an end.’
  • 86) ‘would you like a glass of water?’
  • 87) ‘I would like the windows replaced with the ones we actually thought we were getting.’
  • 88) ‘I tell myself I would rather be fat and happy then thin and miserable, but the fact is, I am fat and miserable.’
  • 89) ‘It's not the sort of song you hear everyday, nor would want to, but it stands out like a gem in an evening of gems.’
  • 90) ‘I would love to see a performance of that opera, but there's none in the next year.’
  • 91) ‘I was just about to make breakfast, would you like some?’
  • 92) ‘Although he says he would love to be a chef, he will never be able to hold down a job.’
  • 93) ‘She would love to build on this success and make a career of dancing at least in the short term.’
  • 94) ‘Whether it is for himself or for his country, he would dearly love a Commonwealth Games medal.’
  • 95) ‘The pair said they would love to go into showbusiness or work in television in the future.’
  • 96) ‘Believe me, it's a club most managers outside the very top ones would love to manage.’
  • 97) ‘He mentions his years at Arbroath, his hometown club, and how one day he would love to rejoin them.’
  • 98) ‘I sincerely admire your work and would love nothing better than to work on something like this!’
  • 99) ‘They would also like to hear from anyone who saw the stolen Maestro earlier in the evening.’
  • 100) ‘I said to her that I didn't understand anybody who would want to live like she was.’
  • 101) ‘would you please turn around?’
  • 102) ‘would you mind clarifying your comment, Alison?’
  • 103) ‘Ruth, would you go with me to London?’
  • 104) ‘The spokesman would not comment on his condition or if and when he will return home.’
  • 105) ‘He avoids it, on the record anyway, and there's no way he would comment on other programmes.’
  • 106) ‘There was no forced entry to the property, but police would not comment further.’
  • 107) ‘Neither the airport not the airline would comment on the cause of the incident.’
  • 108) ‘When approached this week about the ward closure, he would make no further comment.’
  • 109) ‘Her mother noticed a change in her behaviour because she would not leave the family home and she cried a lot.’
  • 110) ‘He asked me to turn it off but I wouldn't, then asked me to go to the office but I listened to the rest of the game first.’
  • 111) ‘At primary school we had processed peas, which I wouldn't eat because I got frozen peas at home.’
  • 112) ‘For years, nobody would go there, as warnings were passed down from one generation of Oxford cavers to another.’
  • 113) ‘There are only a couple of events that we would call sports, the rest are just bizarre battles.’
  • 114) ‘Last week's piece on software piracy drew more than a few comments, as you would expect.’
  • 115) ‘We would hope to address both of these problems by having a dedicated service.’
  • 116) ‘I would describe the event as a convivial talk with a rather short period for questions.’
  • 117) ‘I hope some of you can make it to one of our performances and it would be brilliant to hear some feedback!’
  • 118) ‘The input from the communities has not been as strong as one would have hoped.’
  • 119) ‘To be honest I wouldn't really consider Eldon Hole a caving trip, although it is a fine pitch.’
  • 120) ‘It would be lovely to hear the boy's chatter and not feel left out when they are speaking together.’
  • 121) ‘I get involved in spite of myself and, to be honest, I wouldn't have it any other way.’
  • 122) ‘There are rumours this could be the last shuttle flight, and I wouldn't be surprised.’
  • 123) ‘It would seem that on request of the King, a ship had to be made to fulfil the obligations of the townsmen.’
  • 124) ‘Celtic shouldn't lose at home to a team who have had such a difficult season, but I wouldn't rule it out.’
  • 125) ‘I'd imagine that serious fans will feel really let down.’
  • 126) ‘You'd think that it might be important for her to be able to hear opponents, wouldn't you?’
  • 127) ‘They may struggle against Wales and I wouldn't rule out a Scots win over there.’
  • 128) ‘I have still to speak to the school, but I wouldn't think this would bring out any issues.’
  • 129) ‘I simply mentioned that I wouldn't mind going to Skuba but doubted my friends would come.’
  • 130) ‘He incurred three short suspensions, which would seem to indicate that he still has work to do.’
  • 131) ‘It would be futile to hope that athletes might be encouraged toward exemplary behaviour.’
  • 132) ‘We would therefore hope he will take on board the feelings of fellow residents.’
