sensor vs censor vs censure

sensor censor censure

Definitions

  • 1) A device or organ that detects certain external stimuli and responds in a distinctive manner.
  • 2) A device, such as a photoelectric cell, that receives and responds to a signal or stimulus.
  • 3) any device that receives a signal or stimulus (as heat or pressure or light or motion etc.) and responds to it in a distinctive manner
  • 4) Sensory.

Definitions

  • 1) One who censures or condemns
  • 2) An official responsible for the removal of objectionable or sensitive content
  • 3) acronym Censors Ensure No Secrets Over Radios
  • 4) history A Roman magistrate, originally a census administrator, by Classical times a high judge of public behavior and morality
  • 5) psychology A hypothetical subconscious agency which filters unacceptable thought before it reaches the conscious
  • 6) An official, as in the armed forces, who examines personal mail and official dispatches to remove information considered secret or a risk to security.
  • 7) One that condemns or censures.
  • 8) Psychology The agent in the unconscious that is responsible for censorship.
  • 9) A person authorized to examine books, films, or other material and to remove or suppress what is considered morally, politically, or otherwise objectionable.
  • 10) One of two officials in ancient Rome responsible for taking the public census and supervising public behavior and morals.
  • 11) A critic; a reviewer.
  • 12) One given to fault-finding; a censurer.
  • 13) (Antiq.) One of two magistrates of Rome who took a register of the number and property of citizens, and who also exercised the office of inspector of morals and conduct.
  • 14) One who is empowered to examine manuscripts before they are committed to the press, and to forbid their publication if they contain anything obnoxious; -- an official in some European countries.
  • 15) someone who censures or condemns
  • 16) a person who is authorized to read publications or correspondence or to watch theatrical performances and suppress in whole or in part anything considered obscene or politically unacceptable
  • 17) One who censures, blames, or reproves; one addicted to censure or faultfinding; one who assumes the functions of a critic.
  • 18) An officer empowered to examine manuscripts, books, pamphlets, plays, etc., intended for publication or public performance, in order to see that they contain nothing heretical, immoral, or subversive of the established order of government. See censorship. Formerly called licenser.
  • 19) One of two superior magistrates of ancient Rome, who in the latter half of the fifth century b. c. succeeded to certain powers which had before been exercised by the consuls.
  • 20) In old universities, the title of certain masters chosen by the nations to visit the colleges and reform the administration, discipline, and instruction.
  • 21) In China, one of a body of officials stationed at Peking, under the presidency of a Chinese and a Manchu, who are charged with the duty of inspecting the affairs of the empire, and, if need be, of censuring any of the officials, and even the emperor himself, for any act which they consider illegal, extravagant, or unjust. They are called the “eyes and ears” of the emperor.
  • 22) In the university of Cambridge, a college officer whose duties are similar to those of dean; at Christ Church, Oxford, one of two fellows having similar functions, called senior and junior censor.
  • 23) transitive To remove objectionable content
  • 24) transitive To review in order to remove objectionable content from correspondence or public media, either by legal criteria or with discretionary powers
  • 25) forbid the public distribution of ( a movie or a newspaper)
  • 26) subject to political, religious, or moral censorship
  • 27) To subject to the examination, revision, or expurgation of a censor: as, to censor a book, periodical, play, or the like; especially (military), to subject (press despatches, etc.) to scrutiny with a view to suppressing information which, if made public, might embarrass military operations.
  • 28) To examine and expurgate.

