morale vs moral

morale moral

Definitions

  • 1) The capacity of people to maintain belief in an institution or a goal, or even in oneself and others.
  • 2) The state of the spirits of a person or group as exhibited by confidence, cheerfulness, discipline, and willingness to perform assigned tasks.
  • 3) The moral condition, or the condition in other respects, so far as it is affected by, or dependent upon, moral considerations, such as zeal, spirit, hope, and confidence; mental state, as of a body of men, an army, and the like.
  • 4) a state of individual psychological well-being based upon a sense of confidence and usefulness and purpose
  • 5) Moral or mental condition as regards courage, zeal, hope, confidence, and the like: used especially of a body of men engaged in a hazardous enterprise, as soldiers or sailors in time of war.

Definitions

  • 1) Rules or habits of conduct, especially of sexual conduct, with reference to standards of right and wrong.
  • 2) A concisely expressed precept or general truth; a maxim.
  • 3) The lesson or principle contained in or taught by a fable, a story, or an event.
  • 4) The doctrine or practice of the duties of life; manner of living as regards right and wrong; conduct; behavior; -- usually in the plural.
  • 5) A morality play. See Morality, 5.
  • 6) The inner meaning or significance of a fable, a narrative, an occurrence, an experience, etc.; the practical lesson which anything is designed or fitted to teach; the doctrine meant to be inculcated by a fiction; a maxim.
  • 7) plural Conduct; behavior; course of life in regard to right and wrong; specifically, sexual conduct: as, a man of good morals.
  • 8) Morality; the doctrine or practice of the duties of life.
  • 9) An emblem, personification, or allegory; especially, an allegorical drama. See morality. 6.
  • 10) A certainty.
  • 11) Synonyms See morality.
  • 12) An exact likeness; a counterpart.
  • 13) Moral philosophy; ethics.
  • 14) See inference.
  • 15) The doctrine inculcated by a fable, apologue, or fiction; the practical lesson which anything is designed to teach; hence, intent; meaning.
  • 16) Of or relating to principles of right and wrong in behaviour, especially for teaching right behaviour.
  • 17) Having psychological rather than physical or tangible effects.
  • 18) Conforming to standards of what is right or just in behavior; virtuous.
  • 19) Based on strong likelihood or firm conviction, rather than on the actual evidence.
  • 20) Of or concerned with the judgment of right or wrong of human action and character.
  • 21) Arising from conscience or the sense of right and wrong.
  • 22) Teaching or exhibiting goodness or correctness of character and behavior.
  • 23) Supported by reason or probability; practically sufficient; -- opposed to legal or demonstrable
  • 24) a being who is capable of acting with reference to right and wrong.
  • 25) insanity, so called, of the moral system; badness alleged to be irresponsible.
  • 26) Serving to teach or convey a moral
  • 27) Acting upon or through one's moral nature or sense of right, or suited to act in such a manner. Sometimes opposed to material and physical.
  • 28) Conformed to accepted rules of right; acting in conformity with such rules; virtuous; just. Used sometimes in distinction from religious.
  • 29) theology applied to morals; practical theology; casuistry.
  • 30) a very high degree or probability, although not demonstrable as a certainty; a probability of so high a degree that it can be confidently acted upon in the affairs of life.
  • 31) Relating to duty or obligation; pertaining to those intentions and actions of which right and wrong, virtue and vice, are predicated, or to the rules by which such intentions and actions ought to be directed; relating to the practice, manners, or conduct of men as social beings in relation to each other, as respects right and wrong, so far as they are properly subject to rules.
  • 32) the science of duty; the science which treats of the nature and condition of man as a moral being, of the duties which result from his moral relations, and the reasons on which they are founded.
  • 33) [Obs.] an allegorical play; a morality.
  • 34) the power of moral judgment and feeling; the capacity to perceive what is right or wrong in moral conduct, and to approve or disapprove, independently of education or the knowledge of any positive rule or law.
  • 35) Capable of right and wrong action or of being governed by a sense of right; subject to the law of duty.
  • 36) Tomoralize.
  • 37) Moralizing.
  • 38) Seelaw.
  • 39) obsolete To moralize.