  • 133) ‘Now, the conspiracy theorists are going to say, well, the coroners would say that, wouldn't they?’
  • 134) ‘Yellow card for Adams for claiming that Carlos took a dive. Now he wouldn't do that, would he?’
  • 135) ‘Anderson says - and would that he had said it sooner - ‘It can't be England all the time, there must be a middle way’.’
  • 136) ‘Oh, I would that I could change his mind.’
  • 137) ‘You're so beautiful, and I would I could stay here with you.’

Examples

  • 1) We were watching knowing we could have done something special there again.
  • 2) Then it goes back into something that could be anyone.
  • 3) That could mean something as simple as scanning a document and emailing it straight out.
  • 4) It would easily cover all the costs so they could do something really special.
  • 5) He insisted the badges could be used only with staff consent and that bosses get merely an overview of activity.
  • 6) Cops who seized him found he had cable ties and tape that could have been used as a blindfold or gag.
  • 7) The submarine could have been used to monitor the movement of Indian warships.
  • 8) The brands could use alternatives, but plastic is cheap.
  • 9) People think, 'I could do that.
  • 10) Others could use them as political capital.
  • 11) Who would have thought that something so soft could cause so much anxiety?
  • 12) Though you could sit in something else and just gaze at it.
  • 13) It had to be something they could connect with.
  • 14) It could be a muscle or it could be something worse.
  • 15) Yet we are getting a glimpse into something that could turn the dial on cancer treatment in the future.
  • 16) Is that something we could afford?
  • 17) Think about ways in which you could use the vast amount of energy which these sorts of emotions put at your disposal.
  • 18) Yet we easily could use another 150 workers today.
  • 19) Or he could use emergency powers to force companies to employ British workers.
  • 20) Not only would the fishes get a tasty meal but your bones could be used as the basis for a new coral reef.
  • 21) You could try something elementary: loosen the laces or straps on your shoes.
  • 22) If we had filmed in America or something it could have been disastrous.
  • 23) If we do, it is certainly something we could use again.
  • 24) I could then use some of the money to pay off the remaining mortgage on my main home.
  • 25) Any fool could use it.
  • 26) I could see something like this coming and the incident with the three yellow cards was a disaster for him.
  • 27) We wept, we held each other and we each wished there was something we could say or do that would bring you back.
  • 28) I couldn't use the loo for a while.
  • 29) FOREIGN visitors who use A&E could soon have to pay as part of a crackdown on health tourism.
  • 30) For legal reasons, they couldn't use any of the original code.
  • 31) And, if necessary, drugs could be used to bring this risk factor under control.
  • 32) He once said: 'I could get a kick out of two flies crawling up a window if it was a good race.
  • 33) English FA also fear he could use any approach from them to get a better deal from Portugal.
  • 34) I used to always wonder why I could be so awful to my family my parents, my sister, and I think it's because I knew I *could* be so mean to them & they would always be there.
  • 35) I don't know if I could get you a gig there, but if I *could* would you want to?
  • 36) This means that when we speak of a person's actions, in most cases he could have done otherwise, given the Stoics 'analysis of ˜could™ and other modal concepts.
  • 37) Not outlandishly fast, but fast enough that adaptation could *could*–it is unclear be fairly difficult.
  • 38) Yes priceless could be ..could be .. or worthless could also be .
  • 39) Ben#17…a close friend of mine is in the same boat as your sister…and I agree….but notice—you even stated “could”…….that is what is the problem for most people…..could…I hope “will” can replace “could”….
  • 40) But a moment's further consideration convinced him that it could not be so: he _could_ move his body a little, although when he tried to sit up, something stopped him, pulled his spine straight, pulled his arms and shoulders back down from where he'd raised them.
  • 41) From her promise once given she felt no change of purpose could absolve her; and therefore rarely would she give it absolutely, for she _could not_ alter the thing that had gone forth from her lips.
  • 42) She could not -- _could_ not -- go to Paris with this man, who for all his devotion was a stranger to her.
  • 43) She did not wish to tell a falsehood, and yet she felt that she could not, _could_ not confess now.
  • 44) ‘So I had to learn every aspect as much as I could, in order to get through it and make it.’
  • 45) ‘We could hear the clear belling from inside the patch of forest in the valley.’
  • 46) ‘How did you go about putting that into words so you could file a sensible report to camera?’