Definitions

  • 1) The act of blaming, criticizing, or condemning as wrong; reprehension.
  • 2) The state of excommunication.
  • 3) An official reprimand.
  • 4) An official rebuke, as by a legislature of one of its members.
  • 5) An expression of strong disapproval or harsh criticism.
  • 6) Judicial or ecclesiastical sentence or reprimand; condemnatory judgment.
  • 7) The act of blaming or finding fault with and condemning as wrong; reprehension; blame.
  • 8) obsolete Judgment either favorable or unfavorable; opinion.
  • 9) harsh criticism or disapproval
  • 10) The act of criticizing, especially of finding fault; criticism; expression of blame or disapprobation; faultfinding; condemnation; animadversion.
  • 11) Synonyms Admonition, Monition, etc. (see admonition), stricture, reprobation, disapproval, reflection, dispraise, reproval.
  • 12) Judicial sentence; formal condemnation.
  • 13) Eccles., a penalty imposed upon an offender.
  • 14) Judgment; opinion.
  • 15) A custom which formerly prevailed in several manors in Cornwall and Devonshire, England, by which all the inhabitants above the age of sixteen were summoned to swear fealty to the lord of the manor, to pay eleven pence per poll, and a penny a year ever after as censemoney or common fine. The persons thus sworn were called censers.
  • 16) to criticize harshly
  • 17) to formally rebuke
  • 18) To pass an opinion, especially a severe opinion; judge: followed by of or on.
  • 19) Eccles., to discipline by public rebuke, etc. See censure, n., 3.
  • 20) To judge; adjudge; pass judgment on; sentence.
  • 21) To criticize, especially adversely; find fault with and condemn; blame; express disapprobation of: as, to censure a man, or his manners or conduct; to censure a book.
  • 22) Synonyms Reprove, Rebuke, Reprimand, Censure, Remonstrate with, Expostulate with, Reproach, chide, reprehend, take to task, rate, berate, scold, upbraid, lecture. To reprove is to admonish with disapprobation. To rebuke is to reprove strongly or sharply. To reprimand is to reprove officially; it is the act of one having authority. To censure is to express an unfavorable opinion; it is less personal than the previous terms. Remonstrate with and expostulate with are more argumentative and imply more of advice than either reprove or censure; they also apply only to acts now taking place or about to take place, while censure applies only to what is past. To reproach a person is to lay blame upon him in direct address, and with feeling, to endeavor to shame him with what he has done. The words advance in the degree of likelihood that the person reproved, etc., does not admit the fault for which he is taken to task. See the distinction of corresponding nouns under admonition.
  • 23) To estimate; reckon; regard; consider.
  • 24) obsolete To form or express a judgment in regard to; to estimate; to judge.
  • 25) obsolete To judge.
  • 26) To condemn or reprimand by a judicial or ecclesiastical sentence.
  • 27) To find fault with and condemn as wrong; to blame; to express disapprobation of.
  • 28) To express strong disapproval of or criticize severely, especially in an official capacity: synonym: criticize.

