queue cue

Definitions

  • 1) A waiting list or other means of organizing people or objects into a first-come-first-served order.
  • 2) A line of waiting people or vehicles.
  • 3) A data structure from which the first item that can be retrieved is the one stored earliest.
  • 4) A sequence of stored data or programs awaiting processing.
  • 5) A long braid of hair worn hanging down the back of the neck; a pigtail.
  • 6) A line of persons waiting anywhere.
  • 7) A tail-like appendage of hair; a pigtail.
  • 8) a line of people or vehicles waiting for something
  • 9) (information processing) an ordered list of tasks to be performed or messages to be transmitted
  • 10) a braid of hair at the back of the head
  • 11) A tail; in heraldry, the tail of a beast.
  • 12) The tail-piece of a violin or similar instrument.
  • 13) A tail or pendent braid of hair; a pigtail: originally part of the wig, but afterward, and toward the close of the eighteenth century, when it was in common use, formed of the hair of the head. See cue,1.
  • 14) Same as cue, 2.
  • 15) In musical notation, the stem or tail of a note.
  • 16) UK To arrange themselves into a physical waiting queue.
  • 17) To fasten the hair into a queue.
  • 18) UK To put oneself or itself at the end of a waiting line.
  • 19) computing To add to a queue data structure.
  • 20) form a queue, form a line, stand in line
  • 21) To place in a sequence.
  • 22) To braid or twist (hair) into a queue.
  • 23) To get in line.
  • 24) To fasten, as hair, in a queue.

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete, UK A small portion of bread or beer; the quantity bought with a farthing or half farthing and noted with a q (for Latin quadrans farthing) in the buttery books.
  • 2) sports, billiards, snooker, pool A straight tapering rod used to impel the balls in various games.
  • 3) The name of the Latin script letter Q/q.
  • 4) An action or event that is a signal for somebody to do something.
  • 5) An extract from the music for another part printed, usually in smaller notes, within a performer's part as a signal to enter after a long rest.
  • 6) Games A long stick with a concave attachment at one end for shoving disks in shuffleboard.
  • 7) The letter q.
  • 8) Psychology A stimulus, either consciously or unconsciously perceived, that elicits or signals a type of behavior.
  • 9) Archaic A mood; a disposition.
  • 10) A signal, such as a word or action, used to prompt another event in a performance, such as an actor's speech or entrance, a change in lighting, or a sound effect.
  • 11) Games A long tapered stick with a leather tip used to strike the cue ball in billiards and pool.
  • 12) A gesture by a conductor signaling the entrance of a performer or part.
  • 13) A hint or suggestion.
  • 14) Archaic One's assigned role or function.
  • 15) A reminder or prompting.
  • 16) The tail; the end of a thing; especially, a tail-like twist of hair worn at the back of the head; a queue.
  • 17) The part one has to perform in, or as in, a play.
  • 18) obsolete A small portion of bread or beer; the quantity bought with a farthing or half farthing.
  • 19) The last words of a play actor's speech, serving as an intimation for the next succeeding player to speak; any word or words which serve to remind a player to speak or to do something; a catchword.
  • 20) colloq. Humor; temper of mind.
  • 21) A hint or intimation.
  • 22) A straight tapering rod used to impel the balls in playing billiards.
  • 23) a stimulus that provides information about what to do
  • 24) sports implement consisting of a tapering rod used to strike a cue ball in pool or billiards
  • 25) The name of the letter Q, q.
  • 26) The tail; something hanging down like a tail, as the long curl of a wig or a long roll or plait of hair. In this sense also queue. See pigtail.
  • 27) A number of persons ranged in a line, awaiting their turn to be served, as at a bank or a ticket-office. In this sense also queue.
  • 28) In music, a fragment of some other part printed in small notes, at the end of a long rest or silence occurring in the part of a voice or an instrument, to assist the singer or player in beginning promptly and correctly.
  • 29) Hence— A hint; an intimation; a guiding suggestion.
  • 30) Humor; turn or temper of mind.
  • 31) A farthing; a half-farthing.
  • 32) The part which one is to play; a course of action prescribed, or made necessary by circumstances.
  • 33) Theat, words which when spoken at the end of a speech in the course of a play are the signal for an answering speech, or for the entrance of another actor, etc.