  • 47) ‘The budgie knew his name, address and telephone number and could sing Three Blind Mice.’
  • 48) ‘All that anyone could do at that point was stay back and watch the mesmerizing scene.’
  • 49) ‘That meant we could catch the light and sound show in the evening.’
  • 50) ‘He couldn't handle both of them at once, and he had to get rid of her after she'd seen him.’
  • 51) ‘Seven bridges were built so that the people of the city could get from one part to another.’
  • 52) ‘The first thing to go for was a decent wash in fresh water as we could only have salt water to wash in on board.’
  • 53) ‘I was stunned by the sheer volume of sound that twenty five singers could make.’
  • 54) ‘It tried as hard as it could to rally in the third, but the game had long been out of reach.’
  • 55) ‘My boyfriend and I wanted to sign up for the class so that we could take it together for fun.’
  • 56) ‘We could see nothing except for the next few curves as the path climbed relentlessly into the clouds.’
  • 57) ‘After the show, back at the stable lines, Barbara explained that I could ride a bit.’
  • 58) ‘I made as if to look suitably impressed, but hardly felt that I could compare notes.’
  • 59) ‘From Point Baptiste, we could see the low outline of the French island of Marie Galante.’
  • 60) ‘It felt symbolic of the trip - taking a leap of faith and finding you could exceed your limits.’
  • 61) ‘Several families had to untie bikes from the backs of their cars before they could gain access to the boot.’
  • 62) ‘I once read that in battle the most dangerous thing you could do was run away.’
  • 63) ‘Yet if its occurrence could be measured on this basis, it would be found to be non-existent.’
  • 64) ‘There is also the possibility that it could be used to re-examine unsolved crimes.’
  • 65) ‘One possibility is that he could be sent abroad, but in practice this rarely happens.’
  • 66) ‘There will be a possibility that police could give advice to members of the public in the room.’
  • 67) ‘It is not beyond the realm of possibility that a deal could have been struck.’
  • 68) ‘They could well afford it, given the millions they rake in from the motoring public.’
  • 69) ‘It could force the service to be closed permanently.’
  • 70) ‘He then asked her record company if he could duet with her and was rejected.’
  • 71) ‘He only saw the formula in its microscopic form and didn't realize that it could be macroscopic.’
  • 72) ‘In theory at least, this implies that adding telomerase to cells could rejuvenate them.’
  • 73) ‘He could have bowed out gracefully at any time and it looked like he might, but now this.’
  • 74) ‘We have good speed and we thought we could pressure them with just a straight pass rush.’
  • 75) ‘We are supposed to imagine that this telephone conversation could be taking place right now.’
  • 76) ‘He bristles at the notion that his views could be seen as disloyal to his country.’
  • 77) ‘If my guess is correct then your problem could be related to ageing or some other cause.’
  • 78) ‘One could say that it was not as good as in a strictly Italian resto, but still it was very good.’
  • 79) ‘Don't put it in the hollow of the cheek in an attempt to shade your face, or it could end up looking like a dirty smudge.’
  • 80) ‘In theory, you could spend all day every day in the environs of your bungalow.’
  • 81) ‘When we arrived, the sand was so crisp and clean it could have just come back from the Atlantic laundry.’
  • 82) ‘In fact, he pours cold water on any suggestion he could be a future coach of the club.’
  • 83) ‘Early suggestions were that this could be for two days a week, but it has so far been restricted to twice a year.’
  • 84) ‘We had a letter to say they had not received the form and could I make a request for a new one.’
  • 85) ‘Where did you find the information that you used to write it, and could you suggest a few books for me?’
  • 86) ‘I would be grateful if any readers could tell me more.’
  • 87) ‘Is there a small heater you could recommend for when the icy weather returns?’

Examples

  • 1) What subjects in the film will people take against?
  • 2) The weather will tell us something different today.
  • 3) To put this right will require political courage.
  • 4) It will also have live streams of regular channels.
  • 5) This is a great step along the way that will open up many other possibilities.
  • 6) Work out how much money you will save in a year by quitting.
  • 7) Perhaps the only certainty is that the lawyers representing each side will make a fortune sorting out the inevitable dispute.
  • 8) There will also be justified scepticism about whether aviation capacity in Britain will significantly increase.
  • 9) In the latter case the reserve will be represented by value rather than cash.
