replicate vs duplicate

replicate duplicate

Definitions

  • 1) an outcome of a replication procedure.
  • 2) A repetition of an experiment or procedure.
  • 3) In music, a tone one or more octaves distant from a given tone; a repetition at a higher or lower octave.
  • 4) botany, zoology Folded over or backward; folded back upon itself.
  • 5) Duplicated, copied, reproduced, or repeated.
  • 6) Folded over or bent back upon itself.
  • 7) Folded over or backward; folded back upon itself.
  • 8) To make a copy (replica) of
  • 9) obsolete To reply.
  • 10) bend or turn backward
  • 11) make or do or perform again
  • 12) reproduce or make an exact copy of
  • 13) Folded
  • 14) Toreply.
  • 15) To become replicated; undergo replication.
  • 16) To duplicate, copy, reproduce, or repeat.
  • 17) To repeat (a scientific experiment) to confirm findings or ensure accuracy.
  • 18) Biology To reproduce or make an exact copy or copies of (genetic material, a cell, or an organism).
  • 19) obsolete To reply.

Definitions

  • 1) One that resembles or corresponds to another; an identical copy.
  • 2) One that corresponds exactly to another, especially an original.
  • 3) An identical copy; a facsimile.
  • 4) Games A card game in which partnerships or teams play the same deals and compare scores at the end.
  • 5) Games A card game in which partnerships or teams play the same deals and compare scores at the end.
  • 6) That which exactly resembles or corresponds to something else; another, correspondent to the first; hence, a copy; a transcript; a counterpart.
  • 7) (Law) An original instrument repeated; a document which is the same as another in all essential particulars, and differing from a mere copy in having all the validity of an original.
  • 8) (Law) An original instrument repeated; a document which is the same as another in all essential particulars, and differing from a mere copy in having all the validity of an original.
  • 9) something additional of the same kind
  • 10) a copy that corresponds to an original exactly
  • 11) Specifically, in law and com.
  • 12) One of two or more things corresponding in every respect to each other.
  • 13) One of two or more things each of which corresponds in all essential respects to an original, type, or pattern; another corresponding to a first or original; another of the same kind; a copy: as, a duplicate of a bust.
  • 14) A second copy of a document, furnished by authority when the original has been lost, defaced, or invalidated.
  • 15) An instrument or writing corresponding in every particular to a first or original and of equal validity with it; an additional original.
  • 16) being the same as another; identical. This may exclude the first identical item in a series, but usage is inconsistent.
  • 17) Denoting a manner of play in cards in which partnerships or teams play the same deals and compare scores at the end.
  • 18) Existing or growing in two corresponding parts; double.
  • 19) Identically copied from an original.
  • 20) (Math.) the proportion or ratio of squares. Thus, in geometrical proportion, the first term to the third is said to be in a duplicate ratio of the first to the second, or as its square is to the square of the second. Thus, in 2, 4, 8, 16, the ratio of 2 to 8 is a duplicate of that of 2 to 4, or as the square of 2 is to the square of 4.
  • 21) Double; twofold.
  • 22) (Math.) the proportion or ratio of squares. Thus, in geometrical proportion, the first term to the third is said to be in a duplicate ratio of the first to the second, or as its square is to the square of the second. Thus, in 2, 4, 8, 16, the ratio of 2 to 8 is a duplicate of that of 2 to 4, or as the square of 2 is to the square of 4.
  • 23) identically copied from an original
  • 24) being two identical
  • 25) to produce something equal to
  • 26) to do repeatedly; to do again
  • 27) to make a copy of
  • 28) duplicate or match
  • 29) make a duplicate or duplicates of
  • 30) increase twofold
  • 31) make or do or perform again
  • 32) To become double; repeat or be repeated; specifically, in ecclesiastical use, to celebrate the mass or holy communion twice in the same day. See duplication.
  • 33) In whist and bridge, to play the same cards over again, as nearly as possible under the same conditions, each side getting the hands originally held by its opponents.
