duck vs goose

duck goose

Definitions

  • 1) The flesh of a duck used as food.
  • 2) Slang A person, especially one thought of as peculiar.
  • 3) A durable, closely woven heavy cotton or linen fabric.
  • 4) An amphibious military truck used during World War II.
  • 5) A plunge under water.
  • 6) An amphibious truck used in emergencies, as to evacuate flood victims.
  • 7) Chiefly British A dear.
  • 8) A quick lowering of the head or body.
  • 9) Clothing made of duck, especially white trousers.
  • 10) A female duck.
  • 11) Any of various wild or domesticated waterbirds of the family Anatidae, characteristically having a broad flat bill, short legs, and webbed feet.
  • 12) A pet; a darling.
  • 13) (Naut.), colloq. The light clothes worn by sailors in hot climates.
  • 14) A linen (or sometimes cotton) fabric, finer and lighter than canvas, -- used for the lighter sails of vessels, the sacking of beds, and sometimes for men's clothing.
  • 15) The female pintail.
  • 16) A strong linen fabric simply woven without twill, lighter than canvas, and used for small sails, sails for pleasure-boats, and for men's wear. Duck is usually white or unbleached, but is sometimes made in plain colors.
  • 17) A sweetheart; a darling: a word of endearment, fondness, or admiration. It is sometimes also applied to things: as, a duck of a bonnet.
  • 18) The wood-duck or summer duck, which breeds in trees.
  • 19) In cricket, no score; zero: short for duck's-egg (which see).
  • 20) The hooded merganser: so called from breeding in trees.
  • 21) The garganey or summer tcal, Querquedula circia.
  • 22) A cotton fabric sometimes considered the second grade, for strength and durability, after double-warp (which see, under warp).
  • 23) A lamellirostral natatorial bird of the family Anatidœ and subfamily Anatinœ or Fuligulinœ (which see).
  • 24) Hence— To handle or use a thing recklessly; scatter; squander; throw into confusion: with with or of.
  • 25) The hooded merganser. Also called water-pheasant.
  • 26) Some webfooted bird likened to or mistaken for a duck: as, the cobbler's-awl duck (that is, the avoset).
  • 27) The harlequin.
  • 28) The surf-scoter.
  • 29) The female duck, as distinguished from the male, or drake (which see).
  • 30) The female mallard.
  • 31) A diving inclination of the head.
  • 32) One of the stones used in playing the game of duck on drake.
  • 33) Specifically— The wood-duck (which see). See Aix.
  • 34) To plunge the head or the whole body into water and immediately withdraw; make a dip.
  • 35) To nod or bob the head suddenly; bow.
  • 36) To lower or bend down suddenly, as in dodging a missile or an obstacle, or in saluting awkwardly: as, to duck the head.
  • 37) In bridge, to lead a suit from the dealer or the dummy hand, and make no attempt to win the trick third hand, even when able to do so. See underplay.
  • 38) To dip or plunge in water and immediately withdraw: as, to duck a witch or a scold.
  • 39) Hence To give way; yield; cringe.
  • 40) To lower the head or body.
  • 41) To lower quickly, especially so as to avoid something.
  • 42) In bridge, to lose a trick by deliberately playing lower than one's opponent.
  • 43) To push (a person, for example) suddenly under water.
  • 44) To evade a responsibility or obligation. Often used with out:
  • 45) To evade; dodge.
  • 46) To submerge the head or body briefly in water.
  • 47) In bridge, to deliberately play a card that is lower than (an opponent's card).
  • 48) To move swiftly, especially so as to escape being seen.

Definitions

  • 1) South Africa, slang, dated A young woman or girlfriend.
  • 2) The flesh of the goose used as food.
  • 3) archaic A tailor's iron, heated in live coals or embers, used to press fabrics.
  • 4) slang A stupid person
  • 5) Any of various grazing waterfowl of the family Anatidae, bigger than a duck
  • 6) The female of such a bird.
  • 7) Slang A poke, prod, or pinch between or on the buttocks.
  • 8) Any of various wild or domesticated waterbirds of the family Anatidae, and especially of the genera Anser, Branta, and Chen, characteristically having a shorter neck than that of a swan and a shorter, more pointed bill than that of a duck.
  • 9) A tailor's pressing iron with a long curved handle.
