oral vs aural vs verbal

oral aural verbal

Definitions

  • 1) uncountable oral sex.
  • 2) countable A spoken test or examination, particularly in a language class.
  • 3) countable A physical examination of the mouth.
  • 4) An academic examination in which questions and answers are spoken rather than written.
  • 5) In crinoids, same as oral valve (which see, under oral).
  • 6) Relating to the mouth; mouthly.
  • 7) Spoken rather than written.
  • 8) Linguistics Articulated through the mouth only, with the nasal passages closed.
  • 9) Psychology Of or relating to the first stage of psychosexual development in psychoanalytic theory, from birth to about 18 months, during which the mouth is the chief focus of exploration and pleasure. The oral stage is followed by the anal stage.
  • 10) Used in or taken through the mouth.
  • 11) Consisting of or using speech.
  • 12) Of or pertaining to the mouth; surrounding or lining the mouth.
  • 13) Uttered by the mouth, or in words; spoken, not written; verbal
  • 14) a stage in psychosexual development when the child's interest is concentrated in the mouth; fixation at this stage is said to result in dependence, selfishness, and aggression
  • 15) of or relating to or affecting or for use in the mouth
  • 16) of or involving the mouth or mouth region or the surface on which the mouth is located

Definitions

  • 1) Of or pertaining to an aura.
  • 2) Of or pertaining to sound.
  • 3) Of or pertaining to the ear.
  • 4) Of or pertaining to the air, or to an aura.
  • 5) relating to or characterized by an aura
  • 6) of or pertaining to hearing or the ear
  • 7) Pertaining to the air or to an aura.
  • 8) Perceived by the ear; learned by hearing; auricular.
  • 9) Relating to the ear: as, the aural orifice; aural surgery.

Definitions

  • 1) grammar A verb form which does not function as a predicate, or a word derived from a verb. In English, infinitives, participles and gerunds are verbals.
  • 2) (Gram.) A derived from a verb.
  • 3) In grammar, a derived from a verb and sharing in its senses and constructions; a verbal .
  • 4) Of, or relating to words.
  • 5) grammar Derived from, or having the nature of a verb.
  • 6) Concerned with the words, rather than the substance of a text.
  • 7) Consisting of words only.
  • 8) Expressly spoken or written.
  • 9) Capable of speech.
  • 10) grammar Used to form a verb.
  • 11) Consisting of words alone without action.
  • 12) Of or relating to proficiency in the use and understanding of words.
  • 13) Expressed in spoken rather than written words; oral.
  • 14) Of, relating to, or associated with words.
  • 15) Concerned with words only rather than with content or ideas.
  • 16) Corresponding word for word; literal.
  • 17) Relating to, having the nature or function of, or derived from a verb.
  • 18) Used to form verbs.
  • 19) Expressed in words, whether spoken or written, but commonly in spoken words; hence, spoken; oral; not written
  • 20) obsolete Abounding with words; verbose.
  • 21) Having word answering to word; word for word; literal.
  • 22) See under Inspiration.
  • 23) (Gram.) a noun derived directly from a verb or verb stem; a verbal. The term is specifically applied to infinitives, and nouns ending in -ing, esp. to the latter. See Gerund, and -ing, 2. See also, Infinitive mood, under Infinitive.
  • 24) (Gram.) Of or pertaining to a verb; ; derived directly from a verb; ; used in forming verbs.
  • 25) Consisting in, or having to do with, words only; dealing with words rather than with the ideas intended to be conveyed.
  • 26) communicated in the form of words
  • 27) of or relating to or formed from words in general
  • 28) relating to or having facility in the use of words
  • 29) of or relating to or formed from a verb
  • 30) expressed in spoken words
  • 31) prolix
  • 32) transitive, UK, Australia To fabricate a confession