  • 34) In physiology, to divide into two by natural growth or spontaneous division: as, some in-fusorians duplicate themselves.
  • 35) Inbotany,folded.
  • 36) Exactly like or corresponding to something made or done before; repeating an original; matched: as, there are many duplicate copies of this picture; a duplicate action or proceeding.
  • 37) Consisting of a double number or quantity; multiplied by two.
  • 38) To double; repeat; produce a second (like the first); make a copy or copies of.
  • 39) Double; twofold; consisting of or relating to a pair or pairs, or to two corresponding parts: as, duplicate spines in an insect; duplicate examples of an ancient coin; duplicate proportion.
  • 40) In botany, folded.
  • 41) To make or perform again; repeat.
  • 42) To become duplicate.
  • 43) To make an exact copy of.
  • 44) To make twofold; double.
  • 45) (Biol.) To divide into two by natural growth or spontaneous action.
  • 46) To make a duplicate of (something); to make a copy or transcript of.
  • 47) To double; to fold; to render double.
  • 48) (Biol.) To divide into two by natural growth or spontaneous action.

Examples

  • 1) Family life was horribly stressful, so I've never wanted to replicate it.
  • 2) "'In nutrient baths, cells are programmed to grow, to replicate, to -'What!
  • 3) Like all viruses, it invades the host cells, using their machinery to replicate itself.
  • 4) The ability to reproduce or replicate is considered the basic definition of life.
  • 5) He's said that the one thing he most wanted to replicate from the actual Jim Ellis was the man's composure; whether that's what he does is irrelevant, but he does capture a man choking back his anger, recriminating himself for the times when it erupts.
  • 6) The ability to replicate is essential for the manifestation of the diseases they cause.
  • 7) So I would hope that television would go in a direction of trying to find something that really is different from everything else on the air and that the broadcasters try to originate, as opposed to replicate, which is really what ` s been going on for about the last 10 years.
  • 8) This is a company that invents or stumbles upon a business model or technology impossible to replicate, meaning it can extract high profit margins for the foreseeable future.
  • 9) While the Bowery Lane Bicycle seems useful enough and is not as outlandishly priced as other Dutch-inspired bikes sold to Americans, I can't help thinking that if Mr. Bernard wants to "replicate" Amsterdam here he might be better off opening a Van Gogh museum and digging a series of canals.
  • 10) Already, Mr. Terrill said, he and a group of state lawmakers are drafting legislation to "replicate" Arizona's law and "go beyond it," with stricter penalties for illegal immigrants.
  • 11) Campaigners claim the new accommodation facility would "replicate" some of the worst aspects of conditions at the notorious Yarl's Wood immigration centre.
  • 12) Until recently, state law limited the number of charters to 30 — and only 15 were allowed to "replicate," or open multiple campuses.
  • 13) Korean ceremonial architecture has changed so little in 1100 years that the traditional carpenters and painters working today don't really have to 'replicate' anything when they rebuild old structures; they just do what they always do, on a building site that dates back millenia.
  • 14) ‘Cloning will be used for far more than replicating a mammal or reproducing a child.’
  • 15) ‘A full copy snapshot replicates the data set in its entirety.’
  • 16) ‘A lot of immigrants finish up replicating the culture they came from.’
  • 17) ‘Hobby's architectural hypothesis that places parent-child bonds at the core of all forms of love is true on this view because of the operation of universal organic drives to reproduce or replicate ourselves.’
  • 18) ‘She does idealize the island, at times, particularly as her characters try to replicate island culture within their (often dismal) mainland barrios.’
  • 19) ‘This vaccine induces protective immunity but does not allow the virus to replicate - copy itself - or pass from bird to bird.’
  • 20) ‘In the days before xerox machines, a carbon copy was the best way of replicating a piece of writing.’
  • 21) ‘This is of particular importance since the surviving imperial portraits are copies that replicate officially sanctioned prototypes with varying degrees of fidelity and skill.’