  • 10) Informal A silly person.
  • 11) The flesh of such a bird used as food.
  • 12) (Bot.) The annual spear grass (Poa annua).
  • 13) See Goose flesh, above.
  • 14) (Zoöl.) any pedunculated barnacle of the genus Anatifa or Lepas; -- called also duck barnacle. See Barnacle, and Cirripedia.
  • 15) (Bot.) a coarse kind of rush (Juncus squarrosus).
  • 16) Any large web-footen bird of the subfamily Anserinæ, and belonging to Anser, Branta, Chen, and several allied genera. See Anseres.
  • 17) A silly creature; a simpleton.
  • 18) (Zoöl.) See Gannet.
  • 19) (Bot.) a composite plant (Achillea ptarmica), growing wild in the British islands.
  • 20) Any large bird of other related families, resembling the common goose.
  • 21) See under Fen.
  • 22) a large feather or quill of a goose; also, a pen made from it.
  • 23) (Zoöl.) See Phalarope.
  • 24) [Obs.] a silly person.
  • 25) an attempt to accomplish something impossible or unlikely of attainment.
  • 26) A tailor's smoothing iron, so called from its handle, which resembles the neck of a goose.
  • 27) anything, as a rod of iron or a pipe, curved like the neck of a goose; specially (Naut.), an iron hook connecting a spar with a mast.
  • 28) [Colloq. Eng.] Michaelmas.
  • 29) A game played with counters on a board divided into compartments, in some of which a goose was depicted.
  • 30) In keno, the globe from which the numbered balls are withdrawn.
  • 31) The European graylaggoose.
  • 32) A game of chance formerly common in England.
  • 33) A piece used in the game of fox and geese.
  • 34) A silly, foolish person; a simpleton: in allusion to the supposed stupidity of the domestic goose, inferred from its somewhat clumsy appearance and motions.
  • 35) Any bird of the family Anatidæ and subfamily Anserinæ, of which there are about 40 species of several genera, as well as different varieties of the domesticated bird. See phrases below.
  • 36) A tailors' smoothing-iron: so called from the resemblance of its handle to the neck of a goose.
  • 37) slang To gently accelerate an automobile or machine, or give repeated small taps on the accelerator.
  • 38) slang To sharply poke or pinch someone's buttocks. Derived from a goose's inclination to bite at a retreating intruder's hindquarters.
  • 39) British slang Of private-hire taxi drivers, to pick up a passenger who has not pre-booked a cab. This is unauthorised under UK licensing conditions.
  • 40) To stimulate, to spur.
  • 41) pinch in the buttocks
  • 42) prod into action
  • 43) give a spurt of fuel to
  • 44) To hiss at; hiss down; condemn by hissing.
  • 45) To poke, prod, or pinch (a person) between or on the buttocks.
  • 46) To move to action; spur.
  • 47) To give a spurt of fuel to (a car, for example); cause to accelerate quickly.

Examples

  • 1) The larger yolks of duck eggs help to enrich this salad.
  • 2) I turned and saw a small head ducking and weaving behind the sofa arm.
  • 3) Goose and duck love this.
  • 4) You could hardly flap your wings without hitting at least two more ducks over the head.
  • 5) Pull any excess fat from inside the cavity and around the necks of the ducks.
  • 6) Referees are often criticised for ducking the cameras after matches and now we know why.
  • 7) Too often in the past it bailed out lame ducks.
  • 8) We erected a run outside the duck house and she gradually allowed them more and more freedom.
  • 9) Ministers have ducked the question for years.
  • 10) There is capacity to raise one million ducks a year.
  • 11) The sheltered garden has a large duck pond.
  • 12) He ducked and the bird flew out.
  • 13) His staff called them the duck shoes.
  • 14) This time he ducked the other way.
  • 15) Point out that avoiding you is ducking the issue.
  • 16) They were blushing and shyly ducking their veiled heads.
  • 17) They are picking on a lame duck.
  • 18) The house duck here was grey and soggy with fat.
  • 19) Without a doubt, the cuisine centres around both the goose and the duck.
  • 20) She didn't duck or dive but carried on as normal.
  • 21) Otherwise, the batsman ducked safely on a slow pitch and was rarely subdued for long.
  • 22) She's such an odd duck in so many ways.