Examples

  • 1) This is what you get when governments treat oral health as an optional extra.
  • 2) Experts blame high amounts of sugar in food and drink as well as poor oral hygiene.
  • 3) With oral contraceptives it was when they were with a partner.
  • 4) The guidance says care homes should assess the oral health needs of residents and record them in personal care plans.
  • 5) Work snack warning Eating biscuits and cakes at work is contributing to the obesity epidemic and poor oral health, dentists have said.
  • 6) What does this suggest about his oral language skills?
  • 7) It has been reported that only an oral agreement existed.
  • 8) The pair refused to give oral evidence.
  • 9) This is an oral culture as much as a written one.
  • 10) Yet poor oral hygiene is linked to an increased risk of heart disease.
  • 11) Poor oral health during childhood increases the risk for poor nutrition and other health problems.
  • 12) oral contraceptives became available in the beginning of the sixties.
  • 13) oral language is a much more global language than that of the universities or church declarations.
  • 14) If you have an oral agreement then it is valid until the end.
  • 15) The judge had to decide how much oral evidence to allow at a future hearing.
  • 16) Before that we had only an oral culture.
  • 17) We deal with decay and oral hygiene.
  • 18) Other options available to the creditor include oral examination to see whether it is worthwhile trying to enforce the judgement.
  • 19) If it persists, an oral antibiotic may be needed.
  • 20) The oral reproduction of the stories by the children is the best possible _oral language_ drill, while their partial written review is the basis of much of the regular _composition_ work.
  • 21) And those lucky people who haven’t had oral yet still haven’t had oral… haha.
  • 22) Use condoms or avoid sex, including what we call oral sex because society does not like to use the terms fellatio and cunnilingus.
  • 23) However, be there this distinction betwixt them, or some other, or indeed none at all, yet I presume they were both doctors of traditions, and expounders of that which they called the oral law, in opposition to the scribes, whether amongst the Jews or the Sadducees, who employed themselves in the textual exposition of the law.
  • 24) But he was best known for his books which he called oral histories.
  • 25) ‘They rely on oral interviews rather than written ones.’
  • 26) ‘It focuses on oral communication rather than written communication, which is vital in communities where there are many people who are not literate.’
  • 27) ‘As Ruby and Brown point out in, military records often differed from Spokane versions, which generally assumed an oral, rather than written, form.’
  • 28) ‘Awareness of fabrication and false teaching has long existed but became a major issue in academic circles in the twentieth century due to early reliance on oral, rather than written, transmission.’
  • 29) ‘For example, there is a strong emphasis now on teaching the tricky subject of maths, through an oral technique, rather than the old format of writing it down in your copybook.’
  • 30) ‘But, over the next month, they are expected to deliver written or oral responses to the issues paper, before the inquiry receives final submissions in early August.’
  • 31) ‘In this case, and clearly in many others, there was no written or oral tradition that preserved the author's reasoning for later generations of students.’
  • 32) ‘A lot of the material has been transcribed, which means not only that the material can be read but also that cross referencing from the written to the oral form is a straightforward process.’
  • 33) ‘Campers' discoveries are shared in journal writing, sketching and oral presentation, but they have plenty of time for snorkeling in the ocean and playing on the beach.’
  • 34) ‘He also had written or oral testimony in his support from 27 witnesses, all but five government officials like him.’
  • 35) ‘The notice may be given orally or in writing and takes effect when received; but the agreement may require an oral notice to be confirmed in writing.’
  • 36) ‘I find that this security agreement was primarily oral, but it was also partially written.’
  • 37) ‘There was no evidence of any agreement whether in writing or oral.’
  • 38) ‘They also gain a little confidence in public speaking through their oral reports to the class.’
  • 39) ‘The second option includes writing and presenting an oral defense of a graduate thesis.’
  • 40) ‘My idea is to divide my time doing practice in the mornings and evenings and then to do either written or oral translations during the day.’
  • 41) ‘Primarily, the issue is one of non-disclosure of documents rather than oral testimony.’
  • 42) ‘He also published widely in the teaching of oral language, writing, and methodology.’
  • 43) ‘The governing body may also be represented and may make written and oral representations.’
  • 44) ‘Depending on the nature of the specific disability, the student may benefit from oral instruction, written instruction, or demonstration.’
  • 45) ‘Folk literature from the oral tradition to the printed word encompasses four major types: legends, myths, fables, and fairy tales.’