Examples

  • 1) There are some good players here and morale is good.
  • 2) Yet teacher shortages are acute, turnover is high and morale low.
  • 3) It found 56 per cent had low morale.
  • 4) How some leadership from politicians over the deficit and debt ceiling would lift confidence and morale.
  • 5) What is seen as being moral is not always good for morale.
  • 6) Her contribution was to raise morale by singing songs she made up as we went along.
  • 7) That night the morale of the people sank to its lowest ebb.
  • 8) Working in environments where there is no natural light often leads to low energy and morale.
  • 9) What a morale boost for our troops.
  • 10) But for confidence and morale the workout has been priceless.
  • 11) The guys are doing well and the morale is good.
  • 12) Can they find a way to raise morale?
  • 13) It also increased the morale of the people at work.
  • 14) They hope the dynamite new storyline will boost morale.
  • 15) He says morale is low at the club as a result of the drop.
  • 16) Senior party figures hope that her presence will raise the morale of activists as much as it will enthuse the voters.
  • 17) That gives us morale and confidence.
  • 18) The purpose of team-building exercises is to improve morale and group working.
  • 19) They also damage the morale of people left behind and can slow a company's growth.
  • 20) Yet the competition for a place on the roster is intense, and the morale of the group exceptionally high.
  • 21) This is one of the reasons why it is so hard to raise a group 's morale once it has dropped.
  • 22) ‘Earlier this year there were claims that discipline had slipped and staff morale was at rock bottom.’
  • 23) ‘The morale of the team was high following their win at the same venue a couple of weeks ago.’
  • 24) ‘They clearly are a team in a need of a win just to boost morale for the second half of the season.’
  • 25) ‘Patients were losing confidence in our services, and staff morale was threatened.’
  • 26) ‘The general morale among young people in this country is so low at the moment it is no wonder there are so many problems.’
  • 27) ‘He said that despite hostile desert conditions, morale among the servicemen was high.’
  • 28) ‘After all, football had been hugely important for morale during the war.’
  • 29) ‘You sense that staff morale is high and the eagerness to please is palpable.’
  • 30) ‘Support and guidance from managers is regarded as good, but over a third say morale at work is not good.’
  • 31) ‘With morale at an all time low, it is not hard to understand that the volunteers wonder if it is worth going on.’
  • 32) ‘Staff morale must be sapped by the ordeal of coping with crisis conditions day after day.’
  • 33) ‘A thumping defeat at this point in time could have done some serious damage to morale.’
  • 34) ‘An employee at the company says staff morale is low due to the lack of job certainty in the future.’
  • 35) ‘Former servicemen and women in Colchester have helped boost the morale of British troops fighting in the Gulf.’
  • 36) ‘"They would send us boxes of goodies which was a huge morale booster.’
  • 37) ‘Workers will be more productive, cooperative, flexible and their morale higher without unions.’
  • 38) ‘We must focus on boosting workforce morale, and improving workers' happiness and job security.’
  • 39) ‘"The morale in camp is high and I can promise you that the team is ready for battle.’
  • 40) ‘Dining arrangements also contributed to the morale of the seasonal work force.’
  • 41) ‘He suggested that boosting the workers' morale would translate into safer streets and better services.’