  • 23) Made from cotton duck, both products are very tough.
  • 24) Confronted about their leadership ambitions, most politicians duck and dive.
  • 25) Of these, it is always worth looking out for roast duck, often served with apples.
  • 26) The "bean counting" approach to qualifying students with standardized tests, curriculum, etc. has led to what Asian students call a "duck feeding" approach to education for westerners unfamiliar with the term "duck feeding," think about how foie gras is produced with the student being the duck, and education being the food that they force down their throats.
  • 27) You can certainly see where the term duck egg blue evolved from.
  • 28) That song Ernie sings in the bath tub about how much he loves his duck is a bit questionable too. stu
  • 29) This duck is an albino, whatever species (definitely looks like a redhead).
  • 30) If it walks like a duck is a fallacious argument when the people who claim as much are using a straw man.
  • 31) ‘The rear feet of the beaver are large and webbed like a duck's feet, to give the animal good swimming ability.’
  • 32) ‘Wetlands are a lure for geese, swans, ducks, egrets, storks, herons and the icon of the Camargue, the pink flamingo.’
  • 33) ‘Then Nikolai noticed the heron and the duck waddling up the hill behind Dmitri.’
  • 34) ‘It's not only humans who appreciate the food at this pink-washed cottage opposite Danbury's duck pond - the ducks waddle over for any leftovers.’
  • 35) ‘They watched in silence as a pair of ducks waddled across the lawn and waded into the pond.’
  • 36) ‘Then, at the next hole, a duck waddled onto the green just as Love was lining up a putt.’
  • 37) ‘Geese, ducks, sparrows, and hawks are heading south in numbers.’
  • 38) ‘We stood there in awkward silence, shuffling our feet gawkily like ducks do when they are hungry.’
  • 39) ‘Out of the corner of my eye I saw a small duck waddling toward me.’
  • 40) ‘The duck, whose feet remained free while its feathers stuck to the ice, attracted public sympathy after efforts to free it failed.’
  • 41) ‘Birds as diverse as parakeet, egrets, ducks, terns, and plovers were plummeting in numbers.’
  • 42) ‘The teals, mallards and other small ducks were all paddling about.’
  • 43) ‘In this area, ducks, wading birds, and shorebirds are awaiting your visit.’
  • 44) ‘Wild birds may carry these infections, but they typically prove most harmful to domestic fowl like chickens, ducks, and turkeys.’
  • 45) ‘Flocks of birds, including large ducks, Egyptian geese and dabchicks, were coated in oil on Wednesday.’
  • 46) ‘There were turkeys, geese, ducks and chickens and guinea fowl on sale.’
  • 47) ‘Interesting water birds and several species of ducks and warblers nest there.’
  • 48) ‘As home, migratory stop and breeding ground, Saskatchewan hosts over 25 percent of the continent's ducks and geese.’
  • 49) ‘The Canvasback is a medium-sized duck with an elegant pattern of black, russet, and white.’
  • 50) ‘International cuisine uses the eggs of other birds, including ducks, geese, sparrows, quails and ostriches, but it is the hen that has been universally domesticated.’
  • 51) ‘From a nutritional perspective, the duck, cucumber, spring onion and pancakes make a reasonably well-balanced meal.’
  • 52) ‘In a heavy, flameproof casserole, cook the sausages and duck in the olive oil until their fat runs and the sausages and duck are golden on all sides.’
  • 53) ‘Cook the duck until tender, then add the potatoes and onion.’
  • 54) ‘His garlic duck sausage with black mustard is the hot dog of your dreams.’
  • 55) ‘The bread is perfectly toasted, the duck is perfectly tender, and those waffle chips are scrumptious.’
  • 56) ‘Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan, then sear the duck skin-side down over gentle heat for five to ten minutes or until the skin is crisp, draining off the fat as it renders.’
  • 57) ‘I'm not trying to suggest that Susie's roast venison or my duck with caramelised apple could be described as a horror show, but neither were they worthy of the setting.’
  • 58) ‘Like most of the sauces here, the duck's citrus glaze is notably reserved.’
  • 59) ‘The duck and chicken I sampled were both flavored with balsamic vinegar, and both were overdone.’
  • 60) ‘Season the cavity of the duck with salt and pepper and truss with kitchen string.’