  • 10) Who can say what number of people will have gone in two years?
  • 11) Yet production capacity will be a serious constraint.
  • 12) Who will make you feel good about life and love?
  • 13) This time though the political will is there.
  • 14) This new console will change the way you play home video games.
  • 15) They will give me money for new door.
  • 16) Those hoping that this document will reduce red tape will be greatly disappointed.
  • 17) You need to persuade managers that your return will be good.
  • 18) The service will be free and will be funded by the interest on the deposit pool.
  • 19) The bad news for football fans is that none of the home nations will be competing.
  • 20) The new information will be a part of regular performance tables publications in the future.
  • 21) Patience and determination will be the star prize.
  • 22) The choice will now be between duty and desire.
  • 23) Social workers will try anything to keep a family together.
  • 24) You will be conscious of new glories in the world around you.
  • 25) She is the perfect wife and will soon be granted a son.
  • 26) You ring the bell for a nurse during labour and chances are she will offer you something for the pain.
  • 27) The daily leader conference will take place live at Cheltenham.
  • 28) When her income drops, she will lose the ability to save as much.
  • 29) Some refs will and some won't give you a red card.
  • 30) I think i have a book on birds that might interest you..will go check it out..if so will send it to you.
  • 31) I make minus the peppercorns..will try with that next time...thanks for the almost single..when you write, I will want to be among the first ones to read it!
  • 32) Guess I will love this egg curry..will have to try it soon Meera
  • 33) Update: Ashley has more details, but doesn't answer my question, although to my eyes there's an implication that the new aggregator will be even less platform agnostic than iPlayer - which Ashley says *will* support GNU/Linux....
  • 34) Still debating as to whether or not wellies will be required I have a fetching pair of pink croc wellies so maybe I *will* need them...
  • 35) Yes, a bunch of these will fail, but the ones that draw large audiences *will* be able to monetize down the line.
  • 36) As a newbie to baking, this will be a challenge..will send the entry soon..
  • 37) A Go to the press; tell them ‘It’s a mystery’ why you were fired; and tell them that no one will ever know, thereby challenging them to investigate why you were *really* fired and ensuring that all the embarrassing details *will* come out;
  • 38) ‘Soon there will be bitter regret at all the public land being squandered irredeemably.’
  • 39) ‘Now that she has settled into the British way of life the move to Bradford is one she will never regret.’
  • 40) ‘Alcohol loosens tongues and will allow you to say things you will truly regret later.’
  • 41) ‘It is usually a busy holiday weekend on the roads - but this year will be different.’
  • 42) ‘The committee will also explore different ways of funding light rail to reduce costs.’
  • 43) ‘Examples of these different types of regimes will be given in the next section.’
  • 44) ‘Clarke will know that if he performs well he will be in a strong position to bid for the premiership.’
  • 45) ‘From strong clumps you will get a great display of flowers that last for a long time.’
  • 46) ‘As the river gets deeper the stronger current will start to take you downstream.’
  • 47) ‘When he finally gets to see the contract, he will, in all probability, laugh as much as I did.’
  • 48) ‘Pupils from Tong School will present a piece of drama based on substance misuse.’
  • 49) ‘Each celebrity will be taking three penalties and a trophy will be presented to the winning side.’
  • 50) ‘Organisers hope a celebrity guest will be present for the day, which was a huge success last year.’
  • 51) ‘During the festival he will present a series of new sculptural and printed works.’
  • 52) ‘If the developers decide to put the road on part of the track bed then the town council will be powerless to stop them.’
  • 53) ‘The tax will not be for life, and will stop when the fees have been paid off.’
  • 54) ‘Whatever he says over the next day or two, I expect he will probably take a year off and then decide what to do.’
  • 55) ‘There is an expectation that there will be a reduction in staff numbers in the UK.’
  • 56) ‘He will also present his views on what has been achieved so far and what is yet to come.’
  • 57) ‘Capacity plans will be examined further in the next few months, but are not expected to change.’
  • 58) ‘We are a very strong team and we will turn it around.’
  • 59) ‘If you make something special and powerful and honest and true, you will succeed.’
  • 60) ‘It just takes so long to get the help needed but I'm so much stronger now and I know I will get through it.’
  • 61) ‘In fact, I will continue laying the table outside until everyone refuses to join me.’