Examples

  • 1) This uses electronic sensors and big data software to pick out the smallest of airborne objects.
  • 2) This is detected by a sensor on the truck as the bin is lifted for emptying.
  • 3) There are motion sensors and light switches.
  • 4) Luxury touches include parking sensors and full leather and cloth inside.
  • 5) They had covered heat sensors with plastic bags and wandered off when smoke began billowing out.
  • 6) They also contain pressure sensors that provide feedback on movement and friction zones.
  • 7) The researchers used drones and sensors to monitor the aftermath.
  • 8) The bumper sensors detect objects and stairs.
  • 9) The system relies on infrared lasers to detect electronic light sensors in these cameras.
  • 10) Let us take the humble parking sensor as an example.
  • 11) The pods also use heat sensors to find explosives in the soil.
  • 12) The sensor contains much less silicon than a banana and passes naturally through the body.
  • 13) It can use its sensors day and night to spy on insurgent activity.
  • 14) Once a gun has been fired the sensors will detect the location to within ten metres.
  • 15) It uses sensors to parallel park and will alert the driver to obstacles and hazards.
  • 16) It is a pocket smoke detector but also contains a motion sensor.
  • 17) The police said to get a mini camera with a sensor light to deter him from coming back.
  • 18) Smoke alarm detectors and window sensors sounded minutes before the final dramatic descent, pointing to a possible fire on board.
  • 19) We have here a security system, and it has these perimeter sensors on windows and doors and motion detectors throughout the building.
  • 20) Because of its particular electrical, metallic, and chemical composition, the sensor is able to “react” in a tell-tale manner when it comes into contact with the target.
  • 21) I'm not sure whose sarcasm sensor is malfunctioning -- mine or yours.
  • 22) The CCD image sensor is at the heart of a solid state video camera.
  • 23) In this simple but ingenious way, almost the entire area of the sensor is used to collect light, creating the high performance of the CCD.
  • 24) The sensor is attached to your shoes and transmits data to your iPod.
  • 25) The judicial mind (a.k.a. bull-sh*t sensor is on high alert after reading this).
  • 26) The sensor is based on carbon nanotubes wrapped in a polymer that is sensitive to glucose concentrations.
  • 27) Cleaning your image sensor is scary if you have never done this, and there was a learning curve using the right ratio of fluid on the swabs.
  • 28) The acceleration sensor is for motion games, and features on some of the 905i series of phones from NTT DoCoMo, but I cannot really see the practical use at all.
  • 29) ‘The sensors measure the response of different parts of your brain to the noises.’
  • 30) ‘They use infrared sensors to detect the stairs in your home and stay away from them.’
  • 31) ‘The ship's sensors detect incoming threats, which the command system then analyses and evaluates.’
  • 32) ‘At the Dallas airport, the lights are controlled by sensors that measure sunlight.’
  • 33) ‘There are even tiny sensors that can detect the presence of gunmetal and tanks.’
  • 34) ‘Nathalie glanced around her, aware of the audio and visual sensors now recording her words and actions.’
  • 35) ‘Seabed sensors detect abnormal wave movements and relay the information to scientists.’
  • 36) ‘They will also wear tiny sensors to measure their movements through the day.’
  • 37) ‘Ceiling speakers pump music into every room, and special sensors can detect water leaks.’
  • 38) ‘This generates battery power for the lamp and there is a light sensor to detect whether it is dark enough to switch on.’
  • 39) ‘When they opened up the sensor that had detected the fire, they found nothing more sinister than a dead fly.’
  • 40) ‘Each of the five devices has a motion sensor which triggers off a loud voice when people walk past.’
  • 41) ‘They then measured the arousal of the men by using a sensor which monitored penile tumescence.’
  • 42) ‘I have changed the electronic control unit sensors, fuse box and relays to no avail.’
  • 43) ‘Cabbies could pay a charge for an electronic sensor to make it fall when they approached.’
  • 44) ‘Finally, the researchers have developed new, highly responsive pressure sensors.’
  • 45) ‘In other words the electronic odour sensor can detect the presence of bacteria in a sample of urine or other body fluids.’
  • 46) ‘I have been assured that there is no fault with the temperature sensor or gauge.’
  • 47) ‘The type of the rotor is detected in response to the output signal from the sensor.’
  • 48) ‘The frame consists of arrays of infrared beams and sensors which spot the movement and track it.’