  • 61) ‘Add duck meat and season with salt and white pepper to taste.’
  • 62) ‘The duck bakes for precisely seven minutes and rests for precisely seven minutes.’
  • 63) ‘Stir in the date syrup with the lemon juice, and cook for another 15-20 minutes, until the duck is tender.’
  • 64) ‘I have the Thai mussels as a starter and they're fabulous - the crispy duck, and deep fried rolls with chilli jam are tasty too.’
  • 65) ‘From there it is into the duck, chicken, pork, beef, vegetables and bean curd, rice and noodles.’
  • 66) ‘Thickly slice the duck and serve it on the parsnip purée, scattered with a little extra thyme.’
  • 67) ‘The mail-order range has now been extended to include beef, duck, lamb, chicken, pheasant and goose.’
  • 68) ‘His duck's sweetness is amplified by roasted rhubarb; snapper's nuttiness is made prominent by a ginger-soy nage.’
  • 69) ‘A small tear trickled down Lisa's face as I savored my duck.’
  • 70) ‘The roast duck was good, and so was the grilled lobster, despite a weirdly glowing sidecar of basil mashed potatoes.’
  • 71) ‘Winston Churchill was given a guided tour of the D-Day beaches in a duck.’
  • 72) ‘The Los Angeles City Council is floating an idea to bring duck boats to the downtown area of the LA River.’
  • 73) ‘Today, a ride in a duck does not involve battles!’
  • 74) ‘Land or sea, this duck does it all.’
  • 75) ‘The duck boats are still parked in dry dock.’
  • 76) ‘30 tourists were today forced to jump off a burning duck boat into the River Thames as it sank.’
  • 77) ‘Among the more unusual vehicles contributing to the relief effort a duck boat drafted in to help flooded residents in Windsor today.’
  • 78) ‘The ducks are fully restored, U.S. Coast Guard approved vessels.’
  • 79) ‘The duck boats hugged the shore, giving fans an up-close view of the championship trophy and the players.’
  • 80) ‘Droplets of rain had already fallen, and he quickly ducked into his car to avoid being drenched by the rain.’
  • 81) ‘He quickly ducked into the building and ran for the nearest lift.’
  • 82) ‘Avoiding the rain he ducked into a nearby building and fled downstairs to take a covered shortcut to his work area.’
  • 83) ‘Quickly, Nat ducked into his closet, hoping his father might just leave the house soon.’
  • 84) ‘She quickly ducked into a corner as the stone fell loudly down the stair case.’
  • 85) ‘She quickly ducked into an open classroom, trying to get a peek at the kid as he left the school.’
  • 86) ‘As they turned around, Cary ducked into a cave to avoid being seen.’
  • 87) ‘Martin followed Rocky out of the classroom, and they ducked into a corner to avoid the mass of students.’
  • 88) ‘Thinking quickly, I grabbed Jared by the arm and ducked into the nearest classroom.’
  • 89) ‘I ducked into the next room, quickly moving behind the curtain.’
  • 90) ‘I declined politely and then ducked into the nearest shop just to escape him.’
  • 91) ‘Gusts of wind battered him; he ducked into the office and laid the key on the counter.’
  • 92) ‘When one followed me near my own block, I ducked into a bodega for a bottle of water.’
  • 93) ‘We ducked into one of the food outlets at the top of the mountain and had a drink, waiting for the rain to subside.’
  • 94) ‘She ducked into the shop and pulled the scarf from her head.’
  • 95) ‘I ducked into the first washroom I came across, locked myself in the first stall and clenched my eyes shut, silent sobs making my chest heave.’
  • 96) ‘Abbey ducked into the bathroom, and I continued on to our classroom.’
  • 97) ‘Lance ducked into the garage holding a small radio in his hand.’
  • 98) ‘Soaked, I ducked into Rubenstein's Furniture Store to get out of the rain.’
  • 99) ‘Clark did his best not to shuffle his feet or duck his head.’
  • 100) ‘Cyrus ducked the blow and landed another punch to James' stomach, knocking the wind from him and sending him to the ground again.’
  • 101) ‘He ducked the blow and countered it, his own fist connecting with my jaw and his knee finding its way to my stomach.’
  • 102) ‘But he ducked the blow and darted his head back up colliding with Kung's chin.’