  • 22) ‘The London version may come from the large room, which Pacheco saw on his visit to El Greco, full of reduced versions of his paintings which he kept for replicating his works or as a record of their authenticity.’
  • 23) ‘However, with the amount media circulating today there is no communication by replicating traditional design principles.’
  • 24) ‘What it concerns itself more with is with replicating the successes of genre titles gone by.’
  • 25) ‘In a sense, this private menagerie replicates the oldest of human/animal relationships which was the aristocratic privilege of ownership that was the prevalent model until the French Revolution.’
  • 26) ‘The form of the headdress also almost completely replicates the form of the short-handled agricultural hoe.’
  • 27) ‘In another plaque, Prussian blue pigment, meant to replicate copper corrosion, obscures much of the surface.’
  • 28) ‘Perhaps they replicate each other and work together on occasion, but their roles are different.’
  • 29) ‘In particular, it would be important to replicate this study using different cultural products in order to see if the observed effects can be generalized across art product categories.’
  • 30) ‘Likewise, their movements are falling into selected rhythmic patterns by age 3, and they are capable of clapping rhythmically and replicating short rhythms on instruments before kindergarten.’
  • 31) ‘In addition, in its celebration of irreducible difference, postmodernism has been castigated for replicating the very categories of racist ideological thought that it is intended to supersede.’
  • 32) ‘Made up of roughly circular lines that form tight clusters, they're somewhat like the system drawings of Tara Donovan or James Siena, often replicating the organic structure of fungi or barnacles.’
  • 33) ‘‘This method replicates how problems occur in life,’ he says.’
  • 34) ‘And in doing so, the gene creates copies of its genetic material by replicating itself through intricate processes of cell division.’
  • 35) ‘Every time a chromosome replicates itself, its telomeres shorten in length.’
  • 36) ‘But when Diener announced his discovery, he was overturning scientific dogma that held that an organism with no proteins couldn't replicate itself.’
  • 37) ‘When serum is present, alpha-defensin - 1 acts on vulnerable cells to block HIV infection at the stage when the virus is taken up by the cell and begins replicating itself and integrating into the host.’
  • 38) ‘Instead of creating new cell material, the cell is confused and replicates the virus, which then replicates itself and spreads throughout the body.’
  • 39) ‘A single egg cell replicates itself, and the offspring cells in turn replicate themselves, and so on.’
  • 40) ‘These scientists suggest that RNA was capable of ordering the sequence of amino acids, forming proteins, and replicating itself in a type of ‘RNA world,’ in which RNA was more important than DNA.’
  • 41) ‘Researchers also had to tweak the organism's DNA so it would expend most of its energy making propanediol rather than replicating itself.’
  • 42) ‘The virus would have been pretty awful if it had taken control of a large number of computers and started replicating itself.’
  • 43) ‘Despite the macrophages' defenses, the creature, because of its thick rind, often survives and slowly replicates itself until each macrophage is so full of tuberculosis bacteria that the cell bursts and dies.’
  • 44) ‘Like most RNA viruses they accumulate mutations very fast, and the way the virus RNA replicates itself facilitates frequent recombination.’
  • 45) ‘But actually, HIV replicates itself rapidly during all phases of infection.’
  • 46) ‘He says, ‘This fungus can replicate itself on daylilies, but another type of plant host is necessary for it to complete its life cycle.’’
  • 47) ‘Fewer than 5 percent of co-infection cases become chronic; HDV seems to suppress HBV replication and does not have the ability to replicate itself.’
  • 48) ‘But when Diener announced his discovery, he was overturning the scientific dogma that held that an organism with no proteins wasn't supposed to be able to replicate itself.’
  • 49) ‘Moreover, arginine makes it possible for the herpes virus to replicate itself, so if you're troubled by frequent cold sores, give it a pass.’
  • 50) ‘AAV cannot replicate itself on its own, requiring a ‘helper’ virus infecting the same cell in the body.’
  • 51) ‘Like the AIDS virus, it uses RNA and not DNA to replicate itself.’