Examples

  • 1) They exchanged letters, but these were censored by the government.
  • 2) In a lurid incident shortly before his death, he ran into trouble with government censors.
  • 3) Should film censors get tougher with their ratings?
  • 4) BRITAIN'S film censor is suggesting that it could provide the first classifications for content of the internet.
  • 5) Letters back from the trenches were not so heavily censored.
  • 6) Nor did he censor his reporting in deference to the Palace.
  • 7) Many wrote scathing criticism of their superiors, only to see their reports censored and rewritten.
  • 8) Not surprisingly, government censors cut out whole scenes.
  • 9) The Government has censored the documents to hide the identity of individuals from mobile businesses.
  • 10) Government censors blocked Nobel prize reports from websites.
  • 11) Should the show be banned, censored or more carefully edited?
  • 12) Outrage at the film's content led it to be banned by the censors.
  • 13) But trying to protect sponsors by arresting people who turn up in the wrong T-shirt is like a government trying to censor the internet.
  • 14) A couple of my other films have been censored, but that was a long time ago.
  • 15) A volume planned for publication in 1949 was suppressed by the censors.
  • 16) Service postcards provided basic information, allowed by the military censors, for soldiers to tick.
  • 17) In China, the censor has already cut the movie to just over two hours.
  • 18) The evidence put to them is censored, controlled, delivered after frequent and unwelcome interruptions and often without being understood.
  • 19) America is supposed to be free. u guyz saying…’censor it!’ and ‘ remove it!’ r wrong whoever posted this had a right to and whoever did, i strongly reccomend that u do not censor this pic. its okay if some of u think racism and stereotypes is a big deal, but think about the more important issues!
  • 20) The title censor was given to magistrates in ancient Rome who supervised public morals and drew up the register, or census, of citizens.
  • 21) Obivously, by the mere actions of ABC and the other lib media, the censorship of anything healthcare will lead to something being signed .... what they cannot prevent or censor is the draining of your paycheck through taxation ...
  • 22) It was remarked which these final scenes with Enobarbus raise Antony's impression in a minds, given his mostly cynical, witty, unsparing censor is so despairing during withdrawal his master.
  • 23) Synopsis: An Elizabethan-era censor is visited by a man from the future looking to preserve a seditious play lost to time.
  • 24) In his Persecution and the Art of Writing, which I am assuming Professor Weinberger knows almost by heart, Leo Strauss made the surprisingly unesoteric observation that the best way to avoid the wrath of the censor is to present an apparently balanced debate in which the views of the side disliked by the censor are given a "straight" denunciation.
  • 25) ‘It has caused widespread global controversy, stretching from Catholic groups in Europe and America, to a number of states in India that have also banned the film despite federal censors clearing it for release.’
  • 26) ‘Films that came from Europe were often subjected to the vagaries of individual distributor taste, tastes too often linked to assessments of what might and might not be passed by the film censors.’
  • 27) ‘When you upset the censors with your films, as you often did, were you trying to push buttons consciously or was it something that was organic, something that was just there in your work?’
  • 28) ‘He mentions in his audio commentary that the vampire's death groans were long lost, cut by censors during the film's original theatrical run.’
  • 29) ‘Warren Beatty, then attending the festival with Bonnie and Clyde, expressed his praise for the film and condemned the censors.’
  • 30) ‘Avary remains unrepentant, however, despite having to send the film back to the censors four times.’
  • 31) ‘Kelleher was appointed official film censor in 2003 and today he divides his time between Dublin and west Cork, where he lives with his wife and two children.’
  • 32) ‘In this case, the higher powers are film censors, whether philistine Senators or the timorous, arbitrary ethicists of the MPAA, valiantly guarding us from ourselves.’
  • 33) ‘As a serious cinematic dramatisation of an event that goes to the core of belief of many people in Ireland, this film will have a particular resonance and is likely to be of interest to a wide audience, the film censor's office stated.’