  • 46) ‘Like the slaves, immersed from birth in an oral tradition, she sings the recipe to retain the words.’
  • 47) ‘We often therefore speak of oral traditions, but the most important element in an oral tradition is not so much the spoken word as it is human memory.’
  • 48) ‘But the oral tradition and literature aren't the same.’
  • 49) ‘I think that it is perhaps true that it is only recorded in the magazine, but I think there has been an oral tradition that has kept it alive.’
  • 50) ‘‘I grew up with this history as an oral tradition, as we all did,’ says Wilson.’
  • 51) ‘Addressing themselves to village audiences and carrying on the tradition of oral literature, they use Tok Pisin exclusively and do not rely on scripts.’
  • 52) ‘African radio stations have been important patrons of music and, in some countries, of poetry and oral literature.’
  • 53) ‘As an oral tradition, Druidry does not anchor itself with scientific or historical facts; instead it breathes, shaping itself through stories ancient and modern.’
  • 54) ‘African Americans relied on an oral tradition, unlike Euro-Americans whose expertise came from magazines and books.’
  • 55) ‘Folktales also played a major role in oral literature and their subject matter ranged from love to heroism to supernatural acts.’
  • 56) ‘The Asmat have a great deal of oral literature, but no written tradition.’
  • 57) ‘The Mordvins have retained a rich body of oral literature and music, much of which was recorded in the Soviet era.’
  • 58) ‘A body of oral literature is being assembled at the Office of Cultural Affairs and has been partially transcribed.’
  • 59) ‘Parts of the early oral literature was recorded by M. Khorenatsi, a fourth-century historian.’
  • 60) ‘The Dinka tradition of oral literature is extensive and a considerable amount has been recorded.’
  • 61) ‘Chapter 1 surveys ancient oral literature, storytelling, and the novel.’
  • 62) ‘The songs and poetry represent oral literature passed on to performers by their teachers.’
  • 63) ‘The system had been used to record oral literature but had ultimately been abandoned.’
  • 64) ‘The literary tradition in Equatorial Guinea is oral rather than written.’
  • 65) ‘Indeed, the effect of the Internet on a largely oral society like Sierra Leone will be profound.’
  • 66) ‘It is unfortunate that Inuit are an oral society, because this great knowledge is not being recognized or understood.’
  • 67) ‘We face problems when our ingrained literacy is brought to oral cultures.’
  • 68) ‘He studied authors from the past along with modernists like Joyce, Eliot, and Pound, remarking how increased literacy altered oral cultures like Homeric Greece.’
  • 69) ‘Computational media can have the same fundamental impact on our individual lives and our societies as reading and writing had to move us from oral to literal societies.’
  • 70) ‘Walter Ong has shown that the thinking processes for oral cultures are significantly different from those in societies where literacy has become widespread.’
  • 71) ‘Missionaries also developed written forms of Pacific Islander languages that were previously nonexistent in the predominantly oral culture.’
  • 72) ‘Basque Americans have been relatively slow to establish a literary tradition, in part because so much of their background was based on an oral culture.’
  • 73) ‘Russia has always been primarily an oral culture in which a wide range of folkloric genres and traditions has flourished and provided the primary form of entertainment.’
  • 74) ‘Maintenance of good oral hygiene and dental care are important.’
  • 75) ‘The chronic exposure to silver compounds both in medical and industrial settings can lead to permanent bluish-black discoloration of oral and nasopharyngeal mucosa.’
  • 76) ‘Sites involved include the oral cavity, anus, and genital mucosa.’
  • 77) ‘Encourage the child to begin rudimentary brushing; however, parents should remain the primary caregiver in oral hygiene procedures.’
  • 78) ‘These days Listerine is advertised only for oral hygiene.’
  • 79) ‘Brushing your teeth is only part of a good oral hygiene program, says a professor at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry.’
  • 80) ‘The patient's oral hygiene was very poor with extensive gingivitis.’
  • 81) ‘Maintenance of oral hygiene is fundamental to the success of the treatment.’
  • 82) ‘Dental screening should be performed at each visit to evaluate for caries and other pathology, and to monitor oral hygiene.’
  • 83) ‘Cigarettes are the main causative factors for lung, oral, oesophageal, stomach, bladder, kidney, pancreas and cervical cancer.’
  • 84) ‘Rarely, the oral, esophageal or ocular mucosa may be involved.’
  • 85) ‘Maintaining good oral hygiene, including toothbrushing and visiting your dentist or hygienist regularly, is a crucial part of caring for your teeth.’
  • 86) ‘Scientists know that alcohol increases the risk of several cancers, including those of the oral cavity, oesophagus, and liver.’
  • 87) ‘Epidemiological evidence show the incidence of esophageal and oral cancers is rising in recent years.’
  • 88) ‘Signs of dehydration include increased thirst, fatigue, dry oral mucosa, and decreased urinary output.’