Examples

  • 1) It was our moral duty to help.
  • 2) The moral of this story is that it is good to talk.
  • 3) This has been the moral dilemma of the past.
  • 4) Is this not the time to take the moral high ground?
  • 5) moral dilemmas continued to be a theme.
  • 6) Our moral position is certainly right.
  • 7) The moral of the story is to make sure there is none of it growing in your own garden or next door.
  • 8) But he's also a man of moral fibre.
  • 9) It was a defeat - but a moral victory.
  • 10) It has a moral duty to assist these victims.
  • 11) One of the biggest problems with society is the lack of moral fibre.
  • 12) They were really decent people of good character and moral values who gave me a wonderful childhood.
  • 13) One of those modern moral dilemmas raised its head last week.
  • 14) Others had pointed to the moral bankruptcy of capitalism.
  • 15) There are still people with some moral sense left.
  • 16) Will it have the moral courage to do so?
  • 17) Plainly there is something seriously wrong with my moral compass.
  • 18) You agree to waive your moral rights.
  • 19) We might not have won but it was a moral victory.
  • 20) This is unlike the issue of punishment where abolitionists take an explicitly moral stance.
  • 21) We no longer see sport as a moral lesson.
  • 22) Is it our moral duty to do just that?
  • 23) The moral of the story is to keep a close check when pouring from litre cartons.
  • 24) Such pairings offend not only moral good taste but genetics.
  • 25) We must rely on the moral fibre of our farmers to consider the well-being of the consumer.
  • 26) The Government was not voted in by us to improve our morals, but to manage the country.
  • 27) If we are going to debate the question whether there is a need for moral principles, we need some idea of what we mean by a ˜moral principle™.
  • 28) Assuming an action has moral worth only if it expresses a good will, such actions have no genuine ˜moral worth™.
  • 29) What I mean by "moral Primary" is a moral concept which need not be justified on the basis of any other * moral* premise.
  • 30) And see you not how the mighty engine of _moral power_ is dragging in its rear the Bible and peace societies, anti-slavery and temperance, sabbath schools, moral reform, and missions? or to adopt another figure, do not these seven philanthropic associations compose the beautiful tints in that bow of promise which spans the arch of our moral heaven?
  • 31) _Beautiful_, for instance, is said not only of a successful expression, but also of a scientific truth, of an action successfully achieved, and of a moral action: thus we talk of an _intellectual beauty_, of a _beautiful action_, of a _moral beauty_.
  • 32) It is the moral strength, or, at any rate, the _moral consciousness_ which struck and surprised me so much in the poems.
  • 33) The less complete reaction from sophistic teaching attempted only such reconstruction of the moral point of view as should recover a law or principle of general and universally cogent character, whereon might be built anew a _moral_ order without attempting to extend the inquiry as to a universal principle into the regions of abstract truth or into physics.
  • 34) ‘It is also clear that moral principles and political judgments are inextricably intertwined.’
  • 35) ‘The cardinal virtues enable leaders to habitually incorporate moral principles in their behaviour.’
  • 36) ‘We do not live in an ideal world, and to make moral judgments about the behaviour of others is demeaning.’
  • 37) ‘Finally, you say that ‘on most issues, there is no clear right or wrong, particularly where moral issues are concerned’.’
  • 38) ‘Mandela spent 27 years in prison and his moral courage was respected worldwide.’
  • 39) ‘In this respect moral judgments are like judgments of beauty or intelligence.’
  • 40) ‘But I suspect moral argument is the wrong approach to issues of war and peace and politics generally, not least because so many millions of deaths are just deaths.’
  • 41) ‘What's wrong with making moral choices when we shop, buying only those goods raised in a respectable, sustainable way?’
  • 42) ‘Ms. Colombo said opponents of implants were ‘making a moral judgment, not a medical one.’’
  • 43) ‘I have tremendous respect for the daring, moral courage, and intellectual honesty of this book.’
  • 44) ‘Wrong not only for moral reasons, but wrong because it wasn't something I wanted to end up with for the rest of my life.’
  • 45) ‘We can then make objective judgments about moral progress and decline, with respect to that good.’
  • 46) ‘He claimed repeatedly that his function was not to make moral judgments but to record behaviour.’
  • 47) ‘In the first place, it will not convince those who believe in a rational ethics, who believe that there is a scientific basis for moral judgments and that they are not pure whim.’