  • 34) A straight tapering rod tipped with a small soft pad, used to strike the balls in billiards, bagatelle, and similar games.
  • 35) A farthing's worth; the quantity bought with a farthing, as a small quantity of bread or beer.
  • 36) A support for a lance; a lance-rest.
  • 37) sports, billiards, snooker, pool The act of taking aim on the cue ball with the cue and hitting it.
  • 38) The act of giving someone a cue signal.
  • 39) Totieintoacueortail.
  • 40) To tie into a cue or tail.
  • 41) To insert into the sequence of a performance.
  • 42) To give a cue to; signal or prompt.
  • 43) To position (an audio or video recording) in readiness for playing.
  • 44) Games To strike (a ball) with a cue.
  • 45) To form into a cue; to braid; to twist.

Examples

  • 1) America must be at the front of that queue.
  • 2) People are queueing to get in from one in the morning.
  • 3) All of a sudden a woman muscled her way to the front of the queue.
  • 4) The chain apologised after the problem led to long queues and angry scenes at checkouts across the country.
  • 5) The pair are said to have joined a car queue then left with takeaways while still in the saddle.
  • 6) This is an opportunity for those that really want the upgrade to get to the front of the queue.
  • 7) There were scenes of chaos as hundreds queued to take buses to other destinations in France.
  • 8) Thousands of people queued to pay tribute at the opera house in Donetsk where his body was displayed.
  • 9) Thousands more will join the dole queues within a year or so.
  • 10) There was chaos at airports as queues formed after the introduction of restrictions on hand luggage.
  • 11) They want to meet the people in the queue.
  • 12) The walkout led to lengthy queues for buses and cramped conditions on vehicles.
  • 13) Why not have food run by a national food service and distributed with rationing by queue?
  • 14) My new friend rushed me to the head of one queue.
  • 15) Do they jump the queue at the job centre?
  • 16) When she reached the front of the queue the doctor spoke a different language.
  • 17) Behind him was a long queue of angry motorists pushing him forwards.
  • 18) Instead they will have to join the long queue of unsecured creditors.
  • 19) Long queues formed again outside many branches.
  • 20) Over the past week people have queued for hours to withdraw cash.
  • 21) Teams are teaching commuters to form queues at bus stops.
  • 22) New research shows millions are deeply resentful because they think new arrivals jump the queue for housing.
  • 23) But if the space on the roads is not priced it will be rationed by queues instead.
  • 24) An electronic voice announced to a queue of one that cashier number three was now free.
  • 25) The line of people queuing to have blood tests snakes out of the waiting room and round the corner.
  • 26) At the head of the queue is a woman carrying a baby in her arms.
  • 27) Next project in the queue is a Harry Potter scarf.
  • 28) Mayende also argues that illegal occupations could not be rewarded by providing access to housing on a preferential basis - which he refers to as queue-jumping.
  • 29) These tickets will be called "Cattle Class", and passengers will be treated the same as existing customers but importantly, will not have the put up with standing in queue with the plebs in the standard "Pleb Class" that already exists.
  • 30) I also had a chance to taste Morten's 2007 Meritage blend which was in queue for the bottling line.
  • 31) And I know I'll be in queue to see it twice. shelton p lindsay
  • 32) ‘Upon the group's return a queue of vehicles had lined up to go across the river.’
  • 33) ‘As queues of people lined up in a typical British orderly fashion, traffic on the North Circular began to build up, with punters travelling from as far as Birmingham to get their hands on a cheap deal.’
  • 34) ‘Vehicles previously stuck in queues past the A2 junction suddenly speed up and try to get the best position as three lanes expand to eight for the toll booths.’
  • 35) ‘The publication of each new volume prompts fevered speculation on the story line and late-night queues of children outside bookshops.’
  • 36) ‘This is the time of year when motorists, going about their lawful business, are likely to find themselves at the back of huge queues of vehicles.’
  • 37) ‘Yet we have already seen long queues of vehicles outside York petrol stations as people wait to fill up the tank.’
  • 38) ‘The queue of asylum-seekers awaiting decisions on their applications is twice as long as previously claimed, it was revealed yesterday.’
  • 39) ‘The young woman, a child clinging to each hand, urged those in the momentous queue lining the River Thames to pay her respects to the late Queen Mother on her behalf.’