  • 62) ‘You have to be very strong because you will get knockbacks and you'll have to reassess.’
  • 63) ‘The welfare of the tree is our main concern and we will do what we can to protect it.’
  • 64) ‘We are people who stand by our friends at times of need and we will do so now.’
  • 65) ‘We will stop the menace, so our children can once again play safely on the green.’
  • 66) ‘This is an ideal taster before you rush out and buy the album - which you inevitably will.’
  • 67) ‘There will therefore be no accidents, no speeding, no road rage and no idiotic driving.’
  • 68) ‘You have to believe in your own ability and that you will keep your place in the side.’
  • 69) ‘I will stand in the water and look at my stretching belly and thank Lakshmi for my great good luck.’
  • 70) ‘As long as smoking exists in a legal capacity I will continue to smoke in designated areas.’
  • 71) ‘We will win the title easily and at least a cup competition like the European or FA Cup.’
  • 72) ‘One day we will succeed; it may take a long time, but finally, my generation – the first global generation – will fully understand the value of nature.’
  • 73) ‘I will persist until I succeed.’
  • 74) ‘I will stop being so silly and spontaneous and open towards everyone and everything.’
  • 75) ‘Some health professionals also advocate cutting down if smokers cannot or will not stop.’
  • 76) ‘As President, I will not wait for a green light from abroad when our safety is at stake.’
  • 77) ‘It is a necessary fact that animals will die and suffer in the pursuit of human betterment.’
  • 78) ‘We cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way.’
  • 79) ‘There will always be different trends of opinion in any large, growing socialist party.’
  • 80) ‘There are other people who will want his job, who will have different ideas of what to do next.’
  • 81) ‘When a court makes this value judgment the facts will often speak for themselves.’
  • 82) ‘By the way, you will stop me when I get a title graphic up that everyone likes won't you?’
  • 83) ‘Neither man will give his consent for the use of the embryos, which is required by law.’
  • 84) ‘He is keen to cater to all and if requested will happily search out brands he doesn't already stock.’
  • 85) ‘Bury is not hosting any official events, but will help groups to organise parties.’
  • 86) ‘On the surface it promotes the idea that the New York Times will cover all newsworthy events.’
  • 87) ‘The fact that some retailers will accept euros is not an argument for replacing the pound.’
  • 88) ‘For her vacation, Julie decides to go wherever the first car that stops will take her.’
  • 89) ‘The way we choose to interpret and perceive stares will influence our ability to cope with them.’
  • 90) ‘There are shareware programs that will generate tones of frequencies you specify.’
  • 91) ‘They will also float if you drop one overboard and you can scoop it up with a fish net.’
  • 92) ‘We must develop a program that will drive the nation to a guaranteed annual income.’
  • 93) ‘It is, however, well established that the land with a crop on it will hold more water than a bare field.’
  • 94) ‘Most prefer sun where their colour will be brighter, but will also cope with light shade.’
  • 95) ‘Testing of hair will provide an indicator of drug use at the time the hair was grown.’
  • 96) ‘The official line is that the blocks will stop a truck driven by a suicide-bomber.’
  • 97) ‘My present finances will run to either a pogo stick or a pair of roller skates.’
  • 98) ‘Remember most of the dance and aerobics videos will require a clear space for you to move in.’
  • 99) ‘You should stop when the syllabub will lie in thick, soft folds, only just keeping its shape.’
  • 100) ‘A glance at a field guide will indicate the vast area occupied by breeding curlews.’
  • 101) ‘The strongest animals will never allow themselves to be captured and put in cages.’
  • 102) ‘All I have to do is walk down the street and kids and adults will stop and gawk at me.’
  • 103) ‘They will do this at a certain time of day and the great thing is to break them of the habit.’
  • 104) ‘Americans will do anything to avoid a drawn match and in baseball they do anything.’
  • 105) ‘If you are a few feet away from the bus stop or running towards it, the driver will not stop for you.’
  • 106) ‘He is a strong character and will make people listen to him, but he always has the argument to back his ideas up.’
  • 107) ‘The anger felt in the Square Mile will probably not be comprehensible to him, but it is real.’
  • 108) ‘Since this is a matter of probabilities, it will often not be easy to calculate.’
  • 109) ‘However often the symptoms will be present for some months or years before help is sought.’