  • 52) ‘With this deletion, the chimeric virus was less able to replicate itself when injected into the monkeys.’
  • 53) ‘It was hoped the gene would be absorbed by the brain and eventually replicate itself.’
  • 54) ‘It argues for eliminating ‘cookbook labs,’ in which students replicate experiments where the results are already known.’
  • 55) ‘This allows experiments to be replicated independently by anyone skeptical of the original results.’
  • 56) ‘This result is not consistently replicated in a more recent study by Davis-Friday, Liu, and Mittelstaedt.’
  • 57) ‘According to Gallagher, if DMI's test results were to be replicated nationwide, more than 67 million additional gallons would be sold each year in schools alone.’
  • 58) ‘Those results were not replicated in any of several subsequent studies.’
  • 59) ‘Therefore, the next step is to see if these results can be replicated and further refined using samples from other universities.’
  • 60) ‘The trials are being replicated in potato and pumpkin fields at The Rodale Institute, and in two other area vineyards.’
  • 61) ‘As with all such research, its success hinges on findings whose results can be replicated.’
  • 62) ‘It works on strict adherence to the scientific method, through double-blind studies, good lab practices, etc. and the ability to replicate results.’
  • 63) ‘The foregoing simulation simply assumes that the trials replicate themselves based on what works.’
  • 64) ‘Vermeer experimented with this device and took pains to replicate the optical distortions observed through the apparatus, such as discrepancies of scale, collapsed perspective, halations, and blurred focus.’
  • 65) ‘As part of the Nebraska Soybean and Feed Grains Profitability Project, Jerry Mulliken has conducted replicated trials on his farm in Dodge County for four years to evaluate the effect of row cleaning on corn yield following soybean.’
  • 66) ‘In replicated trials, the hybrid was also resistant to Colorado potato beetle, an insect costing U.S. potato, tomato, and eggplant growers about $150 million annually.’
  • 67) ‘If the data were from replicated trials, there may not be any statistical difference between the results in the ‘Sample’ and ‘WP’ columns.’
  • 68) ‘Because the tests were conducted on corn grown in replicated experiments, they could determine if the diagnostic test level accurately matched the plant response.’
  • 69) ‘Nebraska farmer Jerry Mulliken has conducted replicated trials for six years to assess the effect of row cleaning operations prior to corn planting.’
  • 70) ‘Subsequently, groups were randomly assigned to receive one of the three supplemental treatments (corn, rice bran, or soybean hulls), resulting in three replicates each of two years.’
  • 71) ‘All fermentations were performed on duplicate days with two replicates per day.’

Examples

  • 1) He was also told to hand over duplicate keys for several of the offices overlooking the hotel.
  • 2) We could be polite, affectionate even, concerned about Pat, but the love we had lost was impossible to duplicate now.
  • 3) Interestingly, if they had published a shared announcement they would have given an example of what many people think of when they hear the term duplicate content - the same copy / text / content on different websites.
  • 4) The suit contends that names were cut from the rolls after the Colorado Republican Party provided the state with a list of what it called duplicate registrations.
  • 5) Last month it sought permission to destroy what it called duplicate loan files because the $45,000-a-month storage cost was an "unnecessary burden" on the company.
  • 6) The same relation holds when comparing only hub duplicate pairs, which we defined as duplicate pairs where at least one paralog has a PPI degree ≥ 20.
  • 7) These shorthand notes, transcribed and typed in duplicate, were the nightmare and, on occasion, the Nemesis, of the managers and foremen.
  • 8) Please find herewith a contract in duplicate for your next book which we have taken the liberty of forwarding to you.
  • 9) Upon completion, he shall provide paperwork [printed from the NCIS system no doubt], in duplicate, to the buyer and seller indicating the identity of the gun and confirming the eligibility of the former.
  • 10) He wanted to make a copy and insert his own name on it, saying he had lost his original and was having trouble getting a duplicate from the government.
  • 11) I swear, I figure out how to post and then I end up somehow sending things out in duplicate, all with misspelled words (yes, I know, I'm terrible here too, but I already say I'm an idiot in the title of this LJ.)