  • 40) ‘In its final throes the decaying rock is whittled down into curious rounded shapes standing in a line, like a queue of shrouded figures.’
  • 41) ‘When there are deadlines, we tend to wait until the last moment, after which we line up in endless queues, swearing, as if someone has forced us to wait to the last day.’
  • 42) ‘A team of around 30 health board personnel were on site offering the treatment and there were long queues as people awaited treatment.’
  • 43) ‘No queues of mourners lined the halls to say a final farewell to the man hailed as the workers' hero as his body lay in state at the House of Parliament yesterday.’
  • 44) ‘So every morning people had to line up in a queue for their turn.’
  • 45) ‘They are at present in a long queue awaiting full examination.’
  • 46) ‘Given its location there should be a queue of developers awaiting the chance to purchase this valuable site.’
  • 47) ‘At the American supermarket I learnt that we must join the line, not the queue.’
  • 48) ‘Our first encounter with the festival was the enormous queue of people who lined up to enter.’
  • 49) ‘The long queues outside principals' offices in many township schools made it difficult for the schools to concentrate on teaching as the teachers had to attend to the queues.’
  • 50) ‘At the height of the season all you are likely to see will be the slow moving queue awaiting entrance to the museum.’
  • 51) ‘By the time we reached Roman Road, only half a mile as the crow flies from our starting point, the bus was jam-packed full and sailing past the waiting queues.’
  • 52) ‘A bitmap indicates which queues are not empty, and the individual queues are FIFO lists.’
  • 53) ‘If there are no independent commands in the queue at all, the FPU unit will be idling for 5 clocks.’
  • 54) ‘When packets are dropped this way, a new entry is stored in a special queue of unresolved addresses.’
  • 55) ‘As soon as the BSY bit is cleared, the host can issue another queued command to the drive, allowing a queue of commands to be built in the drive.’
  • 56) ‘Queuing only optimizes command re-ordering if a queue of requests is built up in the drive.’
  • 57) ‘Real-time FIFOs are queues that can be read from and written to by Linux processes.’
  • 58) ‘The scripts, which control the call flow, will queue the call to a list of queues at the same time.’
  • 59) ‘The wait queue is a list of processes blocking on the semaphore.’
  • 60) ‘The Replay queue unloading controller releases the commands for both queues hoping that they will be executed successfully.’
  • 61) ‘As long as you are connected to the Internet, Click-N-Run downloads packages until your queue is empty again.’
  • 62) ‘It simply means the Ethernet driver had free descriptors in its queue and has accepted our data for transmission.’
  • 63) ‘However, from time to time in the short term, the aggregate queues can become congested, as traffic and QoS are shuffled within the network.’
  • 64) ‘Instead, it services the I / O request at the head of the FIFO queue, plus a couple extra for good measure.’
  • 65) ‘To remedy the situation, I wrote a web script which bypasses the email queue and places greetings from Readers directly into my Inbox.’
  • 66) ‘In addition to solving this problem, Linux 2.4 queues will be more robust and scale better to multiple processors.’
  • 67) ‘Once the depth of the queue is reached, the storage of each new address in the queue causes a previously stored address to be output from the queue.’
  • 68) ‘The at and batch commands put jobs into the at queue.’
  • 69) ‘The Call Presentation section in the skillset configuration dialog allows you to specify the order in which calls are serviced in the queue.’
  • 70) ‘One or more application tasks then read messages from the queue to consume the delivered data.’
  • 71) ‘Database logs and indexes are huge I / O bottlenecks, as are mail server queues.’
  • 72) ‘Chinese men were forced to braid their long hair into a queue or ‘pigtail’.’
  • 73) ‘For tonight, he had tied back his hair in a tidy queue, and his eyes seemed especially bright from his sapphire-colored tunic.’
  • 74) ‘His long, shoulder length hair tied in a queue, he walked toward the small stable where his horse was waiting.’
  • 75) ‘His long, braided queue of glossy black hair bobbed lazily back and forth from shoulder to shoulder.’
  • 76) ‘The woman had a hard-nosed look to her, sporting a warrior's queue of green hair.’
  • 77) ‘Now TV stations around the world are queuing up to buy the series.’
  • 78) ‘Academics, meanwhile, have been queuing up to back fiscal autonomy.’
  • 79) ‘We need more skilled craftsmen, and yet there are young people queuing up for apprenticeships who simply cannot get them.’