  • 89) ‘Dentists value the oil for its antiseptic qualities and its gentleness to surrounding oral mucous membranes.’
  • 90) ‘Severe communication difficulties, such as lack of a larynx or oral structures, did not preclude meaningful participation.’
  • 91) ‘As with all oral cancers, it spreads from the oral cavity to the submandibular and cervical lymph nodes.’
  • 92) ‘Hence moderate intake coupled with oral hygiene and dental care is advised.’
  • 93) ‘oral odours are best treated through meticulous oral hygiene and optimal dental care.’
  • 94) ‘Any woman who had ever been pregnant, had a positive pregnancy test, or used estrogen replacement therapy or oral contraceptives was excluded from the study.’
  • 95) ‘Should oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy be discontinued before surgery?’
  • 96) ‘There has been little input from the clinicians who prescribe oral contraceptives or from the women who use them.’
  • 97) ‘Over 20 years he'd published more than 100 papers and reports on cardiovascular disease and the oral contraceptive.’
  • 98) ‘The data do not suggest that use of oral contraceptives can interrupt an established pregnancy.’
  • 99) ‘Accumulating side effects might lead women to switch their oral contraceptives.’
  • 100) ‘Not every woman tolerates oral contraceptives as well as you do, but doctors frequently prescribe them for hard-to-treat acne.’
  • 101) ‘Newer oral contraceptives, with lower levels of ovarian steroids, allow follicular growth, but ovulation usually does not occur.’
  • 102) ‘Some medications (such as steroids or oral contraceptives) may also lead to hypertension.’
  • 103) ‘In both cases, the depression responded to treatment with oral contraceptives.’
  • 104) ‘Selected community pharmacists have made an NHS supply of oral emergency contraception available to 2000 women in the past year.’
  • 105) ‘Limitations of this study include the low number of women using oral contraceptives.’
  • 106) ‘Pharmacists who object to dispensing oral contraceptives on religious grounds might find it awkward to quiz a woman about the reason for the prescription.’
  • 107) ‘They are essentially high dose oral contraceptives.’
  • 108) ‘Currently, oral contraceptives cost an average of $25 to $30 per month by prescription.’
  • 109) ‘If your blood pressure increases significantly, you may have to try a different oral contraceptive or switch to a different form of birth control.’
  • 110) ‘The women in the study were 18 to 44 years of age, were ovulating normally, and were not taking oral contraceptives.’
  • 111) ‘These young women were compared with 27 members of the cohort who had never used oral contraceptives by age 21.’
  • 112) ‘Approximately 80 percent of U.S. women born since 1945 have used oral contraceptives.’
  • 113) ‘For even lower doses, fluoxetine is also available as an oral solution and as a 10 mg capsule.’
  • 114) ‘Exam students should do their orals and practical exams for a week at Easter or just before the written exams in June instead.’
  • 115) ‘She tests us on her weekly columns, gives sudden projects and papers and orals due the next day, and asks impossible things.’
  • 116) ‘I had my orals yesterday and just finished my History exam a while ago.’
  • 117) ‘There were a bunch of people (three of them) hanging around the outside of the consultation room (where our orals were scheduled to be), and we all started talking and comparing answers for the thesis questions.’
  • 118) ‘The exams are just around the corner and students are bogged down with preparation work for practicals and orals but the Transition year students found time to raise funds for those less fortunate.’
  • 119) ‘Taps also came out of the orals room similarly dazed.’
  • 120) ‘I was wondering if I should sign up for orals for this Saturday, so that Wednesday would be my last day.’
  • 121) ‘If it goes on after Easter, then there will be major confusion when the orals and the practicals begin.’
  • 122) ‘The thesis defense is probably just like a more terrifying, more stringent form of orals.’
  • 123) ‘We don't even know whether we are going to have our orals next week.’
  • 124) ‘I'm meeting my study group for lunch today, but I'm pretty much ready for orals.’
  • 125) ‘In the now modular examinations for entry to the Royal College of General Practitioners, a candidate must pass each component, including the orals, to pass overall.’
  • 126) ‘But there was a catch: she had to finish her dissertation and pass her orals in just one year.’
  • 127) ‘For this reason traditional unstructured orals and long cases have largely been discontinued in North America.’
  • 128) ‘Well, it should have been yesterday, but I was preoccupied with preparing for my French oral.’
  • 129) ‘I'd also just like to apologise in advanced if the quality of my English diminishes somewhat this week as I cram my head full of French in preparation for my French oral on Friday.’
  • 130) ‘I will most likely have my French oral, and possibly one or two other exams.’
  • 131) ‘This website has been very useful to be because I am in year 7 and this website has helped me find a piece of world news to do my oral on.’
  • 132) ‘Today was ok, except my French oral went horribly wrong.’
  • 133) ‘My French oral is going to be on either the 12th or 13th of May.’