  • 103) ‘She ducked the wild blow easily, and Jon stepped in, snatching the boy's stick from him and tossing it into the woods.’
  • 104) ‘I ducked a blow, then kicked someone else away, looking desperately around for the door again.’
  • 105) ‘Kino smiled, laughed, and ducked the blow like he could read the chief's mind.’
  • 106) ‘He ducked a decapitating blow and crossed his swords above his head, just in time to block a downward slash.’
  • 107) ‘The leader ducked the blow and brought the axe around in a sweeping arc straight for Drew's knees.’
  • 108) ‘Nick, in a fit of rage and pain took another swing at Will, who merely ducked the blow.’
  • 109) ‘He ducked a blow from a horseman riding up close to him and then grabbed onto the man's leg.’
  • 110) ‘My whimpers became wails and I tried to duck his blows.’
  • 111) ‘He ducks a few blows and hits the other person a few times before the fight is called.’
  • 112) ‘A friend at school had his eye shot by another lad ‘over something silly’, and Pierre once had to duck bullets from a sniper outside his home.’
  • 113) ‘He barely ducks the bullets as his eyes widen when they fly towards him.’
  • 114) ‘They will have expected you to duck this punch and instead you let the blow bounce of your granite chin like an errant moth.’
  • 115) ‘He ducked one, two blows, before Yenny caught him on the shoulder.’
  • 116) ‘She swung at him two more times and he ducked both of those blows as well.’
  • 117) ‘Then he had to duck a punch that would have detached his jaw.’
  • 118) ‘Their jobs can be so tough that at times they even have to duck punches from troublesome beachgoers.’
  • 119) ‘I ducked his punch and pulled his feet from underneath him with my feet.’
  • 120) ‘Whatever else that is, it's hardly ducking responsibility.’
  • 121) ‘Is the closure of Internet chat rooms more about ducking responsibility than child safety?’
  • 122) ‘And none of this is meant to suggest that the editorial page editor can use the policy to duck responsibility for inaccuracies on the page.’
  • 123) ‘Someone who is ducking responsibility for his own actions is hardly in a strong position to call someone else to account.’
  • 124) ‘Those who duck this obligation ill-serve the country.’
  • 125) ‘But the principle is the same: we cannot duck our responsibilities by saying that the other party took part freely.’
  • 126) ‘This low-level approach sought to duck the unwelcome publicity surrounding the sentencing of refuseniks.’
  • 127) ‘Shunning the media and ducking a direct interaction will only cause more damage to the system, if it has not already, with the athletes flopping badly.’
  • 128) ‘Yet the necessary reforms to improve productivity have been ducked by government.’
  • 129) ‘It also ducks out of the more difficult questions of how you define what is right in more ambiguous times.’
  • 130) ‘And you can understand why she might want to duck out occasionally; aside from the required smoking and drinking, carrying this one-woman show seems pretty demanding.’
  • 131) ‘I always thought that schools were places where children were taught to use grown-up equipment properly and it seems to be abrogating educational responsibility to duck out of teaching the right way to handle real javelins.’
  • 132) ‘She had to duck out of the new Oliver Stone flick ‘Beyond Borders’ because the role of a wartime social worker, opposite Kevin Costner, would have been a bit of a stretch.’
  • 133) ‘During the treatment there were times when I wanted to duck out.’
  • 134) ‘For the last few years of school life I ducked out of sports altogether by pretending I had singing lessons.’
  • 135) ‘Only the bravery of Sinitsin saw him through an ordeal which many another boxer would have ducked out of long before the end.’
  • 136) ‘Sometimes referred to as the ‘master magician’, he was criticised for ducking out of a previous hearing of the committee.’
  • 137) ‘Thank goodness we've ducked out of the dinner party thing.’
  • 138) ‘At 18, she ducked out of the limelight, but after several years in retirement, she picked up her skills again.’
  • 139) ‘In fact I hope I don't end up ducking out of saying a name on the phone, too.’
  • 140) ‘It is no more a proper trial than ducking witches used to be.’
  • 141) ‘Offenders could be ducked in water.’
  • 142) ‘Players, including William, were ducked under the water and roughly tackled by the opposing side.’
  • 143) ‘If stripes aren't your style, experiment with other casual fabrics, such as cotton duck, denim, and corduroy.’