  • 80) ‘Shoppers in Manchester are queuing up for anti-ageing treatment being offered in pioneer trial by Boots.’
  • 81) ‘It would seem that they are queuing up to buy into the Premiership.’
  • 82) ‘Now residents who once wanted to leave the estate are queuing up to buy their newly-renovated council homes.’
  • 83) ‘And let's not pretend these fans are queuing up to see a classic boxing match.’
  • 84) ‘Pupils of Melksham schools and their parents have been queuing up for extra lessons on Saturday mornings.’
  • 85) ‘At the same time, credit card companies and hire purchase outfits are queuing up to let us spend money we don't have yet.’
  • 86) ‘Prisoners are queuing up to get a place on the course, not least because it means they can spend a whole day with their partner.’
  • 87) ‘He is convinced Esso won't have to wait long before potential recruits are queuing up for an interview.’
  • 88) ‘Sutton residents are queuing up in their hundreds for affordable homes, according to new figures.’
  • 89) ‘Still volunteers are queuing up for hours to help, but unless they have expertise their help is now not needed.’
  • 90) ‘Developers are already queuing up to buy sites, although it is several years before a start can be made here.’
  • 91) ‘Sponsors, so we were assured, would be queuing up for a piece of the action.’
  • 92) ‘Counsellors and trauma experts are queuing up to offer assistance to the Russian town of Beslan.’
  • 93) ‘It will be a venue of legends and the big names are queuing up to appear.’
  • 94) ‘Pupils are now queuing up try out the two sets of safety glasses, more commonly used in science lessons.’
  • 95) ‘Residents of Kendal are queuing up for a glimpse of a giant reticulated python.’
  • 96) ‘Literary agents are queuing up to sign on young writers from such courses, she says.’
  • 97) ‘All write operations are queued to the secondary device, or the journal device, which may be disk or tape.’
  • 98) ‘When data is ready, that thread/dæmon wakes up and queues the received data for use by the consuming application threads or processes.’
  • 99) ‘Once turned on, programs are queued up for commercial scanning after the end of the show.’
  • 100) ‘A key contributor to the stability and the speed of postfix is the intelligent way in which it queues mail.’
  • 101) ‘Once you create the worker thread, you can queue work in a fashion similar to how work is queued with the default worker thread.’
  • 102) ‘Two clicks on Magnatune queues a never-ending selection of our music in the genre of your choice.’
  • 103) ‘This is used when a script which is controlling the call has finished executing and has not yet queued the call for any skillsets.’
  • 104) ‘Once the type of sales function has been determined, the call will be queued to the appropriate skillsets.’
  • 105) ‘The call blocks until events are ready and then returns all available events once any event is queued.’
  • 106) ‘All up, most of the time you'll queue some actions and leave the movement to the AI.’
  • 107) ‘The inability to queue units and the lack of unit formations are inexcusable omissions.’
  • 108) ‘The service routine looks up the protocol type inside the received frame and queues it appropriately for later processing.’
  • 109) ‘LP is telling you that LPD is not running on the local server, which it must connect to in order to queue the request for the remote printer.’
  • 110) ‘When a command is given to the hard drive, the device needs to determine if this command is to be queued or processed right away.’
  • 111) ‘If not, it will be queued in the computer to which the printer is attached.’
  • 112) ‘Bulk uploads that can be submitted will be queued for processing and once this issue has been resolved, will resume flowing through the system.’
  • 113) ‘The chip includes hyperthreading, which allows a processor to queue up one software thread while processing a different one.’
  • 114) ‘Before combat, several actions can be queued for each character, to be carried out when activated.’
  • 115) ‘A print server can rip, store and queue hundreds of megabytes of print jobs without slowing down the network.’
  • 116) we stood in the queue four hours to get the tickets

Examples

  • 1) So why did the emperor of the unexpected elect to give the cue away?
  • 2) People take their cues about whether to respect a leader from the leader himself.
  • 3) That can only be a cue for one man.
  • 4) Take a cue from your other half and mirror her style.
  • 5) Her behaviour should give you important cues.
  • 6) It has all the right cues for young people.
  • 7) cue panic and people calling an ambulance.
  • 8) The cast stand about awkwardly, dropping props and cues left and right.