  • 48) ‘Not only does he have a righteous motive, but he also has moral courage.’
  • 49) ‘I'm not going to make moral judgments about all this.’
  • 50) ‘It takes just one piece of the jigsaw and turns it into a compelling, documentary-style drama that dispenses with moral judgments in an attempt to arrive at some uncomfortable truths.’
  • 51) ‘Throughout his life, he was an example of moral courage and determination and a source of inspiration to millions.’
  • 52) ‘Today's soldiers trust each other, they trust their leaders, they trust the Army, and they also understand the moral dimensions of war.’
  • 53) ‘But this tolerance has led to a state of belief where American college students are unwilling to make a moral judgment about their value systems and culture.’
  • 54) ‘Further, the arguments are based in moral rather than legal terms.’
  • 55) ‘Moreover, statements are qualifiedly privileged if made pursuant to a legal, social or moral duty.’
  • 56) ‘The society safeguards the moral and social code necessary for them to live together in harmony.’
  • 57) ‘The second tendency is for societies to erect moral codes, which often frown on behaviour encoded by our selfish genes.’
  • 58) ‘Unless one believes that there is an absolute obligation to obey every law, moral duty and legal duty will sometimes come into conflict.’
  • 59) ‘And that must be seen as an intensely moral, rather than legal, obligation.’
  • 60) ‘These movements demand strict conformity to sacred scriptures and to a moral code ostensibly based on these scriptures.’
  • 61) ‘Many of my generation were brought up with a moral code based on the ten commandments, which impressed a watermark in us so deep that it underpins all our lives.’
  • 62) ‘It has to be something of substance, some legal, moral or even social duty, but it has to have substance.’
  • 63) ‘It is really up to the individual retailer to decide whether they are doing anything that breaches their legal or moral codes.’
  • 64) ‘People see accessibility as a costly hassle rather than a moral duty.’
  • 65) ‘So in reality many of our moral codes are based on internal convictions that lack pure and independent proof.’
  • 66) ‘A girl's behaviour was molded to fit a society governed by a strict moral code and rigid social customs.’
  • 67) ‘Their moral code is based on the idea that right and wrong are constants and that those who disagree are by definition immoral.’
  • 68) ‘Portugal's holidays, its moral and legal codes, health and education systems have been greatly impacted by its Catholic heritage.’
  • 69) ‘Read simply, the Bible serves as the moral code upon which our society is based.’
  • 70) ‘We ask of government to live up to its moral and legal obligation to efficiently and effectively deliver basic social services.’
  • 71) ‘On the other hand, a duty is a moral obligation to do one specific thing over another without the freedom to decide.’
  • 72) ‘The council said prosecuting people is a last resort but all dog owners must realise that it is their legal as well as their moral duty to dean up after their dog.’
  • 73) ‘We agreed that they are wrong from the moral and political point of view and they should end.’
  • 74) ‘Smith was a moral philosopher and as such his role was ‘to do nothing, and observe everything’.’
  • 75) ‘David was a moral philosopher and historian and a leading member of the Scottish Enlightenment.’
  • 76) ‘These debates are driven by contrasting moral visions of the proper authority of teachers and the proper docility of students.’
  • 77) ‘What is the proper role for the military in this new political and moral relationship?’
  • 78) ‘Ms Lay said her husband is an ‘honest, decent, moral human begin who would do absolutely nothing wrong.’’
  • 79) ‘Probably, the sense of moral superiority and entrenched bureaucratic power is similar at both locations.’
  • 80) ‘And I think by what your values are you're going to instill in the students some sense of moral values.’
  • 81) ‘The sense of moral superiority afforded by this point of view was perhaps in lieu of economic, educational, and social opportunities.’
  • 82) ‘This is no romantic and idealistic battle for higher principles, fought by a moral and ethical aristocratic elite according to chivalric rules.’
  • 83) ‘We don't just leave our ethical and moral selves at the door when we go to work.’
  • 84) ‘Living an ethical, moral life should be one of the biggest priorities we have.’
  • 85) ‘The youths' values reflect a sense of moral self which is communal and is connected to others.’
  • 86) ‘An election of a high standard should start with the moral character and conduct of the candidate.’