  • 144) ‘Cut the diaper cover pieces from the yellow cotton duck or broadcloth according to the pattern guidesheet.’
  • 145) ‘I am interested in dyeing 35 yards of cotton duck for slipcovers for a sofa.’
  • 146) ‘Some of them are made of cotton duck.’
  • 147) ‘Sailcloth is a very strong, heavy canvas or duck made in plain weave.’
  • 148) ‘Then, in 1941, the mill again served by producing cotton duck for tents to shelter our soldiers in World War II.’
  • 149) ‘Stillington made major inroads into Harrogate's batting as they dismissed three home batsmen for ducks.’
  • 150) ‘I remember that Gundappa Viswanath scored a duck and a century on his Test debut - has anyone else done this?’
  • 151) ‘Laker's tally of eight ducks inflicted in that famous match against Australia at Old Trafford in 1956 is the record for a single Test.’
  • 152) ‘But he also made seven ducks in 30 innings, and a couple of chaps called Greenidge and Haynes made getting back into the side virtually impossible.’
  • 153) ‘They never talk about when I got Len Hutton out for a duck, at Lord's in 1954!’

Examples

  • 1) Get it wrong and your goose is cooked.
  • 2) Allow to cool completely if you are going to use it to stuff the neck of the goose or turkey.
  • 3) We do have to ask in London whether we are in danger of killing the golden goose.
  • 4) On the day, heat two tablespoons of hot turkey or goose fat in a roasting tin in a hot oven.
  • 5) They dined on roast goose.
  • 6) goose and duck love this.
  • 7) It's wonderful with roast goose.
  • 8) To know we will have that and the support of the home crowd, it gives me goose bumps thinking about it.
  • 9) While the goose is cooking, prepare the stuffing, glaze and gravy.
  • 10) I still get goose bumps remembering the moment Crystal Serenity sailed into the sea ice.
  • 11) What questions should you ask about the way geese and turkey are produced?
  • 12) They should beware of killing the golden goose.
  • 13) There are bare legs and goose bumps.
  • 14) It was as if a giant snake were in combat with a large and voluble goose.
  • 15) You could buy buckets of goose fat for roast potatoes with the money saved by switching fowl.
  • 16) How do you imagine all that duck and goose skin was gleaned?
  • 17) The portly princess had cooked her goose.
  • 18) It is painful to watch a gifted writer being such a silly goose.
  • 19) The ad men are killing their golden goose.
  • 20) The place should give you goose bumps.
  • 21) Season and serve with the goose and roast potatoes.
  • 22) Much more of this and his goose will be cooked.
  • 23) Perhaps her golden goose has had its day then.
  • 24) My mum said it gave her goose bumps.
  • 25) Cover the legs with the duck or goose fat and one glass of white wine until they are just submerged.
  • 26) Witnesses identified the birds as geese.
  • 27) What's good for the goose comes to mind.
  • 28) But to contest doctrine, that is to grab the goose by the neck!
  • 29) After thirty years, just thinking about them still gives me goose flesh.
  • 30) Ideal with turkey or goose.
  • 31) Don't fancy turkey or goose?
  • 32) I mean, how hard can you squeeze a golden goose before the bird calls a work stoppage?
  • 33) He said: 'I had goose flesh with all the crowd chanting my name.
  • 34) ‘It also has contributed to the decrease of water fowl such as duck, geese, curlew, plover and snipe.’
  • 35) ‘Wetlands are a lure for geese, swans, ducks, egrets, storks, herons and the icon of the Camargue, the pink flamingo.’
  • 36) ‘Millions of birds - ducks, geese, pelicans, shore birds - use the sea each year.’
  • 37) ‘Brightly coloured bushes and flowers carpet the windswept hills, and in every hollow there are lakes or ponds teeming with black-necked swans, upland geese, ruddy ducks and silvery teal.’
  • 38) ‘A haven of small islands and bars of land looking out towards the sea, the place is a paradise for birdwatchers harbouring geese, eider duck, grouse and eagle.’
  • 39) ‘There were many water fowl such as ducks, geese, swans, heron, cranes, plovers, snipe and curlew, many of which would have been occasionally hunted for their meat.’
  • 40) ‘However, most ducks and geese have spatulate bills, while our little friend had a long, pointed one.’