  • 9) cue another scribbled diagram: she evidently does her research.
  • 10) One way of finding a good flavour match is to take your cue from the other ingredients that cheese is often served with.
  • 11) Right on cue for the Chelsea flower show the weather is set to blossom in the coming week.
  • 12) I asked how he could still pick up his musical cues.
  • 13) I would request another or cue option and hopefully an apology for this very poor advice.
  • 14) Play was held up for 20 minutes amid accusations he picked off the tip of his cue as he struggled for form.
  • 15) cue one of you spending an hour after dinner composing a grumpy email to the restaurant, while the other takes the bin out.
  • 16) One takes one 's cue from them, surely.
  • 17) ANGRY BROOMSTICK yeah the title cue is amazing and dark, but that's the whole point of the story.
  • 18) Keep workin 'those scales, baby; your cue is about to be called.
  • 19) With a medium as diverse as games, I'm starting to take a cue from the music folks and trying to broaden my tools as a critic.
  • 20) Lents neighborhood association might take a cue from the neighbors in Eliot, adjacent to the Rose Quarter.
  • 21) When you start placing them on the board in cue cards, it shows you what you really know, or don't know about your story.
  • 22) Inspired by early rave and dream-pop, witch house also takes its cue from the "chopped and screwed" remix technique so prevalent in early 90s hip-hop.
  • 23) Word on the street was that Snafu takes a cue from the Superman comics: by day a mild mannered watering hole but by night a super human drink fest.
  • 24) Let me be the first to call for us sportsmen to take a cue from the wolves and turkeys!
  • 25) The entire scheme is covered with a plush green roof that takes its cue from the surrounding countryside.
  • 26) ‘The Mayor, not heeding his cue, began his speech early and failed to mention the conference and exhibition sponsors.’
  • 27) ‘The colors and moods combine with the actors' performances and haunting musical cues to create a slightly surreal atmosphere.’
  • 28) ‘This fosters a kind of sensitivity toward the body language of the actors and the musical cues in the narrative.’
  • 29) ‘Actors miss their cues, the dubbing is just out of synch, the sound effects are too loud and don't match up with the action on-screen.’
  • 30) ‘We already had had disasters with actors losing their cue when their partner skipped a line, or having black outs with no one on stage able to cut in.’
  • 31) ‘During a performance, musical cues and sung instructions are given by the leaders, requiring constant attention from the others.’
  • 32) ‘Everyone else seems to be waiting for an offstage cue before they perform, as if unsure of what to do or say next.’
  • 33) ‘My next show had two light cues and no sound cues.’
  • 34) ‘There is a generous amount of sound cues but no speech in any form, since the developers have elected to remove things like unit acknowledgement.’
  • 35) ‘Children don't understand many of the common cues in a live performance.’
  • 36) ‘Time passes slowly as the cast expend most of their energy on dodgy accents, very little on the performances and none at all on picking up cues.’
  • 37) ‘Meanwhile, on the field, Stacy waited for her cue to begin singing.’
  • 38) ‘He looked toward the door and cleared his throat obnoxiously, as if someone had missed his or her cue to enter.’
  • 39) ‘The girl takes a cue and begins dancing, keeping almost perfect beat to the tune.’
  • 40) ‘Safety cues or performance references must be stated positively if you expect your class to improve their skills and continue attending.’
  • 41) ‘Alcohol may serve as a cue, making certain behaviors more accessible and likely.’
  • 42) ‘Both technical aspects were designed effectively, although unfortunately on this opening night both sound and lighting had missed cues and glitches.’
  • 43) ‘Having the orchestra play straight through these groups of cues keeps their performance really sharp and also saves time overall.’
  • 44) ‘He needs a more subtle way of looking for his musical cues from the monitor at the front of the stage.’
  • 45) ‘The actors flurry about backstage, hissing, thumping and gesticulating wildly between cues.’
  • 46) ‘If that sounds painfully scary, you could just say you'll e-mail him later, which is an obvious cue for him to offer up his address.’
  • 47) ‘This was the cue for the home team to get their act together and they did.’
  • 48) ‘This was the cue for a hold up which lasted around five minutes as players, mentors and fans pleaded with the referee to reverse his decision.’
  • 49) ‘It was the cue for many of the home fans to depart.’