  • 110) ‘On reflection, Moss will probably feel he should have done a little better from close range.’
  • 111) ‘Some will have strong links with churches and faith groups and community centres.’
  • 112) ‘It became this battle of wills between the two sides.’
  • 113) ‘We have to recognise that we have laid most of the building blocks already and that it is too late to win a battle of wills.’
  • 114) ‘If he is determined to make this a battle of wills, the outcome could be very messy.’
  • 115) ‘After the christening, the ship majestically slides to the bottom of the harbor, and so we haven't managed after all to launch her, though that was our intention and our wills were in perfect working order.’
  • 116) ‘Second, it is clear that we sometimes ‘want what we by no means want to want’: our bodies react with pleasure and desire independently of our wills.’
  • 117) ‘Conflict is always a conflict of minds and wills of the parties involved.’
  • 118) ‘A recent television program on Siamese twins demonstrated how a pair of joined, genetically identical humans had different preferences and quite distinct wills and spirits.’
  • 119) ‘Rather than conforming their minds, hearts and wills to God's purposes, humans are adept at manipulating the name of God to serve their own agendas.’
  • 120) ‘They may impose their wills, but that does not bring respect.’
  • 121) ‘Both had the ability to impose their wills over their opponents.’
  • 122) ‘Rival deities battle to impose their wills upon the world.’
  • 123) ‘The critique of Manichee dualism and determinism led him to lay strong emphasis on the will.’
  • 124) ‘He had fear in him but a strong will that motivated him to continue with his orders.’
  • 125) ‘He would have burned the ‘Sea Lyrics’ on the spot, had his will been strong enough to set them aflame.’
  • 126) ‘Just as breaking the enemy's will is the surest way to success, so having our will broken is the surest path to defeat.’
  • 127) ‘And rather than having his will broken with the harshness of an over-firm hand, he keeps his spirit.’
  • 128) ‘Indeed, like any parent of a growing child, he found himself increasingly confronting an independent entity with a will of its own.’
  • 129) ‘It takes a real blockhead with a will of iron to make it worse.’
  • 130) ‘Ambitious on it as they are off it, the players are technically-gifted and hard-working, with a will of iron.’
  • 131) ‘The novel traces her effort to find and then preserve her own identity as a woman, with a will and desires of her own, rather than as a queen, expected to play a role that does not answer the innermost promptings of her heart.’
  • 132) ‘I am proud of myself; I have managed to fulfill a feat of endurance and willpower and maintain control over my body.’
  • 133) ‘It took all my willpower to restrain from running to the harbor and instead follow Mr. Kenton at a swift pace.’
  • 134) ‘The man looked to be using every ounce of willpower he possessed to restrain himself.’
  • 135) ‘It was all downhill from there I guess: I have absolutely no willpower, damn me.’
  • 136) ‘My own willpower in such situations usually fails me.’
  • 137) ‘How the ambulances manage to get through in an emergency is anybody's guess, sheer willpower and good luck I think.’
  • 138) ‘It doesn't require willpower, and it doesn't even need you to worry directly about your diet or exercise levels at all.’
  • 139) ‘Now, there is no longer any need for willpower: you have remade yourself.’
  • 140) ‘Quitting smoking is an uphill climb which requires patience, willpower and lots of tissues.’
  • 141) ‘What underlies his willpower is the knowledge that he has trained as hard as possible.’
  • 142) ‘I even turned to drinking once but overcame it with hard work and willpower.’
  • 143) ‘It took me all my willpower, which isn't much, to not ring him back.’
  • 144) ‘Each, through sheer willpower and application, became a supreme footballer.’
  • 145) ‘But riding is not just another routine challenge she can master through sheer willpower.’
  • 146) ‘But it is also a story of indomitable willpower, and the courage and dignity of the human spirit.’
  • 147) ‘With a combination of willpower and unending generosity, fans managed to haul the club back from the brink.’
  • 148) ‘She soon realized that wasn't going to work, and that simple willpower would have to do.’
  • 149) ‘While some have the strength and willpower to be able to quit on their own, many others will need a bit more help and support.’
  • 150) ‘But if your willpower starts to wane, start paying more attention to what you are eating.’
  • 151) ‘His tears were coming down his cheeks faster now but he had no will left to stop it.’