  • 12) ‘They were duplicate copies that the commission had.’
  • 13) ‘For example, I never realised you should keep duplicate copies of receipts.’
  • 14) ‘And beyond duplicate copies, we just don't have that much space here anyway!’
  • 15) ‘Drivers seeking a duplicate licence have to go to their local Garda station with photographic identification and their social security number and have a D800 form signed by a member.’
  • 16) ‘The fee for a duplicate renewal license shall be $5.’
  • 17) ‘She suggested that in the morning I try to find a license bureau and obtain a duplicate license.’
  • 18) ‘They then applied for a driver's permit with his name but their photo. taking everything that they had gotten they walked into a dealer and ordered a duplicate key for the car.’
  • 19) ‘It addressed the issue of duplicate entries and excess paperwork, instead allowing for immediate on site recording of all maintenance work.’
  • 20) ‘Last year the locks on all 164 rooms at the hotel had to be changed after an armed gang escaped with a bag of duplicate card keys.’
  • 21) ‘Deepening the mystery are police claims the raid was carried out by someone who had a duplicate key.’
  • 22) ‘Then I staggered home and gave up my duplicate keys.’
  • 23) ‘They were strongly suspicious the motorbike had been stolen by the rental operator who obviously knew their temporary address and had a duplicate key.’
  • 24) ‘Still, we wondered, why couldn't the server recognize duplicate keys, and just refuse the installation?’
  • 25) ‘Maintenance of the service numbers and the civilian numbers is not consistent with this aim and is a problem where duplicate numbers have been issued.’
  • 26) ‘Nora makes duplicate keys for whoever asks and encourages them to walk right in whenever they please.’
  • 27) ‘The government will issue a new or duplicate number to the name on the certificate.’
  • 28) ‘Based upon analysis of duplicate samples, reproducibility was better than 3% of the measured concentration of each element.’
  • 29) ‘In many cases, only the locksmith who installed the original system can make duplicate keys.’
  • 30) ‘At the very least, you should make an extra copy of your most vital data on duplicate media and store it off-site.’
  • 31) ‘We deleted duplicate hospital records by retaining only one copy of events characterised as the same admission for the same patient on the same day.’
  • 32) ‘Now things are sorted, you should be able to identify duplicates, spares, and rubbish.’
  • 33) ‘What you really need is some kind of weighted-sampling without replacement (which you can simulate by throwing out duplicates, but then you waste time trying to find a reasonable sample).’
  • 34) ‘The pair were both head down reading duplicates of some glossy brochures.’
  • 35) ‘Although 7,000 suspected users of ‘pay per view’ child porn sites based in the US were identified in Britain, police said the actual number would probably be lower, partly due to duplicates.’
  • 36) ‘In a test, 41 duplicates were found in one month.’
  • 37) ‘19 people nominated what I counted as 37 items, many of which were duplicates.’
  • 38) ‘The site currently lists 76,210 stories written by 6,831 writers (although there are a few duplicates and errors).’
  • 39) ‘I still need to sort through a little over half of that for duplicates, incomplete files, etc.’
  • 40) ‘In addition, there is a quarterly auction through which members can sell their duplicates to other members.’
  • 41) ‘He was kind enough to let me have some duplicates from his own collection.’
  • 42) ‘Would it not make better sense to take a head count and track the duplicates?’
  • 43) ‘People are using spam address lists they've got from somewhere because I get as many as ten duplicates of each item.’
  • 44) ‘When she told this to the cameras she also announced to the audience that everyone would be getting a duplicate of the bath robe after the show.’
  • 45) ‘It maintains only one copy of any attachment avoiding duplicates and wasted storage space.’
  • 46) ‘The company received close to 10,000 inputs, even after going through the tedious process of screening duplicates.’
  • 47) ‘The Civilian tiles are the set of tiles that have duplicates while the Military tiles are those that are unique.’