  • 50) ‘That was the cue for Paul, who has been criticised at times this season, to take centre stage, and he answered those critics in no uncertain terms.’
  • 51) ‘Instead, it was the cue for England's forwards to take charge.’
  • 52) ‘And in this smart pub, where a Glaswegian salad is the order of the day, that's the cue for another round of reminiscing.’
  • 53) ‘This served as the cue for sections of the media north of the border to lament the fact that a similar progressive outlook did not exist in this country.’
  • 54) ‘The act of the secondary observer writing down an observation when the primary observer has not indicated a detection can serve as a cue to the primary observer.’
  • 55) ‘Be advised that each species responds to specific environmental cues to begin migration and may take flight ahead of schedule.’
  • 56) ‘Clinic visits may serve as important cues to action that serve as a basis for behavior change.’
  • 57) ‘Then, taking their obvious cue, they began to brawl.’
  • 58) ‘The trend snowballed with many industries taking the cue and entering this market as they found it difficult to revive their industries due to various reasons.’
  • 59) ‘A handwritten tick appears above the word death, but the report has no number inserted in it, in spite of the obvious cue to enter a number in the specified space.’
  • 60) ‘As if this was the cue to begin, all four started to transform.’
  • 61) ‘This was my cue to begin a slow approach with the camera, all the time being eyed warily by the triggerfish.’
  • 62) ‘Two wires served to deliver electrical cues - one each to the brain cells associated with the rats left and right whiskers, respectively.’
  • 63) ‘The plan should list peak flow meter readings or specific symptoms that will serve as your cue to go to the ER.’
  • 64) ‘The digit served as a cue to make a guess in the probability-guessing task.’
  • 65) ‘The primary care physician's emotional response to a patient can serve as an early cue to pursue a somatization diagnosis.’
  • 66) ‘Variety maximises the number of retrieval cues for recall of information.’
  • 67) ‘The context acts as a cue to retrieve the memory of events that occurred in its presence.’
  • 68) ‘You lose glasses and keys either because your brain never encoded an event or piece of information or because a cue devised to trigger your memory failed.’
  • 69) ‘The results of this study also demonstrate that gestures can be external retrieval cues for a memory event.’
  • 70) ‘These kinds of cues are generally effective when a free recall test - a memory search without cues - starts to come up empty.’
  • 71) ‘In the absence of explicit retrieval cues, pair recall will be facilitated by factors that promote unitization of each pair.’
  • 72) ‘Any cinema studies student will be able to go into great detail about all the cues put into cinema to make us understand that something not actually represented is going on.’
  • 73) ‘He admitted defeat and asked the usher if she'd seen Cecelia, offering the turquoise turban as a cue to memory.’
  • 74) ‘Developing such cognitive networks provides more cues for recall and makes the connections more stable and durable over time, making them easier to remember.’
  • 75) ‘Of course, the pictures also provided additional cues for recall.’
  • 76) ‘Religious ideas and practices will not form part of social identification in the absence of cues and memories.’
  • 77) ‘Another experiment examined uncertainty about memory rather than sensory cues.’
  • 78) ‘However, we provided no cues during recall in the experiments in the present study.’
  • 79) ‘This not only identifies what is considered high in fiber but provides a cue to aid in recall.’
  • 80) ‘In this study, the use of language specific retrieval cues did not yield language-specific recall.’
  • 81) ‘The prospective memory cues occurred in 12 trials out of the total 112 trials.’
  • 82) ‘The use of empirically based cues to mistaken memories was similar for both inaccurate and accurate judges.’
  • 83) ‘The boxes were removed from sight because previous research has shown that location acts as a cue to memory.’
  • 84) ‘Retrieval cues do not bring about a complete memory of some events because most of the event was not encoded.’
  • 85) ‘In fact, in some cases corroborative evidence serves as the retrieval cue for the repressed memory.’
  • 86) ‘Lacking auditory and visual cues, the e-mail message or newsgroup post can be productively ambiguous in tone.’
  • 87) ‘In waking life, the best that we can do is interpret overt cues and then attempt to understand a person's intentions and predict their actions, for which dreams offer such a venue.’
  • 88) ‘Clothing and decoration provide important cues to aid interpersonal and intrapersonal communication.’
  • 89) ‘But very sensitive hearing is necessary to hear all the acoustic cues in speech sounds.’