  • 152) ‘As Hume illustrates, we might suppose that there are no Reasons in the area of ethics - just the desires or wills of particular persons, not necessarily shared or respected by anyone else.’
  • 153) ‘I doubted, as I watched over the little boy's head, that the old man would live, but there were always several people who had strong wills to live.’
  • 154) ‘Artistic talent is very often present, but the will to express this talent may be slow to appear.’
  • 155) ‘This is a declaration of military intent, of the will to shed blood and tears for a fellow nation.’
  • 156) ‘Jacklin is not alone in questioning the will to succeed among some of the young players in Europe.’
  • 157) ‘He won because he had to win; because for him, the will to win is as strong as the will to live.’
  • 158) ‘There is a will to succeed that took too long to hone to be put into retirement so soon.’
  • 159) ‘The will or desire to act can be wholesome at one moment and unwholesome at another moment.’
  • 160) ‘Even people who care about the country are slowly having their will to change things drained out of them.’
  • 161) ‘Against this image of authority lay that of the tsar, the very good but very mysterious ‘little father’ of his peoples, who had his will constantly thwarted by the likes of landlords and officers, those who exercised immediate authority.’
  • 162) ‘Like many philosophers he held that the highest form of freedom involves willing as one should, namely, having one's will in step with one's right values.’
  • 163) ‘Everyone who heard Boris was left feeling tremendously buoyant about life in general and bursting with a will to go out and do everything possible to help the Conservative cause.’
  • 164) ‘It's likely that these TV personalities aren't actually lefty liberals with a will to help the poor and needy.’
  • 165) ‘Hopefully I'll come back refreshed and with a will to get on with lots of exciting things!’
  • 166) ‘Anyone with a will to live wouldn't have taken such a great risk.’
  • 167) ‘She says that her experience in care left her with a will and a means to destroy herself quietly for many years both physically and psychologically.’
  • 168) ‘These were two egos competing for attention in a town where celebrities are omnipresent, each pulling in different directions, yet both fired with a will to win.’
  • 169) ‘Instead, they explain that all humans have wills and desires, and it should not be surprising that infants also express theirs.’
  • 170) ‘They are enacting their own selfish wills, and teaching us to do the same.’
  • 171) ‘Up and down the country, thousands of other people have done the same, yet all of us knew at the time we signed such documents that these wills had no proper legal status.’
  • 172) ‘And those jurisdictions have also eliminated discrimination in the areas of property division, wills, stamp duty and hospital visitation rights.’
  • 173) ‘In her classes, she pestered professors with questions about how the legal topic in question - wills and trusts, property law - might apply to pets.’
  • 174) ‘He was accused of deliberately increasing the dosage of opiates used as pain relief in order to end the lives of patients who had left him money in their wills.’
  • 175) ‘Durable power of attorney documents, like wills and trusts, can be changed or rewritten as needed.’
  • 176) ‘It is essential that both partners make wills appointing testamentary guardians in the event of their death while the children are still under 18.’
  • 177) ‘Save in the case of those rash testators who make their own wills, the proper transmission of property from one generation to the next is dependent upon the due discharge by solicitors of their duties.’
  • 178) ‘It's also important to draw up wills to clarify legal custody in the case of unexpected death.’
  • 179) ‘The Family Records Centre, in Islington, holds census information from 1841, wills and birth, death and marriage certificates.’
  • 180) ‘Not long after that, we found out that Mom and Dad had left us all a lot of money in their wills.’
  • 181) ‘Among other material now available online is Scotland's statutory registers of births, deaths and marriages along with wills and testaments.’
  • 182) ‘There must be many people even now who have such an agreement with their doctor and I would like to see such informal contracts accepted as legal, in the same way in which I believe codicils to wills are.’
  • 183) ‘Specifics such as whether the couples were registered partners or had drawn up legal wills shall factor into each decision.’
  • 184) ‘The manual, launched on 22 February, will help in writing wills and testaments.’
  • 185) ‘The names revealed can then be researched in newspapers of the time and at the National Archive, where records of wills, births and deaths will reveal further information.’
  • 186) ‘They make a big thing about their reliance on benefactors, and every ten years or so, they invite their ex-students back for a nice slap-up meal and a bit of a speech to remind us how to leave them money in our wills.’
  • 187) ‘The couple have been to Christchurch twice before and spent a great deal of time on the last visit researching marriages and death records, wills and shipping records.’