  • 48) ‘Sort through drawers and cabinets, discarding duplicates, broken items and dust collectors.’
  • 49) ‘Unlike so many suburban blocks where the homes are all duplicates of each other, set apart only by the gilded numbers hammered onto the garages, Sycamore is a hodgepodge of houses.’
  • 50) ‘I'm mostly doing some much-needed maintenance on my archive files and backups: reorganizing folders, deleting duplicates, burning DVDs, that sort of thing.’
  • 51) ‘For storage efficiency, e-mail can be compressed, duplicates removed and indexed for fast access.’
  • 52) ‘Portraiture is an art unusually bedevilled by duplicates and copies.’
  • 53) ‘Another similar statue was erected at the British Museum, and a duplicate of the statue was specially made in Britain and imported to sit by the new development.’
  • 54) ‘A point-in-time copy represents an exact duplicate of a data volume at the moment the copy was created.’
  • 55) ‘I have a house on a quarter acre in a south Dublin suburb with enough room to build a duplicate of the existing house in the side garden.’
  • 56) ‘In fact, the specimens we used are isotypes; these represent duplicates of the first collections made of these two newly formed species.’
  • 57) ‘The child had to choose the correct items from carefully crafted duplicates; items included spectacles, a pencil, a bowl, a walking stick and a small hand drum.’
  • 58) ‘The images are duplicates of prints by the early 20 th-century French photographer already in the museum's collection.’
  • 59) ‘But making a duplicate for a lost key needs more imagination.’
  • 60) ‘All 10,000 patentees were contacted at their post offices of record and requested to lend the inventor's copy of their patents to the Patent Office so the copies could be duplicated and the duplicates placed in the files.’
  • 61) ‘Why buy expensive plastic duplicates of what grows naturally in the garden?’
  • 62) ‘It tells the story of residents of a small town who are replaced by inert duplicates, which are hatched from alien ‘pods.’’
  • 63) ‘He has a secret duplicate of the key with which he is locked up at night.’
  • 64) ‘There are several instances of singers themselves being offered duplicates instead of the original versions.’
  • 65) ‘The doppelgänger trees were duplicates of the eight-taxon focus tree with sites evolving at the same rates but independently of that tree.’
  • 66) ‘He said: ‘The lockmaker kept a copy of the keys in case one was ever lost and they needed to make a duplicate.’’
  • 67) ‘I gave him the dog-tag, he makes duplicates, he sells them now, and that really broke my heart because this is something sacred to me that I gave the boy.’
  • 68) ‘The duplicates were distributed to familiarise citizens with the new currency but police feel they could be exploited and have urged people to destroy them.’
  • 69) ‘What if God were to collect the molecules sloughed off of my body and, during my lifetime, construct a duplicate of me from them: is it I, Lord?’
  • 70) ‘Unfortunately, with time travel being so unreliable for humans, he can only create a cyborg duplicate of himself and trust that it gets the job done.’
  • 71) ‘‘Yes, and here's yours,’ the Boss responds, handing me a duplicate of my current ID card.’
  • 72) ‘Simply, we're now able to copy an atom, duplicating everything about it except its position and velocity in a new atom somewhere else.’
  • 73) ‘I have taken pictures in rain and snow and duplicated exact copies of this same type of picture in the past for experimentation purposes.’
  • 74) ‘More likely, they thought they could duplicate the Spain success.’
  • 75) ‘Don't try to duplicate someone else's success.’
  • 76) ‘No sooner had the last drop of champagne been poured in Miami than other small-market teams began to wonder if they could duplicate the Marlins' success.’
  • 77) ‘Nearly from the beginning of his bodybuilding career, people have followed his path, hoping to duplicate some of his success.’
  • 78) ‘Oh yeah, you may scoff but soon you'll be copying my pink eye look and trying to duplicate my Gabriel's trumpet-like sneeze.’
  • 79) ‘The first question to answer is whether your business success can be easily duplicated by someone else.’
  • 80) ‘It takes about 20 minutes to cook on the griddle, arrives piping hot, and is covered in a tasty Japanese sauce I haven't been able to duplicate at home.’