Examples

  • 1) A diesel rental car gives more aural pleasure.
  • 2) In fact they provide a surprisingly rich bass, as well as an unexpected subtlety of aural pleasure that exceeds all expectations at this modest price.
  • 3) Both kinds may hold information, the minimum requirement to call an aural disturbance a “communication” rather than simply “noise.”
  • 4) Computer-generated sounds on prerecorded tape, which the composer refers to as aural "wallpaper," are added periodically to the rich instrumental mix.
  • 5) Thus, we can call the aural boundaries "natural" boundaries, and other boundaries "artificial."
  • 6) I'd even give a nod to their live accompaniment to “Planet Earth,” the mother of all nature documentaries; you could argue that live music is a kind of aural HD accompaniment to the film's remarkable nature footage.
  • 7) But a news station is not a place to carry through the Disney mission with a kind of "aural" branding.
  • 8) McLuhan partly bemoaned the rise of the alphabet because it helped destroy an "aural" space that he believed was "cooler."
  • 9) They're all compilations or home recordings of one kind or another, and together they represent a kind of aural inventory of my changing tastes, fortunes and moods since the early 1990s.
  • 10) When it switched from base level to cooling cycle, it cast a kind of aural shadow, not enough to distract, but certainly enough to add color.
  • 11) ‘Another option is a digital aural thermometer that measures the temperature in the ear.’
  • 12) ‘Without doubt, especially during training, aural and other forms of fine sensory feedback are needed.’
  • 13) ‘Sellers faced an even bigger hurdle: he was moving from an aural medium to a visual one.’
  • 14) ‘Questions were geared both to general knowledge and to specific points requiring the use of visual and aural memory.’
  • 15) ‘A Sense of Place will create a fascinating aural impression of Oxfordshire.’
  • 16) ‘It's true what they say about heightened aural perception when you're deprived of your other senses.’
  • 17) ‘By this stage it was obvious the concert was as much a visual as an aural treat.’
  • 18) ‘A delightful film, it takes you on an aural and visual tour of a small rural community at the height of summer.’
  • 19) ‘Yet visual primacy is often at the cost of more effective aural forms of communication.’
  • 20) ‘Whilst men generally rely on visual stimulation for their kicks, women prefer aural pleasure.’
  • 21) ‘So the audience would have different visual experiences, but a shared aural experience.’
  • 22) ‘Cases of deafness were reported in medical journals, as well as aural cavity damage from the insertion of mini headphones.’
  • 23) ‘No performer, teacher, or leader of an ensemble could function properly without a high degree of aural perception.’
  • 24) ‘The day begins violently with the aural attack of The Alarm Clock.’
  • 25) ‘I hope that will not be the last time I shall experience such aural enjoyment.’