  • 188) ‘Members of religious orders may inherit only small life pensions and cannot dispose of property through wills.’
  • 189) ‘Mr Prior has reminded me that he is the nominated executor of two wills of other members of his family.’
  • 190) ‘There is a widely held view among solicitors that do-it-yourself wills only result in making lawyers richer.’
  • 191) ‘Is it the case that a spell will not work if the person casting it consciously desires or wills the outcome?’
  • 192) ‘From another angle, however, it is possible to argue that his premature death was willed by the state.’
  • 193) ‘To save the world, in this understanding, God willed the violent death of God's only beloved son.’
  • 194) ‘He chooses to do so not because he seeks to suffer or because God wills his death, but as the means to life for God's people.’
  • 195) ‘And lastly, regarding the Constitution, the Conservative government will not make any changes unless the democratic process wills it.’
  • 196) ‘But can empire be thrust upon a nation, whether it wills it or not?’
  • 197) ‘How, then, do we deal with the ‘outside’, with new things, the threat of somebody who wills our destruction?’
  • 198) ‘May we be justice minded and peace-filled just as God wills it.’
  • 199) ‘Not for gain or glory, not for riches or immortality, but because my God wills it and that makes it right.’
  • 200) ‘He attempts to refuse them passage, but Virgil reminds him that in Hell what God wills is done.’
  • 201) ‘We sat by Charlie's bed for five days, just willing him to wake up.’
  • 202) ‘The crowd were willing him on but the goal never came.’
  • 203) ‘With only one weekend left until Christmas, the major retailers are willing us all to indulge in a last-minute splurge of spending.’
  • 204) ‘Apart from the stern-faced usherettes willing us out of their establishment, we were the only people left in the auditorium.’
  • 205) ‘The Aussie admits that he left Essex on bad terms with several players, and they were surrounding him yesterday and willing him to fail.’
  • 206) ‘Everyone was willing her to win a fortune and she did not let us down.’
  • 207) ‘I stood at the bar and stared at the barman, willing him to come to me next.’
  • 208) ‘It was even more disappointing yesterday because we could feel the fans getting behind us and willing us to win.’
  • 209) ‘I know how painful it was for the whole family to see her like this, and in the end it was a case of willing her to go, so that her pain would end.’
  • 210) ‘I feel that all the people who know and love me are willing me to be better and get well and take control.’
  • 211) ‘I never imagined my sister would not reappear when I willed her to.’
  • 212) ‘There was a large throng willing him on to success.’
  • 213) ‘I just sat and nodded, not really understanding the full significance of this issue, willing her to go on.’
  • 214) ‘I continued to stare at him, willing him to ask me out, but he never did.’
  • 215) ‘But even as I willed my weary body into sleep, my mind did not cease to race with thoughts.’
  • 216) ‘It is not terribly difficult to create in people the feeling that they have willed events that were not actually under their control.’
  • 217) ‘Edward allowed himself one gulp as he entered the chamber, and then willed his body not to betray his nervousness.’
  • 218) ‘And don't forget that it is one of the most popular games of all time, so there will be more fans willing the movie not to fail.’
  • 219) ‘I can't help muttering under my breath, though, willing the hawk on.’
  • 220) ‘He willed death to come quickly, with every ounce of strength he still possessed.’
  • 221) ‘If I should die before he is freed, the case will be willed to another attorney.’
  • 222) ‘To Bentham, who willed his own body to the University of London, it was perfectly just to put the bodies of paupers to scientific use as a means of repaying their public debt.’
  • 223) ‘He willed the farm to Annie before lapsing into delirium and feverishly mumbling his last words in the Maori he knew so well.’
  • 224) ‘And unlike Graham, who named Protas as her sole heir, Balanchine willed his ballets to a number of heirs, including some of the ballerinas who created the roles in those ballets.’
  • 225) ‘Since all the peoples of the world are his heirs, and since presumably he willed the land to his heirs, then all the people of the earth own it.’
  • 226) ‘In Renaissance Venice wives were free to bequeath their dowries to whom they willed, whereas in Florence they were required by law to leave them to their children or husband.’
  • 227) ‘When he died, he willed that all he had hidden down here be buried with him.’
  • 228) ‘She had willed that after her death parts of her body be put on display or sent to those responsible for abusing animals.’
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