  • 34) ‘We had military censors, not to suppress bad news but to keep damaging news from the enemy.’
  • 35) ‘In late 17th century England, people had to get the permission of censors before publishing books.’
  • 36) ‘We were sure that the film would pass the censors because the scenes were in line with the story.’
  • 37) ‘During this period, the Ontario Board of censors was known to be the most liberal of all the provincial boards, and O.J. Silverthorne was the most respected film censor in Canada.’
  • 38) ‘This necessarily involves engaging with the issues in which Mr Cousins seemingly has no interest: production trends, the size and social composition of cinema audiences and the policies of film censors.’
  • 39) ‘If you're thinking of going to the cinema this weekend, the film censors have been busy trying to help you to decide what to watch.’
  • 40) ‘What enraged and confused the censors was the film's approach to that strange netherworld between dreaming and waking states, in which so much unusual activity transpires.’
  • 41) ‘In The New Yorker, she actually called these six hours of chic ‘fearless,’ as if the film had defied the censors of a police state.’
  • 42) ‘Well, thank you very much, but I don't really want to see images like the ones described anyway, therefore in these circumstances the film censors are right.’
  • 43) ‘Because if the truth were to be told by the movies, they would only cut out the long hair, but they would add a whole lot of things they keep out because the film censors make them.’
  • 44) ‘Such sentiments of animosity towards the church, the teaching establishment and tradition were excuse enough for the censors to ban the film in its entirety.’
  • 45) ‘The goal of Freudian dream interpretation is to undo the work of the censor.’
  • 46) ‘Moreover, if dreams were all expressions of repressed infantile impulses, which found an indirect way past the censor, one would expect that the proportion of sleep spent in dreaming would increase with age.’
  • 47) ‘The superego, originating in the child through an identification with parents, and in response to social pressures, functions as an internal censor to repress the urges of the id.’
  • 48) ‘In most cases, a censor and a chiliarch or centurion from the Imperial Guard were ordered to jointly oversee campaigns to apprehend brigands.’
  • 49) ‘Though everyone knew Carthaginian figs were a successful transplant to Italy; Cato the censor grew them in his garden’
  • 50) ‘The magistracy continued to be controlled by patricians until 351 BC, when Gaius Marcius Rutilus was appointed the first plebeian censor.’
  • 51) ‘Films are censored for a number of reasons: sex, violence or bad language.’
  • 52) ‘Despite these flaws, Kohl does not recommend censoring the books.’
  • 53) ‘He was a rebellious writer whose books were censored for years, and that in itself was meaningful for me.’
  • 54) ‘Please do a better job of censoring your material for the sake of those warfighters and their families.’
  • 55) ‘Her film has been censored a lot in Lebanon, even our film has been censored.’
  • 56) ‘A movie is good, I think, when the censor does not understand what should be censored.’
  • 57) ‘The Pentagon has censored sections of the book, mainly blacking out individuals' names.’
  • 58) ‘The works of Trotsky and his co-thinkers had been censored and suppressed for decades.’
  • 59) ‘It was not only the Roman Catholic book market that was censored in Protestant England.’
  • 60) ‘The Esquire Theatre, on the other hand, is guilty of censoring the work of an artist, no matter how poor that work might actually be.’
  • 61) ‘In most accounts, the story of how The Man with the Golden Arm was censored is a simple one.’
  • 62) ‘Newspapers will often take the easy route of censoring a cartoonist rather than risk the bad publicity of protesters at their front door.’
  • 63) ‘If the system had been in place all Stewart's mail would have been censored.’
  • 64) ‘His books and articles were often refused or censored by publishers and editors.’
  • 65) ‘Because these wishes are unacceptable and potentially disturbing, they are censored and disguised.’
  • 66) ‘An examination into national security should certainly not be censored.’
  • 67) ‘I mean I've been censored more in the United States than I've been censored anywhere.’
  • 68) ‘I don't edit or censor material to suit my purposes, ever.’
  • 69) ‘At the moment, the FCC reviews programmes only after it receives a complaint, imposing fines or censoring presenters after the event.’
  • 70) ‘As long as the State censors films, a handful of individuals, acting on behalf of the State, will be seeing and deciding what we can see.’