  • 41) ‘There are four kinds of tit around here as well as woodpeckers, chaffinches, grey leg geese and tufted ducks.’
  • 42) ‘In October and November, as many as 50,000 migrating geese, ducks, and tundra swans stop at the refuge during their voyage along the Atlantic Flyway.’
  • 43) ‘From October to early spring (if ice doesn't form solidly on them), many of these ponds host a variety of swans, geese and ducks.’
  • 44) ‘Ducks, geese and water hens will be introduced shortly and it is hoped over a short period to build up a colony.’
  • 45) ‘It is a pleasure to see the ducks, geese and water hens merrily splashing around in the lake.’
  • 46) ‘Birds affected by this disease are fowls, bantams, turkeys, geese, ducks, pheasants, guinea fowl and other wild and captive birds, including ratites such as ostriches, emus and rhea.’
  • 47) ‘There were thousands of gulls present along with geese, ducks, egrets, and crows all loafing or actively feeding on the airfield.’
  • 48) ‘They wish all house sparrows and European starlings would just go away, and I am sure that their attitude regarding non-native ducks and geese is no better.’
  • 49) ‘Between March and September the rare osprey visits and there are duck, geese, swans, grouse, herons and buzzards.’
  • 50) ‘The ducks, geese, seagulls and coots looked hardened to this sort of intrusion, coolest of all was a cormorant that stood one-legged on an island and stretched its wings in a black, immobile pose.’
  • 51) ‘If they're in the mood for something different, they also can hunt for geese, quail, ducks, and pheasants.’
  • 52) ‘They found an unspoilt refuge for birdlife - including rare Marsh Harrier, avocet, ducks and geese - existing in the middle of what ten years ago was open water.’
  • 53) ‘There were turkeys, geese, ducks and chickens and guinea fowl on sale.’
  • 54) ‘It is known that oysters, eel, corn bread, goose, venison, watercress, leeks, berries, and plums were eaten, all accompanied by sweet wine.’
  • 55) ‘Christmas dinner includes roast pork or goose, blood sausage, sauerkraut, potatoes, and head cheese, with gingerbread cookies for dessert.’
  • 56) ‘The traditional Christmas main course is now mushrooming into a smorgasbord of poultry and red meats, with many people offering goose, fillet steak and lamb on top of the perennial turkey and ham.’
  • 57) ‘So why isn't rack of pork more popular, up there with goose and turkey as the third option for Christmas dinner?’
  • 58) ‘If you get giblets with your goose, add them to the stock or gravy for extra flavour.’
  • 59) ‘The entrées were boiled pork and beef, roast beef, mutton chops, and goose, while side dishes included hominy, cabbage, potatoes, and fried tripe.’
  • 60) ‘However this year I think I will provide my own Christmas dinner, I think, of goose.’
  • 61) ‘In addition, several of the dishes look slightly out of place; roast goose with apple sauce and walnuts surely being more at home in a book of central European cookery.’
  • 62) ‘Also, you're probably full to the brim with goose, turkey and ham.’
  • 63) ‘It suits strongly-flavoured foods such as meat and game along with fatty meats such as goose, duck, pork and sausages.’
  • 64) ‘Also popular for special meals is roast duck, pork, or goose with dumplings and sauerkraut.’
  • 65) ‘Turkey is easier, but anyone having a fancy for goose, duck, capon or our more unusual feathered friends shouldn't take any chances.’
  • 66) ‘That is why apple sauce is served with fatty pork and goose.’
  • 67) ‘The mail-order range has now been extended to include beef, duck, lamb, chicken, pheasant and goose.’
  • 68) ‘The recipes, both classic and modern, are preceded by notes on history and habitat, and helpful hints on everything from hanging and plucking game birds to catching wild fish and carving caribou and goose.’
  • 69) ‘Roasted goose has a much better texture than duck.’
  • 70) ‘You can also order pheasant, caviar, quail, goose, salmon roes, imported cheese and Scottish smoked salmon.’
  • 71) ‘Dig into a tasty Hungarian sausage, or beef with dumplings and gravy, or roast goose with sauerkraut.’
  • 72) ‘She called me a silly goose earlier… she's a nutcase as well.’
  • 73) ‘But if we blithely assume that the second enclosure movement will have the same benign effects as the first, we may look like very silly geese indeed.’