Examples

  • 1) People who told them to pipe down got verbal abuse.
  • 2) The verbal abuse which has been hurled about in public and on social media is quite appalling and totally unacceptable.
  • 3) She lost two lawsuits last winter filed by former employees at the residence who accused her of verbal and emotional abuse.
  • 4) The model has accused the boxer's parents of verbal and physical abuse.
  • 5) Unique mix of electronic textures and rock guitars held together by verbal dexterity.
  • 6) The incidents refer to alleged verbal abuse.
  • 7) The company refused to honour the verbal agreement and put him on a more expensive tariff.
  • 8) The physical attacks have stopped but the verbal abuse continues.
  • 9) We found that she had organizational and verbal skills.
  • 10) He has a verbal agreement to take charge of the club in the summer.
  • 11) Police said a man had been arrested for verbal abuse and damaging a car.
  • 12) In this situation you will have to use verbal skills as well.
  • 13) Instead, officers often merely give verbal warnings.
  • 14) We expect verbal attack, and it helps to keep us honest.
  • 15) The first tested numerical and verbal reasoning, the second spatial manipulation.
  • 16) Her verbal dexterity when delivering a stream of brilliant put-downs is extremely impressive.
  • 17) Because of his appearance, he has become the victim of verbal and physical attacks.
  • 18) Next are online tests, such as numeracy and verbal reasoning.
  • 19) They said it was to settle a verbal agreement made 13 years before.
  • 20) Taking strength from that she was able to become angry with her husband, who also survived her verbal attack.
  • 21) Riches's blend of verbal dexterity, physical comedy and genuinely unpleasant liquids makes for a truly immersive experience.
  • 22) That is Hamlet's verbal account of it, when he undertakes to reduce his philosophy to rhyme, and gets the player to insert some sixteen of his lines quietly into the court performance: that is his _verbal_ account of it; but _his_ action, too, speaks louder and more eloquently than his words.
  • 23) He communicated what he described as verbal orders from Lee: Early was to march toward Chancellorsville with his entire force, except Pendleton's artillery and one brigade of infantry.
  • 24) It's what we call a verbal taunt,'' Crawford said.
  • 25) It's what we call a verbal taunt,'' said crew chief Dan Crawford.
  • 26) "It's what we call a verbal taunt," crew chief Dan Crawford said.
  • 27) To Carmen Ramirez, the name Oxnard is what she calls verbal camouflage for a beautiful place.
  • 28) Furthermore that is what you call verbal abuse! employment-verbal-abuse. jpgz3rbtc.jpg, image / jpeg, 223x209
  • 29) ‘He gave Rafe a parting thump along with a touch more verbal abuse and left us alone.’
  • 30) ‘I didn't feel up for more verbal abuse, but I still wondered where he was taking me.’
  • 31) ‘After protracted verbal sparring followed by hand-to-hand combat, Harry defeats Riddle by stabbing the diary.’
  • 32) ‘Then there are the random moments like that when verbal communication breaks through.’
  • 33) ‘He loves the verbal jousting almost as much as the 90 minutes.’
  • 34) ‘He loves this verbal jousting as a dodge for his academic laziness.’
  • 35) ‘Joan interrupted their verbal jousting by stepping forward and taking the bottle out of Zeke's hand.’
  • 36) ‘Tests at twelve months showed marginal improvement in verbal fluency associated with estradiol declines.’
  • 37) ‘The Democratic governors who witnessed the verbal assault were likewise restrained in their reaction.’
  • 38) ‘He has verbal dexterity and rhyming skills which very few rap artists have.’
  • 39) ‘But there is a certain standard of verbal dexterity that is expected in politicians at this level.’
  • 40) ‘Why are they often able to deter attacks using merely verbal threats?’
  • 41) ‘The camera remains centered on the individuals as they speak, but pulls back when verbal confrontations occur.’
  • 42) ‘The highly verbal quality of their construction can prove an insurmountable obstacle to their success as a film.’
  • 43) ‘‘It's nice to finally see Silsden getting some visible support rather than just verbal support,’ she said.’
  • 44) ‘Unfortunately, some politicians are prepared to trade verbal punches rather than attend to the country's business.’
  • 45) ‘The conversations between the bird beings sound as ‘bird brained’ as the rather mindless verbal dilly-dallying of the humans.’
  • 46) ‘Perhaps indirect rather than direct verbal strategies and nonverbal communication would be preferable in some relationships.’
  • 47) ‘Music may have meaning, but it is an imprecise language, a language of suggestion and imagery rather than verbal description.’
  • 48) ‘From absolutely nowhere Syrah ran into the verbal battle, speaking with venom in her normally controlled voice.’
  • 49) ‘Healthcare providers may need to write ‘exercise prescriptions’ rather than give verbal advice to frail older adults.’