Examples

  • 1) It is an act of vandalism for which the party deserves censure.
  • 2) Public censure should be reserved largely for those who pulled the trigger.
  • 3) His son does not escape censure.
  • 4) But he could hardly escape censure.
  • 5) Violence and jail receive strong censure.
  • 6) As a result, the country faces international censure.
  • 7) Show no public censure for your dying elephant, either.
  • 8) Enforcement proceedings could lead to public censure, bans from working in financial services or fines.
  • 9) In other circumstances one might expect the uncertainties of a power transfer to encourage a dictatorship to keep its head down and avoid international censure.
  • 10) The idea would be that the risk of public censure would force governments to act in a more consistent long-term manner.
  • 11) Some journalists also deserve censure.
  • 12) He avoided censure through his reputation for being proved right and the certainty that he spoke in the general interest - not his own.
  • 13) He may have been censured by public opinion, but if that is the gauge, where does it stop?
  • 14) Illustrations: A resolution of censure may be amended by striking out the word “censure” and inserting the word “thanks, ” for both relate to opinion of certain conduct; refusing to censure is not the same as expressing thanks.
  • 15) In this way, from the beginning of the thirteenth century, although not expressly so stated in the decretals, the term censure became the equivalent of a certain class of ecclesiastical penalties, i.e., interdict, suspension, and excommunication.
  • 16) Much of the censure is coming from an "infrastructure ü ber alles" crowd that too readily ignores that the costs of these big projects are often grossly underestimated and their benefits significantly exaggerated.
  • 17) Violation of that license board may result in censure or reprimand or license revocation.
  • 18) The kid probably deserves First prize, but, by daring to attack the field of Goebbels Warming, probably managed to get a unique censure from the prize committee typically reserved for Science Fair projects that attempt to justify Eugenics or Lysenkoism — and totally unlike that kid who did a baking soda volcano and still got a “blue ribbon” … everyone gets an award these days, you know … unless their project is clearly unPC.
  • 19) I cannot see a way out of this mess for Israel; if they clampdown they will face even more censure from the world "community", if they give way to Palestinian demands then Israel will not exist in another 20 years.
  • 20) Nevertheless, papal approval or censure is invoked several times in the sources on the Children's Crusade, often in very different, contradictory ways. back
  • 21) Earlier this year PBS distributed to its affiliates only the expurgated version of A Company of Soldiers, a Frontline documentary about American forces in Iraq, because of concerns that obscenities shouted by military personnel during an ambush might bring censure from the FCC; it released the unbleeped version only to those local stations willing to sign waivers absolving PBS of liability for any fines.
  • 22) ‘Charney has been criticised for paradoxically censuring the exploitation of the worker, while pushing the instrumental use of sexuality and women.’
  • 23) ‘However, there is no reason why a human system for judging and formally censuring the behaviour of others should be a slave to the vagaries of chance.’
  • 24) ‘Meanwhile he had been recalled to Adelaide and summoned before a Royal Commission where he was censured and criticized.’
  • 25) ‘Respect for minority rights is definitely important, but she was being overly sensitive in censuring this community-building event with her flimsy, misguided affirmative action notions.’
  • 26) ‘But I don't think that censuring the white authors is the answer.’
  • 27) ‘In 2004, he published a controversial book censuring the power of the media in Britain.’
  • 28) ‘County ambulance service chiefs were censured for bullying.’
  • 29) ‘Broadcast watchdogs have censured him for swearing on his former BBC Radio 1 afternoon show.’
  • 30) ‘The external relations officer asserted that if the board censured him, they would be preventing him from fulfilling his duties.’
  • 31) ‘My Latin temper snaps, and I'm censured by a security guard.’
  • 32) ‘Her look censured his absence from the homestay - and her - the previous day.’
  • 33) ‘The dramatic departures come after Cllr Holden and Cllr Smith were censured last month by the Standards Board.’
  • 34) ‘Donald Dewar personally censured ministers for failing to observe collective responsibility and leaking to the press.’
  • 35) ‘Female students were censured for eating apples ‘too seductively’ in public.’
  • 36) ‘It could have expressed dismay at Pringle's obvious lack of race awareness, censured him, and sent him on a training course.’
  • 37) ‘However, recently he was censured for dangling his baby son Bob near the open jaws of a crocodile and forced to make an apology to his millions of fans.’
  • 38) ‘Since when should an MP be censured for saying something that is offensive to some portion of society?’
  • 39) ‘The last three were to become cardinals and the first two were eventually censured by the Church.’
  • 40) ‘Chao also pointed to the Ministry of Finance for ‘lapses in its supervisory responsibilities,’ adding that the Control Yuan does not rule out censuring the ministry.’
  • 41) ‘Both men, in previous guises, have drawn severe judicial censure, for their actions against the CFMEU.’
  • 42) ‘The investigation ended with much tongue-wagging but no formal censure.’
  • 43) ‘Each of the terrible ten is accompanied by a helpful little paragraph explaining just why it merits our censure.’
  • 44) ‘I would not want the U.S. Senate to write a resolution of censure against you.’
  • 45) ‘Louise McMullan, one of the officers singled out for censure, claimed that the protest had been a success and wanted to thank all those who took part.’
  • 46) ‘His sometimes droll remarks might annoy some readers, but to me they seem a very effective way of delivering not just censure but also ridicule.’
  • 47) ‘In the boycott by the Association of University Teachers, what has been expressed is not criticism or censure but vilification.'’
  • 48) ‘Mr. Wilson disappoints and offers gossip, censure and critical summary.’
  • 49) ‘If the teacher refuses to do so, he will be open to public censure and criticism from his superiors, further warnings and potential expulsion.’
  • 50) ‘He assailed any attempt to single out only one country in the world for censure and abuse.’
  • 51) ‘Dr Lederman accepted his censure, reprimand and a £2,777 fine, documents show.’
  • 52) ‘Her photos of circus freaks and those on the margins of society earned her praise as well as censure from critics.’
  • 53) ‘There are lawyers who admitted to taking their clients money, and yet they receive no censure, nor have their licence lifted to practice law.’
  • 54) ‘The South African document singles out the trans-Atlantic slave trade for censure.’
  • 55) ‘Only Beckett seems to have escaped censure, because of his elegance and self-restraint.’
  • 56) ‘China, which prides itself in its trade with the U.S., is the favorite target of disapproval and censure.’
  • 57) ‘In both cases, strong censure of practitioners followed public attention.’
  • 58) ‘I'm surprised that the council leader has had no word of censure for the embarrassment caused to his administration for this abuse of office.’
  • 59) ‘If your father allows you to swear at your mother without censure, it's horrible and reprehensible, but a private matter.’
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