  • 81) ‘Thus the band is left with studio recordings that are almost impossible to duplicate onstage.’
  • 82) ‘However, by its very nature that quality cannot be duplicated though sometimes I was able to adapt it and make it my own.’
  • 83) ‘It is impossible for us now to duplicate the Great Pyramid even if every country's resources and a trillion dollars were spent on the project.’
  • 84) ‘But the weather combined with the intensely chalky soil yields a sparkling wine that is impossible to duplicate in many New or Old World climates.’
  • 85) ‘With the ever increasing security gate access codes had become nearly impossible to duplicate, but with the warp drive they didn't even have to try.’
  • 86) ‘Since he has never been able to duplicate that condition, that tells me he does not have a game plan for achieving it - that it was luck.’
  • 87) ‘The key to franchise success is being able to duplicate what someone else has already successfully done.’
  • 88) ‘You can even maintain balance in positions impossible to duplicate with free weights.’
  • 89) ‘Some of these make the most of the new medium, and would be impossible to duplicate in the print world.’
  • 90) ‘If the trees were properly priced to reflect this value or if the logging company was responsible for duplicating all of the services that the trees previously provided, it simply would not be economically smart to cut them all down.’
  • 91) ‘Copycat journalists amplified this dubious academic research by claiming that teenage murderers were duplicating their favourite violent scenes.’
  • 92) ‘Now the president is saying, oh, well, we might give you tax relief if you will sign on to my prescription drug proposal, which duplicates coverage that's already provided.’
  • 93) ‘Research that duplicates other work unnecessarily or which is not of sufficient quality to contribute something useful to existing knowledge is unethical’
  • 94) ‘Alliances create better communities which tap into the strength of their multiple institutions and decrease unnecessarily duplicated resources.’
  • 95) ‘First, we needed to ensure that all desired curricular outcomes were being addressed and that no outcomes were unnecessarily duplicated.’
  • 96) ‘The bill would also force the earth to devote its full attention to absorbing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, rather than duplicating products already available from the private sector, he added.’
  • 97) ‘This duplicates a service already provided locally by councils and voluntary groups and is entirely unnecessary.’
  • 98) ‘Is it the duty of an already stretched institution to duplicate the role of common rooms, to cut back the funding to its essential political role, and seek to maintain an unwieldy sabbatical structure?’
  • 99) ‘He said the exercise would not duplicate routine examinations already carried out by the District Auditor, Audit Commission and the Social Services Inspectorate.’
  • 100) ‘But he believes the project will simply duplicate work that police already carry out and says the money would be better spent on the street than on figures.’
  • 101) ‘The Fund's monies will be spent over a three-year period and will not duplicate existing services already provided by the Home Office.’
  • 102) ‘We begin by doing a community profile to assess what the needs are in the area, because it's important not to duplicate services that already exist.’
  • 103) ‘He denied it was duplicating work already being done by Hull Council, or repeating expensive studies done in the past.’
  • 104) ‘In Norway the government has banned new medicine which duplicates medicine already in use, therefore drug companies have no incentive for using animal experiments to develop medicine which they cannot sell.’
  • 105) ‘While informative, there are many gaps when there is no information and a few times the text duplicates things already stated in the audio commentary.’
  • 106) ‘The center gets involved only if all significantly affected parties agree to its presence, and tries not to duplicate services already available.’
  • 107) ‘Others said a united relief committee would duplicate machinery already in existence and might lead to confusion.’
  • 108) ‘Personally I couldn't care less about trying to duplicate effects that have already been achieved using the arcane language of electronics.’
  • 109) ‘Some of the capacity indicators duplicate measurements already used elsewhere in the ESI.’
  • 110) ‘If the requirement duplicates a condition already satisfied, it imposes a double burden on the provider of a service, and it therefore cannot be justified.’
  • 111) ‘To the extent that civil unions will duplicate marriage, then extending that privilege is clearly unnecessary.’
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