  • 50) ‘This can be accomplished by employing consistent verbal descriptors in both oral speech and written materials.’
  • 51) ‘They have extraordinary verbal skills and written skills.’
  • 52) ‘By being in the frame, I could direct scenes from within, rather than giving verbal directions to my actors in-between scenes.’
  • 53) ‘Monday's hearing heard written and verbal testimonies from family members of the deceased and from medical staff.’
  • 54) ‘Written and verbal invitations to community representatives to dialogue with the company have not been taken up.’
  • 55) ‘The councillors did reverse themselves on this matter after two written and two verbal submissions from me.’
  • 56) ‘We proceeded with the understanding that this verbal agreement would eventually be formalized in writing.’
  • 57) ‘SL stated that despite there being no written contract there was a verbal agreement and that would stand up in law.’
  • 58) ‘The experimenter wrote verbal protocols down verbatim.’
  • 59) ‘Patients received written and verbal instructions on proper inhaler technique at screening and at each of the study visits.’
  • 60) ‘Patients who understand and can apply written or verbal information and instructions have better outcomes.’
  • 61) ‘I received several written as well as verbal follow-ups to ensure I was happy and not having any problems.’
  • 62) ‘These beliefs were grounded in memory, experience, and observation rather than verbal instruction or religious revelation.’
  • 63) ‘She gave a verbal agreement to appear in the 1992 film, Boxing Helena.’
  • 64) ‘Manchester United have reportedly reached a verbal agreement with Barcelona on a fee for the England captain.’
  • 65) ‘A verbal agreement can hold more weight than, or even entirely supercede, a written one.’
  • 66) ‘verbal fluency Participants were asked to produce as many grocery items as possible during 60 seconds.’
  • 67) ‘Previous studies by the group have shown that depressed persons making serious suicide attempts have impaired verbal fluency.’
  • 68) ‘Here as well, purely verbal concessions were made to demands for international control.’
  • 69) ‘Second, Crow suggests that evolutionary processes were greatly accelerated by female selection of highly verbal males.’
  • 70) ‘It is unlikely that such a verb as organize will shift, because of its verbal suffix: no Let's have an organize.’
  • 71) ‘The past forms of nominal sentences are verbal sentences because of the verb of existence which expresses the past tense.’
  • 72) ‘Nominal, adjectival, and verbal expressions can, however, be ‘coerced’ into serving a non-prototypical function.’
  • 73) ‘Among other particular features of Albanian and other Balkan languages are a postpositive definite article and the absence of a verbal infinitive.’
  • 74) ‘But the fact that it's not just verbals now is what worries me.’
  • 75) ‘With countless hackles raised, justifiably, on a daily basis with regard to the current fiasco, it's time for the verbals to cease.’
  • 76) ‘Yet abandoning the argument over a few lousy verbals was untenable.’
  • 77) ‘Ryan, 55, has provided the goading verbals for a decade, ever since the mysterious death of Gorgeous George.’
  • 78) ‘He loves the posturing and the verbals and considers it all part of his job as a member of the entertainment business.’
  • 79) ‘Forget Hawkeye and the Snickometer, Channel 4 should be hiring a lip-reader and registering the verbals on a swearometer.’
  • 80) ‘Instead of verbals being directed at the board, though, the chants of ‘Niemi, Niemi’ were merely a tribute to the goalkeeper.’
  • 81) ‘Clearly, some players react to a bit of the verbals - but there's so much more to the game these days.’
  • 82) ‘Then deep in injury time Kerry were caught off side again, Kerins reacted with verbals to the official, and the referee gave him a red card.’
  • 83) ‘In other works the verbal comes to the forefront.’
  • 84) ‘To most purists, putting a new beat behind Grandmaster Flash's verbals is tantamount to redrawing Manet's Olympia on MS Paint.’
  • 85) ‘That, though, was merely the prelude to Lennon's verbals.’
  • 86) ‘It is, in its own small way, a tour de force: his oddball verbals and musical eclecticism do combine in a coherent manner.’
  • 87) ‘Him verballing other people at a meeting on the other side of the world apparently putting things in the newspaper, for me has zero credibility.’
  • 88) ‘And when I went forward, I was verballed by Internal Affairs.’
  • 89) ‘Mr Turnbull may have been caught out, playing to the crowd on Monday night, or he may have been verballed.’
  • 90) ‘The member for Werriwa should get a wig and a gown if he is going to start verballing other members of the chamber in this way.’
  • 91) ‘I thought I had effectively verballed the parties on more than one occasion.’
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Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

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