  • 90) ‘Because of this selectivity, the nurses pay less attention to irrelevant cues and use fewer information cues overall.’
  • 91) ‘He needed always to be on the lookout for subtle cues indicating how his mother would behave.’
  • 92) ‘Was it a case of a people merely following the cues of their leader?’
  • 93) ‘We were the ones who did not know the protocols - but followed the few cues.’
  • 94) ‘The experimenter effect is a term used to describe any of a number of subtle cues or signals from an experimenter that affect the performance or response of subjects in the experiment.’
  • 95) ‘Consequently, these characteristics may serve as cues that are used by respondents to guide their interactions with survey interviewers.’
  • 96) ‘But didn't go any further until he had taken some cue from her that it was okay.’
  • 97) ‘A tinny soundtrack is used to cue the arrival of dramatic tension - a job that is better left to performers.’
  • 98) ‘It cues our hate to keep us watching, like a bullfighter taunting a bull: waving red to draw our attention and anger.’
  • 99) ‘So it cues you that something's around and you try and contain that.’
  • 100) ‘He won't speak to the press unless an overture of fanned notes cues him.’
  • 101) ‘Note the telling musical score, anticipating events, cueing the audience as to when to be scared, assuming we cannot figure that out ourselves.’
  • 102) ‘When cued by the end of a song or solo, the room would erupt into enthusiastic applause and ‘woos,’ not to mention the standing ovations that brought both concerts to an end.’
  • 103) ‘Our vast inside sources cued us in about this extraordinary gentleman.’
  • 104) ‘The cast is great, but everything is so cued, signed, and anticipated that the movie makes me sick at times.’
  • 105) ‘So, not content with reducing my audience to laughter with my first attempt, I cued the musicians to start over.’
  • 106) ‘The musicians sit scattered at both ends of the stage, warming up for an improv exercise in which they cue dancers to stop dancing by quickly interrupting their movement with music.’
  • 107) ‘Like laugh tracks, they cue our emotional responses, but they also disguise their coerciveness by making us feel included.’
  • 108) ‘As the game shifts in tone from the humorous to the dark and back again, this production feels compelled to cue the audience with an almost comic earnestness.’
  • 109) ‘But when he goes down to the valley, it's the same two sentences in Spanish, and then they cue the mariachis.’
  • 110) ‘Some lines in his movies sound as if they were written to cue his reactions, and they are the more memorable for that.’
  • 111) ‘In the earlier days, I wanted the music to cue you almost like a curtain.’
  • 112) ‘Ok I embellish but that's my interpretation when she cues the violins.’
  • 113) ‘On set, instead of saying ‘Action’, he cued his actors by firing a gun.’
  • 114) ‘A slicker actor would have cued revulsion in children, but here the icky inevitability of movie clinches had been thwarted.’
  • 115) ‘A group of teenagers have taken it upon themselves to cue a new snooker hall for the people of the town.’
  • 116) ‘Unity was the message; cue loud applause from almost the entire room.’
  • 117) ‘Make your reminder cues both informative and obvious.’
  • 118) ‘I can be cued back through patient prompting, but it takes me a while, and it might not last.’
  • 119) ‘This may include cueing or prompting, questioning, modeling, telling, or discussing.’
  • 120) ‘For recall to be the measure that most appropriately captures the process of shopping and product choice, shoppers would remember the brand name without being cued or reminded.’
  • 121) ‘If I forget a line, they're not going to cue me, you know?’
  • 122) ‘A manager who has to train distant new hires can directly present the orientation session using the video/audio streaming feed, cueing slides showing detailed information and taking questions from the audience in real time.’
  • 123) ‘Because recorded motion can be cued and played back live, the puppeteer can layer a performance, as one would produce a multitrack audio recording.’
  • 124) ‘The risers are rolled in; lights are fixed, sound is cued and video monitors are put in place.’
  • 125) ‘See, this is what they try and teach you in school, but kids know it already if they're on their decks, cueing records up and learning to count them in.’
  • 126) ‘Since many of the program's participants had never played a record, let alone cued one up, they began by first explaining how a record makes sound on a turntable and then showing them how to handle and cue it.’
  • 127) ‘He fixes my ‘broken’ tape recorder and cues it faster than I can write this sentence.’
  • 128) ‘Actually controlling the quality of the audio and getting it cued up is the responsibility of the studio manager, effectively a sound engineer, who prepares audio clips for broadcast.’