  • 87) ‘His pristine moral character exemplifies the power of human resolve, perseverance, and faith.’
  • 88) ‘Thus, the formation of moral character in nursing forms the foundation for practice.’
  • 89) ‘The root cause of crime is a lack of moral character.’
  • 90) ‘And I agree: it's about a moral character in an immoral world.’
  • 91) ‘It's about getting ideas out to the readers, not about the moral character of the writer (or at least it should be about it).’
  • 92) ‘So what we ask is a peaceful message to, you know, to let people have their right to have healthy bodies and to cultivate their good moral characters.’
  • 93) ‘The moral of this story is not that honesty works.’
  • 94) ‘As always the moral of this story is to use you credit card for any sizeable purchases as any problem with the goods or retailer become the card company's problem rather than yours.’
  • 95) ‘I guess the moral of this story is to question, always question.’
  • 96) ‘The moral of this story is never think that everything will be easy, and that you have to make mistakes and work for every crumb that comes your way.’
  • 97) ‘The moral of this story: Do not assume that I'm friendly and approachable.’
  • 98) ‘The moral of this story is: the camera never lies so don't leave home without one.’
  • 99) ‘And the moral of this story is, people who don't learn to take responsibility for their own actions often end up in prison.’
  • 100) ‘So here's the moral of this story, and it's intended for the hotel industry: Get back to basics already.’
  • 101) ‘Perhaps the moral of this story is that you can't win.’
  • 102) ‘The moral of this story is corny but true: it is better to have loved deeply and have lost than not to have loved at all.’
  • 103) ‘The moral of this story is always stick to what you do best.’
  • 104) ‘The moral of this story for everyone involved is don't bite the hand that feeds you.’
  • 105) ‘The moral of this story is to get it right the first time.’
  • 106) ‘Then I'll tell you: The moral of this story is to know what you fight for.’
  • 107) ‘So I guess the moral of this story is that you should never take things for granted.’
  • 108) ‘I can't find a moral in the story, or a worth-while lesson to be learned of it.’
  • 109) ‘So the moral of the story is, don't form an opinion until you've tried it for yourself.’
  • 110) ‘You should accept who you are, that is the moral of this tale.’
  • 111) ‘There is such a thing as a modicum of decency and morals of public behaviour.’
  • 112) ‘I suppose my image has changed but I'd like to think I'm still the same Vivienne and that my principles and morals are the same.’
  • 113) ‘My mother and father did a great job in instilling the morals and principles in us from the very beginning.’
  • 114) ‘Generally, they do not care about morals and principles, as if such things had nothing to do with them.’
  • 115) ‘Relevant dimensions of difference include morals, values, standards, beliefs, and attitudes.’
  • 116) ‘It totally overlooks right and wrong, morals, discipline, and manners.’
  • 117) ‘My mum's problem is that her sense of right and wrong - her morals - is more important to her than her own safety.’
  • 118) ‘I am satisfied that their ability to prosecute by way of laying information derives from it being a matter of public policy and one which concerns the public morals.’
  • 119) ‘What had really aggravated me was that she had made assumptions about my morals and integrity and was judging me accordingly knowing very little about my situation.’
  • 120) ‘They needed to learn integrity, character, morals, and faith by example.’
  • 121) ‘We create such morals based on the collective opinion that murder is wrong.’
  • 122) ‘Raids were also conducted on premises to look for any behavior which might affront public morals.’
  • 123) ‘I do have morals and standards but about things which really matter, such as the growing number of homeless people in our city centre or the rising number of drug related crimes.’
  • 124) ‘Two common law offences need consideration, namely, conspiracy to corrupt public morals, and outraging public decency.’
  • 125) ‘Everyone has their morals regarding public nudity.’
  • 126) ‘A lot of people teach morals and I believe that everybody has their own standard of morals.’
  • 127) ‘I guess it all depends on your own standards or morals really.’
  • 128) ‘Her take on opposing views seems a bit wrong, and her concept of morals seems largely centered around material things.’
  • 129) ‘The final decades of the seventeenth century had seen a distinct decline in public manners and morals.’
  • 130) ‘However, it is not too much to ask them to themselves act with strong morals and integrity, or else they may be prone to bribery or other forms of corruption.’
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