  • 74) ‘Lord, you're so good to me… Why am I such a silly goose?’
  • 75) ‘His girlish prattlings cause the nation's women to swoon like silly geese when they should be busy churning butter.’
  • 76) ‘But, it's not complete because the missing ingredient is you, you silly goose.’
  • 77) ‘You silly goose, the girl you saw him with was Star Ann.’
  • 78) ‘‘Serves you right, you goose,’ she said, trying to read her magazine.’
  • 79) ‘Michael Nunn and Billy Trevitt started goosing me in a sensitive spot and I couldn't stop laughing.’
  • 80) ‘Never goose anybody with your wand, unless it is specifically called for in the ritual.’
  • 81) ‘There are many times I saw him goose her affectionately as he walked by her in the kitchen.’
  • 82) ‘So, of course, I end up paying more attention to us teasing back and forth than Jessie, and the brat gooses me when I'm facing Taylor.’
  • 83) ‘Evan had slowed and was paying more attention to Taylor than where Jessi was, and the girl quickly came up behind her and goosed her.’
  • 84) ‘As we passed around the corner I reached out and goosed Michelle, but she was ready for it and returned the favor.’
  • 85) ‘I give Trent a kiss and goose him once I reach his locker on Monday morning.’
  • 86) ‘I might have goosed my husband on his way out of the shower.’
  • 87) ‘He finished the drink in one pull, and goosed a waitress as she walked by.’
  • 88) ‘In idle moments, we have imagined ourselves tugging playfully at his beard, perching on his chunky thighs and goosing his ample behind.’
  • 89) ‘And later, in 1970, I met a woman, the ex-wife of a prominent scientist, who had been gently goosed by the president during a White House dinner.’
  • 90) ‘He winked at one of the girls and goosed one of the boys.’
  • 91) ‘Triks managed to run up and goose her just as the photo was being taken.’
  • 92) ‘There will be little boozing, not least because Utah state law places strict restrictions on the sale of alcohol, there will be no goosing of hostesses in the elevators, and all freebies will be politely but firmly returned.’
  • 93) ‘Others like hedge funds have compensation structures that offer them a fraction of the returns generated, and in an atmosphere of low returns, the desire to goose them up increases.’
  • 94) ‘Economists generally view rising deficits as a short-term positive, goosing the economy, but as a long-term threat, tending to drive up interest rates.’
  • 95) ‘So, you have both sides fighting very hard to make sure that the press isn't goosing the process along.’
  • 96) ‘Indeed, if purchasing bonds drives down U.S. bond yields, it may goose the American economy.’
  • 97) ‘So cue up your mix tape and find the 15 to 20 minutes of material that will goose your party into another gear for the rest of the year.’
  • 98) ‘If he cannot, his credibility will suffer, and so will his efforts to goose the bureaucracy to better protect the public.’
  • 99) ‘Perhaps they do this every night just to goose the lobby-bar revenue.’
  • 100) ‘The press has had little to say about the question whether some newspapers and magazines are routinely overcharging advertisers by goosing circulation numbers, a form of fraud.’
  • 101) ‘For now, though, the focus is on whether the Fed will succeed in goosing growth.’
  • 102) ‘I goosed the gas and hot-footed it across the bridge.’
  • 103) ‘Then I goosed the throttle, and tore away at top speed.’
  • 104) ‘And she goosed innovation by creating an incentive program that has doubled the number of patents HP filed this year.’
  • 105) ‘I goosed the throttle again, and headed back towards the thick of the fighting.’
  • 106) ‘This week I present ways to goose the staying power in your notebook's battery, tips on batteries you use in handheld devices, and what to do when your batteries have gone south.’
  • 107) ‘What's more, there's a clear incentive to goose these numbers, especially among tech companies that are heavy issuers of employee stock options.’
  • 108) ‘The 1977 paper made clear that they should not goose growth with low interest rates if doing so would call into question their commitment to sound money.’
  • 109) ‘Morning is the best time to goose your metabolism.’
  • 110) ‘But the constantly increasing numbers do goose the excitement level.’
  • 111) ‘We need one of those altercations every few shows to goose up our ratings.’
  • 112) ‘He has been able to goose up the money supply without suffering serious price inflation, due to various underlying deflationary trends.’
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