  • 129) ‘Instead of having to cue up a tape and set up the mix I could just listen.’
  • 130) ‘Streaming-music sites cue up an amazing playlist of songs, a variety of features and plenty of customer stickiness for advertisers.’
  • 131) ‘Press the same button again to put the camera shot back on, and then you would press a button next to it to cue up the next graphic.’
  • 132) ‘To listen to a storm, cue up this DVD and give the volume knob a sharp, clockwise twist.’
  • 133) ‘Full screen graphics can be cued in and cued up by using two buttons.’
  • 134) ‘If you own the tape, its probably cued up to this piece.’
  • 135) ‘When I stick it in the drive again an hour or even a year later, it cues it back up to where I left off.’
  • 136) ‘I suppose we are meant to include the guy who cues her vocal track as part of the band.’
  • 137) ‘He seemed to have been having difficulty taking out our track and cueing the next set of music and it caused tremendous problems for us because the band was going in fits and starts.’
  • 138) ‘The tape with the self-righteous denunciations has been taken off the reel while the new tape, full of self-righteous media navel-gazing, is cued up.’
  • 139) ‘The director called for the clip, but, oops, it wasn't cued.’
  • 140) ‘I think that's a good goal to shoot for, but I don't necessarily agree that everything has to be cued up in one master list to achieve it.’
  • 141) ‘The snickering stopped when I realized - cue melodramatic organ music - that the creepy kid was me.’
  • 142) ‘When the cue hits the object ball it will bend the tangent line back away from the corner.’
  • 143) ‘If I strike a billiard ball with a cue stick, I effect a transfer of [physical] energy.’
  • 144) ‘Also banned from cabins is sporting equipment such as cricket bats, tennis racquets, golf clubs and snooker cues.’
  • 145) ‘Unlike, say, a tennis racket or cricket bat, a snooker cue is thought irreplaceable by its owner.’
  • 146) ‘Bend forward into a shooting position and see if you feel you can sight straight down your cue.’
  • 147) ‘This game is more than just a game of balls and pockets and cues.’
  • 148) ‘England was resistant to this change for some reason - the cue was available in billiard rooms by 1734, but did not gain real popularity until around 1800.’
  • 149) ‘Prizes for winners and runners-up are new snooker cues.’
  • 150) ‘At one stage he went out armed with a snooker cue, but went back inside.’
  • 151) ‘One man suffered penknife stab wounds to his back and another was hit around the head with a snooker cue.’
  • 152) ‘Shoot straight at the object ball, striking the cue ball one cue tip below center.’
  • 153) ‘It got worse when, attempting to summon a waiter for more wine, I mistakenly outbid everyone in the raffle for a snooker cue signed by innumerable world champions.’
  • 154) ‘Other items include a snooker cue signed by top stars, an England under 21s signed match ball and Bath rugby shirts and balls signed by players.’
  • 155) ‘Perhaps his vanity had caused him to only use a snooker cue chalk once and then throw it away.’
  • 156) ‘Every time I screw my cue together, my goal is to be a better player when I unscrew it.’
  • 157) ‘Following centuries of Billiards dominated by England and France, during the 19th century a third country became obsessed with the sport of cues and balls.’
  • 158) ‘A quick nudge of the cue and the 4 ball was in, center pocket.’
  • 159) ‘The usual effects can be heard such as the cue hitting the ball and such.’
  • 160) ‘He just grabbed his cue and began lining up his shot, looking incredibly sullen.’
  • 161) ‘Pool is supposed to be an easy starting point for cue sports.’
  • 162) ‘‘I missed a few easy balls today but I am cueing brilliantly,’ he said.’
  • 163) ‘But I started cueing well and Alan couldn't put me away,’ he said.’
  • 164) ‘It gives me time get back to the way I was cueing before Sheffield.’
  • 165) ‘And the three times Regal Masters champion was soon cueing superbly.’
  • 166) ‘I am cueing well, but every now and then I make an unbelievable howler.’
  • 167) ‘‘Stephen deserved to win it - he was cueing beautifully and produced his best form when it mattered,’ said the six-times champion.’
  • 168) ‘The Welshman just about deserved to edge ahead after cueing so well in the early stages of the match, although his game dipped after the